You are on page 1of 22

IT Services, ITIL v3 and the

Service Catalog

Greg Hines
(ghines@hinescg.com)
Portions © 2007 OGC
Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
1

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
2

1
Portions © 2007 OGC
Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
3

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
4

2
Terms
Terms
Activities
Customers and users are different:
Concepts • Customers
Value – someone who buys goods and/or services
– an IT customer is the person or group of people who defines and agrees
the service level targets
• Users
– People who use IT services on a day-to-day basis

Services

IT Service
Organization
Users

Customers

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
5

Terms
Activities
Concepts
Value

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
6

3
Terms - Old “Techie” Definition (ITIL v2)
Terms
Activities
Concepts
A service is one or more IT systems that enable a business process.
Value

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
7

ITIL v2
Terms
Activities
Concepts
Value

Service
S
Supportt

Service Delivery Security Management

Software Asset ICT Infrastructure


Management Application Management
Management

Business
Perspectives
Vol
Introduction to ITIL I Business Perspectives
Vol II

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
8

4
ITIL v2
Terms
Activities
Concepts Additional Titles Available:
Value
Planning to Implement Service Management (ISBN 0113308779)
ITIL Small
Small-scale
scale Implementation (ISBN 0113309805)

Service Support (ISBN 0113300158)


Service Delivery (ISBN 0113300174)
Security Management (ISBN 011330014X)
ICT Infrastructure Management (ISBN 0113308655)
Application Management (ISBN 0113308663)
Software Application Management (ISBN 0113309430)
The Business Perspective (ISBN 0113310129)
The Business Perspective 2: The Business Perspective on Successful IT Delivery (ISBN 0113309694)
Introduction to ITIL (ISBN 0113309732)

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
9

Terms – New Definition (ITIL v3)


Terms
Activities
Concepts
A service is a means to deliver value to customers by facilitating
Value outcomes customers want to achieve without (them) having to
undertake the ownership of specific costs and risks.

automate specific
costs
and
risks

Retail – point of sale; distribution


Healthcare – patient registration; order entry
Legal – document management; case management
General – electronic messaging; remote access; workstation support

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
10

5
ITIL v3 Purpose
Terms
Activities
Concepts
Value
• Focus on the value of IT service management processes for the
customer and their business
• Progress integration of IT service with business needs
®
• Improve consistency of the ITIL literature – structure, processes,
terms and definitions
• Provide synergy, reference and alignment with industry standards
® ®
and other best practices: COBIT , CMMI , ISO 20000
• Offer integrated process models for more processes based on the
lifecycle of a service
• Move with the industry in strategic areas such as outsourced and
shared services
• Present guidance on selecting good process aligned tools
• Extend to keep up with business dynamics: internet forces, low cost
computing, ubiquitous computing, SOA, governance

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
11

ITIL v3 Publication Structure


Terms
Activities
Concepts
Value
The ITIL v 3.0 publication structure consists of three parts:

Core
Best Practice
Guidance
Complimentary Best Practice
Web Based Add-ons
Guidance

Support for industry/ • Service Strategy ITIL Live -


technology specific • Service Design http://www.tso.co.uk/ITIL/
best practices • Service Transition
• Service Operation
• Continual Service
Improvement

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
12

6
ITIL v3 Additional Titles
Terms
Activities
Concepts
Value The Official Introduction to ITIL Service Lifecycle (ISBN 9780113310616)
Passing Your ITIL Foundation Exam Book (ISBN 9780113310791)
Building a (ITIL based) Service Management Department (ISBN 9780113310968)
ITIL Small-scale Implementation 2008 Edition (ISBN 9780113310784)

Delivering ITIL Services Using ITIL, Prince2, and DSDM (ISBN 9780113310975) –
March 1, 2010

Service Strategy (ISBN 9780113310456)


Service Design (ISBN 9780113310470)
Service Transition (ISBN 9780113310487)
Service Operation (ISBN 9780113310463)
Continual Service Improvement (ISBN 9780113310494)
Portions © 2007 OGC
Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
13

ITIL v3 Service Lifecycle


Terms
Activities
Concepts
The phases of the service lifecycle and core books of the v 3.0
Value IT Infrastructure Library are:
Service Strategy the design,
design de
development
elopment and implementation of services
ser ices and service
ser ice
(SS) management as a strategic asset (ITIL Text, SS 1.2.3.1)

Service Design the design and development of services and service management
(SD) processes, covering design principles and methods for converting
strategic objectives into portfolios of services and service assets for
both new and changed services (ITIL Text, SS 1.2.3.2)

Service Transition the development and improvement of capabilities for transitioning


(ST) new and changed services into operations while controlling the risks
of failure and disruption (ITIL Text, SS 1.2.3.3)

Service Operation practices in the management of service operation to achieve


(SO) effectiveness and efficiency in the delivery and support of services
so that value for the customer is realized (ITIL Text, SS 1.2.3.4)

Continual Service maintaining value for customers through better design,


Improvement introduction and operation of services through their life
(CSI) (ITIL Text, SS 1.2.3.5)
Portions © 2007 OGC
Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
14

7
ITIL v3 Service Lifecycle
Terms
Record
Activities
Define Plan (Implementation)
Concepts Test
Analyze
Value Approve Design Train Deliver
Charter Develop Document Support

concept for
a new or
enhanced chartered developed operational
service Service service Service service Service service Service
Strategy Design Transition documentation
Operation
service service
trained:
portfolio design users
package IT support

measure operated
report service
improve

service value
data To
customer
Continual
Service
Improvement

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
15

ITIL v3 Service Lifecycle Processes


Terms
Activities
Concepts
Value
Continual
Service Service Service Service Service
Strategy Design Transition Operation Improvement
Service Portfolio Service Catalog Service Event Improvement
Mgt Mgt Transition & Mgt Process
Planning
Release & Deployment

Supplier Testing & Incident Service


Mgt Validation Mgt Measurement

Financial Problem Service


Mgt

Evaluation
ervice Level

Mgt Mgt Reporting


Security Mgt
Information

Availabilitty
Mgt

Mgt

Demand Knowledge
Mgt Mgt
R
Se

Continuity Mgt

Change
IT Service

Mgt
Request
Fulfillment
Service Asset
and Access
Capacity
Configuration Mgt Mgt
Mgt

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
16

8
ITIL v3 Service Lifecycle Processes
Terms
Activities
Concepts
The core books of the v 3.0 IT Infrastructure Library describe
Value the following processes:
Service Strategy

Service Portfolio Management – a dynamic method for governing investments in service


management across the enterprise and managing them for value (ITIL Text, SS 5.3)

Financial Management – to provide the business and IT with the financial value of IT
services and their underlying assets

Demand Management – to understand a customer’s demand for IT services and


influence that demand to cost-effectively optimize capacity

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
17

ITIL v3 Service Lifecycle Processes


Terms
Activities
Service Design
Concepts
Value
Service Catalog Management - to ensure that a service catalog is produced and
maintained, containing accurate information on all operational services and those being
prepared to run operationally (ITIL Text, SD 4.1.1)

Service Level Management - to ensure that an agreed level of IT service is provided for all
current IT services, and that future services are delivered to agreed achievable targets (ITIL
Text, SD 4.2.1)

Supplier Management - to manage suppliers and the services they supply, to provide
seamless quality of IT service to the business, ensuring value for money is obtained (ITIL Text,
SD 4.1.1)

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
18

9
ITIL v3 Service Lifecycle Processes
Terms
Activities
Service Design
Concepts
Value
Capacity Management - to ensure that cost-justifiable IT capacity in all areas of IT always
exists and is matched to the current and future agreed needs of the business, in a timely manner
(ITIL Text, SD 4.1.1)

Availability Management - to ensure that the level of service availability in all services is
matched to, or exceeds, the current and future agreed needs of the business, in a cost-effective
manner (ITIL Text, SD 4.4.1)

IT Service Continuity Management - to support the overall business continuity


management process by ensuring that the required IT technical and service facilities (including
computer systems, network, applications, data repositories, telecommunications, environment,
technical facilities and service desk) can be resumed within required, and agreed, business
ti l (ITIL Text,
timescales Text SD 4.5.1)
4 5 1)

Information Security Management - to align IT security with business security and ensure
that information security is effectively managed in all service and service management
activities (ITIL Text, SD 4.6.1)

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
19

ITIL v3 Service Lifecycle Processes


Terms
Activities
Service Transition
Concepts
Value
Service Asset and Configuration Management –
to support the business and customer’s control objectives and requirements
to support efficient and effective service management processes by providing accurate
configuration information to enable people to make the right decisions at the right time
to minimize the number of quality and compliance issues caused by improper configuration of
services and assets
to optimize the service assets, IT configurations, capabilities and resources
(ITIL Text, ST 4.3.1)
Change Management - to respond to customer’s changing business requirements while
maximizing value and reducing incidents, disruptions and re-work as well as to respond to the
business and IT requests for change that will align the services with business needs (ITIL Text,
ST 4.2.1)
Release and Deployment Management - to deploy releases into production and establish
effective use of the service in order to deliver value to the customer and be able to handover to
service operation (ITIL Text, ST 4.4.1)
Knowledge Management – to enable organizations to improve the quality of management
decision making by ensuring that reliable and secure information and data is available
throughout the service lifecycle (ITIL Text, ST 4.7.1)
Portions © 2007 OGC
Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
20

10
ITIL v3 Service Lifecycle Processes
Terms
Activities
Service Transition
Concepts
Value
Transition Planning and Support – to plan and coordinate resources to ensure that the
requirements of service strategy encoded in service design are effectively realized in service
operation and to identify, manage and control risks of failure and disruption across transition
activities (ITIL Text, ST 4.1.1)

Service Validation and Testing – to assure that a service will provide value to customers
and their business (ITIL Text, ST 4.5.1)

Evaluation – to set stakeholder expectations correctly and provide effective and accurate to
change management to make sure changes that adversely affect service capability and introduce
risk are not transitioned unchecked (ITIL Text, ST 4.6.1)

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
21

ITIL v3 Service Lifecycle Processes


Terms
Activities
Service Operation
Concepts
Value
Event Management – to detect events, make sense of them and determine the
appropriate control action in order to prevent or shorten the duration of service
disruptions

Incident Management – to restore normal service operation as quickly as possible


and minimize the adverse impact on business operations, thus ensuring that the best
possible levels of service quality and availability are maintained

Request Fulfillment – to provide quick and effective access to standard IT services


which business staff can use to improve their productivity or the quality of business
services or products

Problem Management – to eliminate recurring incidents and minimize the effect of


incidents that cannot be eliminated
Access Management – to provide the right for users to access a service or group of
services while preventing access to non-authorized users of the service or group of
services

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
22

11
ITIL v3 Service Lifecycle Processes
Terms
Activities
Continual Service Improvement
Concepts
Value
7 Step Improvement Process – to provide a standard, governance based
methodology for improving services and processes

Service Measurement – to enable the accurate measurement of the user experience


of IT services

Service Reporting – to build, implement and manage a business-focused service


reporting framework

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
23

ITIL v3 Service Lifecycle Functions


Terms
Activities
Concepts
The core books of the v 3.0 IT Infrastructure Library describe
Value the following functions:
Service Desk – a functional unit made up of a dedicated number of staff responsible
for dealing with a variety of service situations, often made via telephone calls, web
interface, email or automatically reported infrastructure events

Technical Management – the teams of people (groups, departments, etc) that provide
technical expertise and overall management of the IT infrastructure

Application Management – the teams of people (groups, departments, etc) that are
responsible for managing applications through their lifecycle

IT Operations Management – the teams of people (groups, departments, etc)


responsible
ibl ffor ongoing
i managementt and d maintenance
i t off an organization’s
i ti ’ IT
infrastructure to ensure delivery of the agreed level of IT services to the business

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
24

12
Portions © 2007 OGC
Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
25

Terms
Terms
Activities
Concepts
A service catalog is a document (or database) providing information
Value about all live IT services, including those available for deployment.

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
26

13
Terms
Terms
Activities
Concepts
There are two type of Service Catalogs:
Value
Business Service Catalog – displays the customer view of the service
catalog and listing all services delivered to customers together with
relationships to the business units and the business processes that rely on the
IT services
Technical Services Catalog – displays details of the IT services as well as
supporting IT services, shared services, CIs, etc. necessary to provide the
service (not visible to customers)

Business Business Business Business


Process 1 Process 2 Process 3 Process 4
Business Service Catalog
Service A Service B Service C Service D Service E

Technical Service Catalog

Support Hardware Software Network Data


Services Services Services Services Services

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
27

Example Business Services


Terms
Human Resources Consulting
Activities Service
Payroll
Concepts Telecommunications Job posting
Project Management
Value Telephone Benefits Collaborative Services
Professional development/education
E mail
Pager Time and attendance
S ff S h d li
Staff Scheduling Mobility services
Mobility services
Voice mail
Performance Management Collaborative software
Intranet paging Travel
Meeting requests
Web based meetings
Resource Scheduling
Expense reports Video conferencing
Conference rooms System Access (Security)
Teleconferencing
Grant
Equipment Report Generation/Information Warehouse
Request
Training rooms Biometrics Document Imaging
Training on IT
Finance/Accounting Sales and Marketing*
Desktop training
General ledger Systems training Facilities and Maintenance*
IT professional development Physical Security Access
Accounting functions
Service Desk
Decision support Off the shelf desktop applications
Wireless Access (guest)

Reporting Incidents and service requests Data Storage, Backup and Recovery


Remote Access
Budgeting VPN
Remote to desktop
Revenue
Tokens Infrastructure Services
Procurement/Supply Chain Management End User Technology
Install hardware
Network
Requisitioning
Install software Storage
Purchase orders Move hardware
Printing
Change software
Warehouse Data center
Network access (patching/port enablement)
Inventory control Printer/output management SPAM Filtering
Mobility device
Reporting Relaying
Disposal
Dispensing? Lifecycle Information

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
28

14
Terms
Activities Sample Business Service Catalog
Concepts
Value
Service Description Applications Number of Business
Users Criticality
IT Service This service provides for a single 3,000 2
Desk point of contact with the
information technologies division
for all IT service disruptions, IT
questions and IT service requests
via telephone, facsimile,
electronic mail and self service.
Electronic This service provide electronic Lotus Notes 3,000 3
Messaging communications for users via Blackberry
electronic mail (workstation, AOL Chat
internet and hand held access),
chat and other means.
Workstation This service provides for new 3,000 1
Services workstation installation,
workstation movement,
workstation retirement, installation
of workstation software and
upgrades of workstation
hardware.

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
29

Example Technical Services


Terms
Activities Network Applications Development
Data transport – Network equipment – switches/routers  Application Development (Design, Development, 
Concepts
Data transport – Network equipment  Documentation)
Value
Data transport – Network equipment  Incident management
Network monitoring Consulting (Iternal Software Evaluations)
Network management  I l
Implementation coordination
t ti di ti
Secure access to external and internal resources  Money Transfers
Secure access to and from Internet  Report Development (Crystal Reports, batch, etc.)
Data transport ‐ wired network installation Web Development and Administration
Data transport ‐ wired network maintenance GIS Development and Administration
Data transport ‐ wired network decommissioning Web Content Management
Data transport ‐ wireless network installation Research
Data transport ‐ wireless network maintenance Application Monitoring
Data transport ‐ wireless network decommissioning Application Management (maintenance, patch management)
Cable Head In ‐ Maintenance and Repaire Training (early life support)
Cable Head In ‐ Administration Access Database Development
Cable Relocates (Physical) Testing
Cable TV Fiber Setup/Teardown Requirements Gathering
Database Forms Development
Database installation Server
Database tuning Account management
Database backup/restore Server management
Database account management Server monitoring
Database schema changes SAN Enterprise Storage Area management
Database consulting SAN Enterprise Storage Area configuration
Database management Internet Security and Connection service
Database monitoring Active Directory management
Research Server provisioning
Infrastructure application maintenance

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
30

15
Terms
Terms
Activities
Concepts
Service catalogs are not the same as a front end for user requests:
Value
Many organizations, misled by software vendors, perceive a service
catalog to be an automated way for users to request certain services
services.

This is not a best practices type of service catalog!


“A service catalog requires an integrated service request management process to be ‘actionable’”**
** The Guide to the Universal Service Management Body of Knowledge, Ian M. Clayton, Copyright © 2008 Service Management 101™;
www.servicemanagement101.com

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
31

Activities
Terms
Activities
Concepts
• define “service” and services
Value

• build a service catalog policy

• produce and maintain an accurate service catalog

• interface and align with Service Portfolio Management and the


Service Portfolio

• interface and align with Service Asset and Configuration


Management and the Configuration Management System (CMS)
including:
− related services
− related configuration items (CIs)

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
32

16
Concepts
Terms
Activities
Concepts
A Service Catalog Policy should be created which identifies:
Value

Wh
What
Services?
Roles/
Responsibilities
Service
Which
Catalog
service
What is Policy
details?
the scope?

What
service
statuses?

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
33

Concepts – Service Details


Terms
Activities
Concepts
“A service catalog describes in detail the capability of each service
Value in the form of the activities a customer of the service can
perform.”** Possible information about the service could include:
p
• An introductory overview of the service provider organization and the service
• The relationship to service portfolio/s and lines of service
• All key concepts and terms used within the subsequent catalog descriptions in the form of a reference to a
glossary or in-built definition of terms
• The functional scope or boundaries for authorized use of the service, geographic, political, activity and market
based, typically associated with service access points
• The responsibilities of all parties in the form of a ‘service responsibility matrix’
• How the service may be requested
• How the service is provisioned
• An introductory overview of the service provider organization and the service
• The minimum and maximum service level characteristics, developed from series of “statements” contributed by
the other service management competencies, describing such things as availability, performance, capacity,
y and continuity
security, y options
p
• What level of support is offered and available for problematic and normal service request situationsand how to
request service or report an incident
• What reports will be provided for customer use in determining if the agreed service levels have been received
• The pricing options, acquisition costs, and charging methods
• How the service may be changed
• Service level options
• Service infrastructure or platform options
• Key service quality and cost indexes**

** The Guide to the Universal Service Management Body of Knowledge, Ian M. Clayton, Copyright © 2008 Service Management 101™;
www.servicemanagement101.com

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
34

17
Concepts
Terms
Activities
Concepts
Include:
Value • all services operating in the live environment
• all services being transitioned into the live environment

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
35

Concepts
Terms
Activities
Concepts
A service portfolio is a mechanism used to manage the investment in
Value IT services over its life.
The service portfolio has three parts:
Service Portfolio
Service State: a subset of services
Service Pipeline
Requirements Gathered moving through “pre-
Defined design” state which are
Analyzed not yet visible to the
Approved customer
Chartered
Designed
Developed Service Catalog appublished subset of
Built services being designed
Tested and/or available to the
Released customer
Made Operational
Retired Service Retirement

“A service catalog is a marketing tool for service portfolios. They coexist and a service catalog
enables and supports a service portfolio.” (USMBOK)
Portions © 2007 OGC
Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
36

18
Value to the Business
Terms
Activities
Concepts
• cost savings to the business (in terms of time) due to a central
Value source of information on the IT services delivered by IT being made
available

• cost savings to IT (in terms of time) because this information is


available to IT enabling more rapid identification of services and
service owners

• cost savings to IT and customers since the service catalog can aid
in setting customer expectations of IT services

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
37

Value to IT
Terms
Activities
Concepts
• initial basis for determining charges for services
Value

• change management impact analysis data source – especially


business impact/priority

• IT communications source (change management, incident


management, problem management, release and deployment
management) – business owner, business contact, escalation
contact

• IT reference source (change management, incident management,


p ob e management,
problem a age e t, release
e ease aandd dep
deployment
oy e t
management) – especially service owner

• aids in the creation of categorization hierarchies


for incident management and problem
management
Portions © 2007 OGC
Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
38

19
Value to IT
Terms
Activities
Concepts
• aids in the ability for incident management to better prioritize
Value incidents and identify major incidents

• aids in the ability for incident and problem management to better


escalate incidents and problems to the correct team

• aids change management in selecting appropriate change advisory


board and emergency change advisory board members

• provides a list of services that service level management needs to


be sure are covered by service level agreements

• provides a list of services that need to be


measured, monitored, reported and reviewed

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
39

Value to IT
Terms
Activities
Concepts
• performing a Business Impact Analysis (BIA) as part of IT Service
Value Continuity Management planning

• starting place for re-distributing workloads as part of Capacity


Management

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
40

20
Summary

Service
Customer/User

Sample Business Service Catalog

Policy Service
Service Description Application Number Busines
Details s of Users s
Criticalit
y

IT Service This service provides for a 3,000 2


Desk single point of contact with the
information technologies
Business/Technical Service Catalog division for all IT service
disruptions, IT questions and IT
service requests via telephone,
facsimile, electronic mail and
self service.

Electronic This service provide electronic Lotus 3,000 3


Messaging communications for users via Notes
electronic mail (workstation, Blackberry
internet and hand held access), AOL Chat
chat and other means.

Workstation This service provides for new 3,000 1


Services workstation installation,
workstation movement,
workstation retirement,
installation of workstation
software and upgrades of
workstation hardware.

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
41

ITIL v3 – APMG Service Catalog Certificate


In the summer of 2009, the APM Group announced another “Official
ITIL V3 Complementary Guidance Course” which leads to the
APMG Service Catalog g Certificate. This certificate is an officially
y
recognized ITIL certification. It exists as an intermediate level
course and provides 1.5 credits.
ITIL
Master
with 25 credits
Intermediate Level
ITIL Expert
with 22 credits
5 credits
Managing Through
Thro gh the Lifecycle
Lifec cle
3 credits each 4 credits each
Capability Stream
Lifecycle Stream

Continual Svc

Offerings and
Improvement

Opperationa
Control and
Optimizatio
Agreement

Validation
Transition

Operation

Protection

l Support
Strategy

Analysis
Planning

Release,
Service

Service

Service
Design

Service

Service

and
&

ITIL Service Lifecycle Modules ITIL Service Capability Modules


2 credits
ITIL Foundations for Service Management
Portions © 2007 OGC
Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
42

21
ITIL v3 – Next Edition
“Ensure that service catalogue manager appears within
Service Operation” ** Continual
Service Service Service Service Service
Strategy Design Transition Operation Improvement
Service Portfolio Service Catalog Service Event Improvement
Mgt Mgt Transition & Mgt Process
Planning

Release & Deployment


Supplier Testing & Incident Service
Mgt Validation Mgt Measurement

Financial Problem Service

Mgt
Mgt Evaluation Mgt Reporting
Security Mgt Continuity
ervice Level

Information

Availability
Mgt

Demand
Mgt
Knowledge
Mgt Mgt
C
Se

y
IT Service

Change
Mgt
Request
Fulfillment
Mgt

Service Asset
and Access
Capacity
Configuration Mgt Mgt
Mgt
** OGC Mandate for Change: Project requirements for an update to the ITIL® core publications, © The Stationery
Office 2009, September 2009
Portions © 2007 OGC
Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
43

Questions

Portions © 2007 OGC


Portions © 2009 Greg Hines
44

22