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Rotational Motion: Moment 1

Colorado Technical University

Rotational Motion: Moment of Inertia

Lab Report 6

Professor Wenton Davis

Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for

PHY211

Physics I Mechanics

By

Taylor DeIaco, Jonathan Quinth, Jenna Rock

Colorado Springs, Colorado

June 2009
Rotational Motion: Moment 2

Table of Contents

Overview..........................................................................................................................................3

Rotational Motion: Moment of Inertia.............................................................................................4

Hypothesis ...................................................................................................................................4

Theory..........................................................................................................................................4

Calculations .................................................................................................................................4

Procedure .....................................................................................................................................4

Measurements ..............................................................................................................................5

Analysis .......................................................................................................................................6

Conclusion .......................................................................................................................................7
Rotational Motion: Moment 3

Overview

This lab report will outline the experiment looking at rotational motion and the moment of

inertia. This will be done using a moment of inertia apparatus, and using those numbers to

perform calculations. The numbers that will be found are the moment of inertia and frictional

torque.
Rotational Motion: Moment 4

Rotational Motion: Moment of Inertia

Hypothesis

The purpose of this experiment is to see if the moment of inertia and frictional torque can

be measured for a irregularly-shaped wheel. This will be done using a moment of inertia

apparatus and hand calculations.

Theory

The premise is that if the following data points are collected, the results can give the

moment of inertia and torque. The weight of the apparatus, the diameters of the hubs, the

distance the weight will travel and the average time for each weight to drop from each hub will

be the data points needed. Once this is found, the following can also be found; velocity, average

velocity, final velocity, and acceleration. With those numbers found, the tension, angular

acceleration, and torque applied by the string can also be calculated. After all of that is found the

torque and angular acceleration can be graphed and the moment of inertia and frictional torque

will be produced.

Calculations

x vo + v v − vo
v= V = a= T = m ( g − a ) a = rα τ = rT
t 2 t
Table 1. Equations Used in this Lab

Procedure

The lab was performed in this way. First the moment of inertia apparatus was clamped to

the table being used. The distance from where the weights would be dropped to the floor was

measured. Next, for each configuration the weight was released three times and timed. From the

all of the times taken for each case, an average time was found. Last of all, the equations from
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Table 1. was used to find the various pieces of data requested and those results are found in

Table 2.

Measurements

1 2 3
4 100g on large
Configuration 50g on small 100g on small 50g on large
hub
hub hub hub
Distance
69 69 69 69
traversed, cm
Radius of
5.68 5.68 8.02 8.02
hub.cm
Radius of hub,
2.84 2.84 4.01 4.01
m
Mass of hub, kg 3.64 3.64 3.64 3.64
Average time, s 6.32 4.31 4.36 2.91
Average
0.11 0.16 0.16 0.24
velocity m/s
Final velocity,
0.22 0.32 0.32 0.48
m/s
Acceleration
0.035 0.074 0.073 0.16
m/s2
Tension in
0.49 0.97 0.49 0.96
string, N
Angular
acceleration, 1.23 2.6 1.82 3.99
rad/ s2
Torque applied
0.014 0.028 0.020 0.038
by string, Nm

Table 2. These are all of the measurements and the results of the equations used from Table 1.
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Experiment 6

0.045
0.04
0.035
0.03 Experimental Data
0.025
Nm

0.02 Best fit line


0.015
0.01
0.005
0
0 1 2 3 4 5
rad/s^2

Graph 1.

Moment of inertia Frictional torque


0.02
0.005Nm
1 .9
Table 3. Final Results

Analysis

This lab was completed fairly smoothly with results that made sense. There are a couple

things to note in the performance of this lab. The apparatus was not clamped to the table in the

traditional manner but was stood on by one of the students. Also, the weight was having to be

released from point marked on the side of the table that was much lower than the bottom of the

apparatus. The times were taken by four different stop watches and operators. After each run was

completed the times were written down and the average time for each configuration was

calculated. So what needs to be noted is that due to the student holding down the apparatus there

may have been a slight weight difference that was not taken into account when calculations were

performed. Also since each configuration was run three times and there were four timers, there

were twelve timings to average which gave a comfortably accurate average. With all this being
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said there is some experimental error that was not taken into account in the final results found in

Table 3.

Conclusion

This experiment was successful in being able to measure the moment of inertia and in

addition find the frictional torque of the bearings. When the experiment was conducted there

were a few adjustments made to the original set up which means there is experimental error in

the results. However despite that, the numbers that were taken were still able to give reasonably

accurate results. So the moment of inertia and frictional torque were found for the moment of

inertia apparatus.