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PY 208 Practice Test 1

Fall 2010

Note: THIS TEST MAY BE LONGER THAN THE ACTUAL TEST. It is a sample and does not include
questions on every topic covered since the start of the semester.

Also be sure to review


Clicker questions
homework assignments on Webassign
White board problems worked in the lab
Exercises, Examples, and Review Questions (at the end of each chapter)in your
textbook

Name (print) __________________________________

When you turn in the test, including the formula page, you must show an NCSU photo ID to identify yourself.
Do not use other paper. If you need more space, write on the blank page included at the end of the test, and indicate that you did this.

• Read all problems carefully before attempting to solve them.


• Your work must be legible, and the organization must be clear.
• You must show all your work, including correct vector notation.
• Correct answers without adequate explanation will be counted wrong.
• Incorrect work or explanations mixed in with correct work will be counted wrong.
Cross out anything you don’t want us to read!
• Make explanations complete but brief. Do not write a lot of prose.
• Include diagrams!

• Show what goes into a calculation, not just the final number:
a ⋅b
=
( )(
8 x10 −3 5 x10 6)= 5 x10 4
c⋅d ( )(
2 x10 −5 4 x10 4)
• Give standard SI units with your results

Unless specifically asked to derive a result, you may start from the formulas given on the formula sheet, including
equations corresponding to the fundamental concepts. If a formula you need is not given, you must derive it.

If you cannot do some portion of a problem, invent a symbol for the quantity you can’t calculate (explain that you are
doing this), and use it to do the rest of the problem.

SIGN THE HONOR PLEDGE:

I have neither given nor received unauthorized aid on this test.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sign your name on the line above.
Things you must know

Relationship between electric field and electric force Conservation of charge


Electric field of a point charge The Superposition Principle

Specific Results

⃗ due to uniformly charged spherical shell: outside


𝐸 like point charge; inside zero
  1 2𝑞𝑠   1 𝑞𝑠
⃗  ⃗ 
𝐸𝑑𝑖𝑝𝑜𝑙𝑒,𝑎𝑥𝑖𝑠  ≈ (on axis, 𝑟 ≫ 𝑠) 𝐸𝑑𝑖𝑝𝑜𝑙𝑒,⊥  ≈ (on ⊥ axis, 𝑟 ≫ 𝑠)
4𝜋𝜖0 𝑟 3 4𝜋𝜖0 𝑟 3
𝑝 = 𝑞𝑠 electric dipole moment 𝑣¯ = 𝑢𝐸
  1 𝑄
⃗ 
𝐸𝑟𝑜𝑑  = √ (𝑟 ⊥ from center)
4𝜋𝜖0 𝑟 𝑟 + (𝐿/2)2
2
  1 2𝑄/𝐿   1 𝑞𝑧
⃗  ⃗ 
𝐸𝑟𝑜𝑑  ≈ (if 𝑟 ≪ 𝐿) 𝐸𝑟𝑖𝑛𝑔  = (𝑧 along axis)
4𝜋𝜖0 𝑟 4𝜋𝜖0 (𝑧 2 + 𝑅2 )3/2
  𝑄/𝐴 [ ]   𝑄/𝐴 [
⃗  𝑧 ⃗  𝑧 ] 𝑄/𝐴
𝐸𝑑𝑖𝑠𝑘  = 1− 2 (𝑧 along axis) 𝐸𝑑𝑖𝑠𝑘  ≈ 1− ≈ (if 𝑧 ≪ 𝑅)
2𝜖0 (𝑧 + 𝑅2 )1/2 2𝜖0 𝑅 2𝜖0
  𝑄/𝐴   𝑄/𝐴 ( 𝑠 )
⃗  ⃗ 
𝐸𝑐𝑎𝑝𝑎𝑐𝑖𝑡𝑜𝑟  ≈ (+𝑄 and −𝑄 disks) 𝐸𝑓 𝑟𝑖𝑛𝑔𝑒  ≈ just outside capacitor
𝜖0 𝜖0 2𝑅

Constant Symbol Approximate Value


Speed of light 𝑐 3 × 108 m/s
Gravitational constant 𝐺 6.7 × 10−11 N ⋅ m2 /kg2
Approx. grav field near Earth’s surface 𝑔 9.8 N/kg
Electron mass 𝑚𝑒 9 × 10−31 kg
Proton mass 𝑚𝑝 1.7 × 10−27 kg
Neutron mass 𝑚𝑛 1.7 × 10−27 kg
1
Electric constant 9 × 109 N ⋅ m2 /C2
4𝜋𝜖0
Epsilon-zero 𝜖0 8.85 × 10−12 N ⋅ m2 /C2
Proton charge 𝑒 1.6 × 10−19 C
Avogadro’s number 𝑁𝐴 6.02 × 1023 molecules/mole
Atomic radius 𝑅𝑎 ≈ 1 × 10−10 m
Proton radius 𝑅𝑝 ≈ 1 × 10−15 m
𝐸 to ionize air 𝐸𝑖𝑜𝑛𝑖𝑧𝑒 ≈ 3 × 106 V/m

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Problem 1

(a) Fig. 1 above shows a neutral block of metal in the presence of two charged plastic spheres, both the
same distance from the block. The spheres have equal magnitudes but opposite signs of charge as shown.
Using the diagram convention from the textbook and class, draw the charge distribution in or on the metal
block in Fig. 1. If there is none, say so explicitly.

(b) At the point in center of the metal block labeled “x” in Fig. 1, draw a vector indicating the direction
of the net electric field due to all charges. If it is zero, say so explicitly.

(c) Fig. 2 above shows a neutral block of plastic in the presence of a charged plastic sphere, with the sign
of the charge shown in the diagram. Using the diagram convention from the textbook and class, draw the
polarization of the plastic block in Fig. 2. If there is none, say so explicitly.

(d) In Fig. 2, draw a vector indicating the direction of the force on the charged sphere due to the plastic
block. If it is zero, say so explicitly.

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Problem 2

A neutral rod made of an unknown material is brought near a charged metal sphere. (The rod is held by
rubber insulating supports). One end of the rod touches the metal sphere, and then the rod is pulled away.

You bring a negatively charged piece of tape near the rod and observe that the tape is repelled. The tape
is repelled no matter what part of the rod you hold the tape near to.

Circle “T” next to each true statement below or “F” for every false statement.

T F The rod is a conductor.

T F The rod has a net positive charge after touching the metal sphere.

T F The magnitude of the charge on the metal ball is lower after the rod touches it.

T F Electrons flowed from the metal sphere to the rod while they were in contact.

You now touch the rod. After doing this, you observe that the charged tape is no longer repelled by any
part of the rod.

Circle “T” next to each true statement below or “F” for every false statement.

T F While touching the rod, chloride ions (Cl-) from the salt water on your skin moved
onto the rod.

T F While touching the rod, sodium ions (Na+) from the salt water on your skin moved
onto the rod.

T F Electrons from the mobile electron sea in your hand move onto the rod.

T F Electrons from the mobile electron sea on the rod move into the mobile electron sea
in your hand.

T F Protons are pulled out of the nuclei of atoms in your hand and move onto the rod.

T F Protons are pulled out of the nuclei of atoms in the rod and move onto your hand.

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For the remaining problems, work out the solutions in your blue book. Start each problem
on a new page and label each problem clearly. Show all work.

Problem 3

A sulfide ion (S2− ) has a charge of −2𝑒 and is at location A, where it experiences an electric force of
⟨−3 × 10−21 , −5 × 10−21 , 4 × 10−21 ⟩ N, due to nearby charged objects. What is the (vector) electric field
at location A?

Problem 4

An electron is a distance 𝑑 from a proton. At this point, the magnitude of the force on the electron is
2 × 10−8 N. The electron moves until it is a distance 3𝑑 from the proton. What is the new magnitude of
the force on the electron due to the proton at this point? Show work or explain briefly.

Problem 5

An electron is a distance 𝑑 from a dipole, moving along the axis of the dipole, where 𝑑 is much larger
than the separation between the charges of the dipole. At this point, the magnitude of the force on the
electron is 4 × 10−8 N. The electron moves until it is a distance 2𝑑 from the dipole. What is the new
magnitude of the force on the electron due to the dipole at this point? Show work or explain briefly.

Problem 6

An electron is a distance 𝑑 from the center of a long uniformly charged rod, moving perpendicularly
toward the rod. At this point, the magnitude of the force on the electron is 6 × 10−8 N. The electron
moves until it is a distance 𝑑/2 from the rod. What is the new magnitude of the force on the electron due
to the rod at this point? Show work or explain briefly.

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Problem 7

Two dipoles are oriented as shown in the diagram. Each dipole consists of two charges +6 nC and -6 nC,
held apart by a rod of length 1.5 mm (nC = nanocoulomb = 1 × 10−9 coulomb).

dipole 2

6 cm
y
dipole 1

8 cm

What is the net electric field at the location marked “x” due to both dipoles? Express your final answer
as a three-component vector.

Problem 8
A plastic disk carries a negative charge of −3 × 10−6 C distributed uniformly over its surface. It lies in the
x-z plane with its center is at the origin, and its radius is R = 7m. A small hollow glass ball, of radius
0.01 m, carrying a charge of 2.5 × 10−9 C uniformly distributed over its surface, is located with its center
at ⟨ -0.09, 0.07, 0⟩m.

Edge view of disk. R (not to scale)


Disk lies in x-z plane.

(a) Calculate the net electric field at location ⟨ 0, 0.05, 0⟩. Show every step in your calculation explicitly.
Give your answer as a three-component vector.

(b) An antiproton (whose charge is -e and whose mass is the same as the mass of a proton) is located at ⟨
0, 0.05, 0⟩. What is the force on the antiproton? Give your answer as a three-component vector.

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Problem 9

A thin glass rod of length 5 m has been rubbed with a silk cloth, and has gained a net charge of
−5 × 10−7 coulombs, distributed uniformly over its surface. A cubical block of copper with side length
0.07 m is placed with its center 0.12 m from the center of the rod, as shown in the diagram below. The
copper block has a charge of 2 × 10−9 coulombs. Note that the rod is very long, and only part of it is
shown in the diagram.

0.12 m y

0.07 m
x

(a) What is the electric field at the center of the block due only to the charged rod? Express your
answer as a three-component vector.

(b) What is the electric field at the center of the block, due only to the charges in and on the
copper? Explain briefly. Express your answer as a three-component vector.