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Types MVAJ05, 10, 20

Tripping and Control Relays

Service Manual

R8141B
HANDLING OF ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT
A person’s normal movements can easily generate electrostatic potentials of several
thousand volts. Discharge of these voltages into semiconductor devices when
handling circuits can cause serious damage, which often may not be immediately
apparent but the reliability of the circuit will have been reduced.
The electronic circuits of AREVA T&D products are immune to the relevant levels of
electrostatic discharge when housed in their cases. Do not expose them to the risk of
damage by withdrawing modules unnecessarily.
Each module incorporates the highest practicable protection for its semiconductor
devices. However, if it becomes necessary to withdraw a module, the following
precautions should be taken to preserve the high reliability and long life for which the
equipment has been designed and manufactured.
1. Before removing a module, ensure that you are a same electrostatic potential
as the equipment by touching the case.
2. Handle the module by its front-plate, frame, or edges of the printed circuit
board. Avoid touching the electronic components, printed circuit track or
connectors.
3. Do not pass the module to any person without first ensuring that you are both
at the same electrostatic potential. Shaking hands achieves equipotential.
4. Place the module on an antistatic surface, or on a conducting surface which is
at the same potential as yourself.
5. Store or transport the module in a conductive bag.
More information on safe working procedures for all electronic equipment can be
found in BS5783 and IEC 60147-0F.
If you are making measurements on the internal electronic circuitry of an equipment
in service, it is preferable that you are earthed to the case with a conductive wrist
strap.
Wrist straps should have a resistance to ground between 500k – 10M ohms. If a
wrist strap is not available you should maintain regular contact with the case to
prevent the build up of static. Instrumentation which may be used for making
measurements should be earthed to the case whenever possible.
AREVA T&D strongly recommends that detailed investigations on the electronic
circuitry, or modification work, should be carried out in a Special Handling Area such
as described in BS5783 or IEC 60147-0F.
SAFETY SECTION
1. INSTALLATION 11
1.1 General 11
1.2 Receipt 11
1.3 Unpacking 11
1.4 Storage 11
1.5 Installation 12
2. COMMISSIONING 12
2.1 Commissioning preliminaries 12
2.1.1 Electrostatic discharge (ESD) 12
2.1.2 Inspection 12
2.1.3 Wiring 12
2.1.4 External links 12
2.2 Preliminary checks 13
2.3 Insulation tests 14
2.4 Operate/reset operation 14
2.4.1 Self, hand, electrical and hand/electrical reset 14
2.4.2 Self-reset 2.5s delayed reset 15
2.5 Restoration of wiring 15
2.6 Problem analysis 15
3. MAINTENANCE 15
4. MECHANICAL SETTINGS 15
4.1 General 15
4.2 Cleaning contacts 16
4.3 Contact settings 16
4.4 Settings 16
4.4.1 Relay types MVAJ05 16
4.4.2 Relay types MVAJ10, MVAJ20 17
5. SPARES 17
5.1 Repairs 17
6. CONNECTION DIAGRAMS 18
7. COMMISSIONING TEST RECORD 33
REPAIR FORM 35
Figure 1 Typical application diagram MVAJ051 19
Figure 2 Typical application diagram MVAJ053 20
Figure 3 Typical application diagram MVAJ054 21
Figure 4 Typical application diagram MVAJ055 22
Figure 5 Typical application diagram MVAJ101 23
Figure 6 Typical application diagram MVAJ102 24
Figure 7 Typical application diagram MVAJ103 25
Figure 8 Typical application diagram MVAJ104 26
Figure 9 Typical application diagram MVAJ105 27
Figure 10 Typical application diagram MVAJ201 28
Figure 11 Typical application diagram MVAJ202 29
Figure 12 Typical application diagram MVAJ203 30
Figure 13 Typical application diagram MVAJ204 31
Figure 14 Typical application diagram MVAJ205 32
CONTENT

1. SAFETY SECTION 3
1.1 Health and safety 3
1.2 Explanation of symbols and labels 3

2. INSTALLING, COMMISSIONING AND SERVICING 3

3. EQUIPMENT OPERATING CONDITIONS 4


3.1 Current transformer circuits 4
3.2 External resistors 4
3.3 Battery replacement 4
3.4 Insulation and dielectric strength testing 4
3.5 Insertion of modules and pcb cards 4
3.6 Fibre optic communication 5

4. OLDER PRODUCTS 5

5. DECOMMISSIONING AND DISPOSAL 5

6. TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS 6
1. SAFETY SECTION
This Safety Section should be read before commencing any work on the
equipment.
1.1 Health and safety
The information in the Safety Section of the product documentation is intended to
ensure that products are properly installed and handled in order to maintain them in
a safe condition. It is assumed that everyone who will be associated with the
equipment will be familiar with the contents of the Safety Section.
1.2 Explanation of symbols and labels
The meaning of symbols and labels may be used on the equipment or in the product
documentation, is given below.

Caution: refer to product documentation Caution: risk of electric shock

Protective/safety *earth terminal Functional *earth terminal


Note: This symbol may also be
used for a protective/safety earth
terminal if that terminal is part of a
terminal block or sub-assembly
e.g. power supply.

*NOTE: THE TERM EARTH USED THROUGHOUT THE PRODUCT DOCUMENTATION IS THE
DIRECT EQUIVALENT OF THE NORTH AMERICAN TERM GROUND.

2. INSTALLING, COMMISSIONING AND SERVICING


Equipment connections
Personnel undertaking installation, commissioning or servicing work on this
equipment should be aware of the correct working procedures to ensure safety. The
product documentation should be consulted before installing, commissioning or
servicing the equipment.
Terminals exposed during installation, commissioning and maintenance may present
a hazardous voltage unless the equipment is electrically isolated.
If there is unlocked access to the rear of the equipment, care should be taken by all
personnel to avoid electrical shock or energy hazards.
Voltage and current connections should be made using insulated crimp terminations
to ensure that terminal block insulation requirements are maintained for safety. To
ensure that wires are correctly terminated, the correct crimp terminal and tool for the
wire size should be used.
Before energising the equipment it must be earthed using the protective earth
terminal, or the appropriate termination of the supply plug in the case of plug
connected equipment. Omitting or disconnecting the equipment earth may cause a
safety hazard.
The recommended minimum earth wire size is 2.5mm2, unless otherwise stated in the
technical data section of the product documentation.
Before energising the equipment, the following should be checked:
− Voltage rating and polarity;
− CT circuit rating and integrity of connections;
− Protective fuse rating;
− Integrity of earth connection (where applicable)
− Remove front plate plastic film protection
− Remove insulating strip from battery compartment

3. EQUIPMENT OPERATING CONDITIONS


The equipment should be operated within the specified electrical and environmental
limits.
3.1 Current transformer circuits
Do not open the secondary circuit of a live CT since the high level voltage produced
may be lethal to personnel and could damage insulation.
3.2 External resistors
Where external resistors are fitted to relays, these may present a risk of electric shock
or burns, if touched.
3.3 Battery replacement
Where internal batteries are fitted they should be replaced with the recommended
type and be installed with the correct polarity, to avoid possible damage to the
equipment.
3.4 Insulation and dielectric strength testing
Insulation testing may leave capacitors charged up to a hazardous voltage. At the
end of each part of the test, the voltage should be gradually reduced to zero, to
discharge capacitors, before the test leads are disconnected.
3.5 Insertion of modules and pcb cards
These must not be inserted into or withdrawn from equipment whist it is energised
since this may result in damage.
3.6 Fibre optic communication
Where fibre optic communication devices are fitted, these should not be viewed
directly. Optical power meters should be used to determine the operation or signal
level of the device.

4. OLDER PRODUCTS
Electrical adjustments
Equipments which require direct physical adjustments to their operating mechanism
to change current or voltage settings, should have the electrical power removed
before making the change, to avoid any risk of electrical shock.
Mechanical adjustments
The electrical power to the relay contacts should be removed before checking any
mechanical settings, to avoid any risk of electric shock.
Draw out case relays
Removal of the cover on equipment incorporating electromechanical operating
elements, may expose hazardous live parts such as relay contacts.
Insertion and withdrawal of extender cards
When using an extender card, this should not be inserted or withdrawn from the
equipment whilst it is energised. This is to avoid possible shock or damage hazards.
Hazardous live voltages may be accessible on the extender card.
Insertion and withdrawal of heavy current test plugs
When using a heavy current test plug, CT shorting links must be in place before
insertion or removal, to avoid potentially lethal voltages.

5. DECOMMISSIONING AND DISPOSAL


Decommissioning: The auxiliary supply circuit in the relay may include capacitors
across the supply or to earth. To avoid electric shock or energy
hazards, after completely isolating the supplies to the relay (both
poles of any dc supply), the capacitors should be safely
discharged via the external terminals prior to decommissioning.
Disposal: It is recommended that incineration and disposal to water
courses is avoided. The product should be disposed of in a safe
manner. Any products containing batteries should have them
removed before disposal, taking precautions to avoid short
circuits. Particular regulations within the country of operation,
may apply to the disposal of lithium batteries.
6. TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Protective fuse rating
The recommended maximum rating of the external protective fuse for this equipment
is 16A, Red Spot type or equivalent, unless otherwise stated in the technical data
section of the product documentation.

Insulation class: IEC 601010-1 : 1990/A2 : 2001 This equipment requires a


Class I protective (safety) earth
EN 61010-1: 2001 connection to ensure user
Class I safety.

Insulation IEC 601010-1 : 1990/A2 : 1995 Distribution level, fixed


Category Category III insulation. Equipment in this
(Overvoltage): EN 61010-1: 2001 category is qualification tested
Category III at 5kV peak, 1.2/50µs,
500Ω, 0.5J, between all supply
circuits and earth and also
between independent circuits.

Environment: IEC 601010-1 : 1990/A2 : 1995 Compliance is demonstrated


Pollution degree 2 by reference to generic safety
standards.
EN 61010-1: 2001
Pollution degree 2

Product Safety: 72/23/EEC Compliance with the European


Commission Low Voltage
Directive.
EN 61010-1: 2001 Compliance is demonstrated
EN 60950-1: 2002 by reference to generic safety
standards.
Section 1. INSTALLATION

1.1 General
Protective relays, although generally of robust construction, require careful
treatment prior to installation and a wise selection of site. By observing a few
simple rules the possibility of premature failure is eliminated and a high degree of
performance can be expected.
The safety section should be read before any work takes place and should be
referred to throughout. Special care should be taken to adhere to suitable electro-
static discharge precautions.
1.2 Receipt
The relays are either despatched individually or as part of a panel/rack mounted
assembly in cartons specifically designed to protect them from damage.
Relays should be examined immediately they are received to ensure that no
damage has been sustained in transit. If damage due to rough handling is evident,
a claim should be made to the transport company concerned immediately and
AREVA T&D should be promptly notified. Relays which are supplied unmounted and
not intended for immediate installation should be returned to their protective polythene
bags.
1.3 Unpacking
Care must be taken when unpacking and installing the relays so that none of the
parts are damaged or their settings altered and must only be handled by skilled
persons.
Relays should be examined for any wedges, clamps, or rubber bands necessary to
secure moving parts to prevent damage during transit and these should be
removed after installation and before commissioning.
Relays which have been removed from their cases should not be left in situations
where they are exposed to dust or damp. This particularly applies to installations
which are being carried out at the same time as construction work.
1.4 Storage
If relays are not installed immediately upon receipt they should be stored in a place
free from dust and moisture in their original cartons and where de-humidifier bags
have been included in the packing they should be retained. The action of the
de-humidifier crystals will be impaired if the bag has been exposed to ambient
conditions and may be restored by gently heating the bag for about an hour, prior
to replacing it in the carton.
Dust which collects on a carton may, on subsequent unpacking, find its way into
the relay; in damp conditions the carton and packing may become impregnated
with moisture and the de-humidifying agent will lose its efficiency.
The storage temperature range is –40°C to +70°C.

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1.5 Installation
The installation should be clean, dry and reasonably free from dust and excessive
vibration. The site should preferably be well illuminated to facilitate inspection.
An outline diagram is normally supplied showing panel cut-outs and hole centres.
For individually mounted relays these dimensions will also be found in publication
R6141.
Publication R7012, Parts Catalogue and Assembly Instructions, will be useful when
individual relays are to be assembled as a composite rack or panel mounted
assembly.
Publication R6001 is a leaflet on the modular integrated drawout system of
protective relays.
Publication R6014 is a list of recommended suppliers for the pre-insulated
connectors.

Section 2. COMMISSIONING

2.1 Commissioning preliminaries


2.1.1 Electrostatic discharge (ESD)
The relay uses components which are sensitive to electrostatic discharges. When
handling the withdrawn module, care should be taken to avoid contact with
components and electrical connections. When removed from its case for storage
the module should be placed in an electrically conducting anti-static bag.
2.1.2 Inspection
Carefully examine the module and case to see that no damage has occurred
during transit.
Check that the relay serial number on the module, case and cover are identical,
and also check that the rating information is correct for the system.
2.1.3 Wiring
Warning
Exposed terminals may present a hazardous voltage unless
equipment is electrically isolated.
Check that the external wiring is correct to the relevant relay diagram and/or
scheme diagram. It is especially important that DC supplies are wired with the
correct polarity. The relay external connection diagram number is given on the
rating label inside the case.
2.1.4 External links
There are two external links as detailed in tables 1 and 2.
All trip relays are supplied as high burden. With the exception of MVAJ102, 202,
they may be converted to low burden by removing the link between case terminals
22 and 24.

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Relay type Feature Link in Link out

MVAJ 051, 053, 054, 055 Burden High Low


Cut-off Instantaneous Instantaneous
MVAJ 101, 103, 104, 105 Burden High Low
201, 203, 204, 205 Cut-off 40-60ms time delayed Instantaneous
MVAJ102, 202 Link not necessary - configured as high burden models

Note: At the point at which the relay cut-off occurs the current drawn by the relay
is either reduced to an economised level or is removed entirely (ie. zero
watt cut-off state).

Table 1: Configuration of high/low burden link (terminals 22 to 24)

A second link is supplied fitted to selected 10 and 20 contact relays as detailed in


Table 2. This link, connected between case terminals 21 and 23 enables a reset
inhibitor feature to be introduced into the circuit of 10 and 20 contact electrical
reset relays, ensuring that the reset circuit is disabled when the operate circuit is
energised.
On relay types 104, 105, 204 and 205 this link may be removed if this feature is
not required.
NB. This link must remain fitted to MVAJ101 and 201 relays to enable the
economising circuit.
Relay type Feature Link in Link out

MVAJ051, 053, 054, 055, Link not available


102, 202
MVAJ101, 201 Link fitted (relay cut-off to economised state)
MVAJ103, 203 Link not available (relay cut-off to zero watts)
MVAJ104, 105, 204, 205 Cut-off state economised zero watts
reset inhibitor active disabled

Table 2: Configuration of economising/reset inhibit link (terminals 21 to 23)

2.2 Preliminary checks


Before leaving the factory all relays are accurately adjusted, tested and carefully
packed. There should be no need for any re-adjustment on commissioning.
Moving parts are held in position during transit by rubber bands and packing.
These should be removed carefully.
2.2.1 To gain access to the relay first loosen the captive cover screws, then carefully
remove the cover from the case.
The module can then be removed from the case by grasping the handles at the top
and bottom of the front plate and pulling forwards.
Care must be taken to ensure that mechanical settings of the element are not
disturbed.

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2.2.2 Carefully remove the rubber band securing the flag mechanism.
2.2.3 Check that the bottom end of the contact operating card has not been dislodged
from the slot in the armature extension.
2.2.4 Check that all push-on connections to the PCB are secure.
Check that all the push-on connections to the back of the contacts are secure.
Check that all the push-on connections to terminal block are secure.
2.2.5 Carefully actuate the armature of each unit in turn with a small screwdriver/probe.
On units fitted with hand reset flag indicators, check that the flag is free to fall
before, or just as, any make contacts close.
2.2.6 Check that the serial number in the cover and the relay case match that of the
module. Replace the module in the case and refit the cover. Make sure that the
reset mechanism in the cover is correctly located with respect to the relay element
and that the flag (or mechanism) can be reset.
Check that the armature(s) are in the reset position by pressing the appropriate
reset buttons.
2.3 Insulation tests
The relay and its associated wiring may be insulation tested between:
– all electrically isolated circuits
– all circuits and earth
An electronic or brushless insulation tester should be used giving a dc voltage not
exceeding 1000V. Accessible terminals of the same circuit should first be strapped
together. Deliberate circuit earthing links removed for the tests must subsequently
be replaced.
2.4 Operate/reset operation
Warning
Exposed terminals may present a hazardous voltage unless
equipment is electrically isolated.
2.4.1 Self, hand, electrical and hand/electrical reset
The operate circuit is terminated to case terminals 27(+), 28(-). The electrical reset
circuit is terminated to case terminals 25(+), 26(-). Disconnect external wiring from
these terminals to allow application of the test supply.
With the relay reset check the continuity of the closed contacts (shown as break
contacts on the drawing).
Check operation of operate circuit and the electrical reset circuit (if applicable) by
energising the relay with 60% of the lower nominal supply voltage.
The relays should switch cleanly with one movement.
Check the operating time of the relay at 100% lower nominal supply voltage and
check the continuity of the closed contacts (shown as make contacts on the
drawing).

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2.4.2 Self-reset 2.5s delayed reset
The operate circuit is terminated to case terminals 25(+), 27(+), 28(-). Disconnect
external wiring from these terminals to allow application of the test supply.
With the relay reset check the continuity of the closed contacts (shown as break
contacts on the drawing).
Check operation of operate circuit by energising the relay with 60% of the lower
nominal supply voltage.
The relays should switch cleanly with one movement.
Check the operating time of the relay at 100% lower nominal supply voltage and
check the continuity of the closed contacts (shown as make contacts on the
drawing).
Check the delayed reset time by energising the relay with full rated supply volts to
case terminations 25(+), 27(+), 28(-), then remove energisation from the case
termination 27(+). Time the closure of a normally closed contact from this point in
time. The reset time shall be between 2 - 2.8s.
2.5 Restoration of wiring
Restore any external wiring connections that may have been disturbed during the
above tests.
2.6 Problem analysis
Repeat Section 2.2 with particular attention to the connection of external links.
If the relay is found to be faulty it should be returned to AREVA T&D for repair and
recalibration. There are no user serviceable parts inside.

Section 3. MAINTENANCE

Periodic maintenance is not necessary, however routine testing should be carried


out the meet the customer requirements.
Check the relay for operation at 60% lower nominal supply voltage and for
contact wear. If required, the mechanical settings may be checked against those
shown in Section 4.

Section 4. MECHANICAL SETTINGS

4.1 General
Contacts are set at the factory and should not require adjustment.
If contacts show signs of contamination during maintenance it may be necessary to
clean contacts and check settings.
Contacts must be checked by qualified personnel only to
ensure that settings are not disturbed.
The safety section should be read before attempting any adjustments.

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4.2 Cleaning contacts
Contacts should be cleaned with the burnishing tool, supplied in relay tool kits.
On no account should cleaning fluids, knives, files or abrasive materials be used.
4.3 Contact settings
Armature gap measurements should be made with the top of the feeler gauge level
with the centre line of the core.
Contact pressures are measured with a gramme gauge at the contact tips.
In general contact gaps and follow through are defined by quoting an armature
gap at which the tips should be just closed or just open. Follow through should be
measured at the centre of the armature. Some mechanically operated contact gaps
must be measured directly with feeler gauges at the contact tips.
The relay contact state is always defined with the relay in the reset position unless
otherwise specified on the appropriate circuit diagram.
Symbols used on diagrams
Contact type Normal duty
Make (normally open) M
Break (normally closed) B
4.4 Settings
Settings should be within those specified in the following tables.
4.4.1 Relay types MVAJ05

Standard armature gap 1.5 to 1.25 mm


Make Follow through – just closed 0.5 mm
– just open 0.6 mm
Force to make 25 to 30 grammes
Break Contact gaps 1.25 to 1.5 mm
Force to break 25 to 30 grammes
Break Cut off contact (top left-hand viewed from front)
Force to break 25 to 30 grammes
Contact gap 0.2 to 0.5 mm
(measured at armature)

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4.4.2 Relay types MVAJ10, MVAJ20

Standard Following
flag flag Units

Standard armature gap 1.5 to 1.4 1.5 to 1.25 mm


Make Follow through – just closed 0.5 0.5 mm
– just open 0.6 0.6 mm
Force to make 26 to 29 20 to 25 grammes
Force to make 30 to 35 25 to 30 grammes
(when less than 4 make)
Break Contact gaps 1.25 to 1.5 1.25 to 1.5 mm
Force to break 26 to 29 20 to 25 grammes
Break Cut off contact (bottom right-hand viewed from front)
Force to break 25 to 30 20 to 25 grammes
Contact gap measured 0.4 to 0.6 0.4 to 0.6 mm
at the armature centre

Section 5. SPARES

When ordering spares, quote the full relay model number and any component
reference numbers, or briefly describe the part required.
5.1 Repairs
Should the need arise for the equipment to be returned to AREVA T&D for repair, then
the form at the back of this manual should be completed and sent with the equipment
together with a copy of any commissioning test results.

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Section 6. CONNECTION DIAGRAMS

5 contact versions
01 MVAJ051 01 self reset
01 MVAJ053 01 hand reset
01 MVAJ054 01 electrical reset
01 MVAJ055 01 hand and electrical reset
10 contact versions
01 MVAJ101 01 self reset
01 MVAJ102 01 self reset (2s delayed reset)
01 MVAJ103 01 hand reset
01 MVAJ104 01 electrical reset
01 MVAJ105 01 hand and electrical reset
20 contact versions
01 MVAJ201 01 self reset
01 MVAJ202 01 self reset (2s delayed reset)
01 MVAJ203 01 hand reset
01 MVAJ204 01 electrical reset
01 MVAJ205 01 hand and electrical reset
Where required, any specific diagram may be supplied on request. If the actual
diagram number is not known, please provide the full model number and serial
number. Typical diagrams follow.

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Case earth
Combination of Output contacts to
1 2
output contacts module terminals
3 4 1 3 5 7 9 11 2 4 6 8
5 6 5M - M M M M M
7 8 4M 1B B M M M M
9 10 3M 2B B M M B M
11 12 2M 3B B B M B M
Contact description
M: Make
B: Break
Viewed from front

1
A 3
22
2 5
24 4 7
Vx 6 9
25 26
8 11
27 28

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RL1
5
Module terminal block (OP)
viewed from rear

Notes T1 T2
RL1-A 22
1 (a) CT shorting links make T3 T22
before (b) and (c) disconnect See Note 2
24
(b) short terminals break before (c) T4 T24
(c) long terminals PR 27 ZJ0401 28
2 Link in for high burden T27 T28
Link out for low burden

Figure 1: Typical application diagram MVAJ 051


Case earth
Combination of Output contacts to
1 2
output contacts module terminals
3 4 1 3 5 7 9 11 2 4 6 8
5 6 5M - M M M M M
7 8 4M 1B B M M M M
9 10 3M 2B B M M B M
11 12 2M 3B B B M B M

Contact description
M: Make
B: Break
Viewed from front

1
A 3
22
2 5
24 4 7
Vx 6 9
25 26
8 11
27 28

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RL1
5
Module terminal block (OP)
viewed from rear

Notes T1 T2
RL1-A 22
1 (a) CT shorting links make T3 T22
before (b) and (c) disconnect See Note 2
24
(b) short terminals break before (c) T4 T24
(c) long terminals PR 27 ZJ0401 28
2 Link in for high burden T27 T28
Link out for low burden

Figure 2: Typical application diagram MVAJ 053


Combination of Output contacts to
Case earth
output contacts module terminals
1 2
1 3 5 7 9 11 2 4 6 8
3 4 5M - M M M M M
5 6 4M 1B B M M M M
7 8 3M 2B B M M B M
9 10 2M 3B B B M B M
11 12 Contact description
Viewed from front M: Make
B: Break
Vx
1
A 3
+ 2 5
4 7
6 9
-
22
8 11
24
25 26 RL1
5
27 28

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(OP)

T1 T2 22
Module terminal block RL1-A
T3 T22
viewed from rear See
24 Note 2
T4 T24
Notes RL1
T6
1 (a) CT shorting links make
before (b) and (c) disconnect (Reset)
T5
(b)
short terminals break before (c) 28
PR 27
(c) T27 T28
long terminals Reset
ZJ0401
2 Link in for high burden 25 26
T25 T26
Link out for low burden

Figure 3: Typical application diagram MVAJ 054


Case earth Combination of Output contacts to
output contacts module terminals
1 2
1 3 5 7 9 11 2 4 6 8
3 4
5M - M M M M M
5 6
4M 1B B M M M M
7 8
3M 2B B M M B M
9 10
2M 3B B B M B M
11 12
Contact description
Viewed from front M: Make
B: Break
Vx
1
A 3
+ 2 5
4 7
6 9
-
22
8 11
24
25 26 RL1
5
27 28

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(OP)

T1 T2 22
Module terminal block RL1-A
viewed from rear T3 T22
See
24 Note 2
Notes T4 T24
1 (a) CT shorting links make RL1
T6
before (b) and (c) disconnect
(b) (Reset)
short terminals break before (c)
T5
(c) long terminals 27 28
PR
T27 T28
2 Link in for high burden Reset
ZJ0401
Link out for low burden 26
25 T25 T26

Figure 4: Typical application diagram MVAJ 055


Combination of Output contacts to module terminals
Case earth output contacts
1 3 5 17
7 9 11 13 15 19 2 4 6 8 10 1214 1618 20
1 2
10M - M M M M M M M M M M
3 4 8M 2B B M M M M B M M M M
5 6 6M 4B B B M M M B B M M M
7 8 4M 6B B B B M M B B B M M
9 10
11 12
Viewed from front Contact description
13 14
15 16 2 1 M: Make
4 3
17 18 6 5
B: Break
19 20
Vx 8 7
10 9
21 22 12 11
23 24 + 14 13
16 15
18 17
25 26
20 19
-
27 28
B A
RL1
Module terminal block 10
viewed from rear (OP)

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Notes
T1 T2 22
1 (a) CT shorting links make RL1-A
before (b) and (c) disconnect T3 T22
See
(b) 24
short terminals break before (c) Note 2
T4 T24
(c) long terminals 21
T21 See
2 Link in for high burden 23 Note 3
Link out for low burden T23
3 Link for economising must be fitted. 27 28
PR
T27 T28
ZJ0393

Figure 5: Typical application diagram MVAJ 101


Combination of Output contacts to module terminals
output contacts
Case earth 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 17 19 2
15 4 6 8
10 1214 1618 20
10M - M M M M M M M M M M
1 2 8M 2B B M M M M B M M M M
3 4 6M 4B B B M M M B B M M M
5 6 4M 6B B B B M M B B B M M
7 8 Contact description
9 10 Viewed from front M: Make
11 12 2 1 B: Break
4 3
13 14 6 5
Vx 8 7
15 16 10 9
17 12 11
18 14 13
19 20 + 16 15
18 17
21 22 20 19
-
23 24 B A

25 26 RL1
10
27 28
(OP)

Page 24
Module terminal block
viewed from rear T4 T2
RL1-A
T3
Notes
1 (a) CT shorting links make T1
before (b) and (c) disconnect 25
RL1-B
ZJ0394
(b) short terminals break before (c) T9

(c) long terminals


PR 27 28
T27 T28

Figure 6: Typical application diagram MVAJ 102


Case earth Combinations of Output contacts to module terminals
output contacts
1 2
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 10 12 14 16 18
3 4 15 17 19 2 4 6 8 20
10M - M M M M M M M M M M
5 6
8M 2B B M M M M B M M M M
7 8
6M 4B B B M M M B B M M M
9 10
4M 6B B B B M M B B B M M
11 12
2M 8B B B B B M B B B B M
13 14
Contact description
15 16 Viewed from front M: Make
17 18 B: Break
2 1
19 20 4 3
21 22 6 5
8 7
23 24 10 9
Vx 12 11
25 26 14 13
16 15
27 28 + 18 17
20 19
-
B A
Module terminal block
viewed from rear

Page 25
RL1
10
Notes (OP)
1. (a) CT shorting links make before T1 T2 22
(b) and (c) disconnect RL1-A
T3 T22
(b) See
Short terminals break before (c) 24 Note 2
(c) Long terminals T4 T24
21
T21 See
2. Link in for high burden.
Link out for low burden. 23 Note 3
T23
3. Do not fit link. PR 27 28
T27 T28
ZJ0393

Figure 7: Typical application diagram MVAJ 103


Combination of Output contacts to module terminals
output contacts
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 2 4 6 8 10 1214 1618 20

10M - M M M M M M M M M M
8M 2B B M M M M B M M M M
Case earth
6M 4B B B M M M B B M M M
1 2 4M 6B B B B M M B B B M M
3 4 2M 8B B B B B M B B B B M
5 6
8
Viewed from front Contact description
7
9 10 2 1
M: Make
12 4 3 B: Break
11 See 6 5
13 14 Vx 8 7
Note 3 10 9
15 16
12 11
17 18 14 13
19 20
+ 16 15
18 17
21 22 20 19
-
23 24
B A
25 26
RL1
27 28 10

Page 26
(OP)
Module terminal block
viewed from rear T1 T2 22
RL1-A
Notes T3 T22
See
CT shorting links make 24 Note 2
1 (a)
before (b) and (c) disconnect T4 T24
(b) RL1 21
short terminals break before (c) T11 T21
RL1-B See
(c) long terminals 23 Note 3
(Reset)
T5 T23
2 Link in for high burden
PR 27 28
Link out for low burden T27 T28
Reset
3 Link to enable reset inhibitor/economising coil. ZJ0393
25 26
T25 T26

Figure 8: Typical application diagram MVAJ 104


Combination of Output contacts to module terminals
Case earth output contacts
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 17 19 2 10 1214 1618 20
15 4 6 8
1 2 10M - M M M M M M M M M M
3 8M 2B B M M M M B M M M M
4
6M 4B B B M M M B B M M M
5 6 4M 6B B B B M M B B B M M
7 8 2M 8B B B B B M B B B B M
9 10
11 Viewed from front Contact description
12
2 1 M: Make
13 14 4 3 B: Break
6 5
15 16 Vx 8 7
10 9
17 18 12 11
19 20 14 13
+ 16 15
21 22 18 17
20 19
-
23 24
B A
25 26
RL1
27 28 10

Page 27
(OP)

Module terminal block T1 T2 22


viewed from rear RL1-A
T3 T22
Notes See
24 Note 2
1 (a) T4 T24
CT shorting links make
RL1 21
before (b) and (c) disconnect T11 T21
RL1-B See
(b) 23 Note 3
short terminals break before (c) (Reset)
T5 T23
(c)
long terminals PR 27 28
2. Link in for high burden T27 T28
Reset
Link out for low burden ZJ0393
3. Link to enable reset inhibitor/economising coil 25 26
T25 T26

Figure 9: Typical application diagram MVAJ 105


Case earth Table 1 Table 2
1 2 29 30 Combinations of (See Note 4)
Output contacts to module terminals
3 4 31 32 output contacts
Cont.
5 6 33 34 Combination L/h R/h stack Module terminals
7 35 36 stack stack Contact description:
8 L/h 29 3133 3537 3941 4345 4730 3234 3638 4042 4446 48
9 10 37 38 20M - 1 1 R/h 1 3 5 7 9 1113 1517 19 2 4 6 8 10 1214 1618 20 M: Make
12 39 40 18M 2B 2 1 1 M M M M M M M M M M B: Break
11
41 16M 4B 2 2 2 B M M M M B M M M M
13 14 42
43 14M 6B 3 2 3 B B M M M B B M M M
15 16 44
12M 8B 3 3 4 B B B M M B B B M M
17 18 45 46
10M 10B 4 3
19 20 47 48
8M 12B 4 4
21 22
23 24 Left hand Right hand
25 26 30 29 2 1
32 31 4 3
27 28 34 33 6 5
36 35 8 7
38 37 10 9 Contact stacks
40 39 12 11 viewed from front
Module terminal block 42 41 14 13
44 43 16 15
viewed from rear 46 45 18 17
48 47 20 19
Notes B A B A
CT shorting links make Vx RL1 RL3
1 (a)

Page 28
before (b) and (c) disconnect 10 10
(b) (OP) (OP)
short terminals break before (c)
(c) long terminals
T1 T2 T7 T20
2 Link in for high burden
Link out for low burden RL1-A 22
T3/T8 T22
3 Link for economising must be fitted. See
RL3-A 24 Note 2
4 The numbers quoted for left hand and right hand T24
stacks in Table 1 are code numbers used for T4/T9 21
cross references to module terminals in Table 2. T21 See
23 Note 3
T23
ZJ0393
PR 27 28
T27 T28

Figure 10: Typical application diagram MVAJ 201


Table 1 Table 2
Combinations of
output contacts Output contacts to module terminals
Case earth
Cont.
1 2 29 30 R/h stack Module terminals
Combination L/h
stack stack
3 4 31 32 L/h 29 31 33 3537 39 41 43 45 47 30 32 34 36 38 40 42 44 46 48
5 6 33 34 20M - 1 1 R/h 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 See Note 2
35 18M 2B 2 1 1 M M M M M M M M M M
7 8 36
16M 4B 2 2 2 B M M M M B M M M M
9 10 37 38 Contact description
14M 6B 3 2 3 B B M M M B B M M M
11 12 39 40 M: Make
12M 8B 3 3 4 B B B M M B B B M M B: Break
13 14 41 42
43
10M 10B 4 3
15 16 44
8M 12B 4 4
17 18 45 46 Left hand Right hand
19 20 47 48
30 29 2 1
21 22 49 50 32 31 4 3
34 33 6 5
23 24 51 52
36 35 8 7
53 38 37 10 9 Contact stacks
25 26 54
40 39 12 11 viewed from front
55 42 41 14 13
27 28 56
44 43 16 15
46 45 18 17
48 47 20 19
Module terminal block
B A B A
viewed from rear
Vx RL1 RL3

Page 29
Notes
10 10
(OP) (OP)
1. (a) CT shorting links make before
(b) and (c) disconnect
(b) Short terminals break before (c) T4 T2 T6 T8
(c) Long terminals
2. The numbers quoted for left hand and right hand stacks RL1-A
in Table 1 are code numbers used for cross references
T3/T7
to module terminals in Table 2. RL3-A

T5/T1

RL1-B
25
T9 ZJ0393
PR 27 28
T27 T28

Figure 11: Typical application diagram MVAJ 202


Table 1 Table 2
Combinations of
Case earth Output contacts to module terminals
output contacts
1 2 29 30 Cont. Module terminals (see Note 3)
L/h R/h stack
4 31
Combination
3 32 stack stack L/h 2931 3335 3739 4143 4547 3032 3436 3840 4244 4648
Contact description
5 6 33 34 20M - 1 1 R/h 1 3 5 7 9 11 1315 1719 2 4 6 8 1012 1416 1820 M: Make
7 8 35 36 18M 2B 2 1 1 M M M M M M M M M M B: Break
9 10 37 38 16M 4B 2 2 2 B M M M M B M M M M
11 12 39 40 14M 6B 3 2 3 B B M M M B B M M M
13 14 41 42 12M 8B 3 3 4 B B B M M B B B M M
15 16 43 44 10M 10B 4 3 5 B B B B M B B B B M
17 18 45 46 8M 12B 4 4
Left hand Right hand
19 20 47 48 6M 14B 5 4
30 29 2 1
21 22 4M 16B 5 5
32 31 4 3
23 24 34 33 6 5
36 35 8 7
25 26 38 37 10 9 Contact stacks viewed
40 39 12 11
27 28 from front
42 41 14 13
44 43 16 15
46 45 18 17
Module terminal block 48 47 20 19
viewed from rear
B A B A
Vx RL3

Page 30
RL1
Notes 10 10
1 (a) CT shorting links make (OP) (OP)
before (b) and (c) disconnect
(b) short terminals break before (c)
T1 T2 T7 T20
(c) long terminals

2 Link in for high burden RL1-A 22


Link out for low burden T3/T8 T22
See
3 Do not fit link
RL3-A 24 Note 2
T24
4 The numbers quoted for left hand and right hand stacks T4/T9 21
in Table 1 are codenumbers used for cross references to T21 See
module terminals in Table 2.
23 Note 3
T23
ZJ0393
PR 27 28
T27 T28

Figure 12: Typical application diagram MVAJ 203


Case earth
Table 1 Table 2
1 2 29 30
Combinations of Output contacts to module terminals
3 4 31 32
output contacts
5 6 33 34 Cont.
35 Combination L/h R/h stack Module terminals
7 8 36 stack stack L/h 29 3133 3537 39 41 4345 4730 3234 3638 40 42 4446 48 (See Note 4)
9 10 37 38
20M - 1 1 R/h 1 3 5 7 9 1113 1517 19 2 4 6 8 10 1214 16 18 20
11 12 39 40 Contact description
18M 2B 2 1 1 M M M M M M M M M M
13 14 41 42 M: Make
16M 4B 2 2 2 B M M M M B M M M M B: Break
15 16 43 44
14M 6B 3 2 3 B B M M M B B M M M
17 18 45 46 12M 8B 3 3 4 B B B M M B B B M M
19 20 47 48 10M 10B 4 3 5 B B B B M B B B B M
21 22 49 50 8M 12B 4 4 Left hand Right hand
23 24 51 52 6M 14B 5 4
53 4M 16B 5 5 30 29 2 1
25 26 54 32 31 4 3
34 33 6 5
27 28 55 56 36 35 8 7
38 37 10 9 Contact stacks
40 39 12 11 viewed from front
42 41 14 13
Module terminal block 44 43 16 15
46 45 18 17
viewed from rear 48 47 20 19

B A B A
Notes Vx RL1 RL3
1 (a) CT shorting links make 20 20
before (b) and (c) disconnect (OP) (OP)
(b) short terminals break before (c)

(c) long terminals


T1 T2 T7 T20
2 Link in for high burden
Link out for low burden RL1-A 22

Page 31
3 Link for economising must be fitted. T3/T8 T22
See
4 The numbers quoted for left hand and right hand
RL3-A 24 Note 2
stacks in Table 1 are code numbers used for T24
cross references to module terminals in Table 2. T4/T9 21
T21 See
RL1 RL1-B 23 Note 3
T10/T11
T23
RL3 RL3-B ZJ0393

(Reset coils) T5/T6

PR 27 28
T27 T28

Reset
25 26
T25 T26

Figure 13: Typical application diagram MVAJ 204


Table 1 Table 2
Case earth
Combinations of Output contacts to module terminals
1 2 29 30 output contacts
3 4 31 32 Cont.
Combination L/h R/h stack Module terminals
5 6 33 34 stack stack L/h 29 3133 3537 39 41 4345 4730 3234 3638 40 42 4446 48 (See Note 4)
7 8 35 36 20M - 1 1 R/h 1 3 5 9 1113 17 6 8 10 14
7 15 19 2 4 12 16 18 20 Contact description
9 10 37 38 18M 2B 2 1 1 M M M M M M M M M M
M: Make
11 12 39 40 16M 4B 2 2 2 B M M M M B M M M M B: Break
13 14 41 42 14M 6B 3 2 3 B B M M M B B M M M
15 16 43 44 12M 8B 3 3 4 B B B M M B B B M M
17 18 45 46 10M 10B 4 3 5 B B B B M B B B B M
19 20 47 48 8M 12B 4 4 Left hand Right hand
21 22 6M 14B 5 4
30 29 2 1
23 24 4M 16B 5 5
32 31 4 3
34 33 6 5
25 26 8 7
36 35
38 37 10 9 Contact stacks
27 28
40 39 12 11 viewed from front
42 41 14 13
44 43 16 15
46 45 18 17
Module terminal block 48 47 20 19
viewed from rear
B A B A
Vx RL1 RL3
20 20
Notes (OP) (OP)
1 (a) CT shorting links make
before (b) and (c) disconnect
(b) short terminals break before (c) T1 T2 T7 T20
(c) long terminals

Page 32
RL1-A 22
2 Link in for high burden T3/T8 T22
Link out for low burden See
RL3-A 24 Note 2
3 Link for economising must be fitted. T24
T4/T9 21
4 The numbers quoted for left hand and right hand T21 See
stacks in Table 1 are code numbers used for RL1 RL1-B 23 Note 3
cross references to module terminals in Table 2. T10/T11
T23
RL3 RL3-B ZJ0393

(Reset coils) T5/T6

PR 27 28
T27 T28

Reset
25 26
T25 T26

Figure 14: Typical application diagram MVAJ 205


Section 7. COMMISSIONING TEST RECORD

Date Site

Station Circuit

Relay model no. Serial no.

Rating
Operating Volts DC Resetting Volts DC

Diagram no.

Visual inspection
Check operation at 60% LNV

Check operating time at 100% LNV ms ms

Check contact continuity

Check electrical reset at 60% LNV

Check reset time at 100% LNV (MVAJ102 only) s s

Check unit resets correctly

Check flags/cover

Remarks:

Commissioning Engineer Customer Witness

Date Date

Page 33
Page 34
REPAIR FORM

Please complete this form and return it to AREVA T&D with the equipment to be repaired. This
form may also be used in the case of application queries.

AREVA T&D
St. Leonards Works
Stafford
ST17 4LX
England

For : After Sales Service Department

Customer Ref: ___________________ Model No: ___________________

AREVA Contract Ref: ___________________ Serial No: ___________________

Date: ___________________

1. What parameters were in use at the time the fault occurred?

AC Volts ___________________ Main VT/Test set

DC Volts ___________________ Battery/Power supply

AC current ___________________ Main CT/Test set

Frequency ___________________

2. Which type of test was being used?


3. Were all the external components fitted where required? Yes / No
(Delete as appropriate)
4. List the relay settings being used

5. What did you expect to happen?

continued overleaf
!
6. What did happen?

7. When did the fault occur?

Instant Yes / No Intermittent Yes / No

Time delayed Yes / No (Delete as appropriate)

By how long? ___________________

8. What indications if any did the relay show?

9. Was there any visual damage?

10. Any other remarks which may be useful:

Signature Title

Name (in capitals) Company name


!
Publication: R8141B

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