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Climate Change Adaptation Pilot Project Local Government Engineering Department (LGED), Bangladesh 10.0 million DKK July
Climate Change Adaptation Pilot Project Local Government Engineering Department (LGED), Bangladesh 10.0 million DKK July
Climate Change Adaptation Pilot Project Local Government Engineering Department (LGED), Bangladesh 10.0 million DKK July
Climate Change Adaptation Pilot Project Local Government Engineering Department (LGED), Bangladesh 10.0 million DKK July
Climate Change Adaptation Pilot Project Local Government Engineering Department (LGED), Bangladesh 10.0 million DKK July
Climate Change Adaptation Pilot Project Local Government Engineering Department (LGED), Bangladesh 10.0 million DKK July
Climate Change Adaptation Pilot Project Local Government Engineering Department (LGED), Bangladesh 10.0 million DKK July
Climate Change Adaptation Pilot Project Local Government Engineering Department (LGED), Bangladesh 10.0 million DKK July
Climate Change Adaptation Pilot Project Local Government Engineering Department (LGED), Bangladesh 10.0 million DKK July
Climate Change Adaptation Pilot Project Local Government Engineering Department (LGED), Bangladesh 10.0 million DKK July
Climate Change Adaptation Pilot Project Local Government Engineering Department (LGED), Bangladesh 10.0 million DKK July
Climate Change Adaptation Pilot Project Local Government Engineering Department (LGED), Bangladesh 10.0 million DKK July

Climate Change Adaptation Pilot Project

Local Government Engineering Department (LGED), Bangladesh

10.0 million DKK

July 2013 June 2014 (one year) Appropriation years: 2013, 2014

N/A

The Bangladesh Climate Change Strategy and Action Plan (BCCSAP), 2009. The Sixth Five Year Plan of the Government of Bangladesh 2011-2015. LGED Gender Strategy Plan, 2007

06.34.01.70 - Climate Fund

Mogens Strunge Larsen, Counsellor

Svend Olling, Ambassador

This pilot project aims at demonstrating the effectiveness of selected climate change adaptation initiatives within rural infrastructure improvements and at raising local community awareness of climate change adaptation through training. The activities will be implemented using labour based methods and a large number of poor rural women. Intervention areas are four administrative units in the Coastal Zone of Bangladesh. The Danida contribution is 10.0 million DKK. The Government of Bangladesh is expected to contribute 5.0 million DKK.

This project is a pilot project which aims at trying out climate change adaptation measures

This project is a pilot project which aims at trying out climate change adaptation measures in four Upazilas of the Coastal Zone of Bangladesh, namely Hatiya, Rangamati, Rangabali and Amtoli. This is to be done through selection and construction of improved cross drainage of roads, protection of roads by raising embankments, protection of road embankments by tree plantation, excavation/ maintenance of drainage canals, improved access to cyclone shelters and community awareness raising like training of rural women and local officials in climate change adaptation.

Further the aim is improving the living conditions of vulnerable people in these areas, in particular destitute rural women, who will be employed as pilot project labourers and receive training in relevant income generating activities and climate change awareness. Climate changes as rise in global temperatures, a rising sea level and more unpredictable weather patterns are expected to result in a number of hazards in the Coastal Zone of Bangladesh like increasing saline intrusion, water logging, inundation, tidal/storm surges and cyclones. The country is already highly susceptible to flooding and extreme floods are becoming more common. Extreme cyclones occur on average every three years. It is highly likely that water management infrastructure and rural roads will face increasing erosion problems due to sea level rise and storm surges, as well as from intense rainfall of short duration. Based on an expected 30 cm sea level rise, it is estimated that a substantial number of coastal polders in the southwest region may experience severe drainage congestion and that half of them will be overtopped due to increased water level in the peripheral rivers. The coastal areas already experience immense damage to rural roads and other infrastructure due to cyclones and storm surges which are expected to be more frequent and intense.

It has been found that climate change hazards in the Coastal Zone of Bangladesh should be classified as ‘high risk’ to the livelihood and living conditions of poor farming households due to loss of life and land, degradation of soil quality, damage to infrastructure and increased burden on women. The seasonal migration is increasing. 28% of the population lives in the Coastal Zone.

Denmark has supported infrastructure development in Bangladesh since 1978; from mid 1990 through the Local Government Engineering Department (LGED). The LGED is widely regarded, also internationally, as one of the most effective government agencies in Bangladesh.

one of the most effective government agencies in Bangladesh. This pilot project will be working within

This pilot project will be working within the organizational set-up of an established and well functioning infrastructure development project. All personnel are well practiced. Materials for activities and construction will be sourced locally wherever possible. In order to minimize the carbon footprint the field supervisory staff will use motorbikes.

LGED has procurement, financial and administrative procedures in place that will ensure the efficient and transparent use of resources during the implementation of the activities proposed under this pilot project. The use of female labour groups for infrastructure works in Bangladesh has been found to be a viable alternative to conventional contracting in quality as well as speed of works.

contracting in quality as well as speed of works. The main challenge for the pilot project

The main challenge for the pilot project will be to adapt the existing comprehensive experience of infrastructure improvements based on network and accessibility considerations to a selective infrastructure scheme approach and a broader scope actively involving local communities. A bottom-up approach to planning of the pilot project activities is foreseen.

A constant challenge for delivery in Bangladesh is maintaining the balance between

financial control and achieving timely impact, because the risk of corruption is so high.

Another challenge will be to make the pilot project results visible to a wider audience. This is important because this pilot project has the potential to serve as a trigger for future interventions of the same nature.

as a trigger for future interventions of the same nature. Development objective: The development objective of

Development objective: The development objective of the Pilot Project is to demonstrate the effectiveness of selected climate change adaptation initiatives within infrastructure improvements and to get experience of raising climate change awareness in selected agricultural areas of the Coastal Zone of Bangladesh.

Specific objectives: The immediate objectives are improved drainage of selected agricultural areas with channel excavation, improved cross drainage, improvement of roads and infrastructure erosion protection. Implementation to be undertaken by poor female workers of the pilot project area using labour based methods. Further, increased community awareness of climate change adaptation through training in selected income generating activities for poor rural women and training of personnel of local government institutions.

Project areas: This pilot project will be implemented in selected areas in the coastal zone

of Bangladesh bordering the Bay of Bengal. Four Upazilas (Sub-districts) in the former

Danida Rural Roads and Market Access Component implementation districts have been selected (Hatiya, Ramgoti, Rangabali and Amtoli). Some climate change induced hazards are found to be identical for the four pilot project Upazilas like cyclones and riverbank erosion. A Hatiya specific hazard is increased salinity due to water logging, Ramgoti and Amtoli specific hazards are tidal surges and a rising sea level.

Financial framework: Large scale climate change adaptation funding in Bangladesh is delivered through four major funds: The Bangladesh Climate Change Resilience Fund, The Global Environment Facility, The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience and The Bangladesh Climate Change Trust Fund. The LGED is financed by very substantial revenue and development budgets and further supported by an impressing series of bi- lateral and international Donors, including Danida. The LGED is well versed in handling foreign funds.

Activities: The activities are to be elaborated according to outputs expected to be delivered as set out below. The infrastructure schemes will be selected to highlight drainage facilitation of agricultural areas and erosion protection of infrastructures and will be identified during the present monsoon and flooding season 2013. Scheme selection will include consultation with the local community to address their concerns. The overall target of the joint Danida and GoB contributions of the Pilot Project is 225,000 labour- days (90% female).

Output 1. Canal Re-excavation:

The pilot project will re-excavate around 4 km of khal/drainage canals in the four pilot project Upazilas to demonstrate effects of de-silting the canals. The canals would be mostly earthen canals of trapezoidal shape with side slopes in accordance with the characteristics of canal bed soil. All works would be implemented engaging poor rural women labourers.

Output 2. Raising of Earth Road Embankments:

During the next 40 years the sea level is expected to rise at least 30 centimeters, which in turn will make the existing polder and road embankments ineffective at severe floods. The pilot project will aim at raising around 34 km of polder and earth road embankments. The pilot project will use standard road designs of LGED and embankment designs from Small Scale Water Resources Project of LGED or Bangladesh Water Development Board. The pilot project will conduct survey of the existing roads and embankments to determine whether the original design is sufficient to protect farm land from possible hazard or not.

Output 3. Improvement of Union and Village roads:

The pilot project will undertake improvement of 6 km river eroded/damaged village and union roads up to brick surface standard within the four pilot project Upazilas. Road improvement works will consist in improving roads by earthwork and pavement of bricks and repair of slopes. All work will be contained within the existing road to avoid environmental impact and land tenure issues; no new roads will be constructed. Selected roads should connect major markets to facilitate trading of agriculture commodities or should connect the cyclone shelters to ease movement to them. Output 4. Construction of Culverts /U-drains:

The pilot project will undertake construction of 90 meters of culverts and u-drains. Bangladesh may have erratic rainfall in the future with heavy rainfall within a very short period. This means that roads should have adequate numbers of openings so as not to hinder any natural drainage of rainfall and flood water.

Output 5. Slope protection:

Embankment slopes erode easily, in particular during heavy, concentrated rainfalls. The pilot project will provide protection to 500 meters of slopes (road embankments, polders). The protection will be in the form of turfing, sandbag filling, brick mattressing, geotextiles, etc.

Output 6. Tree Plantation:

Trees serve as wind barriers and erosion protection. Besides they provide supplies for human consumptions and help to maintain environmental balance. Since the pilot project area is susceptible to tropical storms, the pilot project will carry out tree plantation along roads and at government owned fringe lands. 10 km/6,500 Nos. fruit/timber/herbal trees will be planted along the roads or on fringe land of the pilot project Upazilas. Assistance of the Forest Department will be taken.

Output 7. Capacity development:

Local community participation will involve developing of training for local authorities and female pilot project labourers in relevant climate change adaption issues. The pilot project will arrange training in climate change adaptation for the Union Parishad chairmen and personnel of the pilot project Upazilas (200 Nos). Training will include possible cause of climate change hazards and ways to combat and live with the hazards. Relevant training curricula and material need to be developed.

The pilot project will arrange training in awareness of climate change adaptation and income generating activities for the female pilot project labourers (4,000 Nos.). Interventions would be such that are not affected by climate change induced hazards. Relevant options are bee rearing and mushroom, oyster and shrimp cultivation etc. This activity is primarily aimed at the poorest women headed households who receive cash for pilot project work.

Output 8. Capacity development of Union Parishads:

In order to raise awareness of climate change adaptation measures at the lowest level of administration, the Union Parishads, four UPs will be given small block grants to be used for small infrastructure schemes of their choice and under guidance by the technical assistance staff.

Cross Cutting Issues: The pilot project will ensure fair working conditions and practices as well as related awareness raising. Adherence to GoB standards on child labour, health and safety and minimum wages will be of importance. The pilot project

will also be providing female project labourers with an opportunity to follow basic literacy classes and provide information on human and gender rights. An LGED gender strategy plan was approved in 2007.

Sustainability of the pilot project: The pilot project is intended as a source of experience and information and is expected to the basis for future Danida support to interventions of the same nature in Bangladesh. In addition, the activities undertaken will contribute to improved access for farmers to markets and contribute to increased community awareness in climate change threatened areas. Training will enable recipients in the exposed areas to adapt to future climate induced hazards and thereby contribute to improving the food security situation. In the long term regular and periodic maintenance of the improved infrastructure will be an issue and will depend on allocation of revenue funds. Although there is a very high level of understanding in the LGED, revenue funds for maintenance are scarce, and may be even more scarce in the future due to recent massive government investments in major infrastructure like the Padma bridge and provision of nuclear power stations.

the Padma bridge and provision of nuclear power stations. LGED has received substantial support from Denmark

LGED has received substantial support from Denmark over more than three decades to infrastructure improvements by labour based methods in the Coastal Zone of Bangladesh. The results of the earlier projects/programmes are considered to be impressive as all major activities in general have achieved higher than 90% completion of targets.

1. Noakhali Rural Development Project, 1978 1992.

2. Rural Development Projects 16 & 23, 1994-2000.

3. Minor Roads Component, 2000-2006, 248.5 million DKK.

4. Rural Roads and Market Access Component, 2006-2013, 174.0 million DKK.

Detailed results are available in the respective Danida Project/Programme Completion/Evaluation Reports.

Danida Project/Programme Completion/Evaluation Reports. This pilot project will contribute to improving living

This pilot project will contribute to improving living conditions of vulnerable people, which are among the priority areas for Danish development assistance to Bangladesh:

democratization, good governance and human rights, food security and livelihood. The pilot project will further contribute to Danish development strategy’s overall objective of fighting poverty as the pilot project is targeting poor and destitute rural women in coastal areas which are the least developed of Bangladesh.

The total Danida contribution to the pilot project is 10.0 million DKK as elaborated in

The total Danida contribution to the pilot project is 10.0 million DKK as elaborated in the table below. A detailed budget has been provided as supplementary material in Annex 5. The LGED is well versed in handling foreign donor funds of a substantially larger size. The budget includes all costs related to the implementation of project activities in the selected areas, like physical works, training and national technical assistance staff. Equipment costs are low, as it is expected that necessary equipment like vehicles, motorbikes, survey and office equipment will be transferred from the Danida financed Rural Roads and Market Access Component that will terminate activities in June 2013. The GoB is expected to contribute an additional 5.0 million DKK for infrastructure works. A short-term Danida Advisor will be provided as implementation support.

Danida Budget (12 months, 2013/14)

Million

DKK

1 Pilot Project Activities Output 1. Canal re-excavation Output 2. Raising of embankments Output 3. Improvement of Union and Village Roads Output 4. Construction of culverts/U-drains Output 5. Slope protection Output 6. Tree plantation Output 7. Capacity building/Training Output 8. Capacity building/ Union Parishads

0.42

1.80

2.33

1.27

0.11

0.18

0.19

0.28

 

Sub-total Pilot Project Activities

6.11

61.1%

2 Technical Assistance

1.72

17.2%

3 International technical assistance

0.23

2.3%

4 Operations

0.99

9.9%

5 Equipment

0.23

2.3%

6 Indirect costs/Contingency

0.10

1.0%

 

Total cost

10.00

100%

Rate of exchange 14.148 BDT/DKK The GoBis expected to contribute a further 5.0 million DKK to outputs.

expected to contribute a further 5.0 million DKK to outputs. Factors which potentially can affect the

Factors which potentially can affect the activities negatively are outlined in details below. Having good connections to relevant local authorities and decade long experience, the LGED is confident to be able to manage the risks.

Risks Mitigation measures 1. Work schemes and staff are chosen ‘ politically ’ rather than

Risks

Mitigation measures

1. Work schemes and staff are chosen politicallyrather than according to demonstration needs, so that the pilot project is implemented as a mini- infrastructure project only.

Scheme and staff selection criteria in place.

Training of implementation staff and local authorities in climate change adaption awareness.

2. Construction material prices increase.

Incorporate a pilot project provision for shifting from the LGED rates schedule to market rates.

3. Civil unrest in the target areas due to up-coming Parliament elections.

Operating procedures in place for vehicles, motorbikes and security management.

4. Major natural disasters during pilot project implementation.

Monitor the weather and inform the work teams and beneficiaries of risks.

Have a communication system in place.

Local Government Engineering Department (LGED) Local Government Engineering Department (LGED) is one of the largest

Local Government Engineering Department (LGED) Local Government Engineering Department (LGED) is one of the largest public sector organizations in Bangladesh entrusted with planning and implementation of rural, urban and small scale water resources infrastructure development programs. LGED works closely with the local stakeholders to ensure people’s participation and bottomup planning in all stages of the project implementation cycle. The broad objectives of LGED’s development activities are to improve the socio-economic condition of the country through supply of infrastructures at local level and capacity building of the stakeholders.

LGED works with a wide range of diversified programs from construction of roads, bridges/ culverts and markets to social mobilization, empowerment and environmental protection. LGED promotes labour-based technology to create employment opportunity at local level and uses local materials in construction and maintenance to optimize project implementation cost while preserving the desired quality.

LGED is a highly decentralized organization with more than ninety percent of its total manpower working at District and Upazila (Sub-District) level. The manpower on permanent payroll is around 10,000 in total at head quarters and field levels. The organizational background of LGED can be traced back to the early sixties.

The LGED is financed by very substantial revenue and development budgets and further supported by an impressing series of bilateral and international Donors, including the Danida. The LGED is well versed in handling foreign donor funds, and is widely regarded, also internationally, as one of the most effective government agencies in Bangladesh.

Recent and current relevant Danida financed LGED programmes involve:

- Rural Development Projects 16 & 23, 1994-2000.

- MRP (Danida TSPSI), 2000 2006, 248.5 million DKK.

- RRMAC (Danida ASPSII), 2006 20013, 174.0 million DKK

Bangladesh is home to one of the world’s largest delta systems. Two -thirds of the

Bangladesh is home to one of the world’s largest delta systems. Two-thirds of the country is less than five meters above sea level. It is vulnerable to short-term climate shocks such as cyclones. Severe cyclones occur on average once every three years, creating storm surges sometimes in excess of ten meters high. In 2006 and 2009 Cyclones Sidr and Aila respectively caused damages in the size of up to 2.7% of the Gross Domestic Product. Bangladesh is one of the most densely populated countries of the world. 165 million people are cramped together in a space of 156,000 square kilometers with a population density of 1057 per square kilometer. The country is predominantly rural with about 70% of its people living in rural areas. Its economy is mostly agrarian with agriculture accounting for 48% of the actively employed labor force and 21% of gross domestic product (GDP). In the recent years the country has made significant progress in the garments industries, but a huge number of people still depend on agriculture for survival. Bangladesh continues to face a number of major challenges, including poverty, corruption, political instability, overpopulation and vulnerability to climate change. However, it has recently been praised by the international community for its significant progress on the Human Development Index.

Poverty is widespread and 31% of the population live below the poverty line and earn less than 1.25 dollars a day or consume food less than 2150 kcal a day. About half of them live in extreme poverty meaning that they consume less than 1800 kcal of food daily. The WFP/WB developed poverty map indicates that moderate to high poverty persist in the pilot project districts of Patuakhali, Barguna, Noakhali and Lakshmipur. Skewed distributions of resources, especially land, forces the poor to live in khas or government lands and in areas vulnerable to natural disasters. Most do not have any idea about the severity of the prospects of increasing tropical storm surges or floods due to sea level rise.

Bangladesh is a democratic state governed by a secular constitution. After Bangladesh gained independence from Pakistan, secularism was included in the original Constitution of Bangladesh in 1972 as one of the Four State Principles, the others being Democracy, Nationalism and Socialism. In 2010, the High Court upheld the secular principles of the 1972 constitution. Bangladesh is divided in the following administrative and local government units: Division, District, Upazila and Union Parishad.

The largest ethnic group in Bangladesh is Bengalis, forming more than 98% of the entire population. Bangladesh is the fourth largest Muslim populated state after Indonesia, Pakistan and India. The majority of Muslims are Sunni. Minority groups are Hindus (9.6%), Buddhists (0.7%) and Christians (0.2%).

Bangladesh’s overall human rights situation worsened in 2012, as the government narrowed political and civil society space, shielded abusive security forces from accountability, and ignored calls to reform laws and procedures in flawed war crimes and

mutiny trials. The security forces disguised extrajudicial killings as “crossfire” killings. Opposition members and political activists “disappeared.” Flawed trials against those accused of war crimes in the 1971 war for independence continued. When Rohingya refugees fled to Bangladesh from persecution in Myanmar in 2012, the government pushed back boatloads of refugees, insisting that it had no obligation to provide them sanctuary.

The past year has been marked by (1) political unrest initiated due to disagreements over arrangements of coming election and resistance to the recently initiated liberation war crimes trials with hartals [shutdown of activities by organized street violence]. Further, sporadic garment workers unrest in Dhaka due to working conditions and factory accidents like fire and building collapse have taken place, and (2) religious unrest due to increasing anti-secular movements resulting in several attacks on Hindu and Buddhist temples, probably by Muslim extremists and probably triggered by the presently rather difficult political situation.

The sea level is rising due to global warming. During the last 50 years the mean sea level rose by five centimeters. Different mathematical models developed to predict the effects of future sea level rise reveal that by 2050 the sea level may rise by 30 centimeters which will inundate a large area in the south of Bangladesh and push saline seawater further inside the country making a vast land area unfit for agriculture. Besides it is predicted that rainfall would be erratic and that very heavy rainfall may occur within a very short period, which in turn may collapse the existing drainage system. Sea level rise coupled with storm surge may overtop the polder embankments, which would adversely affect crop production.

The coastal districts of Bangladesh are extremely vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Several million people live here with many living in high risk areas outside the coastal embankments which further are very vulnerable to storm surge. Since it is not possible for Bangladesh to shift all these people to the main land, the only option is to find ways so they may live safer with the effects of climate induced hazards. It has been observed by farmers that occasionally the older roads in particular impede drainage causing water logging and increased salinity. The problems are attributed partly to the design of the road and partly to climate change. Irrespective of the attribution the problems will be further aggravated by climate change. As remedial action the farmers have proposed establishment of culverts, where such have been found to be inadequate, as well as re-excavation of small drainage canals leading to the culverts.

The Danish development assistance to Bangladesh has earlier been centring on support to improvement of agriculture and infrastructure dating back to the Noakhali Rural Development Project (1978-1992) with employment of rural women using labour based methods as one priority. Bangladesh is now one of the pilot countries in the Danish

Climate and Development Action Programme within the areas of Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction, and a number of activities have been initiated.

Development objective   Means of verification Demonstrate the effectiveness of selected climate change

Development objective

 

Means of

verification

Demonstrate the effectiveness of selected climate change adaptation initiatives within infrastructure improvements and to get experience of raising climate change awareness in selected agricultural areas of the Coastal Zone of Bangladesh.

Final survey & report

Specific

Impact Indicators

 

Means of

Objectives

 

verification

Improved drainage of agricultural areas & erosion protection of infrastructures.

Different climate change adaptation options in place on the ground.

Final survey & report.

Raised community awareness of climate change adaptation.

Women’s climate change awareness

Project records.

raised.

UP members climate change

Interviews.

awareness raised.

Employment created for poor women in the pilot project area.

225,000 labour days generated (90%

Project records.

female).

Reduced migration from pilot

Interviews.

project area.

Outputs

Output indicators

Targets

Means of

verification

Output 1

Canals re-excavated.

4

km

 

Project records.

Output 2

Earth road embankments raised.

34

km

Project records.

Output 3

Union and Village roads with all weather protection.

8

km

 

Project records.

Output 4

Culverts and U-drains constructed.

90

meters

Project records.

Output 5

Road and embankment slopes protected.

500 m

 

Project records.

Output 6

Timber, fruit or herbal trees planted on road or on coastal fringes.

10

Km

 

6.500 Nos.

Project records.

80% survival

Output 7

Female labourers trained in climate change awareness & relevant IGA.

4, 000 Nos.

Project records.

200

Nos.

 

Interviews.

UP members have basic

 

understanding of climate change adaptation issues.

   

Output 8

Union Parishads constructing small infrastructures.

4 Nos.

Project records.

Interviews.

IGA: Income Generating Activities, UP: Union Parishad (the smallest administrative unit).

N/A 15

N/A

1. Detailed previous results related to this pilot project are described in the below listed

1.

Detailed previous results related to this pilot project are described in the below listed Danida evaluation reports:

- In the Wake of a Flagship. Ex-Post Impact Study of the Noakhali Rural Development Project in Bangladesh 2001/5.

- Minor Roads Completion Report, TSPSI, 2006.

- Rural Roads and Markets Access Component Completion Report (draft), APSII, April 2013.

2.

Map of the pilot project areas:

and Markets Access Component Completion Report (draft), APSII, April 2013. 2. Map of the pilot project

3.

Detailed Danida and GoB budget (Taka).

Targets (Gob + Danida) Physical & Financial

 

Unit

 

Targets

   

Description

Cost

     

GoB +

Million

 

Danida

 

GoB

Danida

 

Tk.

   

A)

Construction Works by LCS

   

Cost

 

Cost

 

Cost

Raising & re-sectioning of Earthen Roads/Embankments

0.75

34

Km

25.50

14

Km

10.50

48

Km

36.00

Improving of eroded Village Roads

4.00

6

Km

24.00

6

Km

24.00

12

Km

48.00

Improving of eroded Union Roads

4.50

2

Km

9.00

2

Km

9.00

4

Km

18.00

Construction of Drainage structures (Culverts/U-drain)

0.20

90

m

18.00

60

m

12.00

150

m

30.00

Khal/Canal Re-excavation

1.50

4

Km

6.00

4

Km

6.00

8

Km

12.00

Slope protection of roads/embankment/khals etc.

0.007

500

m

3.50

500

m

3.50

1,000

m

7.00

Tree Plantation on road sides/coastal fringes including Caretaking

0.25

10

Km

2.50

5

Km

1.25

15

Km

3.75

     

88.50

 

66.25

 

154.75

B)

Capacity Development

             

Scheme implementation/IGA training for LCS

0.0006

4,000

Nos.

2.40

-

0.00

4,000

Nos.

2.40

Training of UP members on Climate Change issues

0.0015

200

Nos.

0.30

-

0.00

200

Nos.

0.30

Capacity Development of Union Parishad (Construction of small scale infrastructures by Union Parishad on climate related issues)

 

4

Nos.

4.00

4

Nos.

3.50

8

Nos.

7.50

     

6.70

 

3.50

 

10.20

C)

Project Management

             

Technical assistance

   

24.30

 

0.00

 

24.30

International technical assistance

   

3.20

     

3.20

Operation

   

14.00

 

0.00

 

14.00

Equipment (minor office equipment)

   

3.35

 

1.00

 

4.30

Contingency

   

1.00

 

0.00

 

1.00

 

Sub-total : C

   

45.80

 

1.00

 

46.80

 

Total

141.00

70.75

211.75

Note : Tentative LCS Labour Days:

i) From Danida funds:

140,000

ii) From GoB funds:

85,000

Total:

225,000

4.

Detailed Danida budget (DKK).

Targets & Budget (Danida)

Description

Qty

Unit

Unit

Total Cost

Total Cost

(Danida +

Cost

Million Tk.

Million DKK

GoB)

Million

Tk.

A)

Construction Works by LCS

         

Output 1: Khal/Canal Re- excavation

4

Km

1.50

6.00

0.42

Output 2: Raising & re-sectioning of Earthen Roads/ Embankments

34

Km

0.75

25.50

1.80

Output 3: Improving of eroded Village/Union roads

8

Km

4.125

33.00

2.33

Output 4: Construction of Drainage structures (Culverts/U- drains)

90

m

0.20

18.00

1.27

Output 5: Slope protection of roads/embankments /khals etc.

500

m

0.007

3.50

0.25

Output 6: Plantation on road sides/coastal fringes including Caretaking

10

Km

0.25

2.50

0.18

 

Sub-total : A

     

88.50

6.11

B)

Capacity Development

         

Output 7:

         

Scheme implementation/IGA training for LCS

4,000

Nos.

0.0006

2.40

0.17

Training of UP members on Climate Change issues

200

Nos.

0.0015

0.30

0.02

Output 8:

         

Capacity Development of Union Parishad (Construction of small scale infrastructures by Union Parishad on climate related issues)

4

Nos.

1.00

4.00

0.28

 

Sub-total : B

     

6.70

0.47

C)

Project Management

         

Technical assistance

     

24.30

1.72

International technical assistance

     

3.20

0.23

Operation

     

14.00

0.99

Equipment (minor office equipment)

     

3.30

0.23

Contingency

     

1.00

0.10

 

Sub-total : C

     

45.80

3.24

 

Total

141.00

10.00

1 DKK = 14.148 BDT