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CHAPTER 1

THE PROBLEM

Background of the study

It is the aim of any educational institution all over the world to produce

graduates equipped with both academic and non- academic competence and

well-rounded personality. This aim is realized in complementing academic

activities with co and extra-curricular undertakings that widen the horizon of

students (Astin, 2004). Also, such experiences are deemed to enhance their

potentials, heighten their academic performance, develop them personally and

eventually expand the curricula. Thus, co/extra-curricular activities are

encouraged and enjoined in all schools. Predominantly to the underlying

philosophy being capitalized is that the goal of education is not only to promote

common good but the individual welfare in its totality as well. (BulSU, 2005)

Believing Nolledo (2000) who posited that it is the right of any student to

form, establish, join and participate in organizations and societies recognized by

the school and henceforth foster their intellectual, cultural, spiritual, and physical

growth and development activities that will promote these areas are deemed

necessary.

Co/Extra-curricular activities provide young people the opportunity for the

finest academic performance as well as personal development. In participating


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with co/extra-curricular activities, these young people capture the opportunity for

satisfaction, self-development, emotional management and leadership (Pope,

2002). Through involvement in co/extra-curricular activities, young people

become effective coaches and mentors later on. The National Survey of Student

Engagement (2000) stated that student’s involvement in co/extra-curricular

activities is vital in creating a culture of active involvement as well as loyalty and

pride to the institution and in the pursuit of academic success and person.

Academic performance is a complex student behavior and underlies

several abilities, e.g., memory, previous knowledge or aptitude as well as

psychological factors such as motivation, interests, temperaments or emotions,

to name a few (Deary, Whiteman, Starr, Whalley, and Fox, 2004).

Children are the clients of the school system. They make up the students

in the educational system. How the students perform academically depend

largely on how they behave academically. A negative academic behavior, more

often than not, results to academic failures. Inversely, positive academic

behaviors result in better academic achievements.

A good academic performance, however, is not the only determinant of

triumph in the working world. Non-academic factors also matter. The aptitude,

inclination and skills of the student should be taken into consideration, especially

when they apply for college and choose their career paths. In knowing this, the
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country’s local government officials came up with the National Career

Assessment Examination otherwise known NCAE.

The National Career Assessment Examination (NCAE) is an annual

examination administered to public school student throughout the country to

determine their achievement level, strengths and weaknesses in the key subject

areas.

NCAE is a test or exam that is taken by all the 3rd year or grade

nine students all around the Philippines in both private and public schools in the

Philippines on August 26 every year. The students take the same test at the

same time. NCAE is a paper and pencil test using multiple choices format, on

scannable answer sheets which can be checked electronically. NCAE also

measures a senior high school student’s potentials or inclination in such areas as

general scholastic aptitude (GSA), technical vocational aptitude (TVA),

entrepreneurial skills, nonverbal ability and occupational interest.

The components of the test are: Scientific Ability, Mathematical Ability,

Reading Comprehension, Verbal Ability, Logical Reasoning, Manipulative Skills,

Clerical Ability on-Verbal Ability, Entrepreneurial skills. There are different parts

of the test, Likes or Interests, Business or Accountancy, Criminology, and many

more. The test also includes the major subjects like Math, Science, etc. . The

result of the National Career Assessment Examination is used when the 3rd year

or grade nine students go to grade eleven and twelve. The result helps the
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students decide what course they should get. The NCAE also serves as basis for

the selection of scholars in the Commission on Higher Education’s or CHED

program.(http://www.slideshare.net/daniholic/ncae)

At present many students cannot decide on what course they should take,

especially those who cannot make decision by their own. NCAE (National Career

Assessment Examination) assists the compatibility of the skills of the students

regarding their courses. NCAE can help students on their decision making in

taking courses. (www.slideshare.net/xDpauwaw/thesis-full).

One of the reasons the NCAE was developed was to address the issue of

unemployment due to workers getting mismatched with the wrong careers. The

hope is that, by determining which careers they are ideally suited for, students

can plan a course of study that will give them the skills and education they will

need for their ideal careers. (Martin, 2015)

NCAE test results are only one part of the bigger picture in determining

the best career fit for a student. Students shouldn't make major decisions based

on NCAE results alone. Their entire school career as well as their own goals and

interests should be considered when deciding on a course of study and a career.

At a transition stage between 17 and 18 the individual becomes aware of

the decision for making a vocational choice. By analyzing the sub-phase

Capacity, the potentials and abilities are talking to the assessment made by the

DepED known as NCAE.


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This examination will help students assess their capabilities in different

aspects. Next is the stage when an adolescent starts to crystallize and specify

occupations of interest (realistic). This phase is made up of the following sub

phase. 20 Values (Age 15 or 16): The teenager considers their personal values

and priorities in life, as well as his or her occupational lifestyle.  Capacity (Age

13 or 14): The teenager becomes more aware of his or her particular abilities as

he/she relates to potential career. (Age 11 or 12). The child makes more

concrete decisions about him or her likes, dislikes, and interests.

The individual selects a job or professional training program as required

by their career of choice. Later on his career, Ginzberg (1984) stressed that

“career choice is a lifelong process of decision-making for those who seek major

satisfactions from their work.” According to Ginzberg, the point of his theory is

that people make their career decisions which balance their interests and values

with the opportunities. Choosing a career is one of the most important decisions

you will make in your life.

According to the former Department of Education Secretary, Mr. Jesli A.

Lapus, the NCAE mainly seeks to guide graduating students on what career path

is fitted for them. It is also aimed at determining the best-suited college courses

for the examinees after graduation from high school. When the NCAE was first

introduced and took over the National Career Entrance Examination (NCEE) in

2006, it was mandatory for all graduating students of public high schools to take

it but not for private schools.


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Now, even private schools are required to take the examination. It has

been years since the NCAE was implemented but the answer on what is the

relevancy of the NCAE to the academic performance of the graduating students

still remains unsatisfactory to the researchers.

The principle of humanism and egalitarianism has been the anchor of

Philippine education. Over the decades, Filipinos considered education as the key

to success, or roughly translated the key to a stable job and eventually to the

elevation of their social status. The latter ensures that neither poverty nor

difference in political creed and culture shall pose obstacles to the fulfillment of

this basic need.

The whole facet of the learning process shall ensure the provision of good

quality and relevant education. Such quality education shall be an instrument in

the pursuit of the common good, peace and unity, environmental security and

sustain growth and development. The ultimate aim of education is to develop in

the learner the desirable knowledge and skills, values and attitudes.

In that way, he can effectively use to alleviate poverty and improve the

quality not only of his life, but also to his family, the community and the larger

society.

In Philippine educational institutions, success is measured by the student’s

academic performance or how well a student meets standards set by the local

government and the institution itself. As career competitions grow even fiercer,
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the importance of students – specifically graduating students – doing well in their

studies has caught the attention of parents, legislators and educational

departments.

In Alaminos City, there are issues between academic and non-academic

performance, and the results in the test like NCAE. Not all students who excel

academically also excel in such examination. It is along these views that this

study is pursued as it examined the relationship between the scores in the NCAE

and the academic and non-academic performance of the respondent students.

Statement of the Problem:

This study will focus on National Career Assessment Examination Scores

and Academic and Non-Academic Performance of Grade 9 Students in Alaminos

City.

Specifically, it will seek to answer the following questions:

1. What is the demographic profile of the grade 9 students of Alaminos City

in terms of the following:

a. sex,

b. age,

c. monthly family income,

d. occupation of parents,
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e. type of residency,

f. parental presence,

g. availability of IT materials at home,

h. first preference on Academic Strand?

2. What is the scores of the students in the following NCAE subtest:

2.1.1 General Scholastic Aptitude (GSA,

2.1.1 Scientific Ability (SA),

2.1.2 Reading Comprehension (RC),

2.1.3 Verbal Ability (VA),

2.1.4 Mathematical Ability (MA),

2.2 . Technical Vocational Aptitude (TVA)

2.2.1 Clerical Ability (CA)

2.2.2 Visual Manipulative Skill (VMS)

3. What is the performance of the respondents in the following:

a. Academics

a.1.English,

a.2.Mathematics, and

a.3.Science?
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b. Non-Academics

b.1. Investigatory Project,

b.2. Journalism,

b.3. Oratorical Contest,

b.4. MTAP(Quiz Bee),

b.5. Webpage Design,

b.6. Poster Making Contest?

4. Is there a significant difference in the NCAE scores of the students across

their profile variables?

5. Is there a significant relationship between NCAE scores in the following:

a. Academic

b. Non-Academic

Research Hypotheses

The following hypotheses will be tested in null form at the 0.05 level of

significance:

1. There is a significant difference in the NCAE scores across students

profile variables.

2. There is a significant relationship between NCAE scores and their

academic and non- academic performance.


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Scope and Delimitation of the Study

The study will focuses in the National Career Assessment Scores of Grade

9 students in Alaminos City during the School Year 2014-2015 and their

academic and non academic performances during the School Year 2015-2016.

This study will be delimited in all Grade 9 students of the 8 public

secondary schools of Alaminos City Division. The 8 secondary schools includes:

Alaminos City National High School, Alos National High School, Cayucay National

High School, Ildefonso Quimson High School, Inerangan National High School,

School,Polo National High School, San Vicente National High School and Telbang

National High School.

Significance of the Study

The result of the study serves as the basis for career choice for senior

secondary students which are congruent to their skills. This will help students

determine which courses they should study in college and what sort of career

they are best suited for. Like many standardized tests, the NCAE measures

students' general scholastic knowledge, vocational aptitude, occupational

preferences and entrepreneurial skills. Likewise this study is use predictive guide

for the choice of the academic strand.

This study will also give valuable information to secondary teachers as to

which among the different key areas need more attention to improve.
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The results validate DepED’s decision to put great stress on tech-voc

program, that is, to equip high school students with technical-vocational skills

that can empower them to find meaningful employment, whether or not they

pursue college education.

The DepEd NETRC (National Education Testing and Research Center) can

be benefited in determining the validity and reliability testing to make sure that it

really measures what it seeks to measure.

Definition of Terms

For the purpose of clarification the following terms are defined

operationally.

National Career Assessment Examination (NCAE) - this refers to a

test aimed to determine the future appropriate course for Grade 9 students.

Academic performance- refers to the accomplishments or production of

the pupils/students in the schoolwork (Webster, 2006). In this study, academic

performance was measured using the average grade of the students - which was

obtained from the students’ permanent record or Form 137. Five classifications

were used as bases for interpretation, namely: Excellent (95 and above), very

good (89-94), Good (83-88), fair (77-82), and needs improvement (71 to 76).

Academic Achievement-this refers to the academic performance of

grade 9 students in their academic subjects


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Non-Academics- pertains to activities academically related and that all

students must participate in and have the benefits towards academic. This

includes involvement of the respondents in investigatory projects, journalism,

oratorical contest, quiz bees, webpage design and poster making contest.

Co-curricular Activities –these are activities performed by students that

fall outside the normal curriculum for schools but are still beneficiary for

academics.

Parental presence- refers to the presence or absence of one or both

parents in a student’s life. In this study, this was classified as: living with both

parents, living with mother alone, living with father alone, and living without

both parents.

General Scholastic Aptitude (GSA) - refers to NCAE subtest which

composes of scientific ability, reading comprehension. verbal ability and

mathematics ability.

Technical Vocational Aptitude (TVA) - refers to NCAE subtest which

composes of clerical ability and visual manipulative skills.

Investigatory project- refers to a co-curricular activity which is one of

the applications on the NCAE subtest scientific ability.

Oratorical Contest- refers to a co-curricular activity which is one of the

applications on the NCAE subtest reading comprehension and verbal ability.


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MTAP Quiz Bee- refers to a co-curricular activity which is one of the

applications on the NCAE subtest mathematical ability

Webpage-Design- refers to a co-curricular activity which is one of the

applications on the NCAE subtest clerical ability.

Poster Making Contest- refers to a co-curricular activity which is one of

the applications on the NCAE subtest visual manipulative skills.


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Chapter 2

REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES

This chapter exhibits the related studies and literature concerning the

study of the National Career Assessment Examination Achievement and

Academic and Non-Academic Performance of Grade 9 Students in Alaminos City

which will greatly help the researcher in the conceptualization of the present

study.

Related Literature

National Career Assessment Examination (NCAE)

Baruck (2007) state that the National Career Assessment with replaced the

defunct National College Entrance Examination focuses on the technical and

vocational capabilities and entrepreneurial skills of a student. This examination

helps the students, the parents, and their teacher evaluate not only student's

scholastic aptitude but also their career option based on their skills in any field of

interest.

Kenni (2007) conducted a research paper entitled "choosing a career".

The study determined the main objective of administering the NCAE at assessing

the possible career tracks of each student. This helped the students decide at the

course they would likely to succeed in. Students have a lot of a career option in

their mind. Parents have also career options for their child. But with the results
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of NCAE, students and parents can better decide on what career path to choose

where their child would likely to meet success.

It is also stated that NCAE can serve as a guide for students in setting

their goals in college. It is also aimed to address the problem of unemployment

due to the "job skills mismatch" in the country. DepEd Secretary for programs

and project Vilma Labrador emphasize the importance of students and graduates

being able to provide the skills demanded by the market so that they can be

employed, regardless of their educational background.

Solmerin (2007) states that in one of his rare press briefings by Lapus said

about the National Career Assessment Examination. Would help students

determine the college course to be taken in account to their ability and the

requirements of the job market. "Job Skill" mismatch is major challenge right no.

A large number of trained graduates are left unemployed or underemployed

because they do not fit the requirement of the job market.

Sun-star Cebu (2007) contains the article that education secretary

JesliLapus announced that the National Career Assessment Examination (NCAE)

is set for test administration to one point eight million (1.8 m) senior high school

studies in 13,000 public and private secondary schools nationwide

The NCAE consist of the following component, scientific ability, and

mathematical ability, reading comprehension, verbal ability, manipulative skill,

clerical ability, non verbal ability, and entrepreneurial skills. Canuel et al (2007),
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emphasizes in his article that the students need to be efficient with his

knowledge and expertise, thus the National Career Assessment Examination

(NCAE) is endorsed by the Department of Education to assist them wisely in

organizing their ideas.

It is believed that this would facilitate them in attaining new method that

would benefit them during the examination. The people behind the formation of

this review material exhibited their proficiency and aptitude in the way that they

presented this instructive and enlightening. This review material war pertinent

for it provides dependable information on different subject areas every senior

student ought to be familiar

Each set of question in this review motivates the students to carry on with

their undertaking of attaining superior education. Solas et al (2007)

elaborates that the accomplishment of every student rests on how will he is able

to draw together all his knowledge be it stored or learned. But still, no matter

how clever or gifted a student is, he needs all support an institution can offer.

Bas &Espinas (2008) believe that NCAE could greatly help them in

becoming what they really wanted in life. Most f them do not have concrete

plans yet on what career they will pursue and in most cases; they enrol in

courses that are presently in demand or get in to the field chosen by parents and

friend. The high school students need guidance to identify their strengths and

talents so they will be places in the field where they may excel and where these
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talents are maximized. Related Studies Previously conducted studies were

reviewed by the researchers as they were deemed relevant to the study to be

undertaken.

Most students fear that the NCAE may become an obstacle to a college

degree. This is not true since there is not law passed providing the exam to this

authority. This study is related to the researchers' topic because it is all about

NCAE and how NCAE helped the students in choosing the right course for them.

However, it is also different in the current study because the later focuses more

on the effect of NCAE in the first year college students.

It is also stated in Soho (2007) that more than half of the high school

students in the country are fit to enroll in technical-vocational courses that enter

college according to the result of the National Career Assessment Examination

conducted by the DepED. More than 50% of the 1.3 million students who took

NCAE on January 17, 2007 got low score in the general scholastic aptitude test

but many of them did well in technical vocational aptitude.

The result of NCAE on the first and second year of its implementation

would be used solely for recommendation purposes in the career guidance. De

Bell Mathew (2005) this issue brief uses national representative data from the

Adult Education for Work-Related Reason Survey of the 2003 National Household

Education Surveys Program (NHES) to examine the reasons that adult participate

in formal educational courses for related reasons.


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Ninety percent of adult who took such courses in 2002-2003 reported

doing so in order to maintain or improve skills or knowledge they already had.

Among employed adults, the majority took courses. The likelihood of taking

classes for the selected reasons examined in this in this brief generally varied by

participant's age, education, employment status, occupation and household

income.

In an article written by Canvel et al (2007).It was emphasized in his article

that the students need to be efficient with his knowledge and expertise. Thus the

National Career Assessment Examination (NCAE) is endorsed by the Department

of Education to assist them wisely in organizing their ideas. It is believed that

that this would facilitate them in attaining new methods that would benefit them

during the examination.

The people behind the formation of this new material exhibited their

instructive and enlightening. This review material is pertinent for it provides

dependable information on different subject areas every senior ought to be

familiar with. Each set of question in this review motivates the students to carry

on with their undertaking of attaining superior education.

Calimpang et al (2005) used design and produce information about the

prevailing situations or what has been happening. The NCAE is endorsed by the

Department of Education (DepEd) to assist them wisely in organizing their ideas.

The people behind the formation of this review material exhibited their
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proficiency and aptitude in a way that they presented this in structure and

enlightening.

Academic Performance

To perform is to take a complex series of actions that integrate skills and

knowledge to produce a valuable result. In some instances, the performer is an

individual. In other performances, the performer is an individual; in other

instances, the performer is a collection of people who are collaborating, such as

an academic department, research team, committee, student team, or a

university.

Performance, as the adage goes, is a “journey not a destination.” The

location in the journey is labelled as the level of performance. Each level

characterizes the effectiveness or quality of a performance.

As an academic department improves its level of performance, the

members of the department are able to produce more effective student learning,

more effective research, and a more effective culture.

As a teacher advances his levels of performance, he is able to produce

deeper levels of learning, improved levels of skill development, and more

connection with the discipline for larger classes while spending less time doing

this.
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While some factors that influence improving performance are immutable,

other factors can be influenced by the performer or by others. The factors that

can be varied fall into three categories:

Performer’s Mindset. Performer’s mindset includes actions that engage

positive emotions. Examples include setting challenging goals, allowing failure as

a natural part of attaining high performance, and providing conditions in which

the performer feels an appropriate degree of safety.

Immersion. Immersion in a physical, social, and intellectual

environment can elevate performance and stimulate personal as well as

professional development. Elements include social interactions, disciplinary

knowledge, active learning, emotions (both positive and negative), and spiritual

alignment.

Reflective Practice. Reflective practice involves actions that help

people pay attention to and learn from experiences. Examples include observing

the present level of performance, noting accomplishments, analyzing strengths

and areas for improvements, analyzing and developing identity, and improving

levels of knowledge.

The U.S. Department of Education has reported that children educated in

large urban school districts in the United States have substantially lower

academic performance and achievement than children educated in other types of

school districts (U.S. Department of Education, 2003) and furthermore that a


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substantial number of Black students are represented in these urban school

districts (Sanbonmatsu, Kling, Duncan, & Brooks-Gunn, 2006).

Influences on children’s educational outcomes can be associated with

geographic location and characteristics of residential neighborhoods among other

factors (Jacob, 2004; Sanbonmatsu et al., 2006). Stanley, Comello, Edwards, and

Marquart (2008) compared the difference between urban and rural school

communities and noted significant differences in income and education of high

school students’ parents.

These findings supported previous research on the academic performance

of students by indicating that outcomes were based on other variables, such as

parental education and socio-economic status, rather than on community/school

characteristics of urban and rural settings (Stanley et al., 2008).

According Kimani, Kara & Njagi (2013) the purpose of education is to

equip the citizenry with values, skills and knowledge to reshape their society and

eliminate inequality. This is because education helps an individual develop

his/her capabilities, attitudes and behavior that is acceptable to the society. The

benefits of having quality education is that it is able to adapt to the changing

needs of the country as the world changes and spearhead the development of

human resource and the country’s economy.

Educational institutions are mandated to use education as a tool for social

transformation. The success of a school is measured by the quality of students it


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produces. The success of any educational institution is measured by the

performance of its students in both academic and non-academic tests.

This is supported by Yusuf (2008) when contending that the performance

should not only be based in terms of test and examination results and student

ability to apply what is learnt and the rate at which students move on to higher

institution of learning, but should include other areas such as whether the

students have acquired the survival skills.

In spite of that, the use of students’ achievement in academic work to

assess the teacher’s effectiveness has gained ground. The measure of academic

performance as a symbol of school success can be traced way back from the

Victorian period (Bell, 2013). Since then, academic performance has been used

to grade schools and most importantly to determine ones career paths.

The ‘good schools’ are acclaimed to be those that are able groom the

students well enough to achieve the set standards. This is measured by use of

students’ academic performance both at school level and nationally

The level of students’ performance has an impact on the roles played by

education stakeholders. Students’ achievement is influenced by a number of

factors.

Teachers for years have been regarded as the essential catalysts for

school improvement and school improvement. They are the driving force and
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main resource in the development and academic growth of students as they are

sources of knowledge and agents of change (Wallace, 2011).

Teacher effectiveness has been the interest of policy makers, educators

and parents. The effectiveness is measured by students’ academic performance

in both internal and external examination. It is a general feeling that students

who fail the examinations are taught by ineffective teachers; on the other hand

those who excel are taught by the very effective teachers.

In addition to cultivating knowledge, skills and attitudes teachers are

expected to help the students to identify and develop their potential. In the early

stages of education teachers are charged with the responsibility to develop

students’ primary skills necessary for advancement. Teachers play a pivotal role

in helping the students to direct their potential to achieve their destiny. Learners

need to be prepared for these challenges that lie ahead of them.

This is anchored in the idea that our world needs a generation of

teachers who aim to “develop learners instead of teaching them, who help their

learners to become independent (learning to learn), who provide students with

motivation and interest for life-long learning and urge them to become

autonomous learners”(Bubblews, 2013).In addition to cultivating knowledge,

skills and attitudes teachers are expected to help the students to identify and

develop their potential. In the early stages of education teachers are charged
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with the responsibility to develop students’ primary skills necessary for

advancement.

Teachers play a pivotal role in helping the students to direct their

potential to achieve their destiny. Learners need to be prepared for these

challenges that lie ahead of them. This is anchored in the idea that our world

needs a generation of teachers who aim to “develop learners instead of teaching

them, who help their pupils to become independent (learning to learn), who

provide students with motivation and interest for life-long learning and urge

them to become autonomous learners” (Bubblews, 2013).

Literature reviewed revealed that parental involvement in the activities of

the school has a positive impact on students’ academic performance and the

success of the school (Halsey, 2004; Christie, 2005). Parental involvement boosts

the morale teachers because of the partnership that will have been established

between the school and the community.

The most crucial practice would be school leadership creating a climate

that will attract parents to participate in their children’s learning. Parents should

not only be consulted when there is a fund raising activity, but also for activities

which might not be taken as important. Parents are capable of helping students

do homework, tutoring, supervision of afternoon study periods, coaching sports

and motivational talks. As long as they know that their contribution is recognized
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and is vital for the achievement of their children, parents will be more than

willing to value their children’s education.

Parents raised children with the hope of making them better citizens. One

of the parents’ aspirations is to see the children having succeeded in their

schooling. In developing countries where unemployment is rife parents care

about their children academic performance because the status quo is, good

results means better opportunities for more career choices and white collar jobs.

The core business of schools is teaching and learning in order give

students’ quality education. As an affirmation on the above, it is stated that;

“one of the indicators of quality education being provided is cognitive

achievement of learners” (Kimani et al., 2013). It has been said previously that

school leaders, teachers and parents have a critical role in providing quality

education for students. But it can be argued that for quality education to prevail

all education stakeholders should take part in the translation, interpretation and

implementation of policies regarding achievement of high standards of

education, including students.

Much is said about how to help students achieve their academic

performance and little is mentioned about how the students themselves have

impact on their own achievements. It should be noted that whatever effort that

teachers exert to enhance students learning, the honors lay with the students. ;

Hence the proverb ‘you can lead a horse to the river but you cannot force it to
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drink.’ However, there is evidence from research which shows that students can

play a critical role in improving academic performance (Nicholas & Sutton, 2013;

Tella, 2007).

There are several ways in which students can have an impact on their

academic performance. Among others is students study habits. Study habits can

be positive and negative. The negative aspect of students study habits will be

dealt with later in the article. The positive study habit is when students attend to

their school work, read book to search relevant information, schedule time for

doing homework, attend tutorials and ask teachers questions where they do not

understand the concepts taught.

After tests have been marked students who work on teachers’ feedback

have high changes of improving their performance. Another is when the students

work in groups when they are given an assignment or topics for discussion. The

intelligent students will help the low achievers to upgrade their grades and

enhance their confidence. In a mixed ability class it has been proven that if

students are not streamed according to the students capability have a higher

overall attainment and equitable outcomes (Boaler, 2008).

The students involved in mixed-ability approach tend to have respect for

each other. Students who value education as a means of obtaining survival skills

normally take learning serious. They do extra work with the assistance of their

teachers. This ultimately proves their academic performance. Negative study


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habit is when students have a negative attitude towards schooling, students’

reluctance to learn and not preparing work before classes begin.

There are several factors which can contribute to students’ poor academic

performance. One of such is language barrier, which greatly affects students’

academic performance in schools. Many students enter the classroom not fluent

in the languages of instruction. These languages are used for testing students’

mastery of subject content and used in the examinations. The student might

understand the concepts in their mother but fails to express it in the language of

examinations.

At the end the student is rated a low achiever because of the language

problem. According to Pinnock in Elsworth (2013) children take years to master

their native language. Botswana is multi-national society with over twenty-five

spoken languages. Before they have fully mastered their vernacular languages

they are introduced to two languages which are Setswana and English.

Setswana is regarded as a national language and English taken as an

official language. Students are expected to learn Setswana until they finish

secondary school while, English is a medium of instruction from primary up to

university level. These languages are used for testing students’ mastery of

subject content and used in the examinations.

The student might understand the concepts in their mother but fails to

express it in the language of examinations. At the end the student is rated a low
28

achiever because of the language problem. Another factor is parenting styles.

Parental involvement in the child’s school improves his/her performance. But

some of the ways in which parents groom their children can have a negative

impact on students’ academic performance.

In real life there are parents who are authoritative in terms of school

work is concerned. Parenting styles have been shown by researchers that they

can have a negative impact on their children’s performance. Permissive and

uninvolved styles cannot assist in making children value their education.

The permissive style is when the strictness over the children has been

lifted. The children have the freedom of choice in their study. Children living

under this style often neglect their studies in favour of immediate and

entertaining achievements (Verial, 2013). All in fairness, it should be

remembered that if you spare the rod you spoil the child.

The uninvolved style has been revealed as the worst parenting style which

contributes to low students’ performance. Similarly the parents give their children

control over their school work. They do not help children in their homework or

even giving them emotional support when children have personal problems. This

results in students’ demotivation and lack of interest in schooling.

Poor study habits could be another contributing factor in poor students

performance. Students’ lack of study skills and commitment to achievement has

a negative impact on academic performance. Negative attitudes towards


29

schooling, students’ reluctance to learn and preparation of work before classes

begin make students not ready for tests and examinations. Other related factors

such students’ intelligence, socio-economic status and lack of resources are

determinant of students’ academic achievements.

The deficiency in the above means low students academic performance.

Gottman cited in Verial (2013) believes in the authoritative style as it does less

harm to the child’s self-esteem and ability to think autonomously as opposed to

uninvolved style where parents give their children control over their school work.

They do not help children in their homework or even giving them emotional

support when children have personal problems.

This results in students’ demotivation and lack of interest in schooling.

Home background and socio-economic status of the students have also been

attributed to students’ academic performance. Yinusa & Basil (2008) suggest that

the students’ home background influence academic and educational success,

while socio-economic status reinforces the activities and functioning of the

teachers and students.

Lack of academic motivation has also been attributed to students’ low

achievement. Ramsdal, Gioerum & Wynn (2013) attest that lack of academic

motivation seems to be a prominent problem for numerous high school students.

Further researches have indicated that an individual student’s intelligence has


30

the most significant impact on their ability to perform well academically (O’cala,

2010; Radzka, 2010; Boaler, 2008).

Without mental capacity to understand and retain the imparted knowledge

and skills they will not enjoy the teaching and learning. It has also been

observed that intelligent students normally help the low achievers to upgrade

their grades and enhance their confidence (Boaler, 2008).

Other related factors include resources, behavioural problems, friend’s

factors, drugs or alcohol abuse, diet and physical activities (O’cala, 2010;

Radzka, 2010; Boaler, 2008). The above factors are determinant of the students’

academic achievement. The ministry of education as the accounting agent for

the policy makers was chastised by the opposition parties and parents to explain

for yearly drop in students’ academic performance.

This trickled down to schools to provide answers, unfortunately

information given to the public was not convincing. The rift between the ministry

and the teachers unions widen as each party pointed at each for the poor

results. The ministry blamed teachers for their efficiency and incompetence;

while the teachers unions blamed the ministry for teachers’ low morale due to

unbalanced teacher-student ration, lack of consultations, hasty introduction of

new junior certificate syllabi, inadequate resources and unfavourable level of

operation for teachers (Hlabano, 2013).


31

There were calls for the minister of education to resign for her poor

performance as the top accounting officer in the ministry. Having observed

serious deteriorating students’ achievement made the researcher to be interested

in finding out the cause of these poor quality students.

Academic achievement included the results of the consecutive three years

and five specialists eight week rotations conducted in either the rural clinical

division for rural students or in Brisbane for urban students, all following the

same curriculum and taking the same examinations. From the results no

statistically significant differences were found between academic performance of

rural and urban students.

Related Studies

Navarrete et al. (2007) carried out a study on culture and achievement

motivation in Latino and Anglo American high school students of USA on a

sample of 149 students from the high school districts in California. Data were

collected by administering culture value orientation and attribution-emotion scale

to the sample and grade point average was taken as academic achievement

measures of the students.

Socio-economic status and education of the parents had been found to

influence academic achievement of the students of both the cultures. Nuthana

(2007) carried out a gender analysis of academic achievement of school students

of Karnataka. The sample comprised of 600 students including 325 boys and 275
32

girls. Academic achievement was taken as the average grades of two previous

years.

The results of study showed that there was no significant difference in

academic achievement of boys and girls. But the results indicated a significant

difference in academic achievement of urban and rural students with urban

students had higher academic achievement than rural counterparts.

Tella (2007) investigated the impact of motivation on academic

achievement in mathematics. The participants of the study were 450 secondary

school students of both sexes drawn from ten schools of Ibadan. Data were

collected by employing achievement test in mathematics as a measure of

academic achievement. The results revealed significant differences in the

academic achievement of male and female students in mathematics. Male

students were found to have better achievement in mathematics.

Leeson et al. (2008) examined cognitive ability, personality and academic

performance on a sample of 639 high school students of New South Wales,

Australia. The results showed significant gender difference in academic

achievement. The findings also indicated that girls performed better than boys.

The results revealed that gender play unique role in predicting academic

achievement. Naderi et al. (2008) carried out a study to infer whether

intelligence and gender as predictors of academic achievement on a sample of


33

153 undergraduate students of Malaysian University. Cumulative grade point

average scores were taken as measures of academic achievement.

The results indicated that there was no significant difference between the

academic achievement of male and female students. Chaturvedi (2009)

investigated the effect of school environment and certain demographic variables

on achievement motivation and academic achievement of young adolescents.

The respondents of the study were 300 students in the age range of 12-15 years

of Bhopal.

Percentages of marks obtained by the students in last three years were

used as measures of academic achievement. The results indicated significant

gender difference in academic achievement, the girls scored higher than boys

significantly.

Elizabeth (2009) analyzed the family structure and the academic

achievement of 549 African American students attending rural and urban high

schools in North Carolina. The results demonstrated that the female students

attending both the rural and urban high schools had significant higher academic

achievement levels than the male students.

Results also indicated that rural students performed better than urban

students. Naderi et al. (2009) investigated the relationship among intelligence,

creativity, self-esteem and academic achievement of a sample of 153 Iranian


34

undergraduate students in Malaysian universities. Cumulative grade point

average scores were taken as measures of academic achievement.

The findings showed no significant gender difference in academic

achievement of the students. Umunadi (2009) explored the relationship between

the male and female students‟ academic achievement in the subject of television

on a sample 731 students from urban and rural technical colleges in Delta State

of Nigeria.

The results of board examinations revealed that males performed better

than their female counterparts. It was also revealed that urban students

performed better than their rural counterparts. Garikai (2010) empirically

predicted the causes of poor academic performance of the school students on a

sample of 200 high school students of Zimbabwe.

Data were gathered through interview conducted with the students. The

findings indicated that there was a difference in academic performance of male

and female students with male students performing better and education of

parents had significant effect on academic achievement of the students.

Muola (2010) investigated the relationship between academic

achievement motivation and home environment among standard eight pupils.

The sample comprised of 235 standard eight Kenyan pupils from six urban and

rural primary schools from Machakos district. The results indicated a low but

positive relationship (0.15) of parental education with academic achievement of


35

the students that revealed a positive relationship between parental education

and academic achievement of their children.

Sarsani and Ravi (2010) investigated achievement in mathematics of

secondary school students in relation to selected variables. The sample of the

study consisted of 480 boys and girls, drawn from the various private and

government high school of Warangal city in Andhra Pradesh. Data was collected

by administering scholastic achievement test of mathematics to the sample. The

findings indicated significant difference between the mathematics scholastic

achievement of the boys and girls.

The result also showed that girls were higher achievers than boys. Singh

and Praveen (2010) studied the relationship of social maturity with academic

achievement of high school students. The study was conducted on a sample of

400 high school students consisting 200 boys and 200 girls studying in tenth

class of New Delhi.

The aggregate scores of the selected students in the board examinations

were taken as the measures of academic achievement. The results indicated that

there were no significant differences between the academic achievement of boys

and girls. The findings also revealed no significant difference in academic

achievement of rural and urban students.

Asthana (2011) conducted a study on a sample of 300 students

consisting 150 male and 150 female students of secondary education from
36

Varanasi, with a view to assess to gender difference in scholastic achievement.

Scholastic achievement was measured on the basis of an average of marks

obtained in three previous annual examinations.

The findings revealed that there was a significant difference in academic

achievement of male and female students. Girls were found to be better

performers than boys. Bahago (2011) investigated the influence of achievement

motivation and demographic characteristics on academic performance of

nomadic Fulani girls in Adamawa state.

The data were collected from a sample of 300 girls selected from nomadic

primary schools by administering achievement motivation rating scale and

nomadic girls‟ achievement test. The results indicated that academic

achievement of the girls was influenced by parental education levels. The

findings revealed the relevance of parental education in academic achievement

of the girls.

Sharma and Tahira (2011) investigated the influence of parental

education, parental occupation and family size on science achievement of the

secondary school students in western Uttar Pradesh in India. 1500 students were

selected as a sample for the study and data was collected through a

questionnaire that assessed personal information and science achievement test

developed by the researchers themselves. The results indicated that family


37

variables including parental education had significant relationship with the

achievement of their children.

For academic performance, Galiher (2006) and Darling (2005), used GPA

to measure student performance because the main focus in the student

performance for the particular semester. Some other researchers used test

results or previous year result since they are studying performance for the

specific subject or year (Hijazi and Naqvi, 2006). Socerdoke (2001) found out

that grades are higher when students have unusually academically strong study

partner.

Many researchers have discussed the different factors that affect the

student academic performance in their research. There are two types of factors

that affect the students ‘academic performance. These are internal and external

classroom factors and these factors strongly affect the students ‘performance.

Internal classroom factors includes students competence in English, class

schedules, class size, English text books, class test results, learning facilities,

homework, environment of the class, complexity of the course material, teachers

role in the class, technology used in the class and exams systems.

External classroom factors include extracurricular activities, family

problems, work and financial, social and other problems. Research studies shows

that students’ performance depends on many factors such as learning facilities,

gender and age differences, etc. that can affect student performance (Hansen,
38

Joe B., 2000). Harb and El-Shaarawi (2006) found that the most important factor

with positive effect on students' performance is Parental Involvement.

In recent times, students have found a need to seek employment while

studying on a part-time basis due to financial constraints. The numbers of part-

time and mature students has also risen sharply. The use of information

technology also means that information that used to be obtained from sitting

through lectures can be obtained at the click of a mouse. Indeed, web-based

learning approaches have become the order of the day. (Newman-Ford, Lloyd &

Thomas, 2009). Environment (home, classroom, peers and television) (Roberts,

2007). The home environment also affects the academic performance of

students. Educated parents can provide such an environment that suits best for

academic success of their children.

Research findings have also shown that a continued effort of parental

involvement throughout the child‘s education can improve academic

achievement (Driessen, Smit & Sleegers, (2005 2001; Hong & Ho, 2005).

Academic failure has been linked with risk behaviors and negative

outcomes such as; substance abuse, delinquency, and emotional and behavioral

problems (Annunziata, Houge, Faw, & Liddle, 2006). Weiss et al. (2006) also

provide an integrative model of family involvement that is evidence-based or

clearly linked to positive child outcomes. Their model encompasses three

important categories: Parenting, Home-School Relationships, and Responsibility


39

for Learning Outcomes Parenting includes the attitudes, values, and practices

that parents use in raising young children. This category would include nurturing

parent-child relationships and child-centered practices. Home-School

Relationships pertain to both formal and informal connections.

Sunitha (2005) studied academic learning environment of students from

aided and unaided co-educational high schools. The sample of 240 students was

selected from the schools of Dharwad city in India. Data were collected from

administering home learning environment scale developed by the researcher and

academic achievement was taken as average percentage marks of the previous

year and two semesters of the current year of the students.

The results revealed no significant different in academic achievement of

boys and girls. Parental education was also found to have significant and positive

relationship with academic performance of the students.

Bruni et al. (2006) explored the relationships among academic

performance, demographic and psychological factors. On the sample of 380

school students of Italy, school achievement index was used as an instrument to

measure their academic achievement. The findings of the study indicated

significant difference in academic achievement of male and female students.

Female students were found to have higher academic achievement than males.

Halawah (2006) examined the effect of motivation, family environment,

and student characteristics on academic achievement. On the sample comprised


40

of 388 high school students including 193 male and 195 female students of Abu

Dhabi district in United Arab Emirates. Grade point average was taken as

measure of academic achievement of the students.

The results revealed no significant gender difference in academic

achievement of the students. Preiss and Franova (2006) analysed the

relationship between depressive symptoms, academic achievement and

intelligence. The data were collected from the sample of 635 school children

consisting 304 boys and 331 girls by using Wechsler‟s intelligence scale for

children and grade point average.

The findings indicated that there was no gender difference in academic

achievement of boys and girls. Waters et al. (2006) determined whether the

academic performance of 575 medical students learning in rural settings differs

from those learning in urban settings of Australia.

Co-Curricular Performance

The meaning of co-curricular activities revolves around its different feature

and characteristics. For the overall development of a child, curriculum is not only

the single criteria. The holistic growth as well as to develop the various facets

of personality development of children; classroom teaching should be

supplemented with co-curricular activities.

These out of class activities affect all domains of life such as cognitive

(intellectual), emotional, social, moral, cultural and aesthetic. Co-curricular


41

activities meaning are more focused upon cognitive aspects thereby help in

intellectual development. Competitiveness, excellence, quality achievements,

creativeness and enthusiasm are few of the ethics of extra-curricular activities

and also strengthen the meaning of co curricular activities in school.

Non-academic activity in the form of co-curricular one provides support to

students to venture into professional fields like fashion, music, painting, art,

acting, photography, printing and many more. That’s why students need co-

curricular activities, which helps in enhancing many skill

developments. Importance of co curricular activities have increased manifold in

modern life. However, co-curricular meaning varies to little bit as per place, time

and space.

Importance of co curricular activity in school curriculum has been widely

acknowledged by many countries in their respective Curriculum Frameworks. The

same case is also noticed with National Curriculum Framework (NCF) of India.

The extracurricular activities definitions by leading modern educational

thinkers and others are:

1. “Activities sponsored or recognized by a school or college which are not

part of the academic curriculum but are acknowledged to be an essential

part of the life of an educational institution. Co curricular activities include

sports, school bands, student newspaper etc. They may also be classed as

‘Extracurricular’ i.e. activities carried on outside the regular course of


42

study; activities outside the usual duties of a job, as extra class activities”-

according to The International Dictionary of Education (1977).

2. “Co curricular activities were mainly organized after school hours and so

were the extracurricular but they are not an integral part of the activities

of the school as its curricular work”- according to Aggarwal (2000).

3. “Co-curricular activities may be defined as the activities undertaken to

strengthen the classroom learning as well as other activities both inside

and outside the classroom to develop the personality of the child”-

according to Bhatia (1996).

4. “Various social and other types of activities like literary, dramatic, social

services etc. which attracted the attention of the child were considered as

extracurricular activities. Extracurricular activities have been renamed by

educationists as co curricular, which implies that all these activities are a

part of school curriculum”.- according to Mittal 1999)

Co-curricular activities are not new to the modern curricular education

syllabi. It can be traced into Indian ancient schools, gurukuls, and religious

places. All the Indian scriptures like Mahabharata, Ramayana, Ved, Upnishad,

etc., mentioned about extra-curricular activities. In the ancient times, simple co-

curricular activities in school were organized such as wrestling, cooking, singing,

playing, magic, etc. In rest parts of the world, co-curricular programmes were

common in various ancient civilizations.


43

In Spartan Civilization (Greece) warfare, heroic activities, archery,

creativity and artistic talents were widespread. In Roman Civilization, concrete

arts & crafts, and religious ceremonies were given importance. In the dark

history of Europe, extra-curricular activities were also the part and parcel of life.

During reformation period, such activities got patronage.

Great educational thinkers such as Rousseau, Herbert Spencer, Dewey, all

gave much more importance of co-curricular activity in school education.

According to them, Co-curricular activities play vital role in student life.

There are many characteristics of co-curricular activities, which directly or

indirectly help the classroom teaching of students. Co-curricular activities

supplement and complement the entire teaching-learning process and effectively

impact student earning outcomes.

It strengthens the classroom teaching and helps to clear the concept of

topics. Extra-curricular activities give emphasize upon aesthetic as well as

spiritual development, which are the essential components of education. It helps

in developing features like speech fluency and extempore. Such activities are

good platform to excel in acting, singing, speaking, and recitation. Thus, CCA

becomes the integral part of school’s curriculum and student’s life.

Co-curricular activities not only make the students active and energetic

but also enable to harness the in-depth potential of students. It enhances

knowledge in many domains, which benefits the student as well as the school.
44

Co-curricular activities are good platforms to secure your future both

professionally and socially and promote leadership quality. It nurtures student’s

ability in co-operation, co-ordination, organization and lead you toward

leadership.

Extra-curricular activities provide exposure to personality and helps in

psychological and sociological transformation. Schools channelize the energy of

students with the help of extra-curricular activities so that proper realization of

student’s energy and potential can be ensued. The importance of co-curricular

activities is extremely important in case of ADHD and problematic children who

are full of energy.

Education along with co-curricular activities helps in the overall

development of personality. Co-curricular Activities furnish many values among

students. It is depend upon students and teachers how they imbibing these

values for the better education and health of students. Students participate in

physical activities, which contribute towards physical health, vitality, and

endurance of the students. Psychological needs are meet by co-curricular

activities.

Psychological needs such as emotions, self-assertion, sex, and curiosity

are trained and groomed by these activities. A large part of theoretical works in

discipline like geography, and science can get value added from excursions, tour

and nature study.


45

Extra-curricular activities help to inculcate civic and democratic values by

participating in self-government and organizing different festivals and

ceremonies. Co-curricular activity is also an effective platform to make absorb

values like social, aesthetic, cultural, recreational and disciplinary among

students.

Top 10 advantages of co-curricular Activity According to

http://www.gyanunlimited.com

1. Co-curricular activities (CCA) make a horizon for systematic and

meaningful learning opportunities and prepare students for future.

2. CCA makes you active and energetic thereby help in learning and enable

to develop multiple skills to students.

3. Co-curricular activities help in holistic development of the personality.

4. Co-curricular activity along with formal education helps to channelize the

hidden potential of the students and make you a good citizen.

5. Domains like social, academic, intellectual, cultural, democratic, civic and

aesthetic get enriched after participation in co-curricular activities.

6. Students, who are good in sports, also have good academic record.

7. Co-curricular activities help in realizing the importance of education and

develop the spirit of healthy competition.


46

8. Co-curricular activities support students practically and professionally for a

better future.

9. CCA enhances students experience, understanding and brings benefits

beyond students and parents expectation.

10. It is a good source of remaining fit and healthy, and provides you a

mental rest.

Abbot, (2014) defines co-curricular activities, programs, and learning

experiences that complement, in some way, what students are learning in school

like experiences that are connected to or mirror the academic curriculum.

Co-curricular activities are typically, but not always, defined by their

separation from academic courses. For example, they are ungraded, they do not

allow students to earn academic credit, they may take place outside of school or

after regular school hours, and they may be operated by outside organizations.

That said, these traditional distinctions between academic and co-curricular

programs are being eroded in some schools.

It is also mentioned that co-curricular activities were to be an integral part

of the school life. The activities sponsored or recognized by a school were not a

part of the academic curriculum but were acknowledged to be an essential part

of life of an educational institution which 31 include sports, school bands,

students’ newspapers, etc.


47

The significant of co-curricular is that co curricular activities were good for

the teacher-student relations and in the presence of these activities students

performed better in studies. Teachers get more time to understand their

students. They get to know different sides of their students other than studies.

Teachers get advantages from them as they could help others with their ideas

and presence (Cowley, 2005, Ahmad, 2006)

Shukla (2003) added that the school ground must be well-situated with

reference to location and environment. Co-curricular activities would be

enhanced with the presence of a playground. The school must be housed in a

grand building with a playground. It must be pleasing in its aesthetic

environments and designed to accommodate the most progressive features of an

educational programme: races, PT shows, parades etc.

Related Studies

Numerous studies have been conducted concerning the relationship between co-

curricular activities and academic performance. Total co-curricular activity

participation , or participation in co-curricular activities in general, is associated

with an improved grade point average, higher educational aspirations, increased

college attendance, and reduced absenteeism” (Broh, 2005).

Guest and Schneider (2003), in looking at the previous research on this

subject said, “Researchers have found positive associations between co-curricular

participation and academic achievement”.


48

Although researchers agree that co-curricular activities do, in fact,

influence academic performance, the specific effect that various activities

produce is debated. One study, conducted by the National Educational

Longitudinal Study, found that “participation in some activities improves

achievement, while participation in others diminishes achievement” (Broh, 2005).

Many co-curricular activities have proven to be beneficial in building and

strengthening academic achievement, even if the activities are not obviously

related to academic subjects (Marsh & Kleitman, 2005).

“A number of studies revealed that students participating in co-curricular

activities did better academically than students who did not participate” (Marsh &

Kleitman, 2005).

Researchers have particularly studied the relationship between co-

curricular activities and academic performance in student. One study found that

“adolescents who participated in extracurricular activities reported higher grades,

more positive attitudes toward school, and higher academic aspirations” (Darling,

Caldwell, & Smith, 2005).

Darling, Caldwell, and Smith (2005) conducted a longitudinal study

concerning co-/extracurricular activities and their effect on various aspects of

development, including academic performance. A survey containing a list of

twenty different co-curricular activities was distributed to students; they were

asked to check which co-curricular activities they participated in that year.


49

Demographic questions, such as their favorite activity, gender, and

ethnicity were asked in order to take the social factors and influences into

account when calculating the results. The students were also asked what their

academic goals were and their grade point average.

The results showed that the students who participated in school-based co-

curricular activities had higher grades, higher academic aspirations, and better

academic attitudes than those who were not involved in co-curricular activities at

all.

The researcher uses similar study to the above mentioned related studies

and literature. However, the researcher uses NCAE scores and academic and

non-academic of the Grade 9 students in 8 public secondary High Schools of

Alaminos City. The profile of the respondents is test whether it has a significantly

difference with the above mention variables: NCAE, academic and non-academic

performance.

Conceptual Framework

The conceptual framework of the study will be presented in the schematic

paradigm in the succeeding page.

The dependent variables of the study include the profile of the Grade 9

students which includes the following: sex, age, and monthly family income,

occupation of parents, types of residency, parental presence, and availability of

IT materials and first preference on academic strand. It is hypothesized that


50

NCAE scores has significant difference across profile variables and NCAE scores

has significant relationship in Academic and Non-Academic performance.


51

Study Paradigm

Student’s Profile

1. Sex,

2. Age,

3. Monthly family
NCAE scores Performance in
income,
academic and non-
4. Occupation of (As per official
academic
parents, classifications)

5. Type of

residency,

6. Parental

presence,

7. Availability of IT

materials at home

8. First preference

academic strand.

Figure 1. Conceptual Paradigm of the Study


52

Chapter 3

RESEARCH DESIGN

This chapter will present the method of research used in carrying out the

study on the National Career Assessment Examination Scores and Academic and

Academic Performances of Grade 9 Students in Alaminos City

This chapter contains the research design, subjects of the study, and the

instruments in gathering data and the procedures and statistical treatment that

will be used in the analysis of the findings.

Research Design

The researcher will employ the Descriptive Method and the Correlation

type of is study to get accurate results for this study. The researchers will make

use of surveys to find out the most prevalent results of the study.

The study is classified as correlation study because it intends to identify

the relationship between two variables namely the NCAE Achievement and

Academic and Non-Academic Performances of the Grade 9 students of Alaminos

City for School Year 2014-2015 and 2015-2016.

Respondents of the Study

This research study will be conducted in the 8 Public Secondary Schools of

the Divison of Alaminos City. The sample will be drawn from 8 Public Secondary

Schools. The Slovin’s Formula will be used to compute for the sample and
53

stratified random sampling will be employed in selecting the student-respondents

who became the subject of the study.

Slovin’s Formula

N
n
1  Ne 2 where: n = sample size

N=population size

e = marginal error 1 = constant

Computation for sample per class:

% = n
N

Table 1
Distribution of Respondent

Schools Grade 9 Total Computed No. of


Population Respondents
Alaminos City National High School 755 161

Alos National High School 163 35

Cayucay National High School 56 12

Ildefonso Quimson High School 49 11

Inerangan National High School 77 16

Polo National High School 78 17

San Vicente National High School 136 29

Telbang National High School 154 33

Total 1468 314


54

Instrumentation and Data Collection

The main instrument for data gathering that will be used in this study is

in the form of survey questionnaire. The questionnaire to be used will be

approved by the researcher’s adviser. The questionnaire will determine the

student’s profile which includes the: age, family income, occupation of parents,

type of residency, parental presence, availability of IT materials at home.

To determine the exact respondents of this study the stratified random

sampling technique using fishbowl method will be adopted so that each

individual would have an equal and independent chance of being selected.

Each student’s name will be written on a piece of paper and placed inside

a container. The container will be then thoroughly shaken and the slips of paper

will be picked out until the desired number of respondents will be reached.

Data Gathering Procedure

As an initial move, the researcher will seek permission of the Schools

Division Superintendent of Alaminos City and the Principal of the 8 Public

Secondary Schools to conduct the study at the school and allow the researcher

to seek the cooperation of the teachers and section advisers of the grade 10

students for School Year 2015-2016.

The researcher also asked the permission of the Principal to allow the

students to provide their demographic profile through the completion of a Survey

Questionnaire and for the researcher to secure the NCAE results of the student-

respondents in order to obtain NCAE achievement for SY 2014-2015.


55

The researcher will personally administer the research instrument. Both

sets of respondents will be properly oriented before they will be set to the tasks.

Each item will be explained for further understanding. Then all data will be

gathered, classified and tabulated.

Statistical Treatment of Data

In analyzing the profile data, percentage and mean, will be used.

For the demographic profile of the respondents the frequency- percentage

distribution will be used to analyze the data to be collected.

To interpret the percentile score of the students in NCAE subtest includes

the GSA and Academic Stand the following will be used : PR 99+ Excellent(E), PR

98-99 Very High(VH), PR 86-97 Above Average(AV), PR 51-85 Average(A), PR

15-50 Low Average(LA), PR 3-14 Below Average(BA), PR1-2 Poor(P) and PR 0-

.99 Very Poor (VP).

For the TVA subtest the level of 76%- 100% High Preference (HP),51%-

75% Moderate Preference(MP), 26%- 50% Low Preference(LP) and 0%-25%

Very Low Preference(VP).

As for the academic performance which will be based on the student-

respondents’ grade point average (GPA) for SY 2015-2016, the following rating

scale will be used:


56

Academic Performance Scale

Level Percentile Rating Adjectival Rating

5 95 and higher Excellent

4 89 - 94 Very Good

3 83 – 88 Good

2 77– 82 Fair

1 71 - 76 Needs Improvement

Non- Academic Performance Scale

For the non-academic performance the following level will be used: 5-Very

High, where the students participated in all the co-curricular activities; 4-

Moderately High where students participated in almost co-curricular activities; 3-

Slightly High where the students participated in at least three co-curricular

activities; 2-High where the students participated in at least two curricular

activities; 1- Low where students participated at least one co-curricular activity

To test the significant difference in the NCAE scores across the profile

variables, t-test for independent samples and ANNOVA were approach will be

use.
57

Chapter 4

PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS OF DATA AND INTERPRETATION OF


FINDINGS

This chapter presents the necessary gathered data, analyzed, and

interpreted in response to the queries in this study. The gathered data were

organized, tabulated, statistically treated, and analyzed.

PROFILE OF GRADE 9 STUDENTS IN ALAMINOS CITY DIVISION

The profile of Grade 9 students in Alaminos City Division along with their

sex, age, monthly family income, and occupation of parents, types of residency,

parental presence and availability of IT materials at home is presented in table 1.

Table 1
Respondents’ Profile

Variable Frequency Percentage


Sex Male 102 32.48
Female 212 67.52
Age 15 92 29.30
16 178 56.69
17 44 14.01
Monthly Family Income 10,000 or less 235 74.84
10,001 - 20,000 60 19.11
Above 20,000 19 6.05
Parents' Employment Status Not employed 103 32.80
Self-employed 110 35.03
Employed 52 16.56
OFW 49 15.61
Types of Residence City Proper 28 8.92
Barangay 286 91.08
IT Materials available at Home TV and Radio 204 64.97
TV, Radio and Computer 54 17.20
TV, Radio and Computer 56 17.83
with Internet
58

As shown in table 1, it can be noted that the profile of Grade 9 students in

terms of sex, majority (67.52%) of the respondents are female and (32.48%)

are male.

In terms of age, it can be noted from table 1, that (29.30%) are 15 years

old, (56.69%) are 16 years old and (14.01 %) are 17 years old.

It was also presented in table 1 the monthly income of the respondent’s

parents, majority of the parent’s income is Php.10, 000 and less with a

percentage of (74.84 %), (19.11%) for monthly income of 10,001 - 20,000 and

(6.05 %) for monthly income of above 20,000.

In was also noted in table 1, the employment status of the parents of the

respondents’ it was presented that (32.80%) are not employed, (35.03%) are

self employed, (16.56%) are employed and (15.61 %) are OFW.

Types of residency presented in table 1, majority of the respondents lives

in Barangay (91.08 %) and 8.92 % lives in City Proper.

It was noted in table 1, that the available IT materials in the respondent’s

home are the following: TV and Radio (64.97 %), TV Radio Computer (17.20 %),

TV, Radio and Computer with Internet (17.83 %).


59

Table 2

Scores of the Students in the NCAE General Scholastic Aptitude

Scientific Reading Verbal Mathematical


Score Ability Comprehension Ability Ability
f % f % f % f %
Poor (1 - 2) 0 0.00 1 0.32 4 1.27 62 19.75
Below Average 14 4.46 29 9.24 33 10.51 133 42.36
(3-14)
Low Average 127 40.45 153 48.73 105 33.44 70 22.29
(15 - 50)
Average (51 - 85) 116 36.94 77 24.52 131 41.72 25 7.96
Above Average 24 7.64 42 13.38 35 11.15 17 5.41
(86 - 97)
Very High (98 - 99) 26 8.28 10 3.18 6 1.91 7 2.23
Excellent 7 2.23 2 0.64 0 0.00 0 0.00
(99+ - 100)
Mean 55.27 48.65 53.53 44.09
Std. Deviation 26.95 28.26 27.68 29.98
Skewness 0.06 0.36 -0.27 0.46

Table 2, shows that scores student in the NCAE subtest General Scholastic

Aptitudes which includes scientific ability, reading comprehension, verbal ability

and mathematical ability. The following descriptive equivalent were use the of

Poor 1-2.Low Average 15-50,Average 51-85,Above average 86-97,Very High 98-

99 and Excellent 99+-100. However the students were able to obtain the

following: 0.00% for scientific ability, 0.32% for reading comprehension, 1.27%

for verbal ability and 19.75% in mathematical ability, descriptive equivalent is

“Poor”. For “Below Average” with the scores of 3-14 the following results were

obtained.
60

grade of 95 and higher. However, 14 or 8.64% of the student-respondents were

able to attain an average grade ranging from 89 – 94 interpreted as “Poor" in

terms of academic performance; 67 or 41.36% obtained average grades ranging

from 83 – 88 corresponding to “Good” rating; while 75 or 46.3% of the student-

respondents obtained grade averages of 77 – 82 or “Fair” ratings for their

academic performance for SY 2011-2012.

The lowest average grade obtained by the student-respondents was 75 while the

highest average grade was 92. With a mean rating of 82.76, it can be deduced

that the academic performance of the 3rd year students of General Emilio

Aguinaldo National High School for SY 2011-2012 was generally “Good”.

Researches focusing on academic achievement revealed that various

variables had been identified as correlates of academic achievement (Habibollah,

2004; Hulya, 2004, Abar, Carter, & Winsler, 2008; Curcio, Ferrara, & De

Gennaro, 2006; Schlee, Mullis, & Shriner, 2008); these are behavior, age,

gender, socio-economic status, and parenting styles, the independent and

intervening variables included in this study. As such, these variables may have

influenced the student-respondents academic achievements.


61

Table 3
Performance of the Students in the Technical Vocational Aptitude

Reading
Scientific Comprehensio Verbal Mathematical
Score
Ability n Ability Ability
f % f % f % f %
Poor (1 - 2) 0 0.00 1 0.32 4 1.27 62 19.75
Below Average 14 4.46 29 9.24 33 10.5 133 42.36
(3-14) 1
Low Average (15 127 40.45 153 48.73 105 33.4 70 22.29
- 50) 4
Average (51 - 116 36.94 77 24.52 131 41.7 25 7.96
85) 2
Above Average 24 7.64 42 13.38 35 11.1 17 5.41
(86 - 97) 5
Very High (98 - 26 8.28 10 3.18 6 1.91 7 2.23
99)
Excellent (99+ - 7 2.23 2 0.64 0 0.00 0 0.00
100)
Mean 45.10 40.59 42.81 48.17
Std. Deviation 28.43 32.24 34.01 28.06
Skewness 0.57 0.47 0.33 0.02
Table 4
Academic Performance of the Students
Level f %
English
Needs improvement 4 1.27
Fair 27 8.60
Good 149 47.45
Very good 105 33.44
Excellent 29 9.24
62

Math
Needs improvement 3 0.96
Fair 28 8.92
Good 143 45.54
Very good 96 30.57
Excellent 44 14.01
Science
Needs improvement 6 1.91
Fair 38 12.10
Good 126 40.13
Very good 96 30.57
Excellent 48 15.29

Table 5
Participation to Non-Academic Activities of the Students

Activity f %
Investigatory Project
Participative 233 74.20
Non-participative 81 25.80
Journalism
Participative 221 70.38
63

Non-participative 93 29.62
Oratorical Contest
Participative 269 85.67
Non-participative 45 14.33
MTAP
Participative 260 82.80
Non-participative 54 17.20
Webpage Design
Participative 275 87.58
Non-participative 39 12.42
Poster Making Contest
Participative 238 75.80
Non-participative 76 24.20

Across Age (Sample Discussion)

Presented in Table 13 are the differences in the extents of use of

innovative teaching strategies as a whole by the Science teachers across their

profile variable age.


64

Table 13
Differences in the Extents of Use of Innovative Teaching Strategies as a Whole
by the Science Teachers Across their Age
Independent Test Statistics Value F Sig.
Variable
Age Pillai's Trace 0.076 1.292 0.221
Wilks' Lambda 0.925 1.288 0.223
Hotelling's Trace 0.080 1.284 0.225
Roy's Largest Root 0.053 1.732 0.115

As presented in Table 13, as a whole, no significant differences were observed

on the extents of use of innovative teaching strategies by the Science teachers

across their ages. This was shown by the computed p-value of 0.223 for the

Wilks’ Lambda.

Table 14
Differences in the Extents of Use of Individual Innovative Teaching
Strategies by the Science Teachers Across their Age
Strategy df F Sig.
Oral Learning 201 2.942 0.055
Demonstration Learning 201 1.486 0.229
Cooperative Learning 201 2.493 0.085
Discovery Learning 201 1.301 0.275
Practical Works Learning 201 1.986 0.140
Technology-based Learning 201 4.284 0.015

In terms of the utilization of the different types of innovative teaching

strategies, it was found however that significant differences exist on the extent

at which the Science teachers utilized technology-based learning strategies

(p=0.015). Post hoc analysis showed that the extent of utilization of technology-

based learning of the Science teachers who belong to the age bracket 21 – 40

was greater and significantly different as compared to the teachers who belong
65

to the age bracket 41 to 60 but comparable with the teachers who belong to the

age bracket 61 and above.

Results show that younger teachers prefer to use technology-based

learning strategies than middle adult teachers. This could be explained by the

fact that the younger generations are more techno savvies than the older

generations.

The hypothesis stating no significant differences in the extent of utilization

of innovative teaching strategies by the Science teachers across their profile

variable age is rejected.

Across Age

Table 6
Differences in the Students’ Performance in NCAE across their Age
Independent Test Statistics Value F Sig.
Variable
Age Pillai's Trace 0.104 2.816 0.001**
Wilks' Lambda 0.897 2.857 0.001**
Hotelling's Trace 0.114 2.896 0.001**
Roy's Largest Root 0.102 5.232 0.000**

Table 7
Differences in the Students’ Performance in NCAE Areas across their Age

Area F Sig.
Scientific Ability 7.94 0.000
Reading Comprehension 9.21 0.000
Verbal Ability 10.00 0.000
Mathematical Ability 1.52 0.219
Clerical Ability 4.14 0.017
66

Visual Manipulative Skill 8.88 0.000

Across Sex

Table 8
Differences in the Students’ Performance in NCAE across their Sex
Mean Sig.
Differenc (2-
Area Sex N Mean e t df tailed)
Scientific Ability Male 102 51.82 -5.11 -1.58 312 0.116
Femal 212 56.93
e
Reading Male 102 41.37 -10.78 -3.21 312 0.001
Comprehension
Femal 212 52.16
e
Verbal Ability Male 102 50.47 -4.53 -1.36 312 0.174
Femal 212 55.00
e
Mathematical Male 102 39.94 -6.15 -1.71 312 0.089
Ability
Femal 212 46.09
e
67

Clerical Ability Male 102 35.89 -6.96 -1.80 312 0.073


Femal 212 42.85
e
Visual Male 102 47.29 -1.30 -0.38 312 0.702
Manipulative Skill
Femal 212 48.59
e

Across Monthly Family Income

Table 9
Differences in the Students’ Performance in NCAE across their
Monthly Family Income

Independent Test Statistics Value F Sig.


Variable
Monthly Family Pillai's Trace 0.099 2.663 0.002
Income Wilks' Lambda 0.902 2.691 0.002
Hotelling's Trace 0.107 2.719 0.001
Roy's Largest Root 0.092 4.729 0.000

Table 10
68

Differences in the Students’ Performance in NCAE Areas across their


Monthly Family Income

Area df F Sig.
Scientific Ability 313 5.024 0.007
Reading Comprehension 313 4.753 0.009
Verbal Ability 313 3.561 0.030
Mathematical Ability 313 0.784 0.458
Clerical Ability 313 8.824 0.000
Visual Manipulative Skill 313 8.490 0.000

Across Parents’ Occupation

Table 11
Differences in the Students’ Performance in NCAE across their
Parents Occupation

Independent Test Statistics Value F Sig.


Variable
Parents' Pillai's Trace 0.096 1.700 0.034
Occupation Wilks' Lambda 0.906 1.706 0.033
Hotelling's Trace 0.101 1.710 0.032
Roy's Largest Root 0.068 3.489 0.002

Table 12
69

Differences in the Students’ Performance in NCAE Areas across their


Parents Occupation

Area df F Sig.
Scientific Ability 313 2.0470 0.1073
Reading Comprehension 313 2.6250 0.0506
Verbal Ability 313 5.9393 0.0006
Mathematical Ability 313 0.0747 0.9736
Clerical Ability 313 1.8330 0.1411
Visual Manipulative Skill 313 3.1303 0.0260

Across Place of Residence

Table 13
Differences in the Students’ Performance in NCAE across their
Place of Residence

Independent Test Statistics Value F Sig.


Variable
Place of Pillai's Trace 0.018 0.962 0.451
Residence Wilks' Lambda 0.982 0.962 0.451
Hotelling's Trace 0.019 0.962 0.451
Roy's Largest Root 0.019 0.962 0.451
70

Table 14
Differences in the Students’ Performance in NCAE Areas across their
Place of Residence

Area df F Sig.
Scientific Ability 313 1.1888 0.2764
Reading Comprehension 313 0.0852 0.7706
Verbal Ability 313 3.1728 0.0758
Mathematical Ability 313 0.0067 0.9348
Clerical Ability 313 0.3226 0.5704
Visual Manipulative Skill 313 0.0439 0.8343

Across Parental Presence

Table 15
Differences in the Students’ Performance in NCAE across their
Parental Presence

Independent Test Statistics Value F Sig.


Variable
Parental Pillai's Trace 0.0727 0.9469 0.5364
Presence Wilks' Lambda 0.9290 0.9434 0.5414
Hotelling's Trace 0.0746 0.9398 0.5465
Roy's Largest Root 0.0365 1.8675 0.0860

Table 16
Differences in the Students’ Performance in NCAE Areas across their
71

Parental Presence

Area df F Sig.
Scientific Ability 313 1.1104 0.3516
Reading Comprehension 313 1.0629 0.3750
Verbal Ability 313 1.2379 0.2947
Mathematical Ability 313 0.1612 0.9578
Clerical Ability 313 1.3000 0.2700
Visual Manipulative Skill 313 0.4303 0.7868

Across Availability of IT Equipment at Home

Table 17
Differences in the Students’ Performance in NCAE across their
Availability of IT Equipment at Home

Independent Test Statistics Value F Sig.


Variable
Availability Pillai's Trace 0.107 2.902 0.001
of IT Wilks' Lambda 0.894 2.932 0.001
Equipment Hotelling's Trace 0.116 2.960 0.001
at Home 0.098 5.029 0.000
Roy's Largest Root

Table 16
Differences in the Students’ Performance in NCAE Areas across their
Availability of IT Equipment at Home
72

Area df F Sig.
Scientific Ability 313 2.694 0.069
Reading Comprehension 313 3.107 0.046
Verbal Ability 313 5.152 0.006
Mathematical Ability 313 0.901 0.407
Clerical Ability 313 5.721 0.004
Visual Manipulative Skill 313 11.323 0.000

Table 17
Relationship Between the Academic Performance and the NCAE Performance

English Math Science


Value df Asymp. Value df Asymp. Value df Asymp.
NCAE Area Sig. (2- Sig. Sig.
sided) (2- (2-
sided) sided)
Scientific Ability 58.23 20 0.000 31.52 20 0.0487 40.039 20 0.005
Reading 37.28 24 0.041 18.57 24 0.7745 35.039 24 0.068
Comprehension
Verbal Ability 36.14 20 0.015 31.50 20 0.0490 35.620 20 0.017
Mathematical 49.20 20 0.000 22.62 20 0.3079 41.573 20 0.003
Ability
Clerical Ability 44.68 20 0.001 28.84 20 0.0909 34.905 20 0.021
Visual 56.13 16 0.000 35.46 16 0.0034 33.579 16 0.006
Manipulative Skill
73

Investigatory Project
NCAE Area Value df Asymp. Sig. (2-
sided)
Scientific Ability 8.09 5 0.151
Reading Comprehension 13.65 6 0.034
Verbal Ability 7.07 5 0.216
Mathematical Ability 7.91 5 0.161
Clerical Ability 3.82 5 0.576
Visual Manipulative Skill 2.57 4 0.633

Journalism
NCAE Area Value df Asymp. Sig. (2-
sided)
Scientific Ability 31.01 5 0.000
Reading Comprehension 33.98 6 0.000
Verbal Ability 27.71 5 0.000
Mathematical Ability 21.43 5 0.001
Clerical Ability 22.33 5 0.000
Visual Manipulative Skill 15.09 4 0.005

Oratorical Contest
NCAE Area Value df Asymp. Sig. (2-
sided)
Scientific Ability 2.48 5 0.779
Reading Comprehension 2.80 6 0.833
Verbal Ability 7.75 5 0.170
Mathematical Ability 1.35 5 0.930
Clerical Ability 8.47 5 0.132
Visual Manipulative Skill 2.83 4 0.586

MTAP
NCAE Area Value df Asymp. Sig. (2-
sided)
Scientific Ability 4.47 5 0.484
74

Reading Comprehension 4.17 6 0.654


Verbal Ability 16.94 5 0.005
Mathematical Ability 17.15 5 0.004
Clerical Ability 12.39 5 0.030
Visual Manipulative Skill 5.45 4 0.244

Webpage Design
NCAE Area Value df Asymp. Sig. (2-
sided)
Scientific Ability 2.78 5 0.733
Reading Comprehension 7.14 6 0.308
Verbal Ability 6.40 5 0.269
Mathematical Ability 1.63 5 0.898
Clerical Ability 7.45 5 0.189
Visual Manipulative Skill 6.08 4 0.193

Poster Making Contest


NCAE Area
Value df Asymp. Sig. (2-sided)
Scientific Ability 17.24 5 0.004
Reading Comprehension 13.14 6 0.041
Verbal Ability 7.32 5 0.198
Mathematical Ability 5.40 5 0.369
Clerical Ability 2.17 5 0.826
Visual Manipulative Skill 13.10 4 0.011
75

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Journals

Scholargoogle.com September 2, 2015 by Jared Martin

World Journal of Educational Research Vol. 2, No. 2, June 2015, pp. 1- 9, E-

Online Resources

(http://www.slideshare.net/daniholic/ncae)

(www.slideshare.net/xDpauwaw/thesis-full)

https://prezi.com/exydfaksbvqw/analysis-of-the-national-career-assessment-

examination-ncae/

http://www.ehow.com/facts_7484533_importance-national-career-assessment-

examination.html

(http://www.journalofbusiness.org/index.php/GJMBR/article/viewFile/721/651)

World Journal of Educational Research Vol. 2, No. 2, June 2015, pp. 1- 9, E-

ISSN: 2334 - 3176 Available online at www.wjer.org


76

Unpublished Articles

Bransford, J. D., Brown, A. L., Cocking, & R. R., (Eds.). (2000). How people

learn: Brain, mind, experience, and school. Washington DC: National Academy

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Caine, R. N. & Caine, G. (1997). Education on the edge of possibility. Alexandria,

VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Caine, R. N., Caine, G., McClintic, C., & Klimek, K. (2005). 12 Brain/mind learning

principles in action. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Kennedy, J. F. (1962, September). Address given at Rice University. Public

Papers of the Presidents of the United States, 1, 1962, 669-670.

Tomlinson, C.A., Kaplan, S. N., Renzulli, J. S., Purcell, J., Leppien, J., & Burns, D.

(2002). The parallel curriculum: A design to develop high potential and challenge

high-ability learners. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Pellegrino, J., Chudowsky, N., & Glaser, R. (Eds.). (2001 ). Knowing what

students know: The science and design of educational assessment. Washington

DC: National Academy Press.


77

APPENDICES
78

APPENDIXA
Department of Education
Region 1
Division of City Schools
Alaminos City Pangasinan
February 22, 2016

DR. DANILO C. SISON CESO VI


Schools Division Superintendent
Office of the Schools Division Superintendent
Alaminos City

Sir,

I will be conducting a study entitled “National Career


Assessment Examination Scores and Academic and Non-Academic
Performance of Grade 9 Students in Alaminos City.” In partial fulfillment
of the requirements for the degree Master of Arts in Education Major in
Educational Management, which I am pursuing at the Pangasinan State
University, Open University Systems, Linagyen Pangasinan.

In view of this, May I ask permission from your good office to conduct the
said study among the teachers and students in 8 Public Secondary Schools in the
City.

Earnestly hoping that this request merit your favorable response. Thank
you very much and God bless.

Very Truly Yours

MICHELLE L.
Noted:
NAVARRO
Researcher

(SGD)ROSIE S. ABALOS Ph. D (SGD GEMMA MAMARIL DE VERA


Adviser Ph. D
Executive Director

Approved:
(SGD)DR. DANILO C. SISON CESO VI
Schools Division Superintendent
Office of the Schools Division
APENDIX BAlaminos City
Superintendent
79

APENDIX B

Republic of the Philippines


Department of Education
Region 1
Division of City Schools
Alaminos City Pangasinan

February 22, 2016

To All Schools Administrators


Secondary Schools
Alaminos City

Respectfully returned to Ms. MICHELLE L. NAVARRO, researcher her

approved request for the permission to conduct study to public secondary

schools on National Career Assessment Examination Scores and Academic and

Non-Academic Performances of Grade 9 Students in this Division, with the

condition that classes will not be disrupted during its conduct, that no money and

school facilities will be used for the purpose and result of the study be submitted

to this office.

(SGD)DR. DANILO C. SISON CESO VI


Schools Division Superintendent
Office of the Schools Division
Superintendent
Alaminos City
80

APENDIX C

Republic of the Philippines


Department of Education
Region 1
Division of City Schools
Alaminos City Pangasinan

February 22, 2016


Dear Respondent,

The researcher is carrying out a study whose main objective is to

establish whether there is a relationship between National Career

Assessment Examination Scores and Academic and Non-Academic

Performance of Grade 9 Students in Alaminos City. You have been

selected as one of the respondents for the study and the information you will

give will be treated with utmost confidentiality and used purely for academic

purposes. The findings and recommendations from this study are likely to benefit

students and teachers of Public Secondary Schools in Alaminos City. Kindly

please spare some of your valuable time to answer these questions.

Thank you.

Yours Sincerely,

MICHELLE L. NAVARRO
Researcher
81

APENDIX D

Republic of the Philippines


Department of Education
Region 1
Division of City Schools
Alaminos City Pangasinan

Dear Teachers,

The undersigned is conducting a research entitled “National

Career Assessment Examination Scores and Academic and Non-

Academic Performance of Grade 9 Students in Alaminos City” In partial

fulfillment of the requirements for the degree Master of Arts in Education Major

in Educational Management, which I am pursuing at the Pangasinan State

University, Open University Systems, Lingayen Pangasinan.

With the approval of the Schools Division Superintendent, I ‘am

asking your assistance to find the required number of respondents in your

respective schools. For the will answer the questionnaire provided.

Thank you very much for your cooperation and full support. May

God continue to bless you.

Yours Sincerely,

MICHELLE L. NAVARRO
Researcher
82

APENDIX E
QUESTIONNAIRE

Name: _________________________________________________

Grade& Section:__________________________________________

School:__________________________________________________

Direction: Please accomplish the questionnaire completely and honestly. Put a

check on items with choices and supply the data on a blank without choices.

1. Student’s Profile

Sex: Male_______

Female_______

Age: _______

Monthly Family Income: _____

Parents’ Occupation:

_____Not Employed

_____Self-employed

_____ Employed

____OFW

Types of Residency

_____ City Proper

_____ Barangay
83

Parental Presence

_____Living with both parents

____Living with mother alone

_____Living with father alone

_____Living with guardians

_____Living without both parents

Availability of IT materials at home

______TV and Radio only

______TV, Radio and Computers

______TV, Radio, Computers and Internet

2. Scores of the Students in NCAE subtests

Direction: Kindly write your NCAE percentile scores in the following NCAE

subtests.

2.1General Scholastic Aptitude (GSA,

______ Scientific Ability (SA)

______ Reading Comprehension (RC)

______Verbal Ability (VA)

______ Mathematical Ability (MA)

2.2Technical Vocational Aptitude (TVA)

_____ Clerical Ability (CA

______Visual Manipulative on Academic Skill (VMS)


84

3. Level of Performance of respondents. (Academics)

Directions: Rate your academic performance in the enumerated subjects below.

Please refer to the numeral and adjectival value below.

5- Excellent (95- above) 4-Very Good (94-89)

3- Good (88-83) 2-Fair (77-72)

1-Needs Improvement (77-71)

a. English _____

b. Mathematics _____

c. Science _____

B. Non-Academics

Directions: Put a check (/) if you participated in the different co-curricular

activities below, put an (X) if not participated.

NCAE Subtest Non-Academics (/) or( X)

1.Scientific Ability 1.Investigatory Project

2.Reading Comprehension 2.Journalism

3.Verbal Ability 3. Oratorical Contest

4.Mathematical Ability 4.MTAP Quiz Bee

5.Clerical Ability 5. Webpage Design

6.Visual Manipulative Skill 6.Poster Making Contest

Total_____
___