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CREATIVE WRITING

What is Writing?

 "Writing" is the process of using symbols (letters of the alphabet, punctuation and spaces) to
communicate thoughts and ideas in a readable form.
 The activity or skill of making coherent words on paper and composing text.
 Writing is a medium of human communication that represents language and emotion through
the inscription or recording of signs and symbols
 "Writing" can also refer to the work/career of an author

Creativity

 Creativity is a phenomenon whereby something new and somehow valuable is formed.

Creative Writing / Imaginative Writing

• is any writing that is original, artistic, and self- expressive.

• The purpose is to entertain and share human experiences, and it does so by expressing plays,
and personal essays.

• Is any writing that is in contrast to analytic or pragmatic forms of literature like professional,
journalistic, academic, medical, scientific, business, or technical writing.

“It’s not creative unless it sells.” – David Ogilvy, an advertising guru

“Creativity is the WHOLE you” – Jeannie Kim

Creative Writing Genres:

FICTION

 Novel
 Short Story
 (Joke)

POETRY

 Songs
 Riddles
 Proverbs

PLAYS

 Screenplays
 Teleplays
 Stage plays
 Radio plays
TECHNICAL WRITING

When it comes to technical writing, the sole purpose of it is to inform a reader and sometimes trigger
them into taking action which would be beneficial towards the writer.

CREATIVE WRITING

Creative writing's purpose is to both entertain as well as educate. The majority of us enjoy reading
interesting stories and novels, not necessarily because they're helpful to use but because we get a
certain feeling of pleasure from reading them and this is the type of pleasure that you can not get from
reading technical writing.

SENSORY EXPERIENCE WRITING

Writing what you know means writing about what you sense and experience about you, what you see,
hear, smell, taste, and so on.

Writing about what you’ve heard from other people or the news; or what you’ve read in books,
magazines, online, even the graffiti on the walls; or what you dreamed about last night; or what you
think will happen if an octopus begins to walk or crawl in the mall.

Sensory Experience Writing

 is using imagery incorporating the five senses – sight (visual), sound (auditory), smell (olfactory),
taste (gustatory), and touch (tactile).
 As humans, we learn about the world and our surroundings through our senses. A reader needs
to feel engaged in the written world you are creating.
 Writing that incorporates sensory images engages the reader and makes the writing come alive.
It quickens the pulse, gives you goose bumps, makes you taste, hear and smell what the writer
tastes, hears and smells.
 As humans, we learn about the world and our surroundings through our senses. A reader needs
to feel engaged in the written world you are creating.
 Writing that incorporates sensory images engages the reader and makes the writing come alive.
It quickens the pulse, gives you goose bumps, makes you taste, hear and smell what the writer
tastes, hears and smells.
 As humans, we learn about the world and our surroundings through our senses. A reader needs
to feel engaged in the written world you are creating.
 Writing that incorporates sensory images engages the reader and makes the writing come alive.
It quickens the pulse, gives you goose bumps, makes you taste, hear and smell what the writer
tastes, hears and smells.

IMAGERY

 is the author’s use of descriptive and figurative language to represent ideas, actions and entities
in a way that it appeals to a reader’s physical sense.

FIGURES OF SPEECH

Definition: A “figure” of “speech” creates pictures (figures) using words (speech). An author can
create a special effect or an image through the unordinary use of words.

If an author’s words are successful, the reader will create or paint a picture in his mind of the
scene the author describes.

Types of Figures of Speech

1. Metaphor

 is a comparison between two things that share a common characteristic.


 In which one thing is said to be another.
Examples:

The planet is your playground.

The Lord is my shepherd.

2. Simile

 a comparison of two things, usually employing the words like or as.


Examples:
A smile as big as the sun.

She prays like a mantis.

3. Personification

 another type of comparison that treats objects or things as if they were capable of the actions
and feelings of people.

Example:

My car was happy to be washed.

The sun is dancing.

4. Apostrophe

 is a figure of speech in which speaker speaks directly to an object or an idea as if it were a


person.

EX:
“Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are.
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky.”

5. A PARADOX

 is a statement which seems to contradict itself but which contains a deeper truth.

EX:

The child is father of the man


Less is more
You can save money by spending it.

6. IRONY

 the expression of one's meaning by using language that normally signifies the opposite, typically
for humorous or emphatic effect.

EX:
Oh great! You failed the exam.
"Wow, you could win an award for cleanliness!“ (Looking at her son's messy room, Mom says)
7. Oxymoron

 is a figure of speech that combines incongruous or contradictory terms.

Example:

Why then, O brawling love! O loving hate! O heavy lightness, serious vanity; Misshapen chaos of well-
seeming forms! Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health!

8. Hyperbole

 is a figure of speech that uses exaggerations to create emphasis or effect; it is not meant to be
taken literally.

Example:

I told you a million times to clean your room!

9. Understatement

 is a figure of speech employed by writers or speakers to intentionally make a situation seem less
important than it really is.

Examples:

A nurse about to give an injection saying, “It will sting a bit.”

To describe a disappointing experience, a participant may say, “It was…different.”

10. Onomatopoeia

 is a word that actually looks like the sound it makes, and we can almost hear those sounds as we
read.

Ex.

water plops into pond


splish-splash downhill