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CHAPTER 4

ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

4 INTRODUCTION
This chapter deals with the analysis of demographic profile of respondents, exploring the study
constructs and exploring the domains which were taken for the study using statistical tools. The
analysis is done with one hundred twenty four front-line employees from various banks. The
significance of analysis is to access the factors that affect the study on front-line employees from
various banks.
The study constructs were
a) Organizational support
 Supervisory support

 Training

 Servant leadership

 Rewards

 Empowerment

 Service technology support

b) Customer orientation
c) Work outcomes
 Affective organizational commitment

 Job satisfaction

 Job performance

 Turnover intentions

Based on the analysis of the result, the factors which are highly affecting the study on front line
employees of banks were found out. The analysis chart indicates the less influencing and highly
influencing dimensions which were taken for the study. The less influencing factor is caused due to
the unsupported growth for organizational support and not committed to the work which should be
considered for improved services. Therefore, an alternative suggestion is provided for the front-line
employees for improving the growth of the organization and also to gain the customer satisfaction
and so it will be helpful for the banks to get more loyal customers.

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4.1 DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILING
With the help of percentage analysis, demographic variables are identified in percent. The
demographic variables are gender, marital status, Age and years of experience of 124 respondents.

4.1.1 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENT BASED ON GENDER


The classification of respondent based on Gender are shown in the table 4.1.1, the gender is
classified as Male and Female respondents.

TABLE 4.1.1 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON GENDER


S.NO GENDER NO OF PERCENTAGE OF
RESPONDENTS RESPONDENTS
1 Male 85 68.5
2 Female 39 31.5
Total 124 100

CHART 4.1.1 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENT BASED ON GENDER

No of respondents
Gender

Female 39

Male 85

0 20 40 60 80 100

Respondents

INTERPRETATION
The frequency of the Gender contains 124 (one hundred and twenty-four) respondents. In that 85
respondents are male and 39 are female, which is 68.5% male respondents and 31.5% female
respondents.

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4.1.2 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON MARITAL STATUS
The classification of respondent based on marital status are shown in the table 4.1.2, the marital
status is classified as Married and unmarried respondents.

TABLE 4.1.2 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON MARITAL STATUS


S.NO MARITAL NO OF PERCENTAGE OF
STATUS RESPONDENTS RESPONDENTS
1 Married 47 37.9
2 Unmarried 77 62.1
Total 124 100

CHART 4.1.2 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENT BASED ON MARITAL STATUS

No of respondents

Unmarried 77
Marital status

Married 47

0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

Respondents

INTERPRETATION
The frequency of the Marital status contains 124 (one hundred and twenty-four) respondents. In that
47 respondents are married and 77 respondents are unmarried, which is 37.9% married respondents
and 62.1% unmarried respondents.

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4.1.3 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON AGE
The classification of respondent based on age groups are shown in the table 4.1.3, the age groups are
categorized into five groups, namely 20-24 years old, 25-29 years old, 30-34 years old, 35-39 years
old, 40 years old or greater.

TABLE 4.1.3 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON AGE


S.NO AGE NO OF PERCENTAGE OF
RESPONDENTS RESPONDENTS
1 20-24 years old 37 29.8
2 25-29 years old 51 41.1
3 30-34 years old 24 19.4
4 35-39 years old 5 4.0
5 40 years old or 7 5.6
greater
Total 124 100

CHART 4.2.3 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENT BASED ON AGE

No of Respondents

40 years old or greater 7

35-39 years old 5


Age

30-34 years old 24

25-29 years old 51

20-24 years old 37

0 10 20 30 40 50 60

Respondents

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INTERPRETATION
The frequency of the age group contains 124 (one hundred and twenty four) respondents. In that 51
respondents belonging to the age group 25 – 29 years old is the highest percentage with 41.1 % of the
sample size and 5 respondents belonging to the age group 35-39 years old is the lowest percentage
with 4% of the sample size.

4.1.4 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENT BASED ON YEARS OF EXPERIENCE


The classification of respondent based on age groups are shown in the table 4.1.3, the age groups are
categorized into five groups, namely 20-24 years old, 25-29 years old, 30-34 years old, 35-39 years
old, 40 years old or greater.

TABLE 4.1.4 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON YEARS OF


EXPERIENCE
S.NO YEARS OF NO OF PERCENTAGE OF
EXPERIENCE RESPONDENTS RESPONDENTS
1 Less than 1 year 21 16.9
2 1-3 years 49 39.5
3 3-5 years 33 26.6
4 5-10 years 13 10.5
5 10 or more years 8 6.5
Total 124 100

CHART 4.1.4 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENT BASED ON YEARS OF


EXPERIENCE

No of Respondents
10 or more years 8
Years of Experience

5-10 years 13
3-5 years 33
1-3 years 49
Less than 1 year 21

0 10 20 30 40 50 60

Respondents

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INTERPRETATION
The frequency of the years of experience contains 124 (one hundred and twenty four) respondents. In
that 49 respondents have 1-3 years of experience which is the highest percentage with 39.5 % of the
sample size .The employees with less than 1 years of experience are with 16.9% and the employees
with 3-5 years of experience are with 26.6% and the employees with 5-10 years of experience are
with 10.5%. The least group of employees are those who have 10 or more years of experience and
they are with 6.5% of sample size

4.2 EXPLORING ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT, CUSTOMER


ORIENTATION AND WORK OUTCOMES (BANKING SECTOR)
The data is collected from 124 respondents from various banks. Affective organizational
commitment(AOC), Job satisfaction(JS), Job performance(JP), Turnover Intentions (TI), Supervisory
support(SS), Training (T), Servant leadership (SL), Rewards(R), Empowerment(E), Service
Technology support( STS), Customer orientation (CO) are the antecedents which are used in this
study and the descriptive for each of them are given below.
TABLE 4.2.1 EXPLORING THE DIMENSION 1: AFFECTIVE ORGANISATIONAL
COMMITMENT
S.NO AFFECTIVE MEAN STANDARD
ORGANISATONAL DEVIATION
COMMITMENT
1 I talk up this bank to my friends 4.20 .63
as a great organization to work
for
(AOC 1).
2 I find that my values and the 3.98 .63
bank‘s values are very similar.
(AOC 2).
3 I am proud to tell others that I 4.05 .82
Work for this bank (AOC 3).

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4 This bank inspires the very best in 3.91 .80
me in the way of job
performance.
(AOC 4).
5 I really care about the future of 3.91 .84
this bank (AOC 5).
6 This bank earned my complete 4.00 .74
loyalty (AOC 6).

CHART 4.2.1 CHART FOR DIMENSION 1 – AFFECTIVE ORGANISATIONAL


COMMITMENT

Mean

AOC6 4.0081

AOC5 3.9194
COMMITMENT

AOC4 3.9113

AOC3 4.0565
AFFECTIVE ORGANISATIONAL

AOC2 3.9839

AOC1 4.2016

3.7000 3.8000 3.9000 4.0000 4.1000 4.2000 4.3000

MEAN

INTERPRETATION
From the mean values for the variables in Affective organizational commitment, it is found that ―I
talk up this bank to my friends as a great organization to work for‖ has the greatest mean value of
4.2016 and is considered to be highly contributing to Affective organizational commitment. Almost
all the mean scores of other variables are contributing equally to affective organizational
commitment. This shows that there is more number of frontline bank employees who feel committed
to the organization they work for.

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TABLE 4.2.2 EXPLORING THE DIMENSION 2: JOB SATISFACTION

S.NO JOB SATISFACTION MEAN STANDARD


DEVIATION
1 My job is very pleasant (JS 1). 4.0081 .72690
2 I am highly satisfied with my job
4.0081 .72690
(JS 2).
3 I am very enthusiastic about my
4.0081 .71563
work (JS 3).
4 I find real enjoyment in my work
3.8468 .84627
(JS 4)
5 I definitely dislike my job (JS 5). 2.6613 1.19543
6 My job is very worthwhile (JS 6). 3.8548 .80338

CHART 4.2.2 CHART FOR DIMENSION 2 -JOB SATISFACTION

Mean

JS6 3.8548
JOBSATIS
FACTION

JS5 2.66 13

JS4 3.8468

JS3 4.0081

JS2 3.9113

JS1 4.0081

0.0000 0.5000 1.0000 1.5000 2.0000 2.5000 3.0000 3.5000 4.0000 4.5000

MEAN

INTERPRETATION:
From the mean values for the variables in Job satisfaction, it is found that the almost all the mean
scores of other variables are contributing equally to Job satisfaction except ―I definitely dislike my
job‖. This shows that frontline bank employees are satisfied with their job.

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TABLE 4.2.3 EXPLORING THE DIMENSION 3: JOB PERFORMANCE
S.NO JOB PERFORMANCE MEAN STANDARD
DEVIATION
1 I am a top performer (JP 1) 3.9597 .74789
2 I get along with customers better
3.9113 .67489
than others(JP 2)
3 My performance is in the top 10
3.7581 .86833
percent (JP 3).
4 I consistently deliver better quality
3.9355 .71842
service than others (JP 4).
5 I have been rated consistently as a
3.7339 .85643
star performer (JP 5).
6 I go out of my way to help
3.2581 1.24855
customers (JP 6).

CHART 4.2.3 CHART FOR DIMENSION 3 -JOB PERFORMANCE

Mean
3.2581
JP5 3. 7339
JOB PERFORMANCE

3.9355
JP3 3. 7581
3.9113
JP1 3.9597

0.0000 1.0000 2.0000 3.0000 4.0000 5.0000

MEAN

INTERPRETATION
From the mean values for the variables in Job performance,‖ I am a top performer‖,‖ I get along with
customers better than others‖ and ―I consistently deliver better quality service than others‖ are highly
contributing to the Job performance and almost the mean scores of other variables are contributing
equally to Job performance. This shows that the higher number of frontline bank employees are
performing well and they are consistently delivering better quality service to the customers.

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TABLE 4.2.4 EXPLORING THE DIMENSION 4: TURN OVER INTENTIONS
S.NO TURN OVRER INTENTION MEAN STANDARD
DEVIATION
1 I will probably be looking for
another job soon. I will probably be 2.4113 .79646
looking for another job soon (TI 1)
2 I will probably be looking for
another job soon. I will probably be 2.4919 .78083
looking for another job soon (TI 2)
3 I will quit this job sometime in the
2.4839 .78070
next year (TI 3)
4 I will quit this job sometime in the
2.5806 .77666
next year (TI 4)

CHART 4.2.4 CHART FOR DIMENSION 4 - TURN OVER INTENTIONS

Mean

TI4 2.5806
TURN OVER INTENTION

TI3 2.4839

TI2 2.4919

TI1 2.4113

2.3000 2.3500 2.4000 2.4500 2.5000 2.5500 2.6000

MEAN

INTERPRETATION
From the mean values for the variables in Job satisfaction, it is found that almost all the mean scores
of other variables are contributing equally to Turnover intention and the mean value is approximately
2.5 for all the variables. This shows that the higher number of frontline bank employees do not have
the idea of quitting the job.

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TABLE 4.2.5 EXPLORING THE DIMENSION 5: SUPERVISORY SUPPORT
S.NO SUPERVISORY SUPPORT MEAN STANDARD
DEVIATION
1 My boss is very concerned about
the welfare of those under him/her 3.9435 .73587
(SS 1).
2 My boss is willing to listen to
3.8145 .69102
work-related problems (SS 2).
3 My boss can be relied on when
3.8548 .76183
things get difficult at work (SS 3).

CHART 4.2.5 CHART FOR DIMENSION 5 – SUPERVISORY SUPPORT

Mean

SS3 3.8548
SUPERVISORY SUPPORT

SS2 3.8145

SS1 3.9435

3.7500 3.8000 3.8500 3.9000 3.9500 4.0000

MEAN

INTERPRETATION
From the mean values for the variables in Supervisory support, it is found that ―My boss is very
concerned about the welfare of those under him/her.‖ has the greatest mean value of 3.9435 and is
considered to be highly contributing to Supervisory support. Almost all the mean scores of other
variables are contributing equally to Supervisory support. This shows that frontline bank employees
are receiving better supervisory support from the organization they are working for and the
organizations are concerning about the welfare of these employees.

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TABLE 4.2.6 EXPLORING THE DIMENSION 6: TRAINING

S.NO TRAINING MEAN STANDARD


DEVIATION
1 At this bank, sufficient time is
3.8952 .69631
allocated for training (T 1).
2 At this bank, sufficient money is
3.8548 .70646
allocated for training (T 2).
3 At this bank, training programs
3.9194 .77141
are consistently evaluated( T 3)
4 At this bank, training programs
focus on how to improve service 3.9032 .73716
quality (T 4).

CHART 4.2.6 CHART FOR DIMENSION 6 – TRAINING

Mean
T4 3.9032
TRAINING

T3 3.9194
T2 3. 8548
T1 3. 8952

3.8200 3.8400 3.8600 3.8800 3.9000 3.9200 3.9400

MEAN

INTERPRETATION
From the mean values for the variables in training, it is found that ―At this bank, training programs
are consistently evaluated.‖ has the greatest mean value of 3.9194 and is considered to be highly
contributing to training. Almost all the mean scores of other variables are contributing equally to
training This shows that the higher number of frontline bank employees are receiving better training
from the organization they are working for and the organizations allocate sufficient time and money
to train the frontline bank employees in order to improve service quality .

49
TABLE 4.2.7 EXPLORING THE DIMENSION 7: SERVANT LEADRERSHIP
S.NO SERVANT LEADRESHIP MEAN STANDARD
DEVIATION
1 Management constantly communicates the
4.0484 .67300
importance of service quality (SL 1).
2 Management regularly spends time ―in the field‖
or ―on the floor‖ with customers and frontline 3.9113 .68683
employees (SL 2)
3 Management is constantly measuring service
3.9113 .68683
quality (SL 3).
4 Managers give personal input and leadership
3.9435 .74684
into creating quality service (SL 4).
5 Management provides resources, not just ―lip
service, to enhance our ability to provide 3.8629 .72510
excellence service (SL 5)
6 Management shows they care about service by
4.0081 .70418
constantly giving of themselves (SL 6).

CHART 4.2.7 CHART FOR DIMENSION 7 – SERVANT LEADRESHIP

Mean
SERVANT LEADERSHIP

4.0081
SL5 3.8629
SL3 3.8871 3.9435

SL1 3.9113 4.0484

3.7500 3.8000 3.8500 3.9000 3.9500 4.0000 4.0500 4.1000

MEAN

INTERPRETATION
From the mean values for the variables in servant leadership, it is found that ―Management
constantly communicates the importance of service quality‖ has the greatest mean value of 4.0484
and is considered to be highly contributing to training.

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Almost all the mean scores of other variables are contributing equally to training. This shows that the
most of the organizations in which the frontline bank employees are working are constantly
communicating and measuring the service quality.

TABLE 4.2.8 EXPLORING THE DIMENSION 8: REWARDS


S.NO REWARDS MEAN STANDARD
DEVIATION
1 We have financial incentives for service
3.9919 .68070
excellence (R1).
2 I receive visible recognition when I excel in
3.9113 .76522
serving customers (R2).
3 My promotion depends on the quality of
3.8710 .77531
service I deliver (R3).

CHART 4.2.8 CHART FOR DIMENSION 8 – REWARDS

Mean

R3 3.8710
REWARDS

R2 3.9113

R1 3.9919

3.8000 3.8500 3.9000 3.9500 4.0000 4.0500

MEAN

INTERPRETATION:
From the mean values for the variables in rewards, it is found that ―We have financial incentives for
service excellence has the greatest mean value of 3.9919 and is considered to be highly contributing
to rewards. Almost all the mean scores of other variables are contributing equally to training. This
shows that the most of the frontline bank employees are getting financial incentives for their service
excellence and their rewards depend on the quality of the service they deliver.

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TABLE 4.2.9 EXPLORING THE DIMENSION 9: EMPOWERMENT
S.NO EMPOWERMENT MEAN STANDARD
DEVIATION
1 I often make important customer decisions
3.4435 .98197
without seeking management approval (E 1).
2 I have the freedom and authority to act
independently in order to provide service 3.4516 .94872
excellence (E 2).

CHART 4.2.9 CHART FOR DIMENSION 9 – EMPOWERMENT

Mean

E2 3.4516
EMPOWERMENT

E1 3.4435

3.4380 3.4400 3.4420 3.4440 3.4460 3.4480 3.4500 3.4520 3.4540

MEAN

INTERPRETATION
From the mean values for the variables in empowerment, it is found that the mean scores of all the
variables are contributing equally to empowerment. This shows that the most of the frontline bank
employees have the freedom and authority to make important customer decisions without their
management approval in order to provide service excellence

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TABLE 4.2.10 EXPLORING THE DIMENSION 10: SERVICE TECHNOLOGY/SUPPORT
S.NO SERVICE TECHNOLOGY/SUPPORT MEAN STANDARD
DEVIATION
1 We have ―state of the art‖ technology to
3.9919 .74894
enhance our service quality (STS 1)
2 Sufficient money is allocated for technology to
support my efforts to deliver better service 3.8387 .70292
(STS 2).
3 I have the necessary technology support to serve
3.9431 .71633
my customers better (STS 3).
4 Management works hard to make our systems
3.8952 .68454
and processes more customer-friendly (STS 4).

CHART 4.2.10 CHART FOR DIMENSION 10 – SERVICE TECHNOLOGY/SUPPORT

Mean

STS4 3.8952
SERVICE TECHNOLOGY/SUPPORT

STS3 3.9431

STS2 3.8387

STS1 3.9919

3.7500 3.8000 3.8500 3.9000 3.9500 4.0000 4.0500

MEAN

INTERPRETATION
From the mean values for the variables in service technology/support, it is found that ―We have
―state of the art‖ technology to enhance our service quality‖ has the greatest mean value of 3.9919
and is considered to be highly contributing to rewards. Almost all the mean scores of other variables
are contributing equally to service technology/support. This shows that the most of the organizations
are providing technology support to the frontline bank employees in order to deliver better customer
service
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TABLE 4.2.11 EXPLORING THE DIMENSION 11: CUSTOMER ORIENTATION
S.NO CUSTOMER ORIENTATION MEAN STANDARD
DEVIATION
1 I enjoy nurturing my customers (CO 1). 3.4435 1.03831
2 I take pleasure in making every customer feel
3.7016 .77543
like he/she is the only customer (CO 2).
3 Every customer problem is important to me
3.7419 .70850
(CO 3).
4 I thrive on giving individual attention to each
3.7661 .82746
customer (CO 4)
5 I naturally read the customer to identify his/her
3.8548 .65882
needs (CO 5).
6 I generally know what customers want before
3.9274 .68874
they ask (CO 6).
7 I enjoy anticipating the needs of customers
3.8790 .71673
(CO 7).
8 I am inclined to read the customer‘s body
language to determine how much interaction to 3.7903 .78889
give (CO 8).
9 I enjoy delivering the intended service on time
3.8548 .69485
(CO 9).
10 I find a great deal of satisfaction in completing
3.8871 .77784
tasks precisely for customers (CO 10).
11 I enjoy having the confidence to provide good
3.8548 .75108
service (CO 11).
12 I enjoy remembering my customers‘ names
3.7419 .77429
(CO 12).
13 I enjoy getting to know my customers
3.6855 .90497
personally (CO 13).

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CHART 4.2.11 CHART FOR DIMENSION 11 – CUSTOMER ORIENTATION

Mean
CO13

CO11
CUSTOMER ORIENTATUON

CO9

CO7

CO5

CO3

CO1

3.2000 3.3000 3.4000 3.5000 3.6000 3.7000 3.8000 3.9000 4.0000

MEAN

INTERPRETATION
From the mean values for the variables in orientation, it is found that ―I generally know what
customers want before they ask has the greatest mean value of 3.9274 and is considered to be highly
contributing to customer orientation and ―I enjoy nurturing my customers has the least mean value
of 3.4435 and almost all the mean scores of other variables are contributing equally to customer
orientation. This shows that the most of the frontline bank employees enjoy anticipating the needs of
customer and deliver the intended service on time.

EXPLORING THE DOMAINS OF ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT,


CUSTOMER ORIENTATION AND WORK OUTCOMES (IN
BANKING SECTOR)
The dimensions taken for the study are Affective organizational commitment(AOC), Job
satisfaction(JS), Job performance(JP), Turnover Intentions (TI), Supervisory support(SS), Training
(T), Servant leadership (SL), Rewards(R), Empowerment(E), Service Technology support( STS),
Customer orientation (CO). The highest and least contributing dimensions are given below

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TABLE 4.3 EXPLORING T H E DIMENSIONS OF ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT,
CUSTOMER ORIENTATION AND WORK OUTCOMES
S.NO CONSTRUCTS MEAN STANDARD
DEVIATION
1. AFFECTIVE
ORGANISATIONAL 4.0134 .52257
COMMITMENT(AOC)
2. JOB SATISFACTION(JS) 3.7151 .51261
3. JOB PERFORMANCE(JP) 3.7594 .51152
4. TURN OVER INTENTION(TI) 2.4919 .63753
5. SUPERVISORY
3.8710 .58544
SUPPORT(SS)
6. TRAINING(T) 3.8931 .56235
7. SERVANT LEADERSHIP(SL) 3.9435 .47707
8. REWARDS 3.9247 .53906
9. EMPOWERMENT(E) 3.4476 .89900
10. SERVICE TECHNOLOGY
3.9133 .54198
SUPPORT(STS)
11. CUSTOMER
3.7792 .48103
ORIENTATION(CO)

CHART 4.3 CHARTS FOR ALL CONSTRUCTS

Mean
Customer orientation 3.7792
3.9133
Empowerment 3.4476
CONSTRUCTS

3.9247
Servant Leadership 3.9435
3.8931
Supervisory support 3.8710
2.4919
Job performance 3.7594
3.7151
Affective organisational commitment 4.0134
0.0000 0.5000 1.0000 1.5000 2.0000 2.5000 3.0000 3.5000 4.0000 4.5000

MEAN

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4.4 TESTING FOR MEAN DIFFERENCES IN ORGANISATIONAL
SUPPORT, WORK OUTCOMES AND CUSTOMER ORIENTATION ACROSS
VARIOUS LEVELS OF DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF THE FRONTLINE
EMPLOYEES.

The perspectives of Organizational support, work outcomes and customer orientation change were
accessed by frontline employees, In order to study whether the employees have same perceptions
based on various demographic profiles. An independent T-test was carried out to analyze the
differences based on gender and marital status. Further data analysis will be carried out based on the
study.

4.4.1 TESTING FOR DIFFERENCES IN ORGANISATIONAL SUPPORT, WORK OUTCOMES


AND CUSTOMER ORIENTATION ACROSS CHANGE BASED ON GENDER

The perspectives of Organizational support, work outcomes and customer orientation change were
accessed by frontline employees. To study whether the employees have same perceptions, an
independent T-test was carried out. T-test was used to test the difference in the sub-constructs
between the genders (male or female) of the employees. The hypothesis formulated is as follows:

H0: There is no significant difference in the mean scores of the constructs Organizational support,
work outcomes and customer orientation in banking sector with respect to male and female
employees.

Ha: There is a significant difference in the mean scores of the constructs Organizational support,
work outcomes and customer orientation in banking sector with respect to male and female
employees.

57
TABLE: 4.4.1 T-TEST- TESTING FOR DIFFERENCE IN THE PERSPECTIVES BETWEEN
MALE AND FEMALE EMPLOYEES WITH REFERENCE TO THE CONSTRUCTS
ORGANISATIONAL SUPPORT, WORK OUTCOMES AND CUSTOMER ORIENTATION

Sig. (2- ACCEPTED/


GND Mean F Sig. T df tailed) REJECTED
AOC M 4.03 1.437 0.233 0.686 122 0.494 ACCEPTED
Affective F
organizational 3.96 0.767 98.03 0.445
commitment
JS M 3.70 2.714 0.102 -0.23 122 0.818
Job satisfaction F ACCEPTED
3.73 -0.25 90.454 0.803
JP M -
Job performance 3.72 0.316 0.575 1.155 122 0.25
F - ACCEPTED
3.83 1.155 73.839 0.252
TI M -
Turnover 2.42 0.013 0.909 1.701 122 0.091
intentions F - ACCEPTED
2.63 1.724 76.271 0.089
SS M 3.93 0.139 0.71 1.88 122 0.062
Supervisory F ACCEPTED
support
3.72 1.802 66.754 0.076
T M -
Training 3.86 2.307 0.131 0.917 122 0.361
F ACCEPTED
3.96 -1.03 98.98 0.306
SL M 3.94 1.236 0.269 0.188 122 0.851
Servant F ACCEPTED
leadership 3.93 0.196 81.957 0.845
R M -
rewards 3.87 5.275 0.023 1.418 122 0.159
F - ACCEPTED
4.02 1.551 92.635 0.124
E M -
Empowerment 3.31 0.062 0.804 2.423 122 0.017
F - REJECTED
3.73 2.392 71.639 0.019
STS M -
Service 3.91 0.506 0.478 0.047 122 0.963
technology F - ACCEPTED
support 3.91 0.048 77.689 0.962
CO M -
Customer 3.77 0.916 0.34 0.307 122 0.759
orientation F ACCEPTED
3.79 -0.34 95.738 0.734
M- Male F- Female
58
Table 4.4.1 shows that the significance values (2-tailed test / p value) for the constructs
Organizational support (Supervisory support (p=0.062), training (p=0.361), servant leadership
(p=0.851), rewards (p=0.159), service technology support (p=0.963)), Customer orientation
(p=0.759) and work outcomes (affective organizational commitment (p=0.494), job satisfaction
(p=0.818), job performance (p=0.25), turnover intentions (p=0.091)) is greater than 0.05 as seen in
table. This accepts the null hypothesis stating that there is no significant difference between the
perspective of male and female with respect to the constructs Organizational support, work outcomes
and customer orientation.

The significance values (2-tailed test / p value) for the constructs Organizational support
(Empowerment (p=0.017)) is lesser than 0.05 as seen in table. This accepts the alternate hypothesis
stating that there is a significant difference between the perspective of male and female with respect
to the constructs Organizational support, work outcomes and customer orientation.

The t test results indicate that there exists no difference between male and female employees with
respect to the constructs namely Organizational support, work outcomes and customer orientation,
this implies that both male and female counterparts give equal importance to task and relationships at
workplace, however the mean scores for female respondents were similar to their male counterparts.

The t test results indicate that there exists a difference between male and female employees with
respect to the constructs namely Organizational support, work outcomes and customer orientation,
this implies that both male and female counterparts give equal importance to task and relationships at
workplace, however the mean scores for female respondents was not similar to their male
counterparts.

With respect to individualistic and collective learning, both male and female employees exhibited no
difference, this implies that both genders try to excel at the workplace and prefer to create a personal
identity of their own, However they also adopt with equal ease to consult friends, family and take
advantage of the groups for important decisions at the workplace.

With respect to employee attitude, female employees show more leadership qualities than male
employees and they also more benefited with change in culture. This shows that female employees
are equally powerful with the male employees in the workplace.

59
4.4.2 TESTING FOR DIFFERENCES IN ORGANISATIONAL SUPPORT, WORK
OUTCOMES AND CUSTOMER ORIENTATION ACROSS CHANGE BASED ON
MARITAL STATUS

The perspectives of Organizational support, work outcomes and customer orientation change were
accessed by frontline employees. To study whether the employees have same perceptions, an
independent T-test was carried out. T-test was used to test the difference in the sub-constructs
between the Marital Status (Married or Unmarried) of the employees. The hypothesis formulated is as
follows:

H0: There is no significant difference in the mean scores of the constructs Organizational support,
work outcomes and customer orientation in banking sector with respect to married and unmarried
employees.

Ha: There is a significant difference in the mean scores of the constructs Organizational support,
work outcomes and customer orientation in banking sector with respect to married and unmarried
employees.

60
TABLE: 4.4.2 T-TEST- TESTING FOR DIFFERENCE IN THE PERSPECTIVES BETWEEN
MARRIED AND UNMARRIED EMPLOYEES WITH REFERENCE TO THE
CONSTRUCTS ORGANISATIONAL SUPPORT, WORK OUTCOMES AND CUSTOMER
ORIENTATION

Sig. (2- ACCEPTED/


MS Mean F Sig. T df tailed) REJECTED
AOC M 4.03 .501 .480 .306 122 .760
Affective UM 4.00 .302 93.183 .763 ACCEPTED
organizational
commitment
JS M 3.80 .089 .766 1.596 122 .113
Job satisfaction UM 3.65 1.630 103.956 .106 ACCEPTED

JP M 3.86 2.410 .123 1.754 122 .082


Job Performance UM 3.69 1.737 94.165 .086 ACCEPTED

TI M 2.54 .361 .549 .762 122 .448


Turnover UM 2.45 .748 91.596 .456 ACCEPTED
Intentions
SS M 3.90 1.240 .268 .546 122 .586
Supervisory UM 3.84 .531 88.894 .597 ACCEPTED
Support
T M 3.92 .513 .475 .500 122 .618
Training UM 3.87 .497 95.881 .620 ACCEPTED

Sl M 4.05 3.981 .048 2.092 122 .038


Servant UM 3.87 2.238 116.579 .027 REJECTED
Leadership
R M 3.94 .859 .356 .298 122 .766
Rewards UM 3.91 .308 107.891 .758 ACCEPTED

E M 3.52 1.438 .233 .712 122 .478


Empowerment UM 3.40 .723 102.063 .472 ACCEPTED

STS M 3.90 .032 .859 -.145 122 .885


Service UM 3.91 -.143 92.645 .887 ACCEPTED
technology
support
CO M 3.81 .089 .766 .618 122 .538
Customer UM 3.75 .625 100.906 .533 ACCEPTED
orientation
M- Married UM- Unmarried

61
Table 4.4.2 shows that the significance values (2-tailed test / p value) for the constructs
Organizational support (Supervisory support (p=0.586), training (p=0.618),rewards(p=0.766),
empowerment(p=0.478), service technology support(p=0.885), Customer orientation (p=0.538) and
work outcomes (affective organizational commitment (p=0.760), job satisfaction (p=0.113), job
performance (p=0.082), turnover intentions (p=0.448)) is greater than 0.05 as seen in table 4.5.2.

This accepts the null hypothesis stating that there is no significant difference between the perspective
of married and unmarried with respect to the constructs Organizational support, work outcomes and
customer orientation.

The significance values (2-tailed test / p value) for the constructs Organizational support (Servant
Leadership (p=0.038)) is lesser than 0.05 as seen in this table. This accepts the alternate hypothesis
stating that there is no significant difference between the perspective of married and unmarried with
respect to the constructs Organizational support, work outcomes and customer orientation.

The t test results indicate that there exists no difference between married and unmarried employees
with respect to the constructs namely Organizational support, work outcomes and customer
orientation, this implies that both married and unmarried counterparts give equal importance to task
and relationships at workplace, however the mean scores for unmarried respondents were similar to
their married counterparts.

The t test results indicate that there exists a difference between married and unmarried employees
with respect to the constructs namely Organizational support, work outcomes and customer
orientation, this implies that both married and unmarried counterparts give equal importance to task
and relationships at workplace, however the mean scores for unmarried respondents was not similar
to their married counterparts.

With respect to individualistic and collective learning, both married and unmarried employees
exhibited no difference, this implies that both marital status try to excel at the workplace and prefer to
create a personal identity of their own, However they also adopt with equal ease to consult friends,
family and take advantage of the groups for important decisions at the workplace.

With respect to front-line employee attitude, unmarried employees show more leadership qualities
than married employees and they are more benefited with change in culture. This shows that
unmarried employees are equally powerful with the married employees in the workplace.

62
4.5 TESTING FOR HOMOGENEITY IN ORGANISATIONAL SUPPORT,
WORK OUTCOMES AND CUSTOMER ORIENTATION ACROSS VARIOUS
LEVELS OF DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF THE FRONTLINE
EMPLOYEES.

The perspectives of Organizational support, work outcomes and customer orientation change were
accessed by frontline employees, In order to study whether the employees have same perceptions
based on various demographic profiles. An ANOVA test was carried out to study the homogeneity in
the perception of the front-line employees with respect to the age group and experience of the sample
employees. Further data analysis will be carried out based on the study.

4.5.1 TEST FOR HOMOGENEITY ACROSS AGE OF RESPONDENTS AND VARIOUS


CONSTRUCTS

The sample under this study is divided into five groups, namely 20-24 years, 25-29 years, 30-34
years, 35-39 years and 40 years older or greater. The constructs are Organizational Support
(supervisory support, training, servant leadership, rewards, empowerment, and service technology
support), Customer orientation and Work outcomes (Affective organizational commitment, job
satisfaction and job performance). Existence of Homogeneity in the perception of respondents with
respect to the three above-stated constructs was tested across the five age groups of the sample
respondents. The hypothesis is as below.

Ha: There is homogeneity in organizational support, work outcomes and customer orientation across
different levels of age group of employees.

The results of ANOVA are as follows:

63
TABLE: 4.5.1 TEST FOR HOMOGENEITY ACROSS AGE OF RESPONDENTS
AND VARIOUS CONSTRUCTS

DESCRIPTIVES ANOVA
Sum of Mean
Mean Squares Df Square F Sig.
AOC 20-24 years old Between
3.91 1.614 4 .403 1.502 .206
Affective Groups
organizational 25-29 years old Within
4.00 31.975 119 .269
commitment Groups
30-34 years old 4.09
35-39 years old 3.90
40 years old or
4.40
greater
JS 20-24 years old Between
3.63 1.521 4 .380 1.469 .216
Job satisfaction Groups
25-29 years old Within
3.72 30.800 119 .259
Groups
30-34 years old 3.89
35-39 years old 3.63
40 years old or
3.45
greater
JP 20-24 years old Between
3.62 1.939 4 .485 1.907 .114
Job performance Groups
25-29 years old Within
3.77 30.245 119 .254
Groups
30-34 years old 3.95
35-39 years old 3.93
40 years old or
3.59
greater
TI 20-24 years old Between
2.37 2.316 4 .579 1.445 .223
Turnover Groups
intentions 25-29 years old Within
2.48 47.676 119 .401
Groups
30-34 years old 2.72
35-39 years old 2.65
40 years old or
2.28
greater
SS 20-24 years old Between
3.74 2.835 4 .709 2.145 .079
Supervisory Groups
support 25-29 years old Within
3.96 39.323 119 .330
Groups
30-34 years old 3.93
35-39 years old 4.13
40 years old or 3.42
64
greater
T 20-24 years old Between
3.77 3.913 4 .978 3.327 .013
Training Groups
25-29 years old Within
3.95 34.984 119 .294
Groups
30-34 years old 4.08
35-39 years old 4.00
40 years old or
3.32
greater
Sl 20-24 years old Between
3.80 1.690 4 .423 1.912 .113
Servant Groups
Leadership 25-29 years old Within
3.98 26.303 119 .221
Groups
30-34 years old 4.11
35-39 years old 3.96
40 years old or
3.78
greater
R 20-24 years old Between
3.85 1.477 4 .369 1.282 .281
Rewards Groups
25-29 years old Within
3.94 34.265 119 .288
Groups
30-34 years old 4.02
35-39 years old 4.20
40 years old or
3.61
greater
E 20-24 years old Between
3.37 1.961 4 .490 .599 .664
Empowerment Groups
25-29 years old Within
3.47 97.448 119 .819
Groups
30-34 years old 3.62
35-39 years old 3.40
40 years old or
3.07
greater
STS 20-24 years old Between
3.85 1.761 4 .440 1.524 .200
Service Groups
technology 25-29 years old Within
4.00 34.370 119 .289
support Groups
30-34 years old 3.88
35-39 years old 4.10
40 years old or
3.53
greater
CO 20-24 years old Between
3.73 .951 4 .238 1.028 .396
Customer Groups
orientation 25-29 years old Within
3.76 27.510 119 .231
Groups
30-34 years old 3.91

65
35-39 years old 3.92
40 years old or
3.57
greater

Table 4.5.1 shows that the significance value for Organization Support (Training) (p=0.013),
respectively is less than 0.05, indicating that the null hypothesis is rejected and alternate hypothesis is
accepted. Hence there exists difference in perception of Organization Support (Training) by the
respondents of different age levels. However, for the constructs Organizational support (Supervisory
support, servant leadership, rewards, empowerment, service technology support) the significance
values (p=0.079), (p=0.113), (p=0.281), (p=0.664), (p=0.200), Customer Orientation the significance
value (p=0.396) and work outcomes (affective organizational commitment, job satisfaction, job
performance and turnover intentions) the significance value (p=0.206), (p=0.216), (p=0.114),
(p=0.223)is greater than 0.05. So, the null hypothesis is accepted and there is no significant difference
in the perception of Employee attitude towards (Customer orientation) and Organizational Support
and work outcomes by the respondents of different age levels.

From the above table, it can be observed that employees under the age group above 40 (m=4.4048)
are more committed and interested in affective organizational commitment, ( m=3.489) it can be
observed that employees under the age group 30-34 years old are more committed in Job satisfaction,
(m=3.95) it can be observed that employees under the age group 30-34 years old are more committed
in Job performance, (m= 2.72) it can be observed that employees under the age group 30-34 years old
are more committed in Turnover intentions, (m=4.13) it can be observed that employees under the
age group 35-39 years old are more committed in Supervisory support, (m=4.08) it can be observed
that employees under the age group 30-34 years old are more committed in Training, (m= 4.11) it can
be observed that employees under the age group 30-34 years old are more committed in Servant
leadership, (m=4.20) it can be observed that employees under the age group 35-39 years old are more
interested in giving Rewards, (m=3.62) it can be observed that employees under the age group 30-34
years old are more committed in Empowerment, (m=4.10) it can be observed that employees under
the age group 35-39 years old are more committed in Service technology support, and (m= 3.92) it
can be observed that employees under the age group 35-39 years old are more committed in
Customer orientation.

66
45.2 TEST FOR HOMOGENEITY ACROSS YEARS OF EXPERIENCE OF RESPONDENTS
AND VARIOUS CONSTRUCTS

The sample under this study is divided into five groups, namely less than 1 year, 1-3 years, 3-5 years,
5-10 years and 10 years older or more. The constructs are Organizational Support (supervisory
support, training, servant leadership, rewards, empowerment, and service technology support),
Customer orientation and Work outcomes (Affective organizational commitment, job satisfaction and
job performance). Existence of Homogeneity in the perception of respondents with respect to the
three above-stated constructs was tested across the five experience groups of the sample respondents.
The hypothesis is as below.

Ha: There is homogeneity in organizational support, work outcomes and customer orientation across
different levels of experience group of employees.

The results of ANOVA are as follows:

TABLE: 4.5.2 TEST FOR HOMOGENEITY ACROSS YEARS OF EXPERIENCE OF


RESPONDENTS AND VARIOUS CONSTRUCTS

DESCRIPTIVES ANOVA
Sum of Mean
Mean Squares df Square F Sig.
AOC Less than Between
3.73 3.218 4 .805 3.152 .017
Affective 1 year Groups
organizational 1-3 years Within
4.05 30.371 119 .255
commitment Groups
3-5 years 4.07
5-10 years 3.91
10 or more
4.39
years
JS Less than Between
3.44 2.535 4 .634 2.532 .044
Job satisfaction 1 year Groups
1-3 years Within
3.70 29.785 119 .250
Groups
3-5 years 3.82
5-10 years 3.92
10 or more
3.68
years
JP Less than Between
3.52 1.419 4 .355 1.372 .248
Job performance 1 year Groups
1-3 years Within
3.79 30.764 119 .259
Groups
67
3-5 years 3.81
5-10 years 3.80
10 or more
3.83
years
TI Less than Between
2.48 .226 4 .056 .135 .969
Turnover 1 year Groups
Intentions 1-3 years Within
2.49 49.766 119 .418
Groups
3-5 years 2.43
5-10 years 2.57
10 or more
2.56
years
SS Less than Between
3.55 2.599 4 .650 1.955 .106
Supervisory 1 year Groups
support 1-3 years Within
3.95 39.558 119 .332
Groups
3-5 years 3.92
5-10 years 3.87
10 or more
3.91
years
T Less than Between
3.64 4.197 4 1.049 3.598 .008
Training 1 year Groups
1-3 years Within
3.94 34.700 119 .292
Groups
3-5 years 3.95
5-10 years 4.19
10 or more
3.46
years
Sl Less than Between
3.69 1.597 4 .399 1.800 .133
Servant 1 year Groups
Leadership 1-3 years Within
3.97 26.397 119 .222
Groups
3-5 years 4.02
5-10 years 3.94
10 or more
4.04
years
R Less than Between
3.77 1.154 4 .288 .992 .415
Rewards 1 year Groups
1-3 years Within
3.97 34.588 119 .291
Groups
3-5 years 4.02
5-10 years 3.79
10 or more
3.83
years
E Less than Between
3.78 6.554 4 1.639 2.100 .085
Empowerment 1 year Groups
68
1-3 years Within
3.34 92.855 119 .780
Groups
3-5 years 3.21
5-10 years 3.61
10 or more
3.87
years
STS Less than Between
3.77 1.522 4 .381 1.309 .271
Service 1 year Groups
technology 1-3 years Within
4.00 34.608 119 .291
support Groups
3-5 years 3.97
5-10 years 3.78
10 or more
years 3.68

CO Less than Between


Customer 1 year 3.64 Groups .616 4 .154 .658 .622
orientation
1-3 years Within
3.80 27.845 119 .234
Groups
3-5 years 3.85
5-10 years 3.75
10 or more
3.70
years

Table 4.5.2 shows that the significance value for Organization Support (Training) (p=0.013), work
outcomes (affective organizational commitment (p=0.17) and job satisfaction (p=0.044) respectively
is less than 0.05, indicating that the null hypothesis is rejected and alternate hypothesis is accepted.
Hence there exists difference in perception of Organization Support (Training) by the respondents of
different experience levels. However, for the constructs Organizational support (Supervisory support,
servant leadership, rewards, empowerment, service technology support) the significance values
(p=0.106), (p=0.133), (p=0.415), (p=0.085), (p=0.271), Customer Orientation the significance value
(p=0.622) and work outcomes (job performance and turnover intentions) the significance values
(p=0.248), (p=0.969) is greater than 0.05. So, the null hypothesis is accepted and there is no
significant difference in the perception of Employee attitude towards (Customer orientation) and
Organizational Support and work outcomes by the respondents of different experience levels.

From the above table, it can be observed that employees under the age group above 10 or more years
(m=4.39) are more experienced in affective organizational commitment, (m=3.92) it can be observed

69
that employees under the age group 5-10 years are more experienced in job satisfaction, (m=3.83) it
can be observed that employees under the age group above 10 or more years are more experienced in
job performance, (m= 2.57) it can be observed that employees under the age group 5-10 years are
more experienced in turnover intentions, (m=3.95) it can be observed that employees under the age
group 1-3 years are more experienced in supervisory support, (m=4.19) it can be observed that
employees under the age group 5-10 years are more experienced in training, (m= 4.04) it can be
observed that employees under the age group above 10 or more years are more experienced in servant
leadership, (m=4.02) it can be observed that employees under the age group 3-5 years are more
experienced in rewards, (m=3.87) it can be observed that employees under the age group above 10 or
more years are more experienced in empowerment, it can be observed that employees under the age
group 30-34 years old are more committed in Empowerment, (m=4.00) it can be observed that
employees under the age group 1-3 years are more experienced in Service technology support and
(m= 3.85) it can be observed that employees under the age group 3-5 years are more experienced in
Customer orientation

4.6 STUDYING THE DIRECTION AND MAGNITUDE OF RELATIONSHIP


BETWEEN THE ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT, CUSTOMER
ORIENTATION AND WORK OUTCOMES AMONG FRONT LINE BANK
EMPLOYEES.

4.6.1 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ORGANISATIONAL SUPPORT, CUSTOMER


ORIENTATION AND WORK OUTCOMES

The Correlation between Organizational Support, Customer orientation and work outcomes was
analyzed by means of a correlation matrix and is shown in Table 4.7.1.

Ha3(a): There is a relationship between Organizational Support, Customer orientation and work

outcomes

70
TABLE: 4.6.1 CORRELATION BETWEEN ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT, CUSTOMER
ORIENTATION AND WORK OUTCOMES

AOC JS JP TI SS T SL R E STS CO

AOC 1

JS .596** 1
JP .527** .501** 1
TI -.057 -.017 .130 1

SS .362** .426** .475** -.123 1


T .483** .525** .531** -.165 .458** 1
Sl .475** .480** .559** -.030 .528** .566** 1
R .459** .335** .468** .038 .235** .563** .544** 1
E .048 .145 .179* .308** .039 .035 .153 -.033 1
** ** ** ** ** ** **
STS .438 .255 .382 -.121 .415 .436 .437 .383 .080 1
CO .556** .477** .556** -.131 .461** .624** .583** .586** .102 .441** 1
AOC-Affective organizational commitment, JS-Job satisfaction, JP-Job performance, TI- Turnover Intentions, SS-supervisory support, T-
training SL- Servant Leadership, R-Rewards, E- Empowerment, STS- Service technology support and CO- customer orientation

**Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2-tailed).

Table 4.6.1 shows that Affective organizational commitment has significant correlation with
respect to Job satisfaction (r = 0.596), Job performance (r = 0.527), supervisory support (r = 0.362),
training (r=0.483), servant leadership (r=0.475), rewards (r=0.459), service technology support
(r=0.438) and customer orientation (r=0.556).Empowerment (r = 0.048) has a very less correlation
with affective organizational commitment. Turnover Intentions (r=-0.057) has a negative correlation
with affective organizational commitment.

Job Satisfaction has significant correlation with respect to Job performance (r=0.501), supervisory
support (r=0.426), Training (r=0.525), servant leadership (r=0.480), rewards (r=0.335), empowerment
(r=0.145), service technology support (r=0.225) and customer orientation (r=0.477). Turnover
intentions (r=-0.017) has a negative correlation with job satisfaction.

71
Job Performance is significantly correlated with turnover intentions (r=0.130), supervisory support
(r=0.475), training (r=0.531), servant leadership (r=0.559), rewards (r=0.468), empowerment
(r=0.17), service technology support (0.382) and customer orientation (r=0.556).

Turnover Intentions has significantly correlated with empowerment (r=0.308). Turnover Intentions
has a negative correlation with supervisory support (r=-0.123), training (r=-0.165), servant leadership
(r=-0.30), service technology support (r=-0.121) and customer orientation (r=-0.131). Turnover
Intentions has a low correlation with rewards (r=0.038).

Supervisory support has significantly correlated with training (r=0.458), servant leadership
(r=0.528), rewards (r=0.235), service technology support (r=0.415), and customer orientation
(r=0.461) and has a low correlation with empowerment (r=0.039).

Training has significantly correlated with servant leadership (r=0.566), rewards (r=0.563), service
technology support (r=0.436) and customer orientation (r=0.624) and has a low correlation with
empowerment (r=0.035).

Servant leadership has significantly correlated with rewards (r=0.544), empowerment (r=0.153),
service technology support (r=0.437) and customer orientation (r=0.583) and has a negative
correlation with turnover intentions (r=-0.030).

Rewards has significantly correlated with service technology support (r=0.383) and customer
orientation (r=0.586) and has a negative correlation with empowerment(r=-0.33) and has a low
correlation with turnover intentions (r=0.038)

Empowerment has significantly correlated with service technology support (r=0.080) and customer
orientation (r=0.102) and has a low correlation with supervisory support (r=0.039) and training
(r=0.035) and has a negative correlation with rewards (r=-0.33)

Service technology support has significantly correlated with customer orientation (r=0.441),
affective organizational commitment (r=0.438), job satisfaction (r=0.255), job performance
(r=0.382), supervisory support (r=0.415), training (r=0.436), servant leadership (r=0.437), rewards
(0.383) and empowerment (r=0.080) and has a negative correlation with turnover intentions (r=-
0.121).

72
Customer orientation has significantly correlated with affective organizational commitment
(r=0.556), job satisfaction (r=0.477), job performance (r=0.556), supervisory support (r=0.461),
training (r=0.624), servant leadership (r=0.583), rewards (0.586) and empowerment (r=0.102) and
service technology support (r=0.441) and has a negative correlation with turnover intentions (r=-
0.131).

4.7 STUDYING THE IMPACT OF ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT,


CUSTOMER ORIENATION ON WORK OUTCOMES AND TURNOVER
INTENTIONS

4.7.1 TO ANALYSE THE INFLUENCE OF ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT ON WORK


OUTCOMES (JOB PERFORMANCE)
The respondents work outcomes (Job performance) are influenced by various factors like
organizational support. In order to find the extent to which each factor influences the work outcomes,
multiple regression analysis has been carried out. Organizational support has six constructs, namely
supervisory support, training, servant leadership, rewards, empowerment and service technology
support and work outcomes has 4 constructs such as affective organizational commitment, job
satisfaction, job performance and turnover intentions but here were doing regression with six
organizational supports on Work outcomes (Job performance).
4.7.1.1 ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT ON WORK
OUTCOMES (JOB PERFORMANCE)

Ha4(d): The organizational support which includes supervisory support, training, servant leadership,

rewards, empowerment and service technology support are good enough in predicting the job
performance of work outcomes.

Multiple regression analysis in SPSS was used to analyze the above hypothesis and the result is as
follows.

73
TABLE 4.7.1.1 TESTING THE INFLUENCE OF ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT ON
WORK OUTCOMES (JOB PERFORMANCE)

Unstandardized Standardized
Model Coefficients Coefficients T Sig.
Std.
B Error Beta
1 (Constant) .395 .364 1.085 .280
SS .191 .076 .219 2.511 .013
T .173 .086 .190 2.012 .047
SL .206 .106 .193 1.940 .055
R .184 .087 .194 2.115 .037
E .078 .040 .137 1.942 .055
STS .037 .077 .039 .477 .634

R .665a
R square .443
Adjusted R
.414
square

Sig .000b
Dependent
construct JP

The dependent construct is Job performance (work outcomes) and the independent constructs are
supervisory support, training, servant leadership, rewards and empowerment (organizational support).
The significance value from Table 4.7.1.1 shows that Job performance (work outcomes) is influenced
by the constructs supervisory support, training and rewards (organizational support) as p = 0.00
which is less than 0.05, except for the construct servant leadership, empowerment and service
technology support. The value of R square and adjusted R square showed that 44% and 41% of
variation in work outcomes is explained by the independent constructs. The alternate hypothesis that
the independent variables are good enough in predicting the organizational support on work outcomes
(job performance) is accepted and the model is fit.

74
MULTIPLE LINEAR EQUATIONS FOR ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT ON WORK
OUTCOMES

Organizational support on work outcomes = 0.395 + 0.206 (servant leadership) + supervisory support
(0.191) +Rewards (0.184) +Training (0.173) +empowerment (0.078)

Amongst the constructs of Organizational support these supervisory support (β = 0.191), training (β =
0.173), servant leadership (β = 0.206), rewards (β = 0.184) and empowerment (β = 0.078) seemed to
influence the organizational support on work outcomes. Therefore it is inferred that organizational
support on work outcomes is influenced by the constructs supervisory support, training, servant
leadership, rewards, empowerment and service technology support which indicates that work
outcomes on job performance increases supervisory support, training, servant leadership, rewards,
empowerment and service technology support.

47.2 TO ANALYSE THE INFLUENCE OF CUSTOMER ORIENTATION ON WORK


OUTCOMES (AFFECTIVE ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT)
The respondents work outcomes (affective organizational commitment) are influenced by various
factors like customer orientation. In order to find the extent to which each factor influences the work
outcomes (affective organizational commitment), multiple regression analysis has been carried out.
Customer orientation and work outcomes has 4 constructs such as affective organizational
commitment, job satisfaction, job performance and turnover intentions but here were doing regression
with customer orientation on work outcomes (affective organizational commitment).

4.7.2.1 ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF CUSTOMER ORIENTATION ON WORK


OUTCOMES (AFFECTIVE ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT)

Ha4(d): The customer orientation is good enough in predicting the affective organizational

commitment of work outcomes.


Multiple regression analysis in SPSS was used to analyze the above hypothesis and the result is as
follows.

75
TABLE 4.7.2.1 TESTING THE INFLUENCE OF CUSTOMER ORIENTATION ON WORK
OUTCOMES (AFFECTIVE ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT)

Standardized
Unstandardized Coefficients Coefficients
Std.
Model B Error Beta t Sig.
1 (Constant) 1.729 .311 5.555 .000
CO .604 .082 .556 7.395 .000

R .556a
R square .310
Adjusted R
.304
Square

Sig .000b
Dependent Affective organizational
construct commitment

The dependent construct is work outcomes (Affective organizational commitment) and the
independent constructs are customer orientation. The significance value from Table 4.7.2.1 shows
that work outcomes (Affective organizational commitment) is influenced by the construct customer
orientation as p = 0.00 which is less than 0.05. The value of R square and adjusted R square showed
that 30% and 31% of variation in work outcomes is explained by the independent construct. The
alternate hypothesis that the independent variables are good enough in predicting the customer
orientation on work outcomes (Affective organizational commitment) is accepted and the model is fit.

MULTIPLE LINEAR EQUATIONS FOR CUSTOMER ORIENTATION ON WORK


OUTCOMES (AFFECTIVE ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT)
Customer orientation on work outcomes (Affective organizational commitment) = 1.729 + Customer
orientation (0.604).

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Amongst the construct of Customer orientation (β = 0.604) seemed to influence the customer
orientation on work outcomes (Affective organizational commitment). Therefore it is inferred that the
customer orientation on work outcomes (Affective organizational commitment) which indicates that
work outcomes on affective organizational commitment increases customer orientation.

4.7.3 TO ANALYSE THE INFLUENCE OF CUSTOMER ORIENTATION ON WORK


OUTCOMES (JOB SATISFACTION)
The respondents work outcomes (job satisfaction) are influenced by various factors like customer
orientation. In order to find the extent to which each factor influences the work outcomes (job
satisfaction), multiple regression analysis has been carried out. Customer orientation and work
outcomes has 4 constructs such as affective organizational commitment, job satisfaction, job
performance and turnover intentions but here were doing regression with customer orientation on
work outcomes (job satisfaction).
4.7.3.1 ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF CUSTOMER ORIENTATION ON WORK
OUTCOMES (JOB SATISFACTION)

Ha4(d): The customer orientation is good enough in predicting the affective organizational

commitment of work outcomes.


Multiple regression analysis in SPSS was used to analyze the above hypothesis and the result is as
follows.

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TABLE 4.7.3.1 TESTING THE INFLUENCE OF CUSTOMER ORIENTATION ON WORK
OUTCOMES (JOB SATISFACTION)

Unstandardized Standardized
Coefficients Coefficients
Std.
Model B Error Beta t Sig.
1 (Constant) 1.793 .323 5.550 .000
CO .509 .085 .477 6.001 .000

R .477a
R square .228
Adjusted R
.222
Square

Sig .000b
Dependent
construct Job satisfaction

The dependent construct is work outcomes (job satisfaction) and the independent constructs are
customer orientation. The significance value from Table 4.7.3.1 shows that work outcomes (job
satisfaction) is influenced by the construct customer orientation as p = 0.00 which is less than 0.05.
The value of R square and adjusted R square showed that 22% of variation in work outcomes is
explained by the independent construct. The alternate hypothesis that the independent variables are
good enough in predicting the customer orientation on work outcomes (job satisfaction) is accepted
and the model is fit.

MULTIPLE LINEAR EQUATIONS FOR CUSTOMER ORIENTATION ON WORK


OUTCOMES (JOB SATISFACTION)
Customer orientation on work outcomes (job satisfaction) = 1.793 + Customer orientation (0.509).

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Amongst the construct of Customer orientation (β = 0.509) seemed to influence the customer
orientation on work outcomes (job satisfaction). Therefore it is inferred that the customer orientation
on work outcomes (job satisfaction) which indicates that work outcomes on job satisfaction increases
customer orientation.

4.7.4 TO ANALYSE THE INFLUENCE OF CUSTOMER ORIENTATION ON WORK


OUTCOMES (JOB PERFORMANCE)

The respondents work outcomes (job performance) are influenced by various factors like customer
orientation. In order to find the extent to which each factor influences the work outcomes (job
performance), multiple regression analysis has been carried out. Customer orientation and work
outcomes has 4 constructs such as affective organizational commitment, job satisfaction, job
performance and turnover intentions but here were doing regression with customer orientation on
work outcomes (job performance).
4.7.4.1 ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF CUSTOMER ORIENTATION ON WORK
OUTCOMES (JOB PERFORMANCE)

Ha4(d): The customer orientation is good enough in predicting the affective organizational

commitment of work outcomes.


Multiple regression analysis in SPSS was used to analyze the above hypothesis and the result is as
follows.

79
TABLE 4.7.4.1 TESTING THE INFLUENCE OF CUSTOMER ORIENTATION ON WORK
OUTCOMES (JOB PERFORMANCE)

Standardized
Model Unstandardized Coefficients Coefficients
Std.
B Error Beta t Sig.
1 (Constant) 1.524 .305 5.001 .000
CO .591 .080 .556 7.393 .000

R .556a
R square .309
Adjusted
.304
R square

Sig .000b
Dependent
construct Job performance

The dependent construct is work outcomes (job performance) and the independent constructs are
customer orientation. The significance value from Table 4.7.4.1 shows that work outcomes (job
performance) is influenced by the construct customer orientation as p = 0.00 which is less than 0.05.
The value of R square and adjusted R square showed that 30% of variation in work outcomes is
explained by the independent construct. The alternate hypothesis that the independent variables are
good enough in predicting the customer orientation on work outcomes (job performance) is accepted
and the model is fit.

MULTIPLE LINEAR EQUATIONS FOR CUSTOMER ORIENTATION ON WORK


OUTCOMES (JOB PERFORMANCE)
Customer orientation on work outcomes (job performance) = 1.524 + Customer orientation (0.591).

Amongst the construct of Customer orientation (β = 0.591) seemed to influence the customer
orientation on work outcomes (job performance). Therefore it is inferred that the customer orientation
on work outcomes (job performance) which indicates that work outcomes on job performance
increases customer orientation.

80
4.7.5 TO ANALYSE THE INFLUENCE OF ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT AND
CUSTOMER ORIENTATION ON WORK OUTCOMES (TURNOVER INTENTIONS)
The respondents work outcomes (Turnover intentions) are influenced by various factors like
organizational support and customer orientation. In order to find the extent to which each factor
influences the work outcomes, multiple regression analysis has been carried out. Organizational
support has six constructs, namely supervisory support, training, servant leadership, rewards,
empowerment and service technology support and the other construct is customer orientation on
which the work outcomes has 4 constructs such as affective organizational commitment, job
satisfaction, job performance and turnover intentions but here were doing regression with six
organizational support and customer orientation on Work outcomes (Turnover intentions).

4.7.5.1 ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT AND CUSTOMER


ORIENTATION ON WORK OUTCOMES (TURNOVER INTENTIONS)

Ha4(d): The organizational support which includes supervisory support, training, servant leadership,

rewards, empowerment and service technology support and customer orientation are good enough in
predicting the turnover intention of work outcomes.

Multiple regression analysis in SPSS was used to analyze the above hypothesis and the result is as
follows.

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TABLE 4.7.5.1 TESTING THE INFLUENCE OF ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT AND
CUSTOMER ORIENTATION ON WORK OUTCOMES (TURNOVER INTENTIONS)

Standardized
Unstandardized Coefficients Coefficients
Std.
Model B Error Beta t Sig.
1 (Constant) 2.425 .554 4.376 .000
SS .003 .117 .003 .028 .978
T -.222 .135 -.195 -1.636 .104
Sl .022 .163 .017 .138 .891
R .352 .138 .298 2.546 .012
E .248 .061 .349 4.046 .000
STS -.124 .117 -.106 -1.057 .293
CO -.244 .163 -.184 -1.494 .138

R .432a
R square .187
Adjusted R
.138
Square

Sig .001b
Dependent
construct Turnover intentions

The dependent construct is Turnover intentions (work outcomes) and the independent constructs are
supervisory support, training, servant leadership, rewards, empowerment and service technology
support (organizational support) and customer orientation. The significance value from Table 4.7.5.1
shows that turnover intentions (work outcomes) is influenced by the constructs rewards and
empowerment (organizational support) as p = 0.00 which is less than 0.05, except for the constructs
supervisory support, training, servant leadership, service technology support and customer
orientation. The value of R square and adjusted R square showed that 18% and 13% of variation in
work outcomes (turnover intentions) is explained by the independent constructs.

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The alternate hypothesis that the independent variables are good enough in predicting the
organizational support and customer orientation on work outcomes (turnover intentions) is accepted
and the model is fit.

MULTIPLE LINEAR EQUATIONS FOR ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT ON WORK


OUTCOMES

Organizational support on work outcomes = 2.425 +Rewards (0.352) +empowerment (0.248)

Amongst the constructs of Organizational support these rewards (β = 0.352) and empowerment (β =
0.248), seemed to influence the organizational support and customer orientation on work outcomes
(turnover intentions). Therefore it is inferred that organizational support and customer orientation on
work outcomes (turnover intentions) is influenced by the constructs rewards and empowerment which
indicates that work outcomes on turnover intentions increases rewards and empowerment.

4.8 FACTOR ANALYSIS

4.8.1 TO GROUP VARIABLES INTO SMALLER USABLE GROUP FACTORS OF WORK


OUTCOMES- AFFECTIVE ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT AND TURNOVER
INTENTIONS
The dimensions of Work outcomes- Affective organizational commitment and Turnover Intentions
are taken. Factor analysis is used to group variables into smaller group factors

TABLE 4.8.1 KMO AND BARTLETT’S TEST


KMO and Bartlett's Test
Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of
.732
Sampling Adequacy.
Bartlett's Test of Sphericity Approx.
Chi- 376.275
Square
Df 45
Sig. .000

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TABLE 4.8.1.1 ROTATED COMPONENT MATRIX
ROTATED COMPONENT MATRIX
Rotated Component Matrixa
Component
1 2
TI1 .077 .674
TI2 .021 .874
TI3 -.062 .829
TI4 -.061 .839
AOC1 .506 .227
AOC2 .635 -.070
AOC3 .746 .050
AOC4 .742 -.066
AOC5 .747 .050
AOC6 .712 -.150

INTERPRETATION
KMO value is about 0.732 which is greater than 0.6 which implies that Factor Analysis can be carried
out for Affective organizational commitment and Turnover intention. The significance value (0.00) is
lesser than 0.05. Rotated Component Matrix analyzes the variables in all the angles and includes any
variables if left out. The above generated Rotated Component Matrix clearly grouped the work
outcomes dimensions into 2 groups as Affective organizational commitment and Turnover intention

4.8.2 TO GROUP VARIABLES INTO SMALLER USABLE GROUP FACTORS OF


ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT- SUPERVISORY SUPPORT AND SERVICE
TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT
The dimensions of Organizational support- Supervisory support and Service Technology support are
taken. Factor analysis is used to group variables into smaller group factors

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TABLE 4.8.2 KMO AND BARTLETT’S TEST

KMO and Bartlett's Test


Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of
.638
Sampling Adequacy.
Bartlett's Test of Approx.
Sphericity Chi- 220.937
Square
df 21
Sig. .000

TABLE 4.8.2.1 ROTATED COMPONENT MATRIX


ROTATED COMPONENT MATRIX

Rotated Component Matrixa


Component
1 2
SS1 .110 .847
SS2 .049 .805
SS3 .358 .667
STS1 .582 .228
STS2 .697 .258
STS3 .758 -.024
STS4 .810 .114

INTERPRETATION
KMO value is about 0.638 which is greater than 0.6 which implies that Factor Analysis can be carried
out for Supervisory support and Service Technology support. The significance value (0.00) is lesser
than 0.05. Rotated Component Matrix analyzes the variables in all the angles and includes any
variables if left out. The above generated Rotated Component Matrix clearly grouped the
Organizational support dimensions into 2 groups as Supervisory support and Service Technology
support.

85
4.9 CHAPTER SUMMARY

This chapter was attempted to analysis the data that were collected through empirical study by using
SPSS software by employing various tests. Thereby, T-test was used to compare two groups in
respect to the factors that concerned here. Correspondently, anova, correlation and regression analysis
was applied to test relationship and its strength regards to the variables such as, Organizational
support- Supervisory support, Rewards, Empowerment, Servant leadership, Training and Service
technology support, Customer Orientation and Work outcomes – Affective organizational
commitment, Job satisfaction, Job performance and Turnover intention

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CHAPTER 5
FINDINGS, SUGGESTIONS AND CONCLUSION

5.1 FINDINGS
5.1.1 FINDING FROM EXPLORATORY STUDY CONSTRUCTS OF THE FRONT-
LINE EMPLOYEES
It is found that turnover intentions is comparatively low and affective organizational
commitment is high when compared to other sub constructs of work outcomes which shows that
the organization supports the front-line bank employees by providing service technology support,
rewards, servant leadership, training and supervisory support and also the customer orientation of
the front-line bank employees is high which impacts good results on employees job satisfaction
and job performance.

5.1.2 FINDINGS FROM THE TEST FOR MEAN DIFFERENCES IN


ORGANISATIONAL SUPPORT, WORK OUTCOMES AND CUSTOMER
ORIENTATION ACROSS VARIOUS LEVELS OF DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE
(GENDER AND MARITAL STATUS) OF THE FRONTLINE EMPLOYEES.

It is found that there is no significant difference in gender (Male/Female) of the front-line


employees towards their organizational support (Supervisory support, training, rewards, servant
leadership and service technology support) and also in marital status (Married/Unmarried) of the
front-line employees towards their organizational support (Supervisory support, training,
rewards, empowerment and service technology support), customer orientation and work
outcomes (affective organizational commitment, job satisfaction, job performance and turnover
intentions).
It is also found that there is a significant difference in gender (Male/Female) and also in marital
status (Married/Unmarried) of the front-line employees towards their organizational support
(Empowerment) and (Servant Leadership).

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5.1.3 FINDINGS FOR THE TEST FOR HOMOGENEITY IN ORGANISATIONAL
SUPPORT, WORK OUTCOMES AND CUSTOMER ORIENTATION ACROSS
VARIOUS LEVELS OF DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE (AGE AND EXPERIENCE) OF
THE FRONTLINE EMPLOYEES.

There is no homogeneity in organizational support (Supervisory support, Empowerment,


rewards, servant leadership and service technology support), customer orientation and work
outcomes (affective organizational commitment, job satisfaction, job performance and turnover
intentions) across the different levels of Age and in experience organizational support
(supervisory support, servant leadership, empowerment, rewards and service technology
support), customer orientation and work outcomes (job performance and turnover intentions) of
the front-line employees working in banks.
There is homogeneity in organizational support (training) and work outcomes (affective
organizational commitment and job satisfaction) across the different levels of Age and
Experience of the front-line employees working in banks.

5.1.4 FINDINGS FOR THE TEST FOR DIRECTION AND MAGNITUDE OF


RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT, CUSTOMER
ORIENTATION AND WORK OUTCOMES OF THE FRONTLINE EMPLOYEES.

It is found that Affective organizational commitment has significant correlation with respect to
Job satisfaction, Job performance, supervisory support, training, servant leadership, rewards, and
service technology support and customer orientation. Empowerment has a very less correlation
with affective organizational commitment. Turnover Intentions has a negative correlation with
affective organizational commitment and Customer orientation has significantly correlated with
affective organizational commitment, job satisfaction, job performance, supervisory support,
training, servant leadership, rewards and empowerment and service technology support and has a
negative correlation with turnover intentions.

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5.1.5 FINDINGS FOR THE TSET FOR IMPACT OF ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT,
CUSTOMER ORIENATION ON WORK OUTCOMES AND TURNOVER INTENTIONS

The independent variables organizational support (supervisory support, training, servant


leadership, rewards, empowerment and service technology support) is good enough in predicting
the work outcomes (job performance) as a multiple regression.
The independent variables customer orientation is good enough in predicting the dependent
variable work outcomes.

5.2 SUGGESTIONS

The research study to assess the relationship between Organisational support, customer
orientation and work outcomes of the frontline bank employees were conducted under Eleven
constructs and the results of the various tests observed were reported.

1. Results of the study suggest that to improve greater affective organizational commitment
and job satisfaction among frontline bank employees and to reduce their turnover
intentions, management must take proactive actions for the frontline employees to receive
support and encouragement from their supervisors. In this context, actions such as
instituting a structured mentoring program and providing training programs to
supervisors in support skills, for instance, can pay dividends.

2. Support given to subordinates should not be limited to emotional support but should also
include informational support. When employees’ beliefs in their supervisors’reliability,
dependability, competence and willingness to help subordinates increases as a result of
mentoring programs, then, among others, subordinates’ job satisfaction would improve
and their withdrawal tendencies from their jobs would diminish. Likewise, to improve
employee performance, employees must be empowered. To empower employees, giving
them more power and authority should not be the only goal. In addition, employees’
psychological empowerment should be enhanced.

89
3. Psychological empowerment reflects whether or not employees perceive themselves as
being empowered. If employees do not behave as expected when power and control are
transferred to them, this may be due to lack of awareness of the fact that they are
empowered. Also given the study results, employees must be provided with requisite
service technologies to further enhance their performance.

4. The impact of customer orientation (a personal resource) on job performance is more


when compared to other psychological work outcomes. This linkage between customer
orientation and job performance may lead to an interesting managerial implication.
Customer orientation entails such personality traits as enjoying serving others, being
caring and calm, and showing emotional stability in stressful situations. All of these traits
are particularly fitting for frontline service jobs.Given that a good fit between a person’s
abilities and personality and the requirementsof a job leads to better job outcomes .So
management should recruit and select frontline employees who possess customer
orientation qualities. This would necessitate incorporating predictors of customer
orientation into the service worker selection process. Also management should consider
making customer orientation as an explicit component of periodic employee evaluations
to align its broader policies to nourish and nurture employees’ customer orientation over
the long run

5.3 CONCLUSIONS
Thus, it’s clear that there is an association among the Organizational support, Customer
orientation and Work outcomes in banking sector. The difference in perceptions level of the
Front-line employee affects their engagement in Organizational support, Customer orientation
and Work outcomes in banking sector.

90
92
ANNEXURE

The study aims to find the relationships between organizational support, customer orientation, and work outcomes.
The data collected shall be confidential and used for academic purpose only. Thank you for your time and effort.
Kindly give your Rating for the below statements on the five point scale. 1-Strongly Disagree, 2-Disagree, 3- Neither
agree nor Disagree, 4 Agree, 5 Strong Agree.

AFFECTIVE ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT 5 4 3 2 1


I talk up this bank to my friends as a great organization to work for.
I find that my values and the bank’s values are very similar.
I am proud to tell others that I work for this bank.
This bank inspires the very best in me in the way of job performance.
I really care about the future of this bank.
This bank earned my complete loyalty.
JOB SATISFACTION 5 4 3 2 1
My job is very pleasant.
I am highly satisfied with my job.
I am very enthusiastic about my work.
I find real enjoyment in my work.
I definitely dislike my job.
My job is very worthwhile.
JOB PERFORMANCE 5 4 3 2 1
I am a top performer
I get along with customers better than others.
My performance is in the top 10 percent.
I consistently deliver better quality service than others.
I have been rated consistently as a star performer.
I go out of my way to help customers.
TURNOVER INTENTIONS 5 4 3 2 1
I will probably be looking for another job soon.
I often think about quitting.
I will quit this job sometime in the next year.
It would not take too much to make me resign from this bank.
SUPERVISORY SUPPORT 5 4 3 2 1
My boss is very concerned about the welfare of those under him/her.
My boss is willing to listen to work-related problems.
My boss can be relied on when things get difficult at work.
TRAINING 5 4 3 2 1
At this bank, sufficient time is allocated for training.
At this bank, sufficient money is allocated for training
At this bank, training programs are consistently evaluated
At this bank, training programs focus on how to improve service quality.
SERVANT LEADERSHIP 5 4 3 2 1
Management constantly communicates the importance of service quality
Management reguraly spends time "in the field" or "on the floor" with customers anf frontline
Employees
Management is constantly measuring service quality.

93
Managers give personal input and leadership into creating quality service.
Management provides resources, not just “lip service, to enhance our ability to provide excellence
service
Management shows they care about service by constantly giving of themselves.
REWARDS 5 4 3 2 1
We have financial incentives for service excellence.
I receive visible recognition when I excel in serving customers.
My promotion depends on the quality of service I deliver.
EMPOWERMENT 5 4 3 2 1
I often make important customer decisions without seeking management approval.
I have the freedom and authority to act independently in order to provide service excellence.
SERVICE TECHNOLOGY/SUPPORT 5 4 3 2 1
We have “state of the art” technology to enhance our service quality.
Sufficient money is allocated for technology to support my efforts to deliver better service.
I have the necessary technology support to serve my customers better.
Management works hard to make our systems and processes more customer-friendly.
CUSTOMER ORIENTATION 5 4 3 2 1
I enjoy nurturing my customers.
I take pleasure in making every customer feel like he/she is the only customer.
Every customer problem is important to me.
I thrive on giving individual attention to each customer
I naturally read the customer to identify his/her needs.
I generally know what customers want before they ask
I enjoy anticipating the needs of customers.
I am inclined to read the customer’s body language to determine how much interaction to give.
I enjoy delivering the intended service on time.
I find a great deal of satisfaction in completing tasks precisely for customers.
I enjoy having the confidence to provide good service.
I enjoy remembering my customers’ names.
I enjoy getting to know my customers personally.

DEMOGRAPHIC VARIABLES
20-24 years old
Name___________________________ Age 25-29 years old Gender (Male / Female)
30-34 years old
35-39 years old
40 years old or greater

Name of the bank _________________

Marital status (Married / Unmarried) Education Qualification _________________

Less than 1 year


1-3 years
Designation____________ Income level____________ Working Hours_______________ Years of Experience 3-5 years
5-10 years
94 10 or more years