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Special Edition

Pre-Intermediate
Teacher’s Book

John and Liz Soars


Mike Sayer

3
Contents
New Headway Plus Special Edition Pre-Intermediate

Introduction
Unit 1 Tenses – Questions – Using a bilingual dictionary – Social expressions 1 6
Unit 2 Present tenses – have/have got – Collocation: daily life – Making conversation 14
Unit 3 Past tenses – Word formation – Time expressions 23
Unit 4 much/many – some/any – a few, a little, a lot of – Articles – Shopping – Prices 32
Stop and check 1 130

Unit 5 Verb patterns 1 – Future forms – Hot verbs – How do you feel? 39
Progress test 1 138

Unit 6 What … like? – Comparatives and superlatives – Synonyms and antonyms – Directions 47
Unit 7 Present Perfect – for, since – Adverbs, word pairs – Short answers 56
Unit 8 have (got) to – should/must – Words that go together – At the doctor’s 65
Stop and check 2 132

Unit 9 Time clauses – if – Hot verbs – In a hotel 73


Unit 10 Verb patterns 2 – manage to, used to – -ed/-ing adjectives – Exclamations 80
Progress test 2 141

Unit 11 Passives – Verbs and nouns that go together – Notices 87


Unit 12 Second conditional – might – Phrasal verbs – Social expressions 2 94
Stop and check 3 134

Unit 13 Present Perfect Continuous – Word formation – Adverbs – Telephoning 101


Unit 14 Past Perfect – Reported statements – Saying goodbye 110
Stop and check 4 136
Progress test 3 144

PHOTOCOPIABLE MATERIAL
Photocopiable material 117 Progress tests 138
Word list 124 Answer keys 147
Stop and checks 130 Workbook key 151
Introduction
New Headway Plus Special Edition Pre-Intermediate

New Headway Plus Special Headway key ingredients


Edition methodology
New Headway Plus Special Edition
Pre-Intermediate is an adaptation • The basic Headway methodology is use of proven traditional approaches
of the world-renowned New alongside those which have been developed and researched more recently.
Headway Pre-Intermediate. Texts grammar
and topics, together with all photos
and illustrations, have been carefully • The grammatical syllabus is the same as in other editions of New Headway
selected to suit students and teachers Pre-Intermediate because the requirements of lower level students are
throughout the Middle East and usually more predictable than at later levels.
North Africa. This edition can also be
used successfully wherever the
practice
material is considered more • There is a great variety of practice activities covering all the skills.
appropriate.
vocabulary
• Vocabulary is not only integrated throughout, but also developed in its
own section.

skills Work
• Skills work is integrated and balanced. All the texts for listening and
reading come from authentic sources and are simplified and adapted to suit
the level.

everyday English
• There is an Everyday English section which focuses primarily on aspects of
spoken English.

Starter
Each unit begins with a Starter section, which is designed to be a warmer to
the lesson. It is a short student-centred activity and always has direct
relevance to the language to be introduced in the unit. The aim is to focus
students on the topic or key language point of the unit. It also enables the
teacher to find out how well the students can use the language of the unit.

Grammar Spot
Each grammar presentation contains a Grammar Spot. This is a mix of
explanation, questions, and self-check tests to reinforce the grammar being
taught. Each Grammar Spot has a link to the fuller Grammar Reference section
at the back of the book.

4 Introduction
What’s in the Teacher’s Book? What’s in the Workbook?
• Full teaching notes, answers, and possible problems The Workbook is an important component of the course.
• Don’t forget! section which refers to relevant exercises in It revises the grammatical input of the Student’s Book and
the Workbook, and to the Word list. contains the writing syllabus. Many of the exercises are on
the Student’s Workbook recording, for use in class or at
• Tapescripts in the main body of the teaching notes home.
• Word list
There is a list of words that appear unit by unit in Finally!
New Headway Plus Special Edition Pre-Intermediate.
Photocopy the Word list for each unit as you go through In all our New Headway material we try to guide students
the book and give a copy to each of your students. It is to an understanding of new language, rather than just
probably best given towards the end of each unit as an aid have examples of it on the page. We attach great
to revision. importance to practice activities, both controlled and free,
Encourage students to write in the translation if they feel personalized and impersonal. The skills work comes from
it is necessary. Most of the new words are here, but if we a wide range of material – newspapers, magazines,
feel a word isn’t very useful or very common, we have biographies, short stories, radio programmes – and
omitted it. Some very useful words are repeated if they features both British and American English. We hope
appear in a later unit; it is a good idea to revise them. you and your students enjoy using the books, audio, and
• Stop and check tests DVD-ROM, and have success with them whether using
There are four Stop and check revision tests which cover New Headway for the first time or having learned to trust
Units 1–4, 5–8, 9–12, and 13–14. These can either be set in its approach from previous use.
class, or given for homework (preferably over a weekend)
and then discussed in the next lesson. Students can work
in small groups to try to agree on the correct answer, then
you can go over it with the whole class, reminding
students of the language items covered. It is important
that, in the translation sentences which come at the end of
each Stop and check test, students translate the ideas and
concepts, and not word by word.
• Progress tests
There are three Progress tests which cover Units 1–5,
6–10, and 11–14.

Introduction 5
Introduction
to the unit
1 Tenses • Questions
Using a bilingual dictionary
Social expressions 1
Getting to know you

Language aims
Grammar – tenses  There is revision of the Present Simple and Continuous,
the Past Simple, the going to future, the modal verb can, and the full verb have.
You are probably beginning a new class
(Have appears with the do/does/did forms. Have got and have are contrasted in
with a group of students you don’t
Unit 2.) Students should be familiar with these tenses and verb forms, but they
know. Students might know each other,
will no doubt still make many mistakes.
or they might not. Your main aim over
the first few lessons together is to try to This unit provides general revision of these verb forms and their meanings,
make the group gel. You need to and gives you the opportunity to assess your new students’ strengths and
establish a good classroom atmosphere, weaknesses. All the verb forms are dealt with in greater depth in later units of
where everyone feels comfortable. New Headway Plus Special Edition Pre-Intermediate.
Hopefully you will all not only work Question forms  The secondary grammatical aim of Unit 1 is revision of
hard, but have fun at the same time. question forms. These often present learners of English with problems.
Another of your aims will be to check Common mistakes:
out your students’ language abilities. *Where you live? *What you do last night?
How good are they at using the tense *Where do he live? *What did you last night?
system? Do they confuse the Present *Do you can speak French? *Where you went?
Simple and Continuous? (Probably.)
Another problem for learners is voice range. English has a very wide voice
Can they form questions in English?
range, and this is apparent in question formation.
(Probably not.) What’s their vocabulary
like? Is there a disparity in their skills Where do you live?
abilities? Can they speak English better
than write it? Do they panic when Do you like learning English?
listening to a recording? All this
Students often have a very flat intonation, and they need to be encouraged to
information will allow you to get to
make their voice rise and fall as necessary.
know them, and also help you to plan
your lessons. Vocabulary  In the Vocabulary section, students are helped to use a bilingual
dictionary effectively, both L1 to English and English to L1.
The theme of this unit is
communication. The Starter and Everyday English  Common social expressions are introduced and practised
opening ‘Two Students’ sections revise through dialogues.
present and past tenses and question
forms, and students are encouraged to Notes on the unit
ask questions to get to know each other
in the Practice section. Starter (SB p6)
The Reading and speaking section 1 Ask students to work in pairs to match the questions with the answers.
contains a text about how people
communicate, and the Listening and Answers
speaking section involves listening Where were you born? In Morocco.
to best friends describing their What do you do? I’m a teacher.
relationships. Are you married? No, I’m single.
There are opportunities for students Why are you learning English? Because I need it for my job.
to roleplay polite conversations and When did you start learning English? A year ago.
practise social expressions. How often do you have English classes? Three times a week.

6 Unit 1  .  Getting to know you


2 Students ask and answer the questions in pairs. 5 When did he leave school?
6 What is he studying?
7 How many children does he have?
TWO STUDENTS   (SB p6) 8 What is he going to do next year?
Tenses and questions When students have finished, ask individuals for the
1 Ask students to look at the photograph of Maurizio and completed questions. When each question form has
think of questions to ask him, for example: Where are been established, give a model yourself and drill each
you from? Write a few suggestions on the board. question, chorally if you like, but certainly individually,
for pronunciation. Remember that English uses a wider
T 1.1 [CD 1: Track 2] Tell students to listen to voice range than many other languages, and question-
Maurizio and read the text at the same time. Ask if they word questions should start with the voice high and
found the answers to any of their questions and check then fall.
any words they didn’t understand. Then ask students to
work in pairs to complete the text with the verbs in the
Where does he come from?
box.
T 1.2 [CD 1: Track 3] Ask students to listen to Jim,
Answers and tapescript then to work in pairs to write the answers to the
My name’s Maurizio Celi. I (1) come from Bologna, a city in questions. Students then ask and answer the questions
the north of Italy. I’m a student at the University of Bologna. in pairs.
I (2) ’m studying modern languages – English and Russian.
I also know a little Spanish, so I (3) can speak four languages. Answers and tapescript
I (4) ’m enjoying the course a lot, but it’s really hard work. 1 He comes from the north of England, near Manchester.
The course (5) started three years ago. 2 He lives in a village (just outside the city).
I (6) live at home with my parents and my sister. My brother 3 He lives alone.
(7) went to work in the United States last year. 4 He worked in a paper factory.
After I graduate, I (8) ’m going to work as a translator. I hope 5 He left school when he was 15.
so, anyway. 6 He’s studying Spanish.
7 Two (a son and a daughter).
In the feedback, ask students to tell you whether each 8 He’s going to visit his son and his Spanish wife in Spain.
verb has present, past, or future meaning, but don’t get T 1.2
into detail about use at this stage. Hello. My name’s Jim Allen and I come from the north of
2 Ask students to look at the picture of Jim. Ask questions. England, near Manchester. I live in a village just outside the
Examples city. I live alone now, because my wife died three years ago.
Where is he? (At home.) But I’m near my daughter and her family, so that’s OK. Until
What’s he doing? (He’s studying.) last year, I worked in a paper factory, but now I’m retired. I
Is he studying at university? (Perhaps. We don’t know.) never liked my job much but now I’m really enjoying life! I’m
a student again. I’m studying with the University of the Third
Ask students to work in pairs to complete the questions Age. It helps retired people like me who want to study again,
about Jim. Monitor and note the sort of problems your and it’s really wonderful. You see, I left school when I was
students have with question formation. 15 and started work in the factory, because we needed the
money. Now I’m studying Spanish. I love it. My son lives in
POSSIBLE PROBLEMS
Spain with his Spanish wife. Next year I’m going to visit them
• Students omit does and did in the Present and Past Simple. for six months, so I want my Spanish to be good!
• They confuse the Present Continuous and the
Present Simple (*What does he studying?). 3 Ask students to work in pairs to complete the questions.
• They treat the modal verb can as though it were a full Answers
verb (*How many languages does he can speak?).
2 Which university do you go to?
• They forget is in the going to question. (*What he 3 Are you enjoying the course?
going to do after the course?) 4 What are you doing at the moment?
5 Why did you leave school at 15?
Answers 6 Who are you going to visit next year?
2 Where does he live?
3 Who does he live with? Again, drill these questions around the class, focusing
4 What did he do before he retired? on the way the tone of voice starts high then falls.

Unit 1  .  Getting to know you 7


grammar spot   (SB p7) PRACTICE   (SB p8)
The Grammar Spot in each unit aims to get students to
think analytically about the language, so don’t rush it.
Talking about you
Ask students to discuss grammar questions in pairs 1 Ask students to work in pairs and give them a few
before feeding back to the whole class as this encourages minutes to think about how to form the questions, then
peer teaching and builds students’ confidence. If you are get them to take turns to ask and answer with their
teaching a monolingual class, and your students find it partner. It might be a good idea to do this activity as a
easier or more rewarding to answer in L1, encourage mingle, especially if students don’t know each other very
them to do so. well.
1 If you didn’t focus on this earlier, ask students to Monitor as students are asking and answering questions,
work in pairs to find examples of verb forms with helping and correcting as necessary.
present, past and future meaning in the text about 2 Focus students on the questions, and read them out,
Maurizio and Jim. However, don’t go into any modelling good pronunciation. Alternatively, ask each
detail about form and use of past and future tenses question to an individual in the class, thus modelling
here as they will be dealt with in later units. pronunciation and getting students to think about how
2 Ask students to discuss the two questions about to respond. Notice that the questions test two present
present tenses in pairs or threes then discuss their tenses, the Past Simple, and the Present Continuous to
answers as a class. refer to a future arrangement. Divide students into small
groups to ask and answer the questions. Monitor, help
Answers and correct any errors.
The two verb forms are the Present Simple and the
3 Ask students to write a paragraph about themselves
Present Continuous.
using the text about Maurizio as a model. You could set
They are formed differently. The third person of the
this as homework.
Present Simple ends in -s. The Present Continuous is
formed with the verb to be + -ing.
More importantly, they mean different things. The Present Getting information
Simple is used to express an action which is always true, 4 In this information gap activity students must ask each
or true for a long time. The Present Continuous is used to other questions to find out about Jack Dawson,
express an activity happening now, or around now. a postman. In an activity of this kind the more
preparation and setting up you do, the more likely that
3 Ask students to work in pairs to match the question students will do it accurately and well.
words and answers. Do the first as an example. This
Lead in by focusing students on the photograph of Jack
activity gets students to think about the meaning of
and asking them questions about it.
the question words. In the feedback, you could get
students to guess what the whole question might be. Where’s Jack? (In a country lane.)
What’s he doing? (He’s delivering letters.)
Answers Does he wear a uniform? (Yes, he does.)
What . . . ? A sandwich. Does he ride a bike for work? (Yes, she does.)
Who . . . ? Jack. Photocopy the information cards on p117 of the
Where . . . ? In New York. Teacher’s Book. Give half the class Student A cards, and
When . . . ? Last night. half the class Student B cards. Ask them to read their
Why . . . ? Because I wanted to. information and check any words they don’t know.
How many . . . ? Four. Then ask them to work with a partner with the same
How much . . . ? $5. card to prepare questions using the question word
How . . . ? By bus. prompts. Monitor and help them prepare. When they are
Whose . . . ? It’s mine. ready, change the pairs so that one Student A is with a
Which . . . ? The black one. Student B. Model the activity briefly by asking one or
two questions, then let students ask and answer each
Ask students to read Grammar Reference 1.1 and 1.2
other’s questions to complete their information.
on p129 for homework.

8 Unit 1  .  Getting to know you


COMPLETE TEXT VOCABULARY   (SB p9)
Jack Dawson started working as a postman thirty
years ago, when he was 22. He rides a bike because he Using a dictionary
delivers letters to a lot of small villages. Dictionaries are very useful when students are beginning to
He gets up at 3.30 in the morning and starts work at learn a language, but they need to be used with
5.00. Every day he cycles about 15 miles. He finishes caution. They vary greatly in amount of detail and accuracy
work at 2.00 in the afternoon. of information. The better ones will separate out different
After work he goes home and has lunch with his wife, meanings, and give plenty of example sentences. Problems
Joy. She has a part-time job. She works in a shop. They arise especially when students look up a word in the L1 to
like gardening, so they spend the afternoon outside in English section and find perhaps three or four words in
their garden. English to choose from. They need to look at the
information very carefully to know which one is correct in
They have two children, who both live in California.
context.
Last year Jack and Joy went to Los Angeles and visited
their children and four grandchildren. They stayed for In these exercises, students are asked to look at their own
a month. dictionary to see how much information it gives. They then
practise using both halves of their dictionary, first English to
They’re going to Australia next month because some
L1 then L1 to English.
friends are having a big celebration. It’s their friends’
wedding anniversary, and they want everyone to be there. 1 Ask students to look at the dictionary extract. If they are
used to using dictionaries to look words up in their own
language, they should be able to do it for a foreign
Check it language quite easily. However, the reverse is also the
case. If students aren’t used to using dictionaries in L1,
5 Students work in pairs to decide which is the correct basic skills such as alphabetical order and the standard
verb form. As you get the answers, ask Why? each time conventions of dictionary entries (how information is
to reinforce the rules about the Present Simple and presented; the order of information; symbols) will need
Continuous, Past Simple, and the going to future. to be practised.
Answers 2 Ask students to work in pairs and decide if the words in
1 comes (because this is a fact which is always true) the box are nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs,
2 speaks (same reason) prepositions, or past tenses.
3 is wearing (because this is happening now)
4 Do you like (because this is always true and like is a state Answers
verb) bread n never adv
5 went (because this is in the past) hot adj went pt
6 is going to study (because this is in the future – an write v on prep
intention) quickly adv came pt
beautiful adj eat v
in prep letter n
ADDITIONAL MATERIAL
3 Ask students if they can think of any words in English
Workbook Unit 1
with two meanings. Then focus them on the table and
These exercises could be done in class to give further
point out the two different meanings of book. Ask
practice, for homework, or in a later class as revision.
students to work in pairs then ask them to use
Exercises 1–3  Recognizing tenses
dictionaries to look up the other words in the table and
Exercises 4–10  Question forms
write sentences to show the two meanings of each word.
Monitor and help.
T 1.3 [CD 1: Track 4] Ask students to compare their
sentences with the sample answers on the recording.

Unit 1  .  Getting to know you 9


Sample answers and tapescript Reading   (SB p10)
1 I’m reading a good book.
I booked a room at a hotel. Communication
2 What kind of food do you like?
My mother’s a very kind person. a note on communication
3 Can you swim? This may be the first time that you are doing a fluency-
I’d like a can of cola. based lesson with this class, and your aims in such
4 What does this mean? lessons are obviously different from accuracy-based
Some people are very mean. They don’t like spending their ones. Your aim now is to promote natural language use,
money. with students trying to understand and trying to make
5 I live in a flat. themselves understood with all the language they
Holland is a flat country. possess. The extent to which your students are used to
6 The train’s coming. the demands of such lessons will vary, depending on
Athletes have to train very hard. their previous language-learning experience.
7 The phone’s ringing. It can be frustrating for students at this level to do
What a lovely ring you’re wearing! fluency work, because their lack of language prevents
them from understanding and saying all that they
4 This final activity allows students to decide for would like. However, if the right topics are found, it can
themselves which words they would like to look up. You be extremely beneficial and enjoyable for students to
might decide to do it at the beginning of the next lesson realize that they can operate as real language users.
as a quick revision of dictionary use.
In the pre- and post-reading tasks in this section, students
SUGGESTION get to talk about how people and animals communicate. Let
Instead of getting students to look around the room, this discussion go on as long as everyone seems interested.
bring in as many everyday objects as you can. When You might find that by the time you get to the ‘What do you
students have found the word in the dictionaries, put think?’ questions, students are tired, having worked hard at
the object on the floor. Carry on until all (or most) the speaking activity and the reading comprehension.
of the objects are on the floor. Point to an object and
ask for the word to be repeated. Correct any mistakes. 1 Ask students to work in pairs (or groups of three or
Ask a student to come out to the front and point at an four) to write down as many different ways of
object and invite a student to repeat. communicating as they can. Use the cartoons to start
them off. Monitor and help with vocabulary. In the
What follows is a memory game. Remove one object
feedback, list some of their ideas on the board.
from the floor. Students must remember what the
Some suggestions:
object was, so that when you point to the empty space
Using a phone
on the floor, they can still tell you the word. Carry on
Writing and posting a letter
removing objects until about a third remain on the
Sending an e-mail
floor. After that, it becomes very difficult to remember
Using the Internet
exactly what was where!
Sending a fax
TV and radio
Smoke signals
Additional material Sign language
Workbook Unit 1  Braille
Exercise 11  is a vocabulary exercise on jobs in which Morse code
students will need to use dictionaries to find suffixes and 2 Write the following list of ‘ideas to communicate’ on the
where the stress is. board and mime one or two to get the students started,
(for example, lifting an imaginary cup of coffee to your
lips, pointing to your watch). Then put the students in
pairs to mime the ideas to each other. Alternatively, you
could make this an information gap activity, by giving
each student a different list of ideas on a handout which
they have to mime to their partner.
Do you want a cup of coffee?
What time is it?
I’m tired.

10 Unit 1  .  Getting to know you


Have you got any money? A note on the vocabulary
I like your haircut. Reading texts are an excellent source of new vocabulary
I’ll phone you at 7. because they introduce words in natural contexts which
Can you swim? allow students to guess what words might mean. There
I’ve got a headache. are a number of different ways of dealing with the
I’m cold/hot. unknown vocabulary in this text and other texts in the
This food is too hot. coursebook. Here are two suggestions:
I can’t carry this bag. 1 After they have read the text, ask students to
What’s that awful smell? underline words they don’t know then try to guess
3 Focus students on the headings and check that they what they mean. You could get them to check with a
understand them, then ask students to read the article partner before checking their guesses in a
and match the headings to the paragraphs. Tell them dictionary.
not to worry about words in the text they don’t know at 2 If you know your students and their first language
this stage. Ask students to check their answers in pairs well, you could predict words they don’t know then
before feedback. give students synonyms or definitions and ask them
to find matching words in the text, for example Find
Answers
a word that means the largest animal in the sea.
Paragraph 1 How we communicate
Paragraph 2 Differences between people and animals Discourage students from using dictionaries too many
Paragraph 3 A history of communication times as they read. They may lose the thread of the
Paragraph 4 Communication today article if they spend too much time looking up words.

4 Ask students to match the pictures and ancient societies.


Answers What do you think?
Picture a Rome Discuss these questions as a class. Question 3 will bring out
Picture b Greece any current news about information technology. Notice that
Picture c 14th century Europe the question (and probably the answer) uses the Present
Picture d Egypt Continuous.

5 Focus the class on the comprehension questions and


check that there are no problems with understanding, Listening and speaking   (SB p12)
then ask students to work in pairs or small groups to
look back at the text and answer the questions. Best friends
Answers About the listening
1 Bees/dance This listening is made up of four short passages, in
Elephants/make sounds humans can’t hear which four people describe their best friends. The tasks
Whales/communicate by song get students to listen for specific information.
Monkeys/use their faces to show emotions The word friend has many collocations. You may wish
2 Humans have language. They can write poetry, tell jokes, to lead in by eliciting a few from your students. For
make promises, explain, persuade, tell the truth, tell lies. example: good friend, best friend, old friend, close friend,
3 Radio, television, and the Internet. great friend.
4 Good: you can give and get information quickly
Bad: it is difficult to know what information is important
1 Put students in pairs to discuss the questions.
2 T T 1.4 [CD 1: Track 5] Ask students to look at the
photos and the chart. Drill the pronunciation of the
names in the chart: Kirsty /ˈkɜːstɪ/ Azam /ˈæzæm/. Play
the recording. Ask students to listen. Pause after each
recording so that students have time to write their
answers.
Let students check their answers in pairs before
discussing them as a class.

Unit 1  .  Getting to know you 11


Answers than anyone else. I can always talk to her about my problems.
Best Whose When did Why are they friends? She always listens and then gives me good advice! I hope I do
friend friend? they meet? the same for her. We are both married now, and we live quite
near each other, but in different towns. We talk on the phone
Kirsty Shona When we We grew up together and all the time, especially now, because we are both having a
were 12. know everything about baby this summer!
each other. Kirsty knows Dominic
me better than anyone My best friend is called Sammy –er and he often comes to
else. I can always talk to play at my house after school. A long time ago –er when I was
her about my problems. four –er we went to Busy Bee Nursery School together. Me
She always listens and and Sammy are both six now. I like him ‘cos he’s funny and he
gives me good advice. plays football. I like going to play at his house, too. He’s got a
Sammy Dominic When I was He’s funny and he plays big garden.
four. football. Michael
Dave Michael At Don’t know! We were all I have two good friends from university called Dave and
and university. very different. Azam. We stayed in the same house near the university.
Azam I don’t know why we became friends. We were all very
different. Dave was quiet and always worked hard, and Azam
Talal Walid When we We grew up together. was a real character! He never remembered his house keys.
were kids. We always liked the He climbed in through the window at least once a week. He
same games. We still play loved cooking Indian food and having people for dinner. Our
football together and go house was always full of visitors.
shopping together. He’s Now, of course, life is very different. Dave is a writer and lives
like a brother to me. in France. He sends me long, funny emails every month. Azam
is an international lawyer. He’s working in Hong Kong at the
3 T T 1.4 Read through the questions briefly as a class and moment. But we still meet once a year with our families. We
point out difficult vocabulary: share a hobby (have the usually meet at Dave’s house in France and have a holiday
same hobby or interest), He is like a brother (he is the together.
same as a brother). Walid
My best friend is my neighbour, Talal. He’s 16. Our fathers are
Put students in pairs to discuss the questions. Then play
good friends, and I call Talal’s dad ‘Uncle Ahmed’. We grew
the recording again.
up together. When we were kids, we always liked the same
Answers and tapescript games. We still play football together, and we both support
1 Shona and Kirsty the same football team, Al-Mabarrah. We go to watch them
2 Walid and Talal (football and shopping), and Dominic and whenever they play at home. And we often go shopping
Sammy (football) together, because we like the same kind of clothes. Talal’s
3 Michael, Dave, and Azam great – he’s like a brother to me.
4 Dominic and Sammy
5 Michael’s
6 Dominic’s
Language work
7 Shona’s 4 Ask students to match the verbs with the words and
8 Walid’s phrases.
T 1.4 Answers
Best friends become friends
Shona play football
I have three or four good friends, but I think my best friend send emails
is Kirsty. We first met when we were 12. She started at my give advice
school, and the teacher asked me to look after her. We soon talk on the phone
became friends. We looked quite funny together. She’s very cook food
tall, and I’m quite small! Because we grew up together, we grow up together
know everything about each other. So Kirsty knows me better go on the Internet

12 Unit 1  .  Getting to know you


Everyday English   (SB p13) 3 Students work in pairs again to prepare two short
dialogues. Introduce this activity by building up a
Social expressions 1 dialogue as a model on the board first, and getting
students to think where their dialogue is to take place
1 Ask students to look at the pictures. Where do they think
before they start writing. Monitor and help.
the people are? What’s the relationship between them?
Ask students what they think the people are saying Listen to a few of the dialogues, and feed back on any
to each other. Point out that we say certain things at errors, focusing on students’ intonation.
certain times. Try to elicit other typical expressions.
Ask students to match the expressions and responses. Do Don’t forget!
one as an example. This exercise is more difficult than it Workbook Unit 1
at first appears. Some students will finish it very quickly, Exercise 12  Writing an informal letter
but will probably have made several mistakes. Monitor
closely, look at their work and say how many they have SUGGESTION
right and wrong, without saying which ones, and ask In the Teacher’s Book we sometimes suggest when the
them to look again. writing activities could be done, but generally we leave
T 1.5 [CD 1: Track 6] Listen to the recording to check it up to you to decide.
the answers. It can be productive to use a code when you are
correcting written work so that you direct students to
Answers and tapescript the nature of the mistake, and then they have to try to
‘How are you?’ ‘Fine, thanks.’ (Two friends greeting each correct it. This is not always possible – the mistake
other informally.) might be way beyond what they could be expected to
‘Hello, Jane!’ ‘Hi, Habiba!’ understand. Be selective in what you ask students to
‘How do you do?’ ‘How do you do?’ (Formal. Said when you self-correct.
meet somebody for the first time, especially in a business
situation.) You might like to use the following symbols:
‘See you tomorrow!’ ‘Bye!’ (Neutral) G Grammar / This word isn’t necessary.
‘Good night!’ ‘Sleep well!’ (Said as people go to bed.) P Punctuation ^ A word is missing
‘Good morning!’ ‘Good morning!’ (Formal: said, for example, WO Word order T Tense
at work.) WW Wrong word Sp Spelling
‘Hello, I’m Ela Paul.’ ‘Pleased to meet you, Ela.’ (Informal. Said Prep Preposition
when you meet somebody for the first time.) It is a useful, although difficult, skill to teach students
‘Excuse me!’ ‘Yes. Can I help you?’ (In a shop, for example, to to proof-read their written work before handing it in.
get someone’s attention.) Here are two suggestions.
‘Bless you!’ ‘Thanks.’ (When someone sneezes.)
1 Make a list of some of your students’ mistakes from
‘Have a good weekend!’ ‘Same to you!’ (Said in the afternoon
a written homework. Write them on the board.
or evening on the day before the weekend begins.)
Students must first identify the nature of the
‘Thank you very much indeed.’ ‘Not at all. Don’t mention it.’
mistake using one of the above symbols, then
(Formal. Informally, we might say That’s OK.)
actually correct it.
‘Make yourself at home.’ ‘That’s very kind. Thank you.’ (Said
when a guest comes to your home.) 2 When you collect in written work, you can
occasionally redistribute it straight away, making
Ask students to tell you in what situations the dialogues sure that a student doesn’t get his/her own work
are taking place. back. In pairs, and in pencil, students try to find and
Play the recording again and get students to repeat each correct mistakes. Do this just for ten minutes.
expression as a class. Alternatively, you could model the Students tend to get very critical, and start finding
expressions getting individuals in the class to repeat, mistakes where there aren’t any!
focusing on correct intonation, which is very important
here. Word list
2 Ask students to work in pairs to test whether they can Photocopy the Word list for Unit 1 (TB p124) for your
use the expressions. students and ask them to write in the translations, learn
them at home, and/or write some of the words into their
vocabulary notebook.

Unit 1  .  Getting to know you 13


Introduction
to the unit
2 Present tenses  •  have/have got
Collocation – daily life
Making conversation
The way we live

Language aims
Grammar – Present tenses  Present tenses are revised in terms of form and use,
with particular attention given to forming Present Simple questions and short
The theme of this unit is the way we
answers using the auxiliary do/does. It is assumed that students will have a
live. The opening ‘People and places’
certain familiarity with both the Present Simple and the Present Continuous,
section has reading and listening texts
although of course mistakes will still be made.
containing facts and figures about
different English-speaking countries. have/have got  The verb have for possession is used as part of the practice for
The Practice section provides the the Present Simple. However, it is also contrasted with have got for possession
opportunity to practise present tenses in both form and use.
and have/have got in the context of Students at this level are often familiar with have got from their beginners’ and
lifestyles. The texts in the Reading and elementary courses, but they are a little confused about its relation to the full
speaking section describe the lifestyles verb to have both in its form, particularly in questions and negatives, and in its
of two people who live and work in two use. In fact, they are often interchangeable, but generally speaking have got is
different countries. The Vocabulary more informal.
section collocates nouns and verbs
around the topic of daily life, and the
Vocabulary  The first vocabulary activity is a matching exercise which gets
students to collocate verbs with noun phrases, and the second is an exercise
Listening and speaking section contains
which gets them to order these phrases under the topic headings of different
a radio programme in which four night
rooms. The lexical area is ‘Daily life’, chosen because it fits well with the theme
workers talk about their jobs.
of the unit, allowing students to talk about what they do in their homes.
There are opportunities throughout the
There is a personalized practice activity in which students are asked to describe
unit for students to talk about their own
their favourite room to their partner.
way of life and about their own country.
Everyday English  This provides practice in making a conversation. It
introduces and practises phrases students can use to start a conversation and
keep it going.

Notes on the unit


Starter (SB p14)
As a lead-in, ask students to name as many English-speaking countries as they
can. This should be done quickly. You could make it into a little competition.
Set a time limit and see who can write down the most in that time.
Ask students to work in pairs to look at the flags in their book and unscramble
the names of the countries.
Answers
1 Australia 3 South Africa 5 The United States
2 New Zealand 4 Scotland 6 Canada

Check answers with the whole class before the next exercise.

14 Unit 2  .  The way we live


People and Places   (SB p14) e Scotland
My country is the northern part of a bigger country, but we’ve
Present tenses and have/have got got our own parliament. There are just over 5 million of us.
We’ve got a lot of mountains, and there are also lots of rivers,
1 Tell students that they are going to read three short texts
lakes, and islands. People come to my country to fish. Our
with some facts about three of the countries. Tell them
salmon is famous all over the world.
not to worry about the missing words.
f the United States
Ask them to work in pairs to read, then discuss which of I come from a big country. It has a lot of wide open spaces.
the six countries they think is being described. This can We have a population of . . . almost 300 million, and these
generate quite a lot of discussion, as some countries are people have come from all over the world. We have big,
easier to identify than others, so you may have to cosmopolitan cities, but a lot of people live on farms,
encourage them to do it by a process of elimination. ranches, and in small towns. We like baseball and football –
If there are any vocabulary problems, deal with them our kind of football. And we love to eat . . . burgers with fries,
quickly yourself rather than asking students to use and apple pie and ice-cream.
dictionaries. You do not want the activity to last too Photos: bungalows: New Zealand; man fishing: Scotland;
long, because the main aim of the reading here is to ice hockey: Canada; sheep farm: Australia; American football:
provide a context for the grammar. the United States; giraffe: South Africa.
In the feedback, encourage some full-class discussion
about which country is being described by each text. Ask 3 Ask students to close their books and try to remember
questions such as: three facts about each country.
What did you decide? Why? How did you decide? Which grammar spot   (SB p35)
facts helped you to decide?
This lesson reaches its main aim at this point. Focus the
Answers attention of the whole class on these questions so that
a Australia  b Canada  c South Africa your students are clear about the grammatical aims of
the lesson.
Focus students on the missing words from each text, and
ask them to work in pairs to put them in the correct gap. Answers
Do the first as an example. 1 The tense used is the Present Simple (not the Present
Answers Continuous) because present habits and
a huge immigrants enjoy exports permanent/general truths are described.
b only variety has favourite 2 She has three children refers to all time.
c black climate grows elephants She’s having a shower refers to now.
3 Have is used in texts a–c because they are giving formal
2 .1
T 2.1 [CD 1: Track 7] Tell students that they are
and factual information in writing, and have is used in
going to hear three people describing the other three
more formal writing.
countries. Ask them to match a flag and photograph
Have got is used in texts d and e. It is more likely to be
with each description, then discuss which of the
used when speaking informally.
countries they think are being described with their
partner. Again, before you give the answers, encourage Refer students to Grammar Reference 2.1–2.4 on p130.
some whole class discussion.
4 The aim here is not only to personalize the activity and
Answers and tapescript have a short discussion about students’ own countries,
d New Zealand but also for you, the teacher, to be noting how well
Well, my country’s got a population of . . . er . . . about three students are using present tenses and have/have got.
and a half million, so it’s not a big place. Most of the people
In a monolingual class, get students to work briefly in
are from Europe, but about twelve per cent are Maori . . . they
pairs to come up with a few sentences. In a class with a
were the original inhabitants. A lot of people live in
variety of nationalities, you might want to get students
bungalows, which are small houses on one floor. It’s a very
to work individually to think of a few things to say
beautiful country. It’s got a lot of mountains, and people love
before discussing it as a class.
the countryside. Oh, and we’re very good at rugby and cricket.

Unit 2  .  The way we live 15


PRACTICE   (SB p16) Teacher Nadia, tell us about Sara.
This section aims to provide controlled oral and written Nadia  Sara has a camera and a stereo but she doesn’t
practice of the grammar. have a computer or a bicycle, etc.

Talking about you Getting information


1 Note that the forms of have and have got are different. 3 This exercise is a controlled information gap activity
Have behaves like a full verb in the Present Simple with which brings together practice of the Present Simple and
the auxiliary do/does in questions, negatives, and short have/have got. It also reminds students of the difference
answers. Have got uses has/have as the auxiliary in between the uses of the Present Simple and Present
questions, negatives and short answers. Continuous.
Before the lesson, remember to make photocopies of the
T 2.2 [CD 1: Track 8] Play the recording and ask
2
chart on p118 of the Teacher’s Book for half the students
students to repeat the different forms, paying attention
in your class.
to the pronunciation, particularly the stress and rising
intonation in the questions and the falling intonation in Tell students you are going to give them charts with
the answers. different information. They will have to ask questions to
find their partner’s information. Put them in pairs and
make it clear which student is A and which is B, then ask
● ● ● students to work together to prepare their questions
Have you got a car? Yes, I have. fully. This should preferably be done orally, but some
2 Ask students to work in pairs. Tell them to use the weaker students might feel happier doing it in writing
prompts to ask and answer questions. Model the activity too.
with a confident student.
Possible answers
This practice is personalized but still controlled. It is Where does he/she come from?
important that you go round the class to help and Is he/she married?
correct where necessary. Does he/she have any children?
Tell students to take it in turns first to ask and then to Has he/she got any brothers or sisters?
answer the questions. They can choose whether they use How many children/sisters/brothers has he/she got/does he/
have or have got in the question, but the answer must she have?
match. What does he/she do?
What does he/she do in his/her free time?
Possible problems Where does he/she go on holiday?
• Students omit the auxiliary do/does and/or got: What’s he/she doing at the moment?
*Have you a car?
*I haven’t a computer. T 2.3 [CD 1: Track 9] Play the recording so that students

(Although these forms are possible, they are stylized can check their questions and repeat for pronunciation
and archaic, and it would be unwise to present before they start the next part of the activity.
students with three forms of have.)
• They mix the two forms:
Tapescript
*I don’t have got a computer. Where does he come from?
Have you got a car? *Yes, I do. Is she married?
• They are reluctant to use the more natural short Does she have any brothers and sisters?
answers: Has he got any children?
Have you got a car? *Yes, I’ve got a car. (rather than How many brothers and sisters has she got?
just Yes, I have.) What does he do?
Do you have a computer? *No, I don’t have a What does she do in her free time?
computer. (rather than just No, I don’t.) Where do they go on holiday?
What’s she doing at the moment?
A nice way to end the activity and draw the full class 4 Hand out the charts and tell students to ask and answer
together again is to ask one or two members of the class questions to complete their missing information. Model
to tell the others about their partner. This also provides the first couple of questions with a confident student to
practice of the third person after the first and second get them started.
person practice in the pairwork.

16 Unit 2  .  The way we live


While students are asking and answering questions to Vocabulary   (SB p17)
complete their charts you should go round the pairs to
help and check. Daily life
When the charts are completed ask one or two In this sort of activity your students will see the advantages
individuals to tell the whole class about someone in the of recording vocabulary in related groups. Encourage your
charts. For example: students to keep their own special notebook for vocabulary.
Teacher Aziz, tell us about Mohamed. As you go through the units of New Headway Plus Special
Aziz  Well, he comes from Dubai. He isn’t married. Edition Pre-Intermediate, get students to check the
He’s got two brothers and he works for a photocopied Word list for each unit.
computer company. He likes surfing the Internet
and going to … etc. 1 Begin by telling students to look at the first box of verbs
and nouns. Ask them if they can match any verb with a
5 Students question each other about their own free time noun. If necessary, do one or two as an example. Tell
and holidays. This is to give some personalized practice them to work in pairs to match verbs and nouns in the
of the Present Simple in first and second persons for rest of the boxes. You could circulate and help at this
those students who might benefit from further practice. stage, but don’t be tempted to give the answers.
Give students time to prepare questions based on the
prompts in the Student’s Book, then ask them to stand T 2.4 [CD 1: Track 10] When students have finished,

up, walk around and ask their questions to two or three play the recording so that they can listen and check their
students they don’t know very well. Monitor and listen answers.
for errors. Answers and tapescript
have breakfast
Check it wash my hair
6 The aim of this activity is to check that students have watch TV
grasped the differences between the Present Simple and talk to my friends
the Present Continuous, and have and have got, in terms make a cup of tea
of form and meaning. Ask students to work individually listen to the radio
or in pairs. Putting students in pairs to do this exercise relax on the sofa
enables them to help and teach each other. do my homework
have a shower
Answers clear up the mess
1 Where do you go on holiday? do the washing-up
2 Do you have any children? have or put posters on the wall
3 . . . I come from Germany.
4 . . . Everyone is smiling. cook a meal
5 I don’t have a mobile phone. send emails
6 . . . but he doesn’t wear a uniform. put on make-up
7 . . . ‘She’s sitting by the window.’ read magazines
8 I like black coffee. Go through the answers with the whole class and deal
Go through the answers as a class. Ask them why they with any problems with meaning and pronunciation.
have reached their decisions, and in this way you will 2 Tell students to match the activities from exercise 1 with
revise the rules. Alternatively, you may wish to set this the correct room. You could elicit one or two examples
activity for homework. under the heading Kitchen to start them off. Ask students
Ask students to read Grammar Reference 2.3 on p130 of to work in pairs and to write the phrases on the lines.
the Student’s Book for homework. Circulate and help. When students have finished, go
through the answers as a class.
Additional material
Sample answers
Workbook Unit 2 Kitchen: have breakfast, make a cup of tea, do the washing-
These exercises could be done in class to give further up, cook a meal
practice, for homework, or in a later class as revision. Living room: watch TV, talk to my friends, relax on the sofa,
Exercises 1–5  Present Simple read magazines, send emails
Exercises 6–8  Present Simple or Continuous? Bathroom: wash my hair, have a shower, put on make-up
Exercises 9 and 10  have/have got Bedroom: listen to the radio, do my homework, clear up the
mess, have/put posters on the wall

Unit 2  .  The way we live 17


3 The aim of exercises 3 and 4 is to practise the vocabulary 1 Put students in pairs or small groups to discuss the
in a personalized way. questions. In feedback, encourage students to share their
Model the activity by telling students which is your ideas with the class.
favourite room and telling them two or three things you 2 Ask students to look at the photos on the page. Ask
do in that room using the vocabulary from exercise 1. What can you see? What do you think the texts are
Then get students to look at the examples in the book. about? Ask students to read the introduction quickly,
Give them a few minutes to choose their favourite room or read the introduction out as they listen and read.
and think about what they are going to say. Ask Why is it easier for people to have different lives
4 Put students in pairs or groups. Ask them to describe these days? (Because cheap travel and communication
their favourite room to their partner or group, without technology have made the world smaller and smaller, so
saying which room it is. Their partner or group guess the that we can work and live almost anywhere.)
room. The main aim here is fluency, but you could 3 Divide the class into two groups for the jigsaw activity
circulate and make sure students are using the at this point. A good way to do this is to divide the class
vocabulary accurately. into groups of three or four, then tell half the groups to
Alternatively, you could set this for homework and your read text A, and half to read text B.
students could describe the room to each other at the Ask the groups to read their text and discuss the
beginning of the next lesson. questions. Monitor and make sure the groups have
accurate and complete answers to their questions.
Additional material
Answers
Workbook Unit 2 Arne
Exercise 11  is a vocabulary activity which introduces more 1 Amsterdam and Bahrain
household items with pictures, and gives further practice 2 He works on solar energy projects.
in dictionary work. 3 He flies to Holland every six weeks and spends two or
three weeks there.
Suggestion 4 He has an apartment in Amsterdam and a villa in Bahrain.
Remember to encourage students to keep a vocabulary 5 His wife doesn’t travel a lot. She spends most of her time
notebook and remind them to add words to this living in the compound in Bahrain.
whenever they do a vocabulary exercise such as this 6 In Amsterdam it is cold so he wears a raincoat but in
one. Bahrain he can wear a T-shirt.
7 He misses the Amsterdam coffee shops and the rain. He
also misses speaking Dutch.
READING AND SPEAKING   (SB p18) 8 Everyone he works with speaks English so there are no
language problems.
Tales of two cities Joss
1 Cambridge and Nuremburg
About the texts 2 He is a snowboard designer.
This is a fluency activity, in the form of a jigsaw 3 Every two weeks. Sometimes he drives but he usually flies.
reading. The class divides into two groups and each 4 He has a farmhouse in both countries.
group reads a different article about someone who lives 5 She travels a lot, too.
and works in two different cities. 6 In Cambridge, he lives with his wife. In Nuremberg, he
After the reading, students from the different groups lives with his colleague. In Nuremberg, he eats more meat,
get together to swap information about the person cheese, and cakes, and watches TV.
in their article. The selection of the articles means 7 He doesn’t like flying – it’s exhausting and he has always
that students will need to use (naturally and without got a cold.
noticing it) some of the grammar taught in this unit – 8 Germans always want to practise their English with him.
Present Simple and have/have got.
4 Tell students to stand up, then find and sit down with a
The title, Tales (stories) of two cities, is a play on words. student who has read the other text. Students have to tell
There is a famous novel, A Tale of Two Cities, by each other about the person in their article. Monitor and
Charles Dickens. prompt.
The vocabulary in the text is not very demanding, and
5 Once students have finished describing their person’s
it is good to encourage students not to worry about
lifestyle, get them to discuss the questions. Feedback by
unknown words as they read.
asking a few of, but not necessarily all of, the questions
in exercises 3 and 5.
18 Unit 2  .  The way we live
Answers Answers and tapescript
1 They both live in two different places, they both fly often. Jerry
2 Joss travels every two weeks, whereas Arne travels every Place of work: BMW car factory
two to six weeks. Arne travels a longer distance. Hours: 12 hours a night, four times a week
3 Students’ own opinions. Why working nights? He can earn more working at nights.
Also, the robots work at nights, so people need to work to
finish each car.
What do you think? Problems: You have to be very careful between one o’clock
This activity is to round off the lesson and make the and three o’clock in the morning, because that’s when
discussion more personal to students. accidents happen.
They could form groups or pairs again to get some Afzal
ideas, but there probably won’t be much time for a long Place of work: Taxi
discussion. Hours: 11.30pm to 7am
Why working nights? People are friendlier during the night.
No traffic.
LISTENING AND SPEAKING   (SB p20) Problems: You get a bit of trouble from young people.
Doreen
A 24/7 society Place of work: Co-op bank – telephone banking
Hours: Sunday to Wednesday, 10pm to 7am
About the listening Why working nights? She enjoys it. The work is more relaxed
The main aim of this activity is to develop your because customers aren’t in a hurry.
students’ ability to listen for gist and for specific Problems: It’s bad for you. You need to look after your health
information. However, the context also revises and or you get ill.
extends students’ ability to use the Present Simple with Dan
frequency adverbs. Try not to over-correct students, as Place of work: Local supermarket
a key aim should be general fluency. Hours: Midnight to 6am
A nighthawk is a hawk (= bird of prey) that hunts at Why working nights? For the money.
night. The word is also used to describe a person who Problems: It’s difficult to change from working days to
likes to stay up late at night. working nights. It isn’t easy to see his friends. Sometimes he
sleeps all weekend.
1 Ask students to look at the photo. Put students in small T 2.5
groups to discuss the questions. A 24/7 society
P = Presenter   I = Interviewer   Je = Jerry
Answers A = Afsal   Do = Doreen   Da = Dan
1 Night time. P Good morning, and welcome to today’s lifestyle
2 A taxi. A taxi driver. programme A 24/7 society. Over eight million people
now work at night. What do they do, and why do they
2 Put students in pairs or small groups to discuss the need to do it? Our reporter, Richard Morris, finds out.
questions. In feedback, find out if any students (or I Well, it’s 8pm on a Thursday night, and I’m in a BMW car
people in their family) have worked nights. factory, where they make the Mini. The night workers are
Possible answers arriving now. With me is Jerry Horne. Jerry, tell me, what
24/7 means 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. So, a 24/7 society hours do you work?
is one where nothing stops or closes. Je I work 12 hours a night, four times a week.
Typical night jobs: factory shift worker, taxi driver, nurse, I And do you like it?
security guard, nightwatchman, emergency workers such as Je Well, it was difficult at first, but it’s OK now. And the
firefighters, ambulance drivers, and police officers. money’s good. I can earn much more working at night.
I Why do people work at night here?
3 T 2.5
[CD 1: Track 11] Play the recording. Ask students Je Because the robots do! The robots make a lot of each
to listen and complete the chart. Let students listen car, but we finish them. And the Mini is very popular, so
again and check their answers in pairs. we need to make 200,000 a year!
I That’s amazing! Are there any problems working at night?

Unit 2  .  The way we live 19


Je Well, the main problem is that you need to be very Da Well, often it isn’t easy to see my friends. They’re going
careful between the hours of 1 o’clock and 3 o’clock in out and I’m going to work! And at weekends, sometimes
the morning. That’s when accidents happen. I sleep all day. My mum doesn’t like that much!
I Right. Thanks, Jerry. And have a good night! I So why do you do it?
... Da For the money, really. And I don’t mind working at night.
I It’s nearly midnight, and most people are in bed I Thanks, Dan. So there you are. I’m off to bed now. Good
already. But I’m driving around the city streets in a taxi, night!
belonging to Afzal Akram. What time do you start your
shift Afzal? What do you think?
A About 11.30 usually. There are usually plenty of
customers at that time, wanting to get home after The aim of this activity is to provide some free speaking
a night out, and that can last till about 2.00 in the in which students are encouraged to express their own
morning. But the real business comes after that, on opinion. It could be done as a class. Alternatively, you could
airport trips. Lots of people fly in the early hours of the divide students into small groups to discuss the questions,
morning, to get the cheap tickets. They know they’ll then take a few comments from each group at the end.
need a taxi to the airport at that time, but it’s still a
cheap way to get off on holiday. Everyday English   (SB p21)
I So is that families?
A Yes. With kids usually – they’re either incredibly excited Making conversation
to be up at that time and going on holiday, or fast asleep!
I Do you prefer the night shift to the day shift? The aim of this section is to get students to think about the
A Definitely. You get a bit of trouble from younger techniques involved in starting and keeping a conversation
people sometimes, but generally people are friendlier going, and to introduce and practise some phrases which
during the night. There’s something about being out might help them.
alone with a stranger when the rest of the world is 1 T 2.6
[CD 1: Track 12] You could lead in by eliciting
asleep – I think people feel a strong connection with from students ways of having a successful conversation
you, and they open up sometimes. And obviously, it’s a and listing these suggestions on the board. Alternatively,
dream to drive on empty streets, not a car to be seen ask students to tell you what problems they have when
most of the time. I try to finish by 7.00, before the having a conversation in English, and list the problems
traffic starts up. You just have to keep a careful eye on the board.
on the speedometer in case there’s a bored policeman Focus students on the instruction in the Student’s Book
driving around! and ask students to listen and say which dialogue is more
... successful and why.
I It’s now 1 o’clock in the morning and I’m in the Co-op
bank. I’m sitting next to Doreen. At night this telephone Answer and tapescript
banking centre only has six workers. Doreen, what hours The second dialogue is more successful because Jamal asks
do you work? questions, shows interest, and adds comments of his own.
Do I work from Sunday to Wednesday from 10pm to 7am. T 2.6
I Aha. And what do you think of the job? J = James  H = Hans
Do I love it! We’re like a family at night. We’re all good J Hello. What’s your name?
friends, and the work is more relaxed. Customers aren’t H Hans.
in a hurry at 2 o’clock in the morning! J I’m James. I’m a teacher. And . . . where are you from?
I Are there any disadvantages? H Berlin.
Do Well, it’s bad for you! You need to look after your J What do you do?
health. If you don’t, you get ill. But it’s OK for me – I H I’m a student.
could never sleep at night, anyway! J Mm. And . . . how long have you been here in London, Hans?
... H Two months.
I Well, it’s 4 o’clock in the morning, and I’m feeling very J Are you having a good time?
sleepy! I’m in the local supermarket with Dan. So, Dan, H Mm . . . Yes.
when did you start work? (Pause)
Da At midnight. I finish in two hours’ time at 6 o’clock. But J Can I get you a coffee?
some weeks I work during the day. The difficult thing is H No.
changing from day working to night working. J Are you missing your family at all?
I Any other problems? H No.

20 Unit 2  .  The way we live


J Have you got any brothers or sisters? T 2.7 [CD 1: Track 13] Listen to the recording to check

H Yes. answers and focus on pronunciation.
J Er . . . Oh! Er . . . What do they do?
H They are students, too. Answers and tapescript
J Oh well, I’ve got a class now. Goodbye, Hans. 1 ‘What a lovely day it is today!’ ‘Yes. Beautiful, isn’t it?’
H Bye. 2 ‘It’s very wet today.’ ‘Mm. Horrible. Makes you feel
miserable, doesn’t it?’
S = Steven J = Jamal
3 ‘How are you today?’ ‘I’m very well, thanks. How about
S Hello, what’s your name?
you?’
J Jamal. And what’s your name?
4 ‘Did you have a nice weekend?’ ‘Yes, it was lovely. We had
S Steven. Where are you from, Jamal?
lunch and went for a walk.’
J I come from Dubai, the fastest growing city in the world.
5 ‘How do you find living in London?’ ‘I’m enjoying it. It was
And you Steve, where do you come from?
a bit strange at first, but I’m getting used to it.’
S I’m from Scotland. What do you do in Dubai, Jamal?
6 ‘Did you have a good journey?’ ‘Yes, no problems. The
J I’m an architect.
plane was a bit late, but it didn’t matter.’
S Oh, really?
7 ‘Did you watch the football yesterday?’ ‘No, I missed it.
J Yes. It’s a good place to be an architect. There’s a lot of
Was it a good game?’
new construction going on there.
8 ‘What a lovely jacket you’re wearing!’ ‘Thank you. I got it in
S How interesting.
Paris last year.’
J How long have you been a teacher, Steve?
9 ‘If you have any problems, just ask me for help.’ ‘Thank you
S It’s Steven actually, not Steve.
very much. That’s very kind of you.’
J Oh, I’m so sorry. I thought you said Steve.
10 ‘Excuse me. Is this your scarf?’ ‘Yes, it is. Thank you. Where
S That’s OK. It’s just that I don’t like being called Steve for
did you find it?’
some reason. I’ve been teaching here for five years.
J And do you enjoy it? Point out the exaggerated intonation pattern of some
S Yes, very much. I meet a lot of people from all sorts of of the phrases and remind students that you can sound
different countries, and I really like that. Are you enjoying bored and uninterested if you don’t vary your tone when
it here? speaking.
J Oh, yes, very much. I’m learning a lot of English, and I’m
making a lot of friends. The family I’m staying with are very
What a lovely day it is today!
friendly. And even the weather’s good most of the time!
S Well, you can’t depend on that! Can I get you a coffee,
Jamal? Yes. Beautiful, isn’t it?
J Sure, that would be great. There’s enough time before Ask students to practise the dialogues in pairs. Monitor
class, isn’t there? closely and encourage students to put some feeling into
S Yes, it’s only . . . their intonation.

2 Ask students to read the dialogues in the tapescript on NOTE


p119 in pairs, and compare them, noting the ways in The aim of exercise 5 is to provide some light-hearted
which Jamal keeps the conversation going. Get feedback practice in keeping a conversation going. It is a good
from the class and compare what students have noted idea to join in the mingle yourself, as this way you can
with the suggestions or problems listed on the board. provide a clear and consistent model of how to use the
As a class, discuss the list of things that help a small talk, and a good intonation pattern to sound
conversation. See if students can add to the list. interested.

3 Ask students to listen again to the conversation. Then tell


them to turn to the tapescript on p119 and practise it in 5 Ask students to work individually to prepare questions
pairs. Go around checking that they are using correct based on the three subjects in the Student’s Book.
stress and intonation. Monitor and help. Model an example conversation with
a good student to show the others what to do, then tell
4 Ask students to work in pairs to match a line in A with a them to start. Join in yourself, and encourage students to
reply in B and a comment in C. Do the first one as an keep conversations going for as long as possible.
example and check vocabulary if necessary before
students start. Monitor and help.

Unit 2  .  The way we live 21


Don’t forget!
Workbook Unit 2
Exercises 12 and 13  Writing: linking words and, so, but,
however, and because are practised. Then students are
asked to write about their own lifestyle.
Word list
Photocopy the Word list for Unit 2 (TB pp124–125) for
your students, and ask them to write in the translations,
learn them at home, and/or write some of the words into
their vocabulary notebook.

22 Unit 2  .  The way we live


Introduction
to the unit
3 Past tenses
Word formation
Time expressions
Unit
It all head
wentfrom

Language aims
SB
wrong

Grammar – Past Simple  Students will already have a certain familiarity with
the Past Simple, and may be able to use it quite accurately on a basic level.
The theme of this unit is telling stories.
The Past Simple and Past Continuous Possible problems
tenses are revised and practised in the
• Many regular verbs will be known, but you can expect problems with the
context of newspaper stories about pronunciation of -ed at the end, for example:
unusual crimes. In the Reading and helped */helped/ /helpt/
listening section, students are invited to saved */seɪved/ instead of /seɪvd/
read and listen to a short Sherlock watched */wɔʃt/ /wɔtʃt/
Holmes detective story.
It is worth doing some work on this problem, but don’t expect students to
Students have the opportunity to master it easily! It takes a long time to get right.
practise past tenses by means of Students will also know some irregular verbs, such as came, went, saw, met,
personalized pairwork activities, and took, but there are unfortunately still quite a few of them to learn!
writing a news report, and telling Remind students that there is a list of irregular verbs on p143 of the
stories round the class. Student’s Book. You could ask them to learn five new irregular verbs every
week. Do a little test on them from time to time.
• The use of did causes problems. Students forget to use it. For example:
*What time you get up?
*Where you went yesterday?
*I no see you yesterday.
*You have a good time at the picnic?
• Learners try to form a past tense of have with got, which is uncommon in
English.
*I had got a cold yesterday.
English prefers forms with just had.

Past Continuous  The Past Continuous could well be new to students at this
level. In this unit it is contrasted with the Past Simple, and in this context, the
difference between the two tenses is clear. However, the fundamental use of the
Past Continuous to describe background events and temporary situations in the
past is quite a difficult one to grasp. Learners find it hard to see the difference
between sentences such as:
It rained yesterday.
It was raining when I got up.
I wore my best suit to the wedding.
She was wearing a beautiful red dress.
The Past Continuous is not dealt with in great depth in this unit. At this stage,
it is enough to lay a foundation, so that students will learn to recognize the
tense as they see it in context, and gradually begin to produce it.

Unit 3  .  It all went wrong 23


While is often used with verb forms in the Past Continuous. 2 Check that students can recognize irregular past forms
While I was having lunch, James arrived. by asking them to find some verbs in the text and match
Learners often confuse while and during. Exercise 11 in them to the infinitives in the exercise. Ask students to
Unit 3 of the Workbook deals with this. identify which verbs are regular and which are irregular.
Encourage them to work in pairs or to work individually
Vocabulary The Vocabulary section contains several and check with a partner.
exercises on word building. Students are encouraged to
build their vocabulary and their awareness of how English Answers
works by looking at how suffixes and prefixes can change have had set off set off
verbs to nouns, nouns to adjectives, and positives to take took drive drove
negatives. ask asked arrive arrived
Everyday English The Everyday English section deals with give gave catch caught
time expressions – saying dates, and phrases with and get got offer offered
without prepositions. But these areas cause problems of find found think thought
form, because there are so many ‘bits’ to get right. ask and arrive are regular.
In the feedback, model or drill the past forms for
Notes on the unit pronunciation.
3 T 3.2
[CD 1: Track 15] Tell students that they are going
Starter (SB p22) to listen to some sentences about the story which are
In this Starter activity students’ knowledge of basic irregular incorrect. They must listen and correct the mistakes.
past tenses is checked. Read the example very carefully, and point out that they
Ask students to work in pairs to fill the gaps then feed back have to write two sentences, one negative and one
as a class, drilling any past tenses that students find difficult positive, then play the recording. You may need to pause
to pronounce. If necessary, refer students to the list of after each sentence to give students time to write. After
irregular verbs on p143 of the book. the first playing, ask students to work in pairs to
compare information, then play the recording again if
Answers necessary, and students work in pairs again to check.
1 be 5 say 9 get
2 see 6 have 10 can Tapescript
3 go 7 take 11 make 1 Mr Yilmaz took the Schumacher family to Berlin.
4 tell 8 give 12 do 2 Schumacher gave Mr Yilmaz a 60 euro tip.
3 They drove along small country roads.
Alternatively, you could test students’ ability to use past 4 Schumacher drove very slowly.
tenses by asking them some questions about yesterday or 5 The Schumachers missed their plane.
last weekend. 6 A man offered Mr Yilmaz 30 thousand euro for his taxi.
What did you do yesterday? Where did you go?
When getting the feedback to this exercise, insist on
What time did you go to bed?
good pronunciation. This requires a wide voice range to
Listen carefully to their replies to see how well they are using express surprise and strong stress to show contrast.
the Past Simple. You could ask them What tense were all my
questions? to see if they know the name of the tense. ● ●
He didn’t take them to Berlin.
formula one taxi   (SB p22)

Past Simple He took them to Coburg.


1 Ask students to look at the picture and the headline to Answers
the newspaper article. Ask questions to set the situation 2 He didn’t give him a 60 euro tip. He gave him a 100 euro tip.
and get students to predict the story. 3 They didn’t drive along small country roads. They drove
T 3.1 [CD 1: Track 14] Focus students on the gist along the German autobahn.
question Why was this the best drive of the taxi driver’s 4 He didn’t drive very slowly. He drove at full speed.
life? and ask them to read and listen to the story. 5 They didn’t miss their plane. They caught their plane.
6 He didn’t offer him 30 thousand euro. He offered him
63 thousand euro.

24 Unit 3  .  It all went wrong


4 Ask students to work in pairs to complete the questions. PRACTICE   (SB p23)
They should write them down. Monitor and help. In
the feedback, insist on correctly formed questions, and Making connections
make sure the question starts with the voice high. The aim of this activity is to give students further accuracy
Answers practice in producing past forms, and to check their ability
2 Where did he take them them? to use the connectors, so, because, and, and but.
To the city of Coburg. 1 Focus students on the box and the example, then ask
3 Why did Michael Schumacher ask to drive the taxi? them as a class to connect feel ill with a phrase in the
Because he was late for his plane. right-hand column. When they have got the idea, ask
4 How much did Michael Schumacher give as a tip? students to work in pairs to produce as many sentences
€100. as they can. This could be done as a written exercise
5 How fast did he drive? or, if you think your students can manage it, it could
At full speed. be done as an oral exercise in pairs. Monitor, help and
6 How much did one man offer Mr Yilmaz for his taxi? correct, paying particular attention to the pronunciation
€63,000. of past forms.
T 3.4 [CD 1: Track 17] Students listen and check their
T
grammar spot   (SB p23) answers.
Ask students to work in pairs or threes to answer the Sample answers and tapescript
grammar questions. 1 I broke a cup, but I mended it with glue.
2 I felt ill, so I went to bed.
Answers
3 I made a sandwich because I was hungry.
1 The Past Simple, because it is a newspaper report of an 4 I had a shower and washed my hair.
incident that happened in the past. 5 I lost my passport, but then I found it at the back of a
The question is formed with did + infinitive (students will drawer.
probably use the term infinitive instead of base form). 6 I called the police because I heard a strange noise.
The negative is formed with didn’t + infinitive. 7 I ran out of coffee, so I bought some more.
2 a asked /t/ 8 I forgot to call him, so I said sorry.
showed /d/ 9 The phone rang, so I answered it.
wanted /ɪd/ 10 I told a joke, but nobody laughed.
walked /t/
started /ɪd/ Possible problem
b tried /d/ Students may not be sure about how to use the
carried /ɪd/ connectors, particularly so. You may wish to check
c liked /t/ students’ ability to use them before starting the exercise
believed /d/ by writing some examples on the board and asking
used /d/ check questions. For example:
d stopped /t/
planned /d/ but I mended it with glue.
I broke a cup, so I bought another one.
T 3.3 [CD 1: Track 16] Ask students to listen and I broke a plate.
and repeat the past forms. Drill the words for the because I dropped it.
pronunciation of -ed. Which sentence shows a contrast?  … but …
Which sentence adds extra information?  … and …
3 Regular past tenses are formed by adding -ed. Which sentence shows a consequence?  … so …
If the verb ends in consonant + y, change the -y to -ied. Which sentence says why you did something? 
We double the final consonant when the verb ends … because …
consonant – vowel – consonant.
Refer students to the list of irregular verbs on p143, and
Grammar Reference 3.1 on p131.

Unit 3  .  It all went wrong 25


Talking about you 2 Tell students they are going to read an article about a
The aim here is to round off the lesson with a personalized crime. Ask them to look at the photos and headline and
free speaking activity using the Past Simple. guess what it might be about. Students then read the
article quickly to see if they were right. In the feedback,
2 Ask students to work in pairs to talk about what they did last check any difficult vocabulary.
night, last weekend, etc. Monitor the groups carefully. There
Ask students to work in pairs to put the past forms from
will no doubt be mistakes of form and pronunciation, but
exercise 1 in the gaps.
you can’t correct them all, so be selective! As you go round
the groups, you could write down some mistakes, and after Answers
you have conducted the feedback you could write them on 1 visited 5 noticed
the board for the class to correct. 2 thought 6 found
3 cut 7 stole
Additional idea 4 hid 8 spent
This is a variation on a drill to practise the question
and the Past Simple. Find pictures of people doing 3 Ask students to discuss the questions with their partner,
everyday things such as going for a walk, watching then briefly as a class.
TV, playing tennis, fishing, swimming, reading,
writing a letter, etc. You need quite a few, about ten. Answers
Ask the class to stand up in a circle if you have a small 1 Maps and pages from 150 library books.
class, or several circles if you have a large class. Give 2 He cut pages from the books and hid them inside his own
Student A a picture of, say, someone playing tennis. books.
Ask the student What did you do yesterday? Student 3 No. He did it because he loved collecting rare books.
A says I played tennis. Student A gives the picture
to Student B, and asks What did you do yesterday? 4 T 3.5
[CD 1: Track 18] Ask students to put the lines in
Student B says I played tennis, and hands the card the story, in the spaces marked (…), then check with a
to Student C. B asks C What did you do yesterday? partner. As an example, ask students first to tell you
etc. You, meanwhile, give another card to Student A which line goes in the first space. Do feedback as a class
and ask What did you do yesterday?, etc. All the pictures and play the recording to check.
are passed round in a circle. Tapescript and answers
Ask students to read Grammar Reference 3.2 on p132 b, a, d, e, c
at home.
T 3.5
Joseph Beck loved books. For eight years, when he was living
Additional material in Manhattan, he regularly visited the National Archive
Library in New York. When he asked to look at extremely
Workbook Unit 3 rare antique books, staff thought that Mr Beck was a typical
These exercises could be done in class to give further academic and was doing important research. He was indeed
practice, for homework, or in a later class as revision. an academic, Harvard-educated, and a millionaire publisher.
Exercises 1–6  Past Simple But in a quiet corner of the library, while security cameras
were looking the other way, Mr Beck took out a knife and
cut pages from the books. He carefully hid the pages inside
CRIME in the library   (SB p24) his own books and took them back to his Manhattan home,
where he was making a collection of rare texts.
Past Simple and Continuous When another library user took out a book after Mr Beck,
1 Put students in pairs to check the meanings in their he noticed that something was wrong – several pages were
dictionaries and find past forms. In feedback, check the missing. A police investigation found that 150 of the books
students’ understanding by miming some or all of the borrowed by Mr Beck had missing pages. Altogether, he stole
words, and asking students to tell you which word you maps and texts worth $3m.
are miming. Mr Beck admitted his guilt, and said that his love for
collecting rare books was difficult to control. He spent
Answers nine months in prison for his crime.
hid found
visited stole 5 Put students in pairs to take turns reading the story aloud.
cut spent
thought noticed
Visited and noticed are regular.

26 Unit 3  .  It all went wrong


GRAMMAR AND PRONUNCIATION   (SB p24) PRACTICE   (SB p25)
Ask students to work through the questions in pairs or
small groups. SUGGESTION
Before going on to the Practice exercises, you might
Answers decide that your students would like some more
1 The tense used is the Past Continuous. The Past information about this (new) tense. You could read
Continuous is used to give background information and Grammar Reference 3.2 and 3.3 on p132. In Unit 3 of
description. (The Past Simple is used to tell the story.) the Workbook, exercise 7 is a mechanical drill to
This is demonstrated by the fact that these lines can be practise forming the Past Continuous. Once they have
taken out of the story without seriously interfering done it, your students might feel more confident about
with comprehensibility. doing the following exercises. Don’t be surprised if
Notice that in statements was /wəz/ and were /wə/ are there are quite a few mistakes with the Past
weakly stressed and have a schwa sound. The r in were Continuous. You have just introduced students to a
is silent unless the first sound of the following word is a new tense, and it will take time for them to see how it
vowel, eg were eating /wəriːtiŋ/. In questions, operates. Let students have the rules reinforced as they
negatives and short answers was and were are stressed see the correct answers in exercises 1 and 2, and be
and have their full value. prepared to re-teach if necessary.
T 3.6 [CD 1: Track 19] Play the recording.
Students listen and repeat. They could then practise
reading out all the sentences in exercise 4, paying Discussing grammar
attention to the weak stress in was /wəz/ and were 1 Students work in pairs to decide which is the correct
/wə/. verb form and underline it.
T 3.6
he was living he was doing Answers
they were looking they were missing 1 saw
2 was shopping, lost
2 We make questions by inverting the subject with was 3 stopped, was driving
or were. 4 did you cut
Was he living in Manhattan? 5 was cooking, dropped
Were the cameras looking the other way? 6 arrived, was having
We make negatives by adding not or n’t after was or
were. We usually use n’t, especially when speaking. 2 Students work in pairs to put the verbs in the correct
He wasn’t living in Manhattan. form.
They weren’t looking the other way.
Answers
3 In the first sentence she made the coffee after they 1 was going, met
arrived, possibly as a result of their arrival. 2 didn’t want, was raining
When we arrived, 3 was listening, rang
Past X      X Present 4 picked
she made some coffee.
In the second sentence, she started making coffee before 5 said, were watching
we arrived and the making of the coffee was
in progress when we arrived. fortunately/unfortunately
When we arrived, The aim of the following exercises is to introduce the words
Past
                     X Present fortunately and unfortunately and then to give students lots
I I of practice in using the Past Simple tense by means of a fun
she was making some coffee.
whole class activity. It should be lots of fun, but don’t forget
Refer students to Grammar Reference 3.2 and 3.3 on to monitor and feed back on errors involving the use of the
p132. past tense.

Unit 3  .  It all went wrong 27


3 Focus students on the story and model it, paying 7 Monitor and help with pronunciation as the students
particular attention to your intonation, rising on read the completed article aloud.
fortunately, falling on unfortunately.
Additional material
fortunately unfortunately
Workbook Unit 3
Gesture to a student to continue the story by adding the Exercises 7 and 8  the Past Continuous
next sentence, beginning Fortunately. Then gesture to Exercise 9  Past Simple or Continuous?
another student to continue, and so on around the class.
You could correct any errors at the end.
reading and listening   (SB p26)
4 Put students in a circle if possible, and start one of the
stories by reading out the first sentence. As the story goes Sherlock Holmes
around the class, note down any errors to feed back at
the end. Alternatively, put students in groups of four to Background information
do the activity and monitor the groups, or even start two The stories of Sherlock Holmes were written by Sir Arthur
different stories, going round the group in opposite Conan Doyle. Conan Doyle was born in Scotland in 1859.
directions. He studied medicine at Edinburgh University and then
moved to England to work as a doctor. His first Sherlock
Exchanging information Holmes story, a novel called A Study in Scarlet was published
5 Ask students to look at the photo and read the headline. in 1887. In 1891 he wrote The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes
Ask them say what kind of person they think Hugo for a magazine and these stories became hugely popular with
Fenton-Jones is and what they think a spending spree is. the public. By the 1920s Doyle was one of the highest paid
Ask them to speculate on what they think he spent the writers in the world and Sherlock Holmes one of the most
money on. famous detectives in the world. Doyle’s last book The
Casebook of Sherlock Holmes was published in 1927. Doyle
Answers died on 7 July, 1930 but his stories are still read worldwide.
The boy is a teenager who borrowed his brother’s credit card. The character of Sherlock Holmes lives on.
A spending spree is an uncontrolled episode of excessive
shopping. Introduction
6 Put students in A and B pairs. Give copies of the text on Write the name SHERLOCK HOLMES on the board and ask
page 119 of the Teacher’s Book to the Student Bs. Read students if they know the name. Encourage them to offer
the instructions as a class and give students three or four any information they have about him. Establish that he is a
minutes to read their texts and prepare questions. very famous character in English literature and perhaps give
Monitor and help. some brief information about the author of the Sherlock
Holmes stories, Conan Doyle.
When the pairs are ready, model the activity briefly with
a reliable student, then give a clear start signal. Monitor 1 Ask students to work in pairs to discuss the choices and
and listen for errors, particularly with question underline the correct ones. Go through the answers with
formation, as they do the activity. the class.

Answers (complete text) Answers


Teenager Hugo Fenton-Jones borrowed his elder brother 1 Sherlock Holmes was a detective.
Peter’s credit card while Peter was working on his computer. 2 He was English.
He then flew to Paris and stayed at the Ritz Hotel. His room 3 He lived in London.
cost £800 a night. Next he took a taxi to the Champs Élysées. 4 Stories about him first appeared in the 19th century.
While he was shopping, he bought expensive clothes, a Cartier (However, they continued to be written and published in
watch and Armani sunglasses. Back at the hotel, Hugo phoned the 20th century.)
his friends and invited them to join him in Paris. They were
having lunch in the restaurant at the Ritz when Peter phoned. 2 Tell your students that they are going read a Sherlock
He was furious with his brother and ordered him to return Holmes story. Ask them to tell you the title, then to look
home immediately. at the picture and the three headings and to guess what
Hugo flew back early next morning. When he arrived at the story is about. They should be able to deduce that
London airport, his brother and his father were waiting for this story is probably set in a university and that some
him. ‘They aren’t speaking to me at the moment,’ said Hugo students have tried to copy some exam papers.
yesterday. ‘They’re too angry.’

28 Unit 3  .  It all went wrong


3 Ask students to read Part 1 and answer the questions with Answers
a partner. Go through the answers with the whole class. Gresham, the tall athlete, copied the papers.
Sherlock Holmes solved the mystery because he knew that
Answers only someone very tall could see through the window to the
1 Sherlock Holmes, Henry Weaver and Weaver’s servant, papers on the desk. Also the balls of mud came from sports
Bannister. shoes. Holmes went to the sports ground to collect a sample
2 He was staying in one of England’s most famous university of mud – the same mud he found in the rooms.
towns. (This is probably Oxford or Cambridge.) Gresham wrote the letter to say that he was very sorry and that
3 He received the Greek translation papers for the exam the he was going to leave the university and go to Africa. This means
next day. that the examinations can take place. A happy ending for all.
4 The exam papers were lying on the floor by the window.
5 Because he didn’t want a scandal in the college. He didn’t Tapescript
want to cancel the exam. SH = Sherlock Holmes  HW = Henry Weaver G = Mr Gresham
6 Bannister is Mr Weaver’s servant. He helped Mr Weaver HW Tell me, Holmes. What have you found out? Can the
examine the room. examination take place?
7 They found a broken pencil on the table next to the SH Yes, the mystery is solved.
window and a small ball of black mud on the desk. HW But who . . .? Which student . . .?
8 They think that someone copied the exam papers. SH  Please ask Mr Gresham to join us.
HW Gresham, can you come here, please.
4 Ask students to read Part 2 and work with their partner G  What is it? What’s happened?
to decide if the statements are true or false. Go through SH  Close the door, Mr Gresham. Now, tell me honestly, why
answers with the class. did you do it? How did you do it?
G  Oh, no! I’m sorry, so sorry.
Answers SH  Come, come Mr Gresham, perhaps it’s easier if I speak.
1 False. The tutor’s room was on the ground floor. The three You see, when I learnt that you, Gresham, were an
students lived on three floors above. athlete and a long jumper, I understood immediately.
2 True. He wasn’t tall enough. This is what happened. That afternoon you were
3 False. He examined the carpet and found nothing. returning from practising your sport. You were carrying
4 False. The papers were next to the window because the your jumping shoes. You passed your tutor’s window and
intruder wanted to see if the tutor was returning. because you are very tall you could see the papers on his
5 False. The intruder didn’t see Mr Weaver because he came desk. Then you saw that the door was open, so you
back through the side door. entered, put your shoes down on the desk and moved to
6 False. The intruder escaped through the bedroom window. the window to copy the papers. Am I right so far?
7 True. There was another small black ball of mud in the G  Yes, yes.
bedroom. SH  Suddenly you heard your tutor at the side door. You
picked up your shoes, leaving some mud on the desk,
5 Ask students to read Part 3 and discuss who they think did and ran into the bedroom. What you didn’t see was that
it, first with their partner, then in groups. Which student is as you climbed out of the window, more mud from your
guilty? Or is it Bannister? Go round the groups and listen shoes fell to the floor. This morning, early, I went to the
to their discussion. Ask them to give reasons for their sports ground and collected a sample of the same mud.
conclusions. Get feedback from the whole class. Establish Is this all correct, Mr Gresham?’
that all three students had motives to copy the papers. G  Yes, it is. I feel so bad, so guilty and ashamed. But can I
What were these motives? But who had the greatest just show you this, Mr Weaver?
motivation? Do your students agree on who did it? HW What is it?
6 T 3.7
[CD 1: Track 20] Tell students they will now listen G  It’s a letter. I wrote it in the middle of the night. Read it,
to the final part and find out who did it. Play the please. In it I say how sorry I am for what I did.
recording. Discuss with the class whose ideas were HW Ah yes. And you say you are not going to take the
correct. Who guessed correctly? Answer the questions examination. Oh, and you’re going to leave the university
with the whole class. and go to Africa.
G  Yes, I am.
HW Gresham, I am really pleased to hear that.
SH  Well, Mr Weaver, Mr Gresham, time for my breakfast, I
think. I hope the exams go well, Mr Weaver. Good luck in
Africa, Mr Gresham. Goodbye.
HW Thank you, Holmes. It was a lucky chance that you were
staying in town at this time.

Unit 3  .  It all went wrong 29


What do you think? Answers
Discuss the questions with the whole class. This will Noun Verb
probably just be a brief discussion. If your students think expla'nation ex'plain
Holmes was clever to solve the mystery, ask them in what invi'tation in'vite
ways he was clever. Perhaps your students were just as clever. trans'lation trans'late
de'cision de'cide
en'joyment en'joy
Language work em'ployment/em'ployer/emplo'yee em'ploy
7 After all the discussion, this exercise provides a quieter im'provement im'prove
time in class. Ask students individually to write the past dis'cussion dis'cuss
tenses as quickly as possible. If you have time, ask them organi'zation 'organize
to go through the answers with a partner or just go imagi'nation i'magine
through them quickly with the class. ad'vertisement 'advertise
im'provement im'prove
Answers
received tried thought (irreg) Noun Adjective
found (irreg) went (irreg) left (irreg) friend 'friendly
said (irreg) could (irreg) examined fame 'famous
walked saw (irreg) ran (irreg) 'laziness 'lazy
put (irreg) copied 'patience 'patient
'happiness 'happy
8 Ask students to work in pairs and tell the story to each care 'careful/'careless
other. Go round, monitoring and assisting. 'difference 'different
help 'helpful/'helpless
'beauty 'beautiful
VOCABULARY AND PRONUNCIATION   (SB p28) guilt 'guilty
im'portance im'portant
Noun, verb, and adjective endings 'danger 'dangerous
This section has links with the reading about Sherlock
Holmes but does not rely upon it. It can be self-standing. Go through the completed chart with the class. Get students
to say the words in their pairs: the noun and its verb, the
1 Ask a student or students to read aloud the four noun and its adjective(s).
sentences. Ask which of the underlined words are nouns
(examination, luck), which word is an adjective (lucky) expla'nation ex'plain
and which word is a verb (examined). friend 'friendly etc.
Point out the stress change in the pronunciation of the You could ask individual students or do it as a class chant.
verb ex'amine and the noun exami'nation. Ask students 3 T 3.8
[CD 1: Track 21] Ask students to do this exercise
to repeat the words separately and then in the sentences. individually, then when they have finished to check with
This introduces the pronunciation work to follow. a partner. Go round and monitor the class as they work.
2 Ask students to look at the boxes of noun and adjective
endings. They could read these aloud. Ask them to work
Answers
in pairs to complete the charts and to say aloud the
1 expla'nation
words to each other to decide on the correct stress. Help
2 trans'late
them to put in the stress markings.
3 im'proved (note that the past tense is needed here)
4 'careful
5 'differences (note that the plural is needed here)
6 'dangerous
7 en'joy
8 'helpful
9 organi'zation
10 invi'tation

Ask individual students to read the sentences aloud. Ask


other students to say if they are correct or not. Then
play the recording for them to check their answers.

30 Unit 3  .  It all went wrong


Making negatives Focus students on the dates written in American English,
4 T T 3.9 [CD 1: Track 22] Look at the prefixes as a class and ask if they can say what the difference is (the month
and give students a couple of examples, such as unusual is written before the day).
and undress, to show how they work. Elicit as many T 3.11 [CD 1: Track 24] Play the recording to listen and

other examples as students can think of. check.
Ask students to work in pairs to complete the sentences. 2 Practise the dates as a class or in pairs. Encourage
Do the first as an example. Play the recording for them students to attempt the correct stress and intonation.
to listen and check. T 3.12 [CD 1: Track 25] Play the recording for students to

Answers check whether they said the dates correctly.
1 unpacked 5 untidy 9 illegal 3 Students work in pairs to put at, in, on, or no preposition
2 impossible 6 unemployed 10 unfair in the gaps. Monitor unobtrusively to find out how well
3 dislike 7 disagree students do the exercise, then tell them the answers.
4 impolite 8 disappeared
Answers
at six o’clock on Saturday in 1995
Everyday English   (SB p29) – last night in December at the weekend
(on in US English)
Time expressions on Monday morning in summer – two weeks ago
in the evening – yesterday evening on January 18
1 Ask students what today’s date is, and practise saying it
in the two ways. Tell students that we always use at with times, for example,
the first of August    August the first at 6 o’clock. Ask students to work in pairs to work out other
rules. In the feedback, list the rules on the board and refer
Point out that in American English the date is usually
students to Grammar Reference 3.4 on p132.
written with the month, not the day, expressed first. It is
usually said August first. Rules
Ask students to practise saying the dates and years in pairs. at in on no preposition
Before they listen to the recording, let students concentrate times months days last night/week, etc.
on getting the form of the dates and years right. years dates Monday morning, etc.
seasons today/yesterday
T 3.10 [CD 1: Track 23] Listen to the recording. Stop the
two weeks ago, etc.
recording after each date, and drill it round the class.
Concentrate now on correct form and pronunciation. It 4 Model the questions around the class, and drill them for
is very important that dates are said with strong and pronunciation if necessary. Then put students in pairs or
weak stresses. groups of three to ask each other the questions. Monitor
● ● ● ● ● ● and check that students are using dates correctly. Do a
The sixteenth of July nineteen eighty-five brief feedback, and correct any errors.
Tapescript
Additional material
the eighth of January, nineteen ninety-eight
January the eighth, nineteen ninety-eight Workbook Unit 3
the sixteenth of July, nineteen eighty-five Exercise 6 Past time expressions
July the sixteenth, nineteen eighty five
the twenty-fifth of November, two thousand and two Don’t forget!
November the twenty-fifth, two thousand and two Workbook Unit 3
Exercise 10  is a vocabulary exercise on have + noun.
Possible problems Exercises 11 and 12  are two exercises on writing. Students
• Students forget to say the definite article. are asked to write a story.
*I came here on fifth August. Word list
• Students might not know all the ordinal numbers, Photocopy the Word list for Unit 3 (TB p125) for your
especially first, second, third, and twenty-first, students, and ask them to write in the translations, learn
twenty-second, etc. You might want to practise these them at home, and/or write some of the words into their
first. The pronunciation of some ordinal numbers is vocabulary notebook.
difficult because of consonant clusters.
fifth  sixth  twelfth
Unit 3  .  It all went wrong 31
Introduction
to the unit
4 much/many • some/any
a few, a little, a lot of • Articles
Shopping • Prices
Let’s go shopping!

Language aims
Expressions of quantity  It is assumed that students will have some knowledge
of expressions of quantity, but that the intricacies of this area (particularly in
The theme of this unit is shopping. In
relation to count and uncount nouns) will mean that mistakes will still be
the opening section, ‘The Weekend
common.
Shop’, expressions of quantity are
introduced in the context of two The point is also made that the rules about the use of something/anything, etc.
friends discussing their weekend are the same as for some and any. These are also practised.
shopping list. In a separate presentation Articles  It is expected that students will not have actually studied articles in
section, a text about a shopkeeper, there English to any great extent. However, they will probably be aware that the use of
is some work on the use of articles in articles varies between languages. Those students whose L1 has no articles,
English. The Reading is about three such as Arabic, find their use particularly difficult. Don’t expect your students
markets around the world, and the to have a deep understanding of article usage at the end of this unit. There are
Vocabulary and listening consists of too many rules and exceptions. Hopefully they will know a little more.
four dialogues set in different shops.
Vocabulary  Vocabulary is introduced around the topic of things we buy in a
brainstorming activity before the main listening texts.
Everyday English  Prices and the functional language of shopping are chosen to
fit the theme of the unit. These are practised in a variety of everyday shopping
situations.

Notes on the unit


Starter (SB p30)
The aim of the alphabet game is to see how well your students understand the
idea of count and uncount nouns. It also brings out a lot of vocabulary, revises
past tenses from the previous unit, and it is fun.
Focus students on the examples in the book then model the first sentence.
Nominate a student to read the second sentence and so on until they have got
the idea. If you have a small class get them to sit in a circle to do this activity.
Try to model and insist on good stress and a good rhythm.
● ● ● ●
Yesterday I went shopping and I bought an apple and some bread.
Don’t let this activity go on too long. As you get towards halfway through the
alphabet, students’ memories will be tested. Be prepared to give lots of prompts,
so you can get on to the main part of the lesson.

32 Unit 4  .  Let’s go shopping!


THE WEEKEND SHOP   (SB p30) 2 This exercise aims to check students have grasped the use
of how much and how many before going on to study
Quantity more expressions.
You could personalize the lead-in by writing The shopping Focus students on the quantity expressions in the box
list on the board and eliciting from students what they or and check their understanding of the vocabulary by
their family usually buy every week. asking them to match the expressions in the box with the
items on the shopping list.
1 Set the scene by reading the introduction and asking
students to look at the photograph of Sam and Victor. Answers
Ask students some questions. two large bottles mineral water
Where are they? just one white loaf bread
What are they doing? 200g of Cheddar cheese
four packets crisps
Focus students on the shopping list and check any
six cans cola
unknown words. You may also wish to check the
half a kilo of black ones olives
meaning of a pint of milk and a dozen eggs. (1.76 pints
four big ones potatoes
/paɪnts/ = 1 litre, dozen /ˈdʌzən/ = 12)
T 4.1 [CD 1: Track 26] Ask students to listen to the Students continue the conversation in pairs. Monitor
conversation between Sam and Victor without reading and correct. Encourage good pronunciation of the
and tick the things on the shopping list that they questions, particularly the intonation.
mention.
Answers ● ●
How much milk do we need?   And how many eggs?
milk  eggs  potatoes  butter
3 T 4.2
[CD 1: Track 27] Students read and listen to the
Ask them to listen and read the second time, and to look rest of the conversation between Sam and Victor. Ask a
at Victor’s questions. Then put students in pairs to few questions afterwards to check that students have
discuss the questions in the Grammar Spot. In the followed the conversation, and to see how well they can
feedback, you could check students’ understanding by use expressions like a few, a little, and not many.
asking individuals check questions. For example:
Hamed, can we count cheese? How much orange juice have they got?
Noor, can we count potatoes? How many vegetables have they got?
Alternatively, you could ask students to list on the board
the things that are countable and uncountable.
grammar spot   (SB p31)
Countable Uncountable 1 Ask students to work in pairs to find seven count
eggs milk nouns and four uncount nouns in the conversation.
potatoes butter Answers
tomatoes cheese Count nouns: apples, grapes, vegetables, carrots, onions,
olives cola crisps, nephews.
crisps mineral water Uncount nouns: coffee, tea, orange juice, money.
bread
Point out that plural count nouns usually end with -s or 2 The aim of this activity is for students to discover for
-es. Students often find the word crisps difficult to themselves from context the sometimes confusing
pronounce because of the consonant cluster sps. rules of use involved with count and uncount nouns.
This exercise is not easy. Be prepared to give lots of
grammar spot   (SB p30) help.
We can’t count milk but we can count eggs. Students work in pairs to complete the table by
We say How much when the noun is uncountable. finding examples of use in the conversation.
We say How many when the noun is countable
(one, two, three, etc.).

Unit 4  .  Let’s go shopping! 33


Answers Is there any make-up in your picture?
We with with in in in Once students have got the idea they can ask and answer
use . . . CNs UNs positive questions negative questions in their pairs. Monitor closely and listen for
sentences sentences errors and examples of good language use. Correct errors
some ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ (sometimes) and give feedback.
any ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
much ✓ ✓ ✓ Sample answers
many ✓ ✓ ✓ Picture A Picture B
a lot of ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ towels a lot / lots a few / not many
a few ✓ ✓ soap none a lot / lots / some
a little ✓ ✓ toothbrushes a lot / lots a lot / lots
toothpaste a lot / lots a little / not much
You might want to check students’ ability to use this shampoo none some / a little /
language by doing exercises 1 to 4 in the Practice not much
section at this stage. toilet paper a little / not much a lot / lots
3 Focus students on the table and ask them to find two shaving foam none a lot / lots
examples of the phrases in the conversation. The use make-up a lot / lots none
of the phrases is checked in exercise 5 of the deodorant some none
following Practice section. perfume/aftershave a lot / lots a little / some /
not much
Answers hairbrushes one a lot / lots /
V Do we need anything else? some / three
V . . . did somebody finish it?
Refer students to Grammar Reference 4.1 on p133.
something/someone/somewhere
5 Do the first question as an example. Students work in
PRACTICE   (SB p31) pairs to complete the rest.
T 4.3 [CD 1: Track 28] Students listen and check their

Discussing grammar answers.
1–3 Encourage your students to do these quite quickly. Ask Answers and tapescript
them to do the five sentences in exercise 1 on their own 1 ‘Did you meet anyone interesting at the conference?’
as quickly as possible, then check with a partner. Do ‘Yes. I met someone who knows you!’
the same for 2 and 3, then go through all the answers 2 ‘Ouch! There’s something in my eye!’
together as a class. Point out that in exercise 2 ‘Let me look. No, I can’t see anything.’
a lot/lots of could be used in all the sentences except for 3 ‘Let’s go somewhere exciting for our holidays.’
number 5, and check students understand that it can ‘But we can’t go anywhere that’s too expensive.’
only be replaced by many and much in questions and 4 ‘I’m so unhappy. Nobody loves me.’
negatives. ‘I know somebody who loves you. Me.’
Answers 5 I lost my glasses. I looked everywhere, but I couldn’t find
1 1 any  2 any  3 some  4 some  5 any them.
2 1 much  2 many  3 much  4 many  5 many 6 ‘Did you buy anything at the shops?’
3 1 a few  2 a lot/lots of  3 a little  4 a lot/lots of   ‘No, nothing. I didn’t have any money.’
5 a few  6 a little 7 I’m bored. I want something interesting to read, or
someone interesting to talk to, or somewhere interesting
to go.
Questions and answers 8 It was a great book. Everyone loved it.
4 Divide student’s into pairs. Tell them to decide who is
A and who is B. As look at the picture of the bathroom Survey
on p32. Bs look at the picture of the bathroom on p129.
6 The aim of this activity is to provide some personalized
Tell students they have different pictures, and they have
fluency work for students. It is an opportunity for the
to find out what their partner has in their bathroom and
teacher to find out whether they can use some, any, etc.
how many/much. Refer the students to the questions on
appropriately in a fluency situation.
their page and model one or two first.

34 Unit 4  .  Let’s go shopping!


Focus students on the two lists of good and bad things. grammar spot   (SB p33)
Then put them in small groups of three or four to make
1 Ask students to find and underline examples of a/an
their own lists. Nominate one person in each group to be
and the not only in the text (see below) but also in
the ‘secretary’ to write down the other students’
their answers to the questions (see above).
suggestions. Monitor, prompt, and help with vocabulary.
At the end, write a definitive list on the board and 2 Ask them to find examples where there is no article.
correct any errors or point out examples of good Tell students that they should consult Grammar
language use. Reference section 4.2 on p133 for the rules governing
the use of articles.
Additional material
Answers
Workbook Unit 4 My uncle’s a shopkeeper. He has a shop in an old village
These exercises could be done in class to give further by the River Thames near (no article) Oxford. The shop
practice, for homework, or in a later class as revision. sells a lot of things – (no article) bread, (no article) milk,
Exercises 1 and 2  Count and uncount nouns (no article) fruit, (no article) vegetables, (no article)
Exercises 3–6  Expressions of quantity newspapers – almost everything! It’s also the village post
office. The children in the village always stop to spend a
SUGGESTION few pence on (no article) sweets or (no article) ice-cream
At this point it might be a good idea to do the Reading on their way (no article) home from (no article) school.
and speaking section (Markets around the world, p34) My uncle doesn’t often leave the village. He hasn’t got a
before you do the next grammar presentation. Your car, so once a month he goes by (no article) bus to Oxford
students might like the variety. and has (no article) lunch at the Grand Hotel with some
friends. He’s one of the happiest men I know.

MY UNCLE’S A SHOPKEEPER   (SB p33)


PRACTICE   (SB p33)
Articles
Rules for the use or non-use of articles in English can be
Discussing grammar
tricky. Therefore before doing this lesson with your class it Ask students to work in pairs to do these two exercises.
would be wise to read through the Grammar Reference They can refer to their lists of rules.
section on page 133 to remind yourself of the rules. 1 Students identify the mistake in each sentence and
However, take care! Don’t overdo explanations with the discuss why it is wrong.
class. The text about the shopkeeper is designed to highlight
some of the rules. Do Exercises 1 and 2 before going Answers
through the Grammar Spot. 1 He’s a postman, so he has breakfast at 4 a.m.
2 Love is more important than money.
1 T 4.4
[CD 1: Track 29] Ask students a few quick
3 I come to school by bus.
questions about the picture. What/Who can they see?
4 I’m reading a good book at the moment.
Ask them to listen for more information about the man.
5 ‘Where’s Jack?’ ‘In the kitchen.’
Play the recording.
6 I live in the centre of town, near the hospital.
2 Ask different students to read the questions aloud. Ask 7 My parents bought a lovely house in the country.
others to answer. Go through the questions with the 8 I don’t eat bread because I don’t like it.
whole class. Note that the answers contain lots of
examples of article use. 2 Students complete the sentences with a/an, the, or no
article.
Answers
1 He’s quite old. He’s got a beard and a moustache. He’s Answers
wearing a hat and an apron. 1 I have two children, a boy and a girl. The boy is twenty-
2 He’s a shopkeeper. two and the girl is nineteen.
3 In an old village by the River Thames. 2 Mike is a soldier in the army, and Chloë is at university.
4 He sells (no article) bread, milk, fruit, vegetables and 3 My wife goes to work by train. She’s an accountant. I don’t
newspapers. have a job. I stay at home and look after the children.
5 Once a month. 4 What a lovely day! Why don’t we go for a picnic in the
6 By (no article) bus. park?
5 ‘What did you have for lunch?’ ‘Just a sandwich.’

Unit 4  .  Let’s go shopping! 35


Go through the exercises with the whole class. Ask them Answers
why they have reached their decisions, and in this way A shopping centre is a modern, covered building, full of
you will revise the rules. different shops. The shops are high street or international
names, and sell global brands.
Additional material A market is often open air (unless it is a covered market), and
made up of small stalls. They usually sell local products.
Workbook Unit 4
Exercises 7–9  Articles (Exercise 8 would be suitable as a 2 Ask students to read the introduction, then discuss the
quick warmer at the start of almost any lesson.) question as a class.
Exercise 10  Spelling of plural nouns (this would also be a
good warmer.) Answers
Because they sell goods that are different, and made and
grown locally.
READING and speaking   (SB p34)
3 Divide students into groups. If you have a small class, say
Markets around the world 12, divide them into three groups of 4. If you have a large
class, say 30, divide them into six groups of five, two
About the text groups reading text A, two groups reading text B, etc.
This is a jigsaw reading activity. Students work in three Make sure each group knows which text to read.
groups to read three different texts, answer specific
information tasks, then share their information with 4 Ask students to read through the questions, then tell
students from other groups. them to research their text and find answers. Encourage
students to discuss the answers in their groups.
The texts are about three markets: one in Bangkok, in
Thailand in south-east Asia, which is a floating market 5 Tell students to stand up, walk round, and sit down with
on canals, and sells local food and traditional clothing; two students who have read a different text. Manage this
one on a Sunday morning in a small town in Provence, proactively, making sure everybody finds partners. Once
a region in southern France, which sells local French students are in threes, tell them to share their answers.
food and antiques; and one in Marrakech, in Morocco, In feedback, get one student from each three to
in northern Africa, called a souk, which sells spices, summarize findings for each question.
clothes and carpets.
Answers
You may wish to pre-teach vocabulary around the topic
Bangkok
of markets: market, stall, sellers, to bargain, packed,
1 On the canals around the town of Damonen Saduak.
busy, noisy. After reading, you may need to explain
2 Every day from 6.30am.
some of the things that can be bought in the markets:
3 Tropical fruit and vegetables, fresh coconut juice, and local
olives = small black or green fruit, from which oil is
food. Hot soup.
extracted
4 Traditional hats, silk dresses, flowered shirts.
antiques = very old objects
5 There are old ladies with huge hats, and food sellers with
lace = a light delicate cloth
cookers on their boats.
bunches of flowers = groups of cut flowers
6 Colourful, noisy, fascinating.
herbs = plants used to flavour food
7 Continue along the canal to the canal villages.
lavender = nice-smelling purple flowers
8 Bangkok is a city of contrasts – tall glass buildings and the
silk = thin smooth cloth woven from thread made by
100-year-old canals.
silkworms
Provence
rugs/carpets = a thick, soft cover on the floor – carpets
1 In a small town called Isle-sur-la-Sorgue, in southern
cover the whole floor, rugs are smaller and cover a part
France.
of the floor
2 Every Sunday, from early morning until 1 o’clock.
3 Olives, cheese, roast chicken, herbs, olive bread, tomatoes,
1 Ask students to look at the pictures of the markets. Ask, ham, melons.
Where are they? What do they sell? (See ‘About the text’ 4 Antique French furniture, antique lace and cloth, flowers,
above.) soap, lavender, sun hats, beach towels, local mineral water.
Put students in pairs to discuss the questions. 5 The sellers call out in the accent of the south. The antique
Demonstrate to bargain by trying to buy something from and flower sellers fill the pavements with their goods.
one of the students and arguing about the price he/she
suggests.

36 Unit 4  .  Let’s go shopping!


6 Truly amazing, packed, noisy, busy, beautiful, brightly Vocabulary and Listening   (SB p36)
coloured.
7 Find a cool place next to the river for a picnic. Buying things
8 It’s a sleepy little town, with narrow streets and many
1 Ask students what they can buy or do in a clothes shop.
bridges – like Venice.
Write some of their ideas on the board, then put them in
Marrakech
pairs or threes to do the rest of the exercise. Give
1 Behind the main square in Marrakech, Jemaa el Fna.
students a time limit so that they do this quite quickly,
2 From early morning until lunchtime, and again in the
then feed back with the whole class.
evening.
3 Spices and meat. Sample answers
4 Clothing, gold, silver, carpets, and rugs. a clothes shop buy a shirt, sweater, etc., try on clothes, etc.
5 Mr Youssaf invites you to sit down and gives you tea, and a pharmacy buy medicine, aspirin, soap, etc.
talks for hours about his rugs. a café buy a coffee or tea, eat a sandwich or cakes,
6 Narrow, busy, aromatic, noisy, colourful, beautiful. read a paper, talk to friends, etc.
7 Return to the main square and watch the snakes (and count a bank put money in, take money out, exchange
your money). money or traveller’s cheques, etc.
8 It’s a city of ancient, sand-coloured buildings and palm a newsagent’s buy a newspaper, buy sweets, etc.
trees in the middle of the desert.
2 T 4.5
[CD 1: Track 30] The aim of this first listening
activity is to improve students’ ability to listen for gist,
What do you think? using contextual and lexical clues to work out the
This is a personalized fluency discussion which aims to situation. Read through the questions together then play
revise vocabulary and get students talking. the recording. Pause after each conversation and ask
students to discuss their answers in pairs before getting
Ask students to discuss the questions in their groups of
feedback.
three.
Answers
Additional material Conversation 1
1 a clothes shop  2 a sweater  3 Yes  4 £39.99
Workbook Unit 4 Conversation 2
Exercise 11  Clothes 1 a newsagent’s  2 Top Gear – a magazine   3  Yes
Conversation 3
Note 1 a pharmacy  2 tablets and tissues  3 Yes
Don’t forget to encourage your students to keep adding Conversation 4
words to their own vocabulary notebooks and/or find 1  a café   2  an espresso and a doughnut (but changes to
the words in the Word list and write in the translation. carrot cake)  3 Yes  4 £2.85
Also you could, by this stage of your course, have
regular short vocabulary tests/competitions. Ask 3 Students work in pairs to complete the conversations.
students to study the Word lists for the first four units. You may need to play the recording again, pausing
You could test vocabulary via pictures, definitions, and to give students time to write down their answers.
translation. This could be done in teams and students Let students check their answers by referring to the
could sometimes devise their own tests for each other tapescript on p120.
to increase motivation.
Answers and tapescript
T 4.5
1 A Hello. Can I help you?
B I’m just looking, thanks.
. . .
B I’m looking for a sweater like this, but in blue. Have
you got one?
A I’ll just have a look. What size are you?
B Medium.
A Here you are.

Unit 4  .  Let’s go shopping! 37


B That’s great. Can I try it on? T 4.6
A Of course. The changing rooms are over there. 1 A Two coffees, please.
. . . B Two pounds eighty, please.
B I like it. 2 A How much is this sweater?
A It fits you very well. B Twenty-eight pounds fifty.
B How much is it? 3 A A white loaf and three rolls, please.
A £39.99. B That’ll be one pound eighty-two p.
B OK. I’ll have it. 4 A How much do I owe you?
A How would you like to pay? B Twelve dollars and twenty cents.
B Cash. 5 A How much was your car?
2 A Could you help me? I’m looking for this month’s edition B Fifteen thousand dollars.
of Top Gear. Can you tell me where it is? 6 A What a fantastic house!
B Over there. Middle shelf. Next to Max Power. B Darling! It cost half a million pounds!
3 A Hello. I wonder if you could help me. I’ve got a bad 7 A Just this book, please.
cold and a sore throat. Can you give me something for B Five pounds ninety-nine, then.
it? 8 A How much was the cheque for?
B OK. You can take these three times a day. B A hundred and sixty dollars.
A Thank you. Could I have some tissues as well, please?
B Sure. Anything else? 2 Invite students to say the exchange rate between
A No, that’s all, thanks. £ sterling/US dollars and their currency. This activity
provides some controlled practice of prices. Model the
4 A Good morning. Can I have a black coffee, please?
question, How much is … ?, then put students in pairs to
B Espresso?
ask each other. Monitor and check that they are saying
A Yes, please. Oh, and a doughnut, please.
prices correctly.
B  I’m afraid there aren’t any left. We’ve got some
delicious carrot cake, and chocolate cake. 3 Check the vocabulary, then give students a few minutes
A OK. Carrot cake, then. to prepare and practise the dialogues in their pairs. Go
B Certainly. Is that all? round and help with their pronunciation. You could ask
A Yes, thanks. one or two pairs to act out some conversations in front
B That’ll be £2.85, please. of the class.
A Thank you.
Don’t forget!
Workbook Unit 4
Everyday English   (SB p37)
Exercise 12  Filling in forms
Prices and shopping Word list
Photocopy the Word list for Unit 4 (TB pp125) for your
1 Focus students on the prices in the boxes. Drill them
students, and ask them to write in the translations, learn
round the class for pronunciation.
them at home, and/or write some of the words into their
T 4.6 [CD 1: Track 31] Play the recording and ask vocabulary notebook.
students to write the numbers they hear. Put them in Stop and check 1  (TB p130)
pairs to check their answers. Then get a full-class A suggestion for approaching the Stop and check tests is in
feedback on where each dialogue takes place. the introduction on p5 of the Teacher’s Book.
Answers and tapescript
1 £2.80 (in a post office)
2 £28.50 (in a clothes shop)
3 £1.82 (in a baker’s)
4 $12.20
5 $15,000
6 £1/2 million (£500,000)
7 £5.99 (in a bookshop)
8 $160

38 Unit 4  .  Let’s go shopping!


Introduction
to the unit
5 Verb patterns 1 • Future forms
Hot verbs
How do you feel?
What do you want to do?

Language aims
Grammar – verb patterns  Students might well have come across several of the
verb patterns in this unit, either formally or informally, but they will probably
The title of this unit is ‘What do you
not have seen them presented under the heading verb patterns. It is worth
want to do?’ In the opening ‘Hopes and
explaining what a pattern is, i.e. something that repeats itself.
ambitions’ section, various verb
patterns within the context of hopes, Possible problems
ambitions, and plans are introduced
and practised. In a second grammatical • Mistakes of form are common with verb patterns, and it is this area that
focus, going to is contrasted with will. is specifically practised in the Grammar Spot and first practice activity.
There is a reading text about the *I’m going work as a designer.
children of Gaza, and the Listening *She hopes finding a job soon.
activity is a conversation between two *He want have a restaurant.
colleagues at work. The Vocabulary • Two possible patterns with like are also presented, and these cause
section looks at the Hot verbs have, go, problems of form and use. With the two forms being similar, they are
and come. easily mixed up, but learners also find the conceptual difference of
‘general versus specific preference’ difficult to grasp.
Common mistakes
*I like play football.
*I’d like having a cup of coffee.
Common mistakes of use
*I’m thirsty. I like a mineral water.
*Do you like to come to the match tonight?

In this unit, we suggest that for a general preference, like + -ing is used.
Students might come across like + the infinitive to express this use.
I like to relax at the weekend.
The verb patterns presented in this unit are such high frequency items (with the
exception of hope), that once you have presented them, they will automatically
be revised and practised in many classroom activities. If mistakes occur in
subsequent lessons, remind students of the rules.
going to and will  Going to is contrasted with will in this unit, by only one use
of each verb form. Both items are traditionally taught in a first year book, so
the forms will not be new. Will to express a spontaneous offer was practised in
the Everyday English section of Unit 4. In this unit it is seen with a very similar
use, to express a future intention or a decision made the moment of speaking.
This is in contrast with going to, which expresses a pre-planned intention.
Students might well perceive this conceptual difference quite easily, but it is
another matter to apply the rule thereafter. Selecting appropriate future forms
causes many problems for a long time.

Unit 5  .  What do you want to do? 39


Common mistakes 1 T 5.1 [CD 1: Track 32] Ask students to look at the
‘Have you booked a holiday yet?’ *‘Yes. We’ll go to Spain.’ pictures and work in pairs to match them with the
*What will you do tonight? sentences. Do one as an example. When they are ready,
*What do you do tonight? students listen to the recording and check whether their
*What you do tonight? predictions are correct.
‘The phone’s ringing.’ *‘OK. I answer it.’
Answers and tapescript
Students often use the base form of the verb to express a 1 Kamal 2 Sean 3 Alison 4 Martyn 5 Mel 6 Amy
spontaneous offer or intention, rather than will. 1 Sean, aged 9
*I open the door for you. When I grow up, I want to be a footballer and play for
Making offers and expressing intentions are common Manchester United, because I want to earn lots of money.
occurrences in the day-to-day interactions of classrooms, After that, I’m going to be an astronaut, and fly in a rocket to
whether students are acting in roles or just being Mars and Jupiter. And I’d like all the people in the world and
themselves. If (and when!) you hear mistakes with this use all the animals in the world to be happy.
of will, it is worth reminding learners of the rule. They 2 Mel, aged 19
might learn it all the better for seeing the item in a real I’ve finished my first year at Bristol University, and now I’m
context. For example, if a student offers to help you collect going to have a year off. My brother and I are going round the
in some books and says ‘I collect the books for you’, take the world. We hope to find work as we go. I really want to meet
opportunity to point out to the class how will should be people from all over the world, and see how different people
used here. live their lives.
3 Kamal, aged 29
This unit deals with the modal use of will. Will as an What I’d really like to do, because I’m mad about TV and
auxiliary verb to show future time is dealt with in Unit 9. everything to do with TV, is to become a TV presenter. I’m
Vocabulary The Vocabulary section introduces the Hot getting married next June, so I can’t do anything about it yet,
verbs, have, go, and come. This is the first Hot verbs section but I’m going to start applying for jobs this time next year.
in the book. These sections aim to focus on the use of 4 Martyn, aged 39
common verbs in English, looking at them as vocabulary My great passion is writing. I write detective novels. Three
items, dealing with their range of meanings, confusions as to have been published already. But my secret ambition . . . and
which one to use, and specific collocations. this would be the best thing in my life . . . I would love to
Everyday English  This section looks at vocabulary and have one of my novels made into a TV series. That would be
functional language in the context of feelings. fantastic.
5 Amy, aged 49
We’re thinking of moving, because the kids are leaving home
Notes on the unit soon. Meg’s eighteen, she’s doing her A levels this year, so
with a bit of luck, she’ll be off to university next year. And
Starter (SB p38) Kate’s fifteen. Jack and I both enjoy walking, and Jack likes
This starter activity gets students talking about themselves fishing, so we’re going to move to the country.
and previews their ability to form and use the verb patterns 6 Alison, aged 59
focused on later in the unit. Well, I’ve just broken my arm, so what I really want to do is
go back to the health club as soon as possible. I really enjoy
Give students a few minutes to prepare some sentences,
swimming. At my age, it’s important to stay physically fit, and
then either put them in small groups to chat, or nominate
I want to be able to go off travelling without feeling unwell.
a few people and have a brief class discussion. Don’t worry
I’m going to retire next year, and I’m looking forward to
about errors made with the verb patterns at this stage, but
having more time to do the things I want to do.
note how well students can use them.
2 Ask students to listen again and complete the chart. You
HOPES AND AMBITIONS  (SB p38) may need to pause after each section to give them time
to write.
Verb patterns 1
Lead in by asking students about their hopes and ambitions.
You could ask What do you hope to do in the next ten years?
Would you like to travel? Where would you like to go?

40 Unit 5  .  What do you want to do?


Answers Additional idea
Ambitions/Plans Reasons So far, students have read the target structures,
Sean A footballer for To earn lots of money perhaps written them, and perhaps spoken
Manchester United examples of them, but not to any great extent.
An astronaut Drill the sentences in the Grammar Spot around the
He wants the people and class, correcting as necessary. Ask students to
animals in the world to practise saying the sentences in pairs.
be happy 2 Answer this question as a class. Try to get from
Mel A year off  ants to meet people
W students the idea that like going is a general, all-time
Going round the world from all over the world preference. It applies to the past, present, and future.
Kamal Becoming a TV presenter Mad about TV Would like to go refers to now or the (near) future.
Getting married next June If you feel it would help your class to do so, translate
Martyn Have a novel made into a His passion is writing these two sentences.
TV series
Refer students to Grammar Reference 5.1 and 5.2
Amy Going to move to the The kids are leaving on p134.
country home, and she and her
husband, Jack, love
walking Discussing grammar
Jack loves fishing too 1 Ask students to work in pairs to do this exercise, or let
Alison Go back to the health Just broken her arm them do it individually then check with a partner. In the
club and stay physically fit Enjoys swimming feedback, refer back to the rules if necessary, then get
Wants to be able to travel students to work in pairs to make correct sentences with
Going to retire next year the other verbs.

3 The aim of this activity is to allow students to discover Answers


verb patterns and their rules for themselves. Focus 1 a,c 2 b,c 3 c 4 a,b 5 b,c 6 a,c
students on the example then let them underline the
Ask students to make correct sentences with the other
other examples in exercise 1. Ask them which verbs are
verbs.
followed by to + infinitive, and which are followed by
preposition + -ing. You may then wish to put students in Answers
pairs to find more examples of these patterns in the 1 enjoy living
tapescript on p121. 2 are hoping to go
3 want to go ’d like to go
grammar spot   (SB p39) 4 I’m looking forward to seeing
1 Ask students to work in pairs to complete the 5 want to learn
sentences using the words go abroad. Write the 6 ’d love to have
sentences on the board in the feedback and point out
the different verb forms. Making questions
Answers 2 Ask students to work in pairs to do this exercise.
I’d like to go abroad
T 5.2 [CD 1: Track 33] Play the recording so that
I can’t go abroad
students can check their answers then put them in pairs
I’m looking forward to going abroad
to practise the conversations, making up A’s answers.
I hope to go abroad
I enjoy going abroad Answers and tapescript
I’m thinking of going abroad 1 A I hope to go to university.
I’d love to go abroad B What do you want to study?
2 A One of my favourite hobbies is cooking.
Point out that the verb go is in the infinitive after B What do you like making?
some verbs and -ing after others, and that we use -ing 3 A I get terrible headaches.
after prepositions like of. The to in looking forward to B When did you start getting them?
is a preposition. 4 A We’re planning our summer holidays at the moment.
B Where are you thinking of going?

Unit 5  .  What do you want to do? 41


5 A I’m tired. Underline the words as shown, and ask students the
B What would you like to do this evening? following questions.
When did Ann decide to buy some sugar? Before she spoke or
Talking about you while she was speaking?
These two exercises provide some personalized free practice When did Ann decide to buy the tea? Before she spoke or
for students. Encourage lots of interaction but make sure while she was speaking?
students are using the verb patterns accurately. Ask students if they can tell you the difference between the
3 Before students work in pairs, make sure they can ask the two forms. Explain that going to is used to express an
questions correctly. Drill them around the class. As intention that is thought about before the moment of
students ask and answer in pairs, monitor and note any speaking, and will expresses a spontaneous intention.
errors regarding the use of verb patterns. At this stage, it is a good idea to remind students that the
verbs go and come are not generally used with going to but
4 Give students some time to prepare the questions in
with the Present Continuous.
pairs. Change the pairs to ask and answer questions.
You could finish the activity by asking one or two pairs Examples
to say their questions and answers again while the rest of I’m going to go shopping. ✗
the class listens. Alternatively, this activity would work I’m going shopping. ✓
well as a mingle activity, where all students stand up and I’m going to come to France. ✗
ask one or two questions to as many other students as I’m coming to France. ✓
possible.
1 Ask a few questions about the pictures to set the situation,
Sample questions get students talking.
Which countries would you like to go to?
Where are they? What are they doing?
When do you want to get married? How many children do
you want to have? Ask students to work in pairs to match a sentence with
What are you going to do/are you thinking of doing after each picture.
this course?
Answers
Additional material 1e  2f  3b  4a  5c  6d

Workbook Unit 5 2 Set this activity up carefully by reading through the


These exercises could be done in class to give further sentences with students and checking the vocabulary,
practice, for homework, or in a later class as revision. then doing one mini-conversation as an example on the
board. Ask students to work in pairs to do this exercise.
Exercises 1–3  Verb patterns
Exercises 4–6  Would like (to do) and like (doing) T 5.3 [CD 1: Track 34] Students listen to the recording
Before moving on to the next presentation of will and going and check their answers, then practise the conversations
to, you and your class might prefer to do some skills work. in pairs. Make sure they try to imitate the
You could do the reading activity The children of Gaza on pronunciation, stress, and intonation of the sentences on
p42 of the Student’s Book. the recording.
Answers and tapescript
FUTURE INTENTIONS   (SB p40) 1 What are the lads doing this afternoon?
They’re going to see a football match. United are playing
going to and will at home.
If you think your students already have an idea about the 2 Oh, no! I’ve dropped my bag.
difference between going to and will, do the exercises as they I’ll pick it up for you.
are in the Student’s Book. If you think that they would make Thank you. That’s very kind.
a lot of mistakes (which is discouraging), do the following 3 Is Tom on a work trip?
introduction first. Yes, he’s going to visit someone in Malaysia.
Introduction: Write the dialogue below on the board. That sounds like an interesting place to go.
Ann I’m going to buy some sugar. It’s on my shopping list. 4 The phone’s ringing.
Bill We need some more tea, too? It’s OK. I’ll answer it. I’m expecting a call.
Ann OK. I’ll buy a couple of packets of tea.

42 Unit 5  .  What do you want to do?


5 I haven’t got any money. Discussing grammar
Don’t worry. I’ll lend you some.
3 Students work in pairs to decide which is the correct
Thanks. I’ll pay you back tomorrow. I won’t forget.
verb form.
6 What are you and Pete doing this evening?
We’re going to have a meal in town. There’s a new Answers
restaurant we want to try. 1 I’ll carry
2 I’m going
3 I’ll give
grammar spot   (SB p40) 4 We’re going to see
Answer the questions as a class. 5 I won’t tell
6 you’re going to get married
Answers 7 I’m going shopping, I’ll post
1 Point out the pronunciation of I’ll /ɑɪl/ and won’t 8 are you going
/wəʊnt/.
2 Spontaneous intentions: I’ll pick it up for you, I’ll 4 T 5.4 [CD 1: Track 35] This is a type of prompt drill
answer it, I’ll lend you some. which aims to help students grasp the idea of the
Before the premeditated intentions, the speaker made contrasting uses of going to and will by getting them to
some plans: Before going to see a football match, make quick decisions as to which one to use. Play each
they put on their scarves, or bought a ticket. Before conversation opening and pause the recording for
travelling, he arranged a meeting, and packed his students to respond. Make sure all students are
suitcase. Before going for a meal, they talked about contributing and selecting the correct tense.
which restaurant to go to, and booked a table.
Going to expresses an intention that is thought about Answers and tapescript
before the moment of speaking. Will is used to express 1 ‘My bag is so heavy.’ ‘Give it to me. I’ll carry it for you.’
a spontaneous intention. 2 I bought some warm boots because I’m going skiing.
3 ‘Tony’s back from holiday.’ ‘Is he? I’ll give him a ring.’
Refer students to Grammar Reference 5.3 on p134. 4 ‘What are you doing this evening?’ ‘We’re going to see a
football match.’
5 You can tell me your secret. I won’t tell anyone.
PRACTICE   (SB p41) 6 Congratulations! I hear you’re going to get married.
7 ‘I need to post these letters.’ ‘I’m going shopping soon.
Let’s have a picnic! I’ll post them for you.’
8 What about holidays. Where are you going this year?
1 Read the introduction to the exercise as a class. Drill the
two sample sentences (I’ll make some sandwiches; I’ll
bring some salad). Make sure that students pronounce Check it
the ’ll.
5 Ask students to work in pairs to correct the sentences.
Do the next part quite briskly, so that suggestions are
coming from students all the time. The suggestions must Answers
be spontaneous! Try to get an idea from most of the 1 What do you want to drink?
class. If there are any mistakes with ’ll, correct them. 2 I’ll have a mineral water, please.
3 I can’t help you.
2 Read the introduction as a class. Model the sample
4 It’s starting to rain.
sentences yourself, and exaggerate the stressed I’m. If you
5 I’m looking forward to seeing you again soon.
think it’s necessary, ask the class why going to is now
6 I’m thinking of changing my job soon.
used, and not will.
7 Phone me tonight. I’ll give you my phone number.
You need to remember the suggestions your students 8 I’m seeing the doctor tomorrow about my back.
made. Repeat them, using will, and invite the student who
made that suggestion to say it again using going to. Again,
try to do this briskly, otherwise the exercise will pall. Talking about you
6 Give students some time to prepare a few questions,
using either the Present Continuous or going to. Before
students work in pairs, drill some example questions to
focus on the wide tone range required in English.

Unit 5  .  What do you want to do? 43


5a Abroad can be anywhere that is not your country.
What are you doing this evening? Overseas is also used when a country is an island, such as
the UK.
What are you going to do next weekend? 6c When two people talk, it is a dialogue.
7b The medical area is called paediatrics.
Where are you going on holiday? 8g The word garbage is US usage. British English more often
uses rubbish, but garbage is also used sometimes.
Students work in pairs to ask and answer questions.

Additional material 4 Ask students to work in pairs and discuss the questions
on the second part of the text.
Workbook Unit 5
Exercises 7–9  will and going to Answers
1 Mahmud means that the children in Gaza don’t have the
opportunity to have the normal life of children. They see
READING AND SPEAKING   (SB p42) and have to do things which make them grow up quickly,
and lose the innocence of childhood. This is what happened
The children of Gaza to him when the worst fighting happened in Gaza.
1 Create interest in the topic by getting your students to 2 Flowers do sometimes grow on garbage heaps, and it is
talk about places in the world where children might possible to see that they are pretty flowers. But they are
have problems getting an education. This could be for still on a garbage heap, and people won’t come to see
political or economic reasons. these flowers. Ahmad wanted to do something special
with his life in the past, and become someone that people
2 Ask students to read the first part of the text (on p42). would notice, like a pretty flower. But now he’s not sure
Then ask them to decide whether the sentences are true that it’s worth it, because he feels that Gaza is a place that
or false, and to correct the false sentences. has been forgotten, like a garbage heap.
3 Taima’a wants to live in Gaza, because she loves it. She can’t
Answers
imagine living anywhere else. She doesn’t want to escape
1 False. Because there are so many children and so few
the problems of Gaza, but do something about them, by
schools, schools have two shifts a day, but this is so that
becoming a journalist, lawyer, or the Prime Minister.
different children can go at different times. The word shift
4 Reem feels sorry for all the children in the world who are
was used in Unit 2, p20, in 24/7 Society.
suffering, not just children of her own nationality, religion
2 True
or colour. She wants to be a paediatrician so that she can
3 False. The teachers try to get their children to come to
give medical care to children.
school rather than take part in protests and fighting, so
5 Reema thinks that it’s the people that are most important
they would not get involved themselves.
in a country or city. She lived in the Emirates, and had
4 True
much more freedom and opportunity there, and she
5 True
knows that places like Paris can seem like an ideal dream
6 False. We don’t know how many children presented the
to someone who lives in Gaza, because of the wonderful
monologues in Gaza, but 1,000 young people presented
buildings and views. However, she wants to stay in Gaza,
them in different cities across the world.
because she thinks there’s something very special about
the people there. She feels there is a lot of love in Gaza,
3 Ask students to read the second part of the text,
and she suggests that other places could probably learn
the monologues on p43. Then ask them to do the
a lot from Gaza about the love that people can have for
vocabulary exercise, matching the words from the text
each other, when they have to work together against
with the definitions.
great difficulties.
Answers
1f A tough person can survive a lot of problems and
difficulties in life.
What do you think?
2h The most common example is human rights. Wind up the lesson by encouraging students to express their
3d The adjective is literate, and the most common form is own opinions. You could do this with the whole class or in
the negative, illiterate. small groups. Small groups maximize students’ talking time,
4e You persuade someone to do something when they don’t allow you to monitor and note errors, and let shyer students
really want do it. speak without having too many people listening to them!
A good way to get feedback from groups is to have one
student from each group summarize what they talked about.

44 Unit 5  .  What do you want to do?


VOCABULARY   (SB p44) Answers
1 Simon and Rob have a meeting with their new manager
Hot verbs – collocations with have, go, come (Jeff Armstrong).
You could introduce this lesson by writing have, go, and 2 Simon isn’t feeling well because he’s got a cold, and a
come on the board, putting students in small groups, and really bad headache.
giving them a few minutes to think of as many phrases as 3 He can’t go home because he has another really important
they can using these very common verbs. meeting this afternoon.
4 Brian can’t help Simon because he’s gone out for lunch.
1 Read through the examples with students. 5 No, they’re going to have a meal at Rob’s house.
2 Ask students to work in pairs to complete the gaps.
2 T 5.5 Tell students that they are going to listen to the
Answers recording again, and that they have to listen out for
1 have an accident 6 have a cold examples of the Hot Verbs have, go, and come. Put the
2 come first/second/last in a race 7 go wrong students in groups of three, and ask them to decide who
3 go out for a meal 8 have a meeting is going to listen for examples of each verb (one student
4 come and see me 9 have a good time listens for examples of have, another listens for go, and
5 go shopping 10 come true the third listens for come). You can make this
competitive if it helps to motivate the students, i.e. see
3 Students complete the sentences and check with their which student(s) in the group can catch the correct
partner. number of examples of their verb. Remind them that
they are listening for examples of these verbs in
Answers combination with other particular words, not just
1 having to come examples of them on their own. They should write down
2 have or have got go all examples, even if it is the same verb combination.
3 Come have
4 going Have coming Play the recording. You can pause it sometimes if you
5 is having go feel the students are struggling to write down their
6 Come to go examples, but they should have enough time because
7 go have they are only listening for examples of one verb. If
8 going Do . . . have or Have . . . got necessary, you could play the recording again. This is a
9 came good exercise to get students listening very intensively to
10 come a dialogue.
Ask how many examples each student heard. Give
them the correct numbers, and ask them to look at the
Additional material
tapescript on p121 to find the examples that they missed.
Workbook Unit 5
Answers
Exercise 10  extends and practises words that go together,
have 7 examples – have a meeting, have (got) a cold, have
and verbs and prepositions.
a headache, have (got) a meeting, having a good time,
had an accident, have time
LISTENING   (SB p44) go 6 examples – go home, go home, going wrong, gone
out for lunch, go shopping, go out for a meal
Having a bad day come 2 examples – come round, come and see me
This listening exercise is a follow-on from the Vocabulary N.B. It’s not the case that the students listening for come had
section. It practise the Hot Verbs have, come, and go an easier time! It’s the listening for examples which is the
through a dialogue between two colleagues at work. difficult part.
1
T 5.5 [CD 1: Track 36] Tell the students that they are 3 This is an opportunity for some personalised speaking
going to hear a conversation between two colleagues at practice, with time for preparation that can make sure
work, Simon and Rob. Ask them to look at the that the students practise some of the vocabulary they
questions, and then play the recording. Ask students to have learnt. Ask students to think about a particularly
work in pairs to compare Answers to the questions. good or bad day that they’ve had recently, and make a
few notes about it. If students don’t want to talk about
a real experience, or can’t think of one, they can invent
one. Monitor their note writing and try to get them to

Unit 5  .  What do you want to do? 45


just write down one or two words for each idea, without Answers and tapescript
unnecessary words such as a, the, I, etc. They can use 1 A I feel nervous. I’ve got an exam today.
dictionaries to find the key vocabulary they need for B Good luck! Do your best.
their story, or ask you if there aren’t too many students 2 A I don’t feel very well. I think I’m getting the ’flu.
for you to deal with. And ask them to use as many B Why don’t you go home to bed?
examples as possible of the Hot Verbs they have learnt. 3 A I’m feeling a lot better, thanks. I’ve got a lot more
Put the students into pairs to tell each other their stories. energy.
Encourage the other student to ask questions to get more B That’s good. I’m pleased to hear it.
information, doing this yourself as an example as you go 4 A I’m really excited. I’m going on holiday to Australia
round and monitor. Note down any serious errors for tomorrow.
later correction as a class. B That’s great. Have a good time.
5 A I’m fed up with this weather. It’s so wet and miserable.
B I know. We really need some sunshine, don’t we?
EVERYDAY ENGLISH   (SB p45) 6 A I’m really tired. I couldn’t get to sleep last night.
B Poor you! That happens to me sometimes. I just read
How do you feel? in bed.
1 Set the scene by asking students to look at the photos 7 A I’m a bit worried. My grandfather’s going into hospital
and say how they think the people in the photos feel. At for tests.
this stage, you could try to elicit some expressions by B I’m sorry to hear that, but I’m sure he’ll be all right.
asking students what they think the people are saying. 8 A I feel really depressed at the moment. Nothing’s going
right in my life.
2 Ask students to work in pairs to match the phrases. B Cheer up! Things can’t be that bad!
Answers
4 Students work in pairs to prepare and practise
1 I feel nervous. I’ve got an exam today.
conversations using some or all of the situations.
2 I don’t feel very well. I think I’m getting the ’flu.
Monitor and help with preparation. Let some pairs act
3 I’m feeling a lot better, thanks. I’ve got a lot more energy.
out their dialogues to the class. Ask other students to
4 I’m really excited. I’m going on holiday to
comment on the pronunciation.
Australia tomorrow.
5 I’m fed up with this weather. It’s so wet and miserable. Don’t forget!
6 I’m really tired. I couldn’t get to sleep last
night. Workbook Unit 5
7 I’m a bit worried. My grandfather’s going Exercise 11  revises adjectives and asks students to write a
into hospital for tests. postcard.
8 I feel really depressed at Nothing’s going right in Word list
the moment. my life. Photocopy the Word list for Unit 5 (TB p126) for your
students, and ask them to write in the translations, learn
3 Now ask them to choose a reply from a–h. them at home, and/or write some of the words into their
T 5.6 [CD 1: Track 37] Students listen to the mini-
vocabulary notebook.
dialogues and check their answers. You may choose to Progress test
pause the recording after each phrase so that students There is a Progress test for Units 1–5 on p138 of the
can repeat for pronunciation, or ask them to work in Teacher’s Book.
pairs to practise after each dialogue. Alternatively, drill
some of the phrases with particularly interesting or
unusual intonation patterns. For example:

Why don’t you go home to bed?

That’s great!

Poor you!

46 Unit 5  .  What do you want to do?


Introduction
to the unit
6 What . . . like? • Comparatives and superlatives
Synonyms and antonyms
Directions
Tell me! What’s it like?

Language aims
Grammar – What . . . like? This question, which asks for a description, causes
difficulties for students.
The theme of the unit is describing
people and places. This provides a POSSIBLE PROBLEMS
useful context to practise the grammar • Like is used as a preposition in What … like?, but students only have
for this unit, What … like? and experience of it as a verb, as in I like swimming.
comparatives and superlatives. The
Listening and speaking section describes • The answer to the question What … like? does not contain like with the
adjective.
life in Sweden and compares it to
Common mistake
Britain. The Reading section describes
What’s John like? *He’s like nice.
the multicultural diversity of London.
• Students may find What … like? a strange construction to ask for a
description. In many languages the question word how is used to do
this. In English, however, How is John? is an inquiry about his health,
not about his character and/or looks, and the answer is He’s very well.

What … like? is introduced first in the unit to provide a staged approach to the
practice of comparatives and superlatives in the second presentation. It is a
useful question in the practising of these.
Comparatives and superlatives It is assumed that students will have a certain
familiarity with these, although of course mistakes will still be made. The
exercises bring together all aspects of comparatives and superlatives:
• the use of -er/-est with short adjectives, -ier/-iest with adjectives that end in
-y, and more/most with longer adjectives.
• irregular adjectives such as good/better/best and bad/worse/worst.
• as … as to describe similarity.
Students experience little difficulty with the concept of these structures but
experience more difficulty in producing and pronouncing the forms because of
all the different ‘bits’ involved. One of the most common problems is that they
give equal stress to every word and syllable, so that utterances sound very
unnatural.
Common mistakes
*She’s more big than me.
*He’s the most rich man in the world.
*She’s tallest in the class.
*It’s more expensive that I thought.
*He is as rich than the Queen.
There are a lot of controlled activities which aim to practise the form, and a
pronunciation drill to practise natural connected speech.
Vocabulary Adjectives are practised in the Vocabulary section, where students
are asked to explore the use of synonyms and antonyms.

Unit 6  .  Tell me! What’s it like? 47


Everyday English This section practises getting and giving After listening for the first time, students write down as
directions with prepositions of place, e.g. behind, in front of, many adjectives as they can remember. You may need
and prepositions of movement, e.g. along, across. A map is to replay the recording once or twice, but they should be
used to do this. The final activity is personalized, and familiar with most of the adjectives, although possibly
students give each other directions to get to their homes crowded, polluted, and noisy will need some explanation,
from school. and they will certainly need some pronunciation
practice: crowded /ˈkraʊdɪd/, polluted /pəˈluːtɪd/, noisy 
Notes on the unit /ˈnɔɪzi/.
In the feedback, write the adjectives on the board.
Starter (SB p46) Answers
The aim of this activity is to personalize the theme by Melbourne beautiful, sort of big, very cosmopolitan, old and
getting students to describe the capital cities of their new (buildings), hot (in summer)
countries. Hopefully, they will use some of the adjectives Dubai very hot, very dry, very modern, interesting
and other vocabulary used in the unit. Pay careful attention Paris very beautiful, wonderful, old (buildings), interesting,
to how well they can use descriptive language. modern (buildings)

WORLD TRAVEL  (SB p46) Note


The first stage of the lesson focuses only on the
What’s it like? adjectives and giving descriptions before moving to the
introduction of the question What … like? This is so
1 Read through the introduction to Todd Bridges with that when the question is introduced students will
your students. understand from the start that the answer to this
2 Check that your students know where Melbourne, question is a description and does not contain like.
Dubai, and Paris are. You may need to refer to a map
to do this. Elicit as many facts about these places as you
can and write the words and phrases on the board. grammar spot   (SB p46)
3 T 6.1 [CD 1: Track 38] Play the recording. You could ask Before you ask students to match the questions and
students to listen to see if their predictions are the same answers, give them the opportunity to tell you if they
as what Todd says. heard the question What … like? Ask Did anyone hear the
question the friend asked about all the cities?
Tapescript Now do the matching activity as a class. The aim is to
T = Todd E = Ellen make clear the difference between the verb to like and the
E You’re so lucky, Todd. You travel all over the world. I never preposition like.
leave Chicago!
T Yeah – but it’s hard work. I just practise, practise, practise Answers
and play tennis all the time. I don’t get time to see much. 1 Do you like Paris? Yes, I do./No, I don’t.
E What about last year? Where did you go? Tell me about it. What’s Paris like? It’s beautiful./It’s got lots
T Well – in January I was in Melbourne, for the Australian of old buildings.
Open. It’s a beautiful city, sort of big and very
2 The second question, What’s Paris like?
cosmopolitan, like Chicago. There’s a nice mixture of old
and new buildings. January’s their summer so it was hot You could ask students to read the tapescript on p121 to
when I was there. see the questions in context. You could ask them to
E And what’s Dubai like? When were you there? underline the questions in the text.
T In February. We went from Australia to Dubai for the Dubai Refer students to Grammar Reference 6.1 on p135.
Tennis Open. Boy is Dubai hot! Hot, very dry, very modern.
Lots of really modern buildings, white buildings. 4 The aim of the exercise is very controlled oral practice.
Interesting place, I enjoyed it. You could chorus drill the question to practise the
E And Paris! That’s where I want to go! What’s Paris like? contraction What’s, and the intonation.
T Everything that you imagine! Very beautiful, wonderful old
buildings but lots of interesting modern ones too. Ask students to work in pairs. Go round, helping and
correcting.
Ask your students to do this exercise without looking at
the tapescript if possible.

48 Unit 6  .  Tell me! What’s it like?


Sample answers BIG, BIGGER, BIGGEST!  (SB p47)
What’s Melbourne like? It’s a beautiful city, sort of big and
very cosmopolitan. There are old and new buildings, and it’s Comparatives and superlatives
hot in summer. It is assumed that your students will already have some
What’s Dubai like? It’s very hot, very dry and very modern, familiarity with comparatives and superlatives, and so
but it’s very interesting too. different aspects of them are brought together in this text,
What’s Paris like? It’s got very beautiful, wonderful, old including the uses of as … as, much as an intensifier, and
buildings, and interesting, modern buildings too. different from. The aim is to find out how much they know.
1 T 6.3 [CD 1: Track 40] Ask students to work in pairs to
PRACTICE  (SB p47) complete as many sentences as they can. Find out how
much they know. Then play the recording to check their
What’s Chicago like? answers.
In the feedback, point out that as is pronounced /əz/,
1 Ask students to do this on their own and compare their
that different is followed by from not than, and that much
answers with a partner when they finish. They should be
is strongly stressed and used to show a big difference
able to do it quite quickly.
when comparing. A clear way of showing this is to write
Answers and tapescript Melbourne 30°, Madrid 32°, and Dubai 45° on the board:
T = Todd Y = You Madrid is hotter but Dubai is much hotter.
1 Y What’s the weather like?
T Well, Chicago’s called ‘the windy city’ and it really can Answers and tapescript
be windy! Melbourne was interesting, but, for me, Paris was more
2 Y What are the people like? interesting than Melbourne, and in some ways Dubai was the
T They’re very interesting. You meet people from all over most interesting of all because it was so different from any
the world. other place I know. It was also the hottest, driest, and most
3 Y What are the buildings like? modern. It was hot in Melbourne but not as hot as in Dubai.
T A lot of them are very, very tall. The Sears Tower is 110 Dubai was much hotter! Melbourne is much older than Dubai
storeys high. but not as old as Paris. Paris was the oldest city I visited, but
4 Y What are the restaurants like? it has some great modern buildings, too. It was the most
T They’re very good. You can find food from every beautiful place. I loved it.
country in the world.
5 Y What’s the night-life like? grammar spot   (SB p48)
T Oh, it’s wonderful. There’s a lot to do in Chicago.
1 As a class, ask students to tell you the comparative
2
T 6.2 [CD 1: Track 39] Students listen and check their and superlative of each adjective. Make sure students
answers. Drill the questions around the class, or play pronounce the comparatives accurately, particularly
and pause the recording for students to repeat. the weak stress /ə/ on -er. You may wish to do this as
a repetition drill.
3 This activity allows students to practise the new
structure, What’s … like?, in a fairly controlled yet Answers
personalized way. Ask students to work in pairs, model Adjective Comparative Superlative
what you want them to say, then monitor and correct a small smaller smallest
errors thoroughly. cold colder coldest
near nearer nearest
Additional material b big bigger biggest
hot hotter hottest
Workbook Unit 6
wet wetter wettest
These exercises could be done in class to give further
c busy busier busiest
practice, for homework, or in a later class as revision.
noisy noisier noisiest
Exercises 1–2  What … like?
dry drier driest
d beautiful more beautiful most beautiful
interesting more interesting most interesting
exciting more exciting most exciting

Unit 6  .  Tell me! What’s it like? 49


Ask your students to work in pairs to find out what the I’m not as tall as you, but I’m taller than Anna.
rules are.
/aɪm nɔt əz tɔːl əz juː bʌt aɪm tɔːlə ðən ænə/
Answers This car’s more expensive than John’s.
One-syllable adjectives: add -er or -est.
/ðɪs kɑːz mɔː(r) ɪkspensɪv ðən dʒɔnz/
Two-syllable adjectives ending with -y: drop the -y then
add -ier or -iest. But it isn’t as expensive as Anna’s.
Adjectives with two syllables or more: use more or most. /bʌt ɪt ɪznt əz ɪkspensɪv əz ænəz/
T 6.5 [CD 1: Track 42] Play the sentences on the
Note recording one by one (or model them yourself) and get
At this point, explain the rule about the doubling of the whole class to chorus them, then ask individual
the consonant: where there is one vowel then one students to repeat them or practise them with a partner.
consonant at the end of the word, the consonant
doubles. 4 Poems and rhymes are good ways of remembering
irregulars and exceptions. Your students may like to
learn this by heart. They could invent their own poem
2 Check that students know the comparative and for bad, worse, worst.
superlative forms of these irregular adjectives.
Answers PRACTICE  (SB p48)
far farther farthest
good better best Comparing four capital cities
bad worse worst
These exercises bring together the grammar from both the
Refer students to Grammar Reference 6.2 on p135. presentations – What … like? and comparatives and
superlatives.
2 T 6.4
[CD 1: Track 41] This is a short pronunciation
1 Ask students to match the cities with the photographs.
exercise. The aim is to practise the links between words
Ask them about the buildings, the weather, etc.
in connected speech and weak forms, which students
often find difficult because they are trying to remember Answers
all the different ‘bits’ of these structures. Picture 1 Damascus (Syria)
Play the first sentence on the recording (or model it Picture 2 Paris (France)
yourself) and highlight the weak forms, hotter /hɔtə/ and Picture 3 Brasilia (Brazil)
than /ðən/ and the word links: Picture 4 Beijing (China)
This summer’s hotter than last.
2 This is an information gap activity which needs to be set
/ðɪs sʌməz hɔtə ðən lɑːst/ up carefully. Photocopy enough copies of the
Do the same with the second sentence, pointing out the information about Paris and Beijing, and Damascus
weak stresses on as … as and the word links: and Brasilia, for students in your class. You can find the
information on p120 of the Teacher’s Book. Put students
It wasn’t as hot as this last year.
into two groups, A and B. Give the students in each
/ɪt wɔznt əz hɔt əz ðɪs lɑːst jɪə/ group information about the same cities. Give students
Check that students understand the use of (not) as … as time to read. Monitor and help with vocabulary.
in the example. Point out that so can only be used with When students are ready, focus them on the questions
the negative. See if students can find or remember other and drill them for pronunciation.
examples from Todd’s conversation in exercise 1. Now put students in pairs with one from Group A and
3 Ask students to work in pairs on the next set of one from Group B, each with different information.
sentences. They could mark in the word links and say Model the activity by asking a confident student some of
them to each other. If your students know the phonemic the questions, then let students work in their pairs to ask
script you could transcribe the sentences (see below) and and answer. Monitor and note errors.
give them out to help them practise. 3 Ask students to do this in their pairs. Tell them to write
It isn’t as cold today as it was yesterday. sentences using all of the structures and remind them to
/ɪt ɪznt əz kəʊld tədeɪ əz ɪt wɔz jestədeɪ/ use the adjectives in the Grammar Spot on p48. Tell them
that they do not have to make sentences just using the
But it’s colder than it was last week.
/bʌt ɪts kəʊldə dən ɪt wɔz lɑːst wiːk/

50 Unit 6  .  Tell me! What’s it like?


facts about the cities – if they know the cities they can Tapescript
give their own opinions. 1 A I moved to a new flat last week.
B Oh, really? What’s it like?
Sample answers A Well, it’s bigger than my old one but it isn’t as modern,
Facts and it’s further from the shops.
Damascus is older than Paris. 2 A I hear Martin’s got a new boss.
The population is smaller. B Yeah. He started work last week.
It’s smaller than Brasilia. B Oh, really? What’s he like?
It’s not as cold as Beijing. A Well, he’s much nicer than his old boss, and much more
Paris is wetter than Damascus. intelligent. Martin’s happier now than he’s been for a
It’s farther from the sea. long time.
Opinions 3 A We have a new teacher.
Paris is more beautiful/cosmopolitan/crowded than B Oh, really? What’s she like?
Brasilia. A Well, I think she’s the best teacher we’ve ever had. Our
last teacher was good but she’s even better and she
4 Students work individually to choose two cities in their works us much harder.
own country that they know something about, and 4 A Is that your new car?
to think of ideas to compare. You could give them an B Well, it’s second-hand, but it’s new to me.
example with two cities from your own country if you A What’s it like?
think this will help. Ask students to work in pairs to tell B Well, it’s faster than my old car and more comfortable,
each other about their two cities. When students have but it’s more expensive to run. I love it!
finished, you could get them to feed back what their
partner told them to the rest of the class.
Check it
Conversations 6 Go round and monitor the pairs as they correct the
5 Allocate different conversations to different pairs, or let sentences.
the pairs choose one for themselves, but make sure that
Answers
there is variety in the class.
1 He’s older than he looks.
Some sample answers are given here so that you can give 2 Jake’s as tall as his father.
additional prompts to reluctant students. Make it clear to 3 ‘What is Hong Kong like?’ ‘It’s really exciting!’
students that not every line of the conversation needs to 4 Trains in India are more crowded than in Europe.
contain examples of the structures – the idea is to 5 Al-Azhar University in Cairo is the oldest university in the
broaden the context of use. world.
Sample answers 6 He isn’t as intelligent as his sister/He isn’t more
1 New flat: It’s more expensive – it has a much more intelligent than his sister.
beautiful garden. It has more bedrooms. It’s nearer to the 7 This is harder than I expected.
city centre, but further from the countryside. I am very 8 Who is the richest man in the world?
happy there. 9 Everything is cheaper in my country.
2 New boss: He’s taller, more organised and very funny, 10 Rome was hotter than I expected.
much funnier than his old boss. Conduct feedback with the whole class.
3 New teacher: She’s the best/friendliest/funniest/most
caring/most intelligent. Additional material
4 New car: It’s bigger, more comfortable, and it has more
space for luggage. It was more expensive than my old car, Workbook Unit 6
but it’s much better. I love driving it. Exercises 3–8  Comparatives and superlatives

Go round and help with ideas and ask them to go back


through their dialogues to get them right and aim for
good pronunciation. At the end, ask one or two pairs to
act out their conversation to the rest of the class.
T 6.6 [CD 1: Track 43] Play the recording. Students
repeat the last lines.

Unit 6  .  Tell me! What’s it like? 51


LISTENING AND SPEAKING  (SB p49) J That’s right. But it’s wonderful, you want to stay up all
night and the Swedes make the most of it. Often they start
Living in another country work earlier in summer and then leave at about two or
The aim of the lead-in is to create awareness of and interest in three in the afternoon, so they can really enjoy the long
Sweden. You could bring in a map or pictures if you have any. summer evenings. They like to work hard but play hard
too. I think Londoners work longer hours, but I’m not sure
1 Ask students the questions in the Student’s Book and this is a good thing.
brainstorm as many suggestions as you can. Put them on F So what about free time? Weekends? Holidays? What do
the board without comment. They will find out whether Swedish people like doing?
they are true or not later. J Well, every house in Sweden has a sauna . . .
Go through the statements with students. Check that F Every house!?
they understand words that are key to the understanding J Well, every house I’ve been to. And most people have a
of the listening: insulated, the sun sets/rises, luxurious, country cottage, so people like to leave the town and get
sauna. Put students in pairs or or groups of three to tick back to nature at weekends. These cottages are sometimes
whether they think they are true or false. quite primitive, – no running water or not even toilets
and . . .
2
T 6.7 [CD 1: Track 44] Read through the information
F No toilet?
about Jane Bland with students. Play the recording.
J Well, some don’t have toilets but they all have a sauna.
Students listen and check their answers. They may need
After the sauna they run and jump into the lake to get
to listen twice.
cool.
Answers (to questions in exercise 1) and tapescript F What!? Even in winter?
1 True J Yeah – Swedish people are very healthy.
2 False (they look forward to spring) F Brrr! Or mad!
3 False (they are well-insulated)
4 True 3 In a monolingual class, students can do this in pairs. In
5 True a multilingual class, they will have to work alone. Give
6 True students time to prepare a few sentences. You may wish
7 False (only in summer) to give them some headings to think about: the seasons,
8 False (they are primitive – with no running water or toilets) the weather, houses, work, and free time.
9 False (every house she has been to has a sauna) Put students in small groups to discuss. Monitor and
J = Jane F = Fran, a friend note errors, particularly those involving comparatives.
J When I say that I live in Sweden, everyone always wants to
know about the seasons . . . Additional material
F The seasons? Workbook Unit 6
J Yeah . . . you know, how cold it is in winter – what it’s like Exercises 10 and 11  do some work on relative clauses and
when the days are so short. provide a model text, which leads to students writing a
F So what is it like? description of their city.
J Well, it is cold, very cold in winter, sometimes as cold as
–26˚ and of course when you go out you wrap up warm,
but inside, in the houses, it’s always very warm, much READING AND SPEAKING  (SB p50)
warmer than at home. Swedish people always complain
that when they visit England the houses are cold even in a London: the world in one city
good winter. In Sweden the houses are much better
insulated than in Britain and they always have the heating About the text
on very high. The texts are exploited by specific information tasks.
F And what about the darkness? The second task is a jigsaw reading task – this means
J Well, yeah, towards the end of December, there’s only one that the students have to do an information gap
hour of daylight – so you really look forward to the spring. exchange with a partner. Speaking activities allow
It is sometimes a bit depressing but you see the summers students to express their opinions on the texts, and talk
are amazing – from May to July, in the north of Sweden, about their own cultures.
the sun never sets, it’s still light at midnight, you can walk
in the mountains and read a newspaper.
F Oh, yeah – the land of the midnight sun.

52 Unit 6  .  Tell me! What’s it like?


Greater London is a very large and diverse city. In many 4 Tell students that they are going to read two of the
ways it is made up of lots of small towns all packed four texts on p51 and then exchange the information
together. Peckham, New Malden, and Stockwell are with a partner. Divide the class into groups of four or
‘towns’ swallowed up in London’s conurbation. Green five. Call half of the groups A and the other half B. Get
Lanes is a long road that goes through places like Wood the A groups to read texts 1 and 3, and the B groups
Green and Stoke Newington in north London. to read texts 2 and 4. Give students five or six minutes
Cyprus is an island in the eastern Mediterranean. It was to read the extracts and discuss the answers to the
partitioned into a Turkish-controlled north, and Greek questions in their groups. Monitor to help with any
south in 1975. Although peaceful, it is still a disputed vocabulary queries. Be prepared to help students with
territory. Cyprus is a former British colony, which is the pronunciation of the names of the people/places.
one reason why the Cypriot community is so large 5 Tell students to stand up and cross-pair so that the
in London. Madeira is an island in the Atlantic. The A students work with the B students. Once they have
football club, FC Porto, is based in the city of Oporto, found a new partner, tell them to take it in turns to ask
in northern Portugal. FC Porto won the European and answer the questions in exercise 4. With weaker
Champions’ League in 2004. classes, demonstrate the task by getting an A and B
You may wish to check the following set of words, used student to ask and answer the first question across the
when describing a multicultural city: class. Remind students not to show each other their texts
immigrant = somebody who has come to live in a as they do the information exchange.
different country Check the answers with the whole class.
vitality = liveliness
Answers
cosmopolitan = showing the influence of many cultures
1 Text 1: Posh Daddy. He’s the manager of a West Indian and
diverse = very different
African hairdresser’s. He’s in the hairdresser’s. He’s doing a
accepted = allowed to become part of a community
customer’s hair.
stick together = stay together/support each other
Text 2: They are the staff of the Asadal restaurant. They
are in the kitchen of the restaurant. They’re working.
1 Ask students to write things they like and dislike about Text 3: They are the staff of the Yasar Halim Bakery. They
their capital city, then tell the class. are in the bakery. They are working and chatting.
2 Ask students to take two or three minutes to prepare Text 4: They are the Portuguese football fans in the FC
answers to the questions. Put students in pairs or small Porto Fan Club. They are in a café. They are chatting.
groups to tell each other about their capital cities. 2 Text 1: Nigerian/African
If you have a multinational class, you could exploit Text 2: Korean
this lead-in more fully. Ask individuals from different Text 3: Turkish
countries to stand up and make a brief presentation Text 4: Portuguese
about their capital city. Encourage other students to ask
them questions about their capital. 3 Text 1: Posh Daddy / Big Choice Barber’s / Peckham
Text 2: Young-il Park / the Asadal restaurant / New
3 Ask students to look at the photos and the title. Ask Malden
What do you think ‘the world in one city’ means? Text 3: Yasar Halim / the Yasar Halim Bakery / Green
Give students a minute to read through the sentences. Lanes
Tell them to guess which they think are true, and which Text 4: José Antonia Costa / the FC Porto Fan Club /
false. Then ask students to read the introduction to the Stockwell
article and decide whether the statements are true or
false. Let students check their answers in pairs before 4 Text 1: West Indian
discussing as a class. Text 2: English
Text 3: Turkish Cypriot/Greek Cypriot
Answers Text 4: Madeiran
1 True 5 False
2 False 6 False
3 False 7 True
4 True

Unit 6  .  Tell me! What’s it like? 53


5 Text 1: Yes. The two black communities haven’t always got Answers and tapescript
on well. 1 ‘Mary’s family is very rich.’
Text 2: Yes. Young-il was the first Korean in his school and ‘Well, I knew her uncle was very wealthy.’
people stared. 2 ‘Look at all these new buildings!’
Text 3: Not in London but in Cyprus there are still ‘Yes. Paris is much more modern than I expected.’
problems between the two communities. 3 ‘Wasn’t that football match exciting!’
Text 4: Yes. The Portuguese and Madeirans are very ‘Yes, it was brilliant.’
separate groups. 4 ‘George doesn’t earn much money, but he’s so kind.’
‘He is, isn’t he? He’s one of the most generous people I
6 Text 1: pepper soup and kuku paka (chicken with coconut know.’
which is hot and spicy) 5 ‘Ann’s bedroom’s really untidy again!’
Text 2: kimchi (salty, spicy chilli peppers and vegetables) ‘Is it? I told her it was messy yesterday, and she promised
Text 3: baklava (a sweet cake make with honey and nuts) to clean it.’
Text 4: bacalhau (salted cod with potatoes and onions) 6 ‘I’m bored with this lesson!’
‘I know, I’m really fed up with it, too!’
What do you think?
Students work in small groups to discuss the questions. Antonyms
Monitor and encourage as much speaking as you can. It is a 3 Remind students what antonyms are: words that are
good idea to make one student in each group the discussion opposite in meaning. You could do this in the same way
leader, responsible for asking the questions and making sure suggested for synonyms above.
everybody has a chance to speak.
Let your students stay in the same pairs. You need to
Sample answers focus them again on the adjectives in the previous
People come to London for jobs and money. It’s an advantage exercise to do this exercise. Look at the examples.
for their children to speak English. People in London leave you
Answers
alone so you are free to live your own life. The love of food in
interested bored, fed up
London creates a lot of jobs for new communities.
horrible wonderful, brilliant
Students’ own answers to the rest of the questions.
mean kind, generous
old new, modern
poor rich, wealthy
VOCABULARY AND PRONUNCIATION  (SB p52) tidy untidy, messy
Synonyms 4 Read through the introduction with your students. Draw
Check that your students know what synonyms are: words particular attention to the response containing not very
that are the same or similar in meaning. You could make + the antonym. Then ask them to work together in their
the point by asking them to give you some examples in their pairs to construct more polite answers.
own language, and also by reading through the introduction
to the exercise with them. Sample answers and tapescript
1 ‘London’s such an expensive city.’
1 Ask students to work in pairs to complete the ‘Well, it’s not very cheap.’
conversations. They may need to use dictionaries to 2 ‘Paul and Sue are so mean.’
check the meaning of some of the words, but encourage ‘They’re certainly not very generous.’
them to try to guess first. 3 ‘Their house is always so messy.’
2
T 6.8 [CD 1: Track 45] Students listen to the recording ‘Mmm . . . it’s not very tidy.’
to check their answers. 4 ‘Their children are so noisy.’
‘Yes, they’re certainly not very quiet.’
Now play the dialogues through one at a time and after
5 ‘John looks so miserable.’
each one ask the pairs of students to repeat the
‘Hmm, he’s not very happy.’
dialogues, and to try to imitate the stress and intonation.
6 ‘His sister’s so stupid.’
Let them practise the conversations in pairs.
‘Well, she’s certainly not very clever.’

54 Unit 6  .  Tell me! What’s it like?


5 T 6.9 [CD 1: Track 46] Students listen to the recording 3 This activity is very controlled. Before you ask students
to check their answers. to do it in pairs, go through the introductory example
Allocate pairs of students across the class to be A or B with the whole class, and then do one or two further
and get them to act out the little dialogues. Encourage examples yourself with individual students across the
good stress and intonation. The main stress in both class, to check their understanding of the prepositions.
sentences is on the adjective. Go round helping and correcting.
Example
4 This is designed to teach/revise prepositions of
● ● ● ●
movement. Ask students to do it on their own and then
Paul and Sue are so mean.
compare with a partner.
● ● ●
They’re certainly not very generous. T 6.10 [CD 1: Track 47] Students listen and check their
T
answers. The route is marked on the map in 2 above.
Additional material
Answers and tapescript
Workbook Unit 6 You go down the path, past the pond, over the bridge, and
Exercise 9  looks at the use of suffixes in adjective formation. out of the gate. Then you go across the road and take the
path through the wood. When you come out of the wood
you walk up the path and go across the road. It takes five
EVERYDAY ENGLISH  (SB p53) minutes.

Directions Don’t forget!


The aim is to direct students in stages towards being able to
understand and give directions. Students could work in Word list
pairs from the start of the lesson. Photocopy the Word list for Unit 6 (TB p126) for your
students, and ask them to write in the translations, learn
1 Ask them to look at the map and find the different
them at home, and/or write some of the words into their
things. Go round the pairs to check and then go through
vocabulary notebook.
with the whole class together.
2 Tell them to read the descriptions of the places not yet
on the map and to insert them in the correct place. The
aim of this is to teach/revise prepositions of place.

4
6

5
2
3

1 8

Answers
1 hotel 6 greengrocer’s
2 bank 7 flower shop
3 baker’s 8 museum
4 supermarket 9 bookshop
5 pharmacy

Unit 6  .  Tell me! What’s it like? 55


Introduction
to the unit
7 Present Perfect  •  for, since
Adverbs, word pairs
Short answers
Fame

Language aims
Grammar – Present Perfect  This is the first unit in New Headway Plus Special
Edition Pre-Intermediate where the Present Perfect is dealt with. The simple
This unit uses the theme of fame to
aspect is introduced and practised. In Unit 13, the simple aspect is revised, and
introduce the Present Perfect. The
the continuous aspect is introduced.
theme naturally lends itself to talking
about people’s experiences, which is The Present Perfect means ‘completed some time before now, but with some
one of the main uses of the Present present relevance’, and so joins past and present in a way that many other
Perfect. The new structure is languages do not. In English, we say I have seen the Queen (at some indefinite
introduced by means of texts about time in my life), but not *I have seen the Queen yesterday. Other languages
two famous writers, the Listening and express the same ideas, but by using either a past tense or a present tense. In
speaking section has an interview with many other European languages, the same form of have + the past participle
an imaginary Formula One driver, and can be used to express both indefinite (Present Perfect) and definite (Past
the Reading section has an interview Simple) time.
with him at home with his wife. There Common mistakes
are opportunities to roleplay interviews *I have watched TV last night.
with celebrities. *When have you been to Russia?
*Did you ever try Chinese food?
Many languages use a present tense to express unfinished past. However,
English ‘sees’ not only the present situation, but the situation going back into
the past, and uses the Present Perfect.
Common mistakes
*I live here for five years.
*She is a teacher for ten years.
*How long do you know Paul?
Students are usually introduced to the Present Perfect very gently in their first
year course, so they will not be unfamiliar with the form. This unit aims to
introduce students to some uses/meanings of this tense, but your class will not
have mastered it by the end of the unit. It takes a long time to be assimilated.
Vocabulary  The first vocabulary exercise practises adverbs of different kinds:
adverbs of manner (slowly), adverbs of frequency (usually), focusing adverbs
(only, too, especially), comment adverbs (of course, fortunately) and adverbs of
degree (nearly).
The second exercise looks at word pairs, idiomatic expressions consisting of
two words joined by and, such as salt and pepper, and now and then.
Everyday English  This section practises short answers. There are exercises on
short answers throughout the Workbook whenever a new tense or verb form is
introduced, and this section aims to bring the area together, and to give some
oral practice.

56 Unit 7  . Fame
Notes on the unit Suggested timelines and check questions

Starter (SB p54) past


x? x? x? present
This is a quick check that students know the Past Simple Noor has been to France.
and past participle forms of these common irregular verbs. Is Noor in France now? (No.)
Ask students to work in pairs to help each other with the Do we know when? (No.)
answers. They can check their answers in the irregular verbs Is when important? (No.)
list on p143 of the Student’s Book.
xpast present
1998
FAMOUS WRITERS  (SB p54) Noor went to France in 1998.
Is Noor in France now? (No.)
Present Perfect and Past Simple Do we know and say when? (Yes.)
Ask some other students Which countries have you been
Note to? Encourage the class to ask When did you go there?
We usually suggest that students look at the Grammar Lead in to the topic by asking students about writers
Reference at the back of the Student’s Book for and novels. Personalize and create interest by asking
homework after the presentation in class. However, with questions.
certain difficult items, it is worth asking students to
spend five or ten minutes looking at the information in Who are your favourite novelists? What sort of books do
the Grammar Reference before you introduce the you like?
structure in class, so that they can begin to understand When did you last read a novel? Do you know any
and think about the area. The Present Perfect is a case in British writers?
point, so set this for homework (see Student’s Book
p136). 1 Ask students to look at the photographs in their book
and ask them a few questions.
Additional idea When were they born? How do you think they are related?
If you feel you would like to remind your students of What do you think their novels are about?
the form and basic use of the Present Perfect (to express
experience) before you begin the ‘Famous Writers’ Note
section, you could do the following mini-revision • The Victorian novelist Anthony Trollope wrote
lesson. novels about life in a provincial English town. His
Ask a student (who you know has travelled) Which most famous novel is Barchester Towers (1857).
countries have you been to? If the student is puzzled by • The novelist Joanna Trollope writes historical and
the verb form, prompt with in your life. contemporary novels – some of which also describe
Write the names of the countries on the board. Say to life in rural England. Although related, Joanna is not
the class Noor has been to France, Germany, Italy, and a direct descendant of Anthony Trollope.
Portugal. Do we know when Noor went to France? Ask
her a question with When … ? to elicit the question in Ask students to complete the sentences with He or She.
the Past Simple When did Noor go to France? Do the first as an example. Check that students
understand why the answer is He: because Anthony
The class now asks Noor the questions, and she replies
Trollope is dead, and therefore what he did is finished
with the dates.
and has no connection to now, or She: because Joanna is
Put two sentences on the board. still alive and writing now.
Noor has been to France, Germany, Italy, and Portugal.
Answers and tapescript
Noor went to France in (1998). 1 He wrote novels about Victorian life. She writes novels
Ask the class if they know the names of these two about modern people and their relationships.
tenses. The Past Simple should be known, but probably 2 He wrote 47 novels, travel books, biographies, and short
not the Present Perfect. Explain (in L1, if possible, or stories. She has written more than twenty-five novels. She
through the use of timelines) that the Past Simple is started writing in her thirties.
used to talk about definite time, and the Present Perfect
is used to talk about indefinite time, to talk about an
action which happened some time before now.

Unit 7  . Fame 57
3 She has lived in the west of England for forty years. He 2 Ask students to work in pairs or small groups to put the
lived in Ireland for eighteen years. verbs in the correct tense. Encourage them to look back
4 She has been married twice, and has two daughters. She at the sentences in exercise 1 to help them.
married for the first time in 1966. He was married and had
two sons. Answers and tapescript
1 Anthony Trollope travelled to South Africa, Australia,
T 7.1
[CD 1: Track 48] Play the recording so students can Egypt, and the West Indies. Joanna Trollope has travelled
check their answers. At this stage you may wish to play to many parts of the world.
and pause the recording to drill the sentences containing 2 She has won many awards, and several of her stories have
the Present Perfect around the room, paying particular appeared on TV.
attention to the contracted has. 3 Her first book came out in 1980. Since then, she has sold
over six million copies.
grammar spot   (SB p54) 4 She went to school in the south of England, and studied
1 Ask students to work in pairs to underline the English at Oxford University, but she has lived in the
examples of the Past Simple. The aim is to country for most of her life.
consolidate what is known (i.e. the Past Simple) 5 She writes her books by hand. She has had the same pen
before moving on to the new (i.e. the Present Perfect), since 1995.
and to reinforce the idea that the Past
T 7.2 [CD 1: Track 49] Play the recording so that
Simple is used to refer to definite past time.
students can check their answers.
Answers 3 Do 1 and 2 as a class to establish the two question forms,
1 wrote one in the Present Perfect and one in the Past Simple,
2 wrote/started and drill them to establish a model.
3 lived
4 married/was married Answers and tapescript
1 ‘How long has she lived in the west of England?’
Ask students why the Past Simple is used. Then ask ‘For forty years.’
them to underline examples of the other tense, the 2 ‘What did she study at university?’
Present Perfect. ‘English.’
3 ‘How many novels has she written?’
Answers
‘More than twenty-five.’
1 –
4 ‘How many books has she sold?’
2 has written
‘Over six million.’
3 has lived
5 ‘When did her first novel come out?’
4 has been married
‘In 1980.’
2 Complete the rule as a class. 6 ‘How many times has she been married?’
‘Twice.’
We make the Present Perfect with the auxiliary verb 7 ‘Has she got any children?’
have + the past participle. ‘Yes, two daughters.’
3 Students work in twos or threes to answer the third 8 ‘How long has she had her pen?’
Grammar question. They might be able to infer the ‘Since 1995.’
answers, or they might have no idea. If students can
manage something such as Anthony Trollope is dead, T 7.3 [CD 1: Track 50] Play the recording so that
they are doing well. students can check their answers. Drill the questions
around the room, making sure students start with the
Answers voice high.
Anthony Trollope wrote forty-seven novels – Past Simple, At this stage you could ask students to ask and answer
because he is dead and can write no more. the questions about Joanna in pairs. Monitor and
Joanna Trollope has written more than twenty-five novels correct.
– Present Perfect, because she is still alive, and can write
more in the future.
Refer students to Grammar Reference 7.1 and 7.2 on
p136.

58 Unit 7  . Fame
PRACTICE  (SB p55) T 7.4 [CD 1: Track 51] Play the recording so that
students can check their answers. You could play and
Discussing grammar pause and drill the sentences around the class. Get
students to make similar sentences about themselves
1 The aim of this exercise is to check that students have
then read them out to the class.
grasped the form and use of the Present Perfect. It tests
some of the typical errors and confusions made by Answers and tapescript
students learning this tense. Students work in pairs to 1 I’ve known my best friend for years. We met when we
choose the correct verb form. were 10.
2 I last went out for a meal two weeks ago. The food was
Answers
awful.
1 Have you ever been 4 was
3 I’ve had this watch for three years. My Dad gave it to me.
2 saw 5 have bought
4 We’ve used this book since the beginning of term. It’s not
3 have liked 6 moved
bad. I quite like it.
5 We lived in our old flat from 1988 to 1996. We moved
Find someone who . . . because we needed somewhere bigger.
2 This is a mingle activity, where students ask the same 6 We haven’t had a break for an hour. I really need a cup of
question to everyone in the class. Photocopy p121 of the coffee.
Teacher’s Book, and cut it up into sentences. (If you 7 I last had a holiday in 1999. I went camping with some
paste them onto card, you can use them again.) friends.
8 This building has been a school since 1985. Before that it
Every student must have a sentence. Read the example in was an office.
the Student’s Book, showing that they have to turn their
sentences into a question beginning Have you ever … ?
Make sure students don’t go round the class saying ‘Find Asking questions
someone who has been to France.’
6 T 7.5 [CD 1: Track 52] Ask students to work in pairs to
Before you ask the class to stand up, check that complete the conversation then play the recording so
everyone’s question is correct. Model the activity with a they can check their answers. Ask students to tell you
strong student, asking a Have you ever … ? question and why the different tenses are used.
three or four follow-up questions to show that you want
students to find out as much as they can. Answers and tapescript
A Where do you live, Olga? Present Simple, because
Students stand up and ask everyone, making a note of
it is true now.
the answers.
B In a flat near the park.
3 When they have finished and have sat down, allow them A How long have you lived there? Present Perfect, because
a minute to decide what they are going to say when they it is unfinished past –
report back to the class. Ask all students to report back. starting in the past and
continuing until now.
for and since B For three years.
A And why did you move? Past Simple, because it
4 Students work in pairs to complete the expressions with
asks about a finished
for and since. Before they start, tell students that for is
past event.
used with a period of time, and since is used with a point
B We wanted to live in a nicer area.
in time. Compare:
. . . for ten minutes. Drill the three questions round the class, paying
. . . since January 2000. particular attention to the intonation pattern of Wh-
questions, then ask students to work in pairs to practise
Answers
the conversation.
1 for 5 since
2 for 6 for 7 This activity gives students lots of controlled speaking
3 since 7 for practice in manipulating the question forms of three
4 since 8 since different tenses. Be prepared to have to do a lot of
prompting and correcting.
5 Ask students to work in pairs to match the lines to make Model the first conversation with a confident student
sentences. Do the first as an example to give them the then ask students to work in pairs to practise. Ideally,
idea then monitor and help. they should be able to do this without having to write,

Unit 7  . Fame 59
just using the prompts, although it may be a good idea to Answers and tapescript
let them write out the first conversation for confidence. Teams he has raced with Grands Prix he has won
Ask two or three pairs to model one of their ✔ Jordan ✔ Australian
conversations for the class at the end. Ferrari ✔ Bahrain
✔ Jaguar Korean
Sample answers ✔ Toyota ✔ Malaysian
1 A What do you do? ✔ Black Bull ✔ Monaco
B I work (for a bank). Renault Abu Dhabi
A How long have you worked there? Maclaren ✔ Turkish
B For a year. ✔ Toro Bianco ✔ Brazilian
A What did you do before that?
B I worked for (an insurance company). T 7.6
2 A Have you got a car? I = Interviewer B = Bruno Cruz
B Yes, I have. . . . and that’s all the traffic news. Back to you, Andrew.
A How long have you had it? I Thanks Roger. Well, everyone’s been very excited here
B Since 1998. at Sporting Talk since we heard that our next guest was
A How much did you pay for it? coming in for an interview. And here he is in the studio,
B It was about two thousand pounds. Formula One Champion yet again, Bruno Cruz. Welcome
3 A Do you know Omar? to the programme, Bruno, and thank you so much for
B Yes, I do. coming in.
A How long have you known him? B Thank you for having me.
B For ten years. I You’ve had an incredible year, Bruno, haven’t you?
A Where did you meet him? B Yes, it’s been amazing. I’ve just got back from Brazil. It was
B We met at college. incredible to win there again, in front of my own people –
it’s always very special. I needed a good rest afterwards, so
8 Extend the previous two activities by doing some I’ve just had a wonderful holiday in Brazil with my family.
personalized speaking practice, using the prompts I Now, it seems that you’ve always been on the racing scene
suggested in the Student’s Book. This could be done in Bruno. How long have you been in the business?
pairs or as a mingle activity. B Er, fifteen years in Formula One. I drove Formula Three
before that.
Additional material I How did you start?
B Like most racing drivers, I started with go-karting – when
Workbook Unit 7 I was at primary school – but I’ve always been crazy about
These exercises could be done in class to give further racing, for as long as I can remember. My father was a
practice, for homework, or in a later class as revision. sports journalist, and he took me to my first Grand Prix in
Exercises 1–5  practise the form of the Present Perfect. 1986, when I was 12. I loved it. When I left school, I joined
Exercise 6  practises for and since. a driver development program with my first team, so I’ve
Exercises 7 and 8  Students are asked to discriminate always been a racing driver – I’ve never done anything else.
between the Present Perfect, the Present Simple, and the I And you’ve driven with quite a few different teams over
Past Simple in the Tense revision. the years, haven’t you?
B Yes, I certainly have. I’ve raced with Jordan, Jaguar, both no
longer with us, of course. And . . . then there was Toyota
Listening and speaking  (SB p57) – another team that hasn’t lasted as long as my racing
career! And then Black Bull, and now Toro Bianco.
A Formula One driver I And how long have you been with Toro Bianco now?
1 Talk to students about the kind of sports they like. Ask B Since 2008. They asked me to join them just after I won
the questions in Student’s Book. my fifth driver’s championship. They’re a great team. And
when you’ve worked with so many different teams, you
2 T 7.6
[CD 1: Track 53] Read the introduction and look at
know how important they are for the driver.
the picture. Play the recording. Students listen and
I So that’s seven championships you’ve won now?
complete the chart.
B That’s right. And what I’m really proud of is that I’ve won
Ask students to work in pairs to compare their answers on every Grand Prix circuit in the world, apart from the
before feedback. new ones, the Korean, and the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix – but
I came second in Abu Dhabi two years ago!

60 Unit 7  . Fame
I That’s incredible. So what do you think makes you such a Sample answers
successful driver? A
B Well, I think it really all depends on making the right Bruno started with go-karting when he was at primary school.
decisions. It’s not about driving fast, it’s actually about His father took him to his first Grand Prix in 1986.
planning, and quick thinking, and doing the right thing at He joined Toro Bianco after he won his fifth championship.
the right time. Bruno came second in Abu Dhabi two years ago.
I And now the big question everyone’s asking. Is it true that Ayrton Senna died in 1994.
next year will be your last as a Formula One driver? B
B Oh, I still haven’t decided on that. But I certainly don’t Bruno has been a Formula One driver for fifteen years.
want to stop at the moment. You know, the amazing thing He has driven with quite a few different teams over the years.
is that I still get very excited when I get into the car at the He has been with Toro Bianco since 2008.
beginning of a race – just as excited as when I got in my Bruno has won seven championships.
first Formula One car in 1996. There hasn’t been a death in Formula One for nearly twenty
I You talk about excitement . . . what about fear? Have you years.
ever felt afraid on the track?
B Of course I have! A bit of fear is a good thing to have if 5 Ask students to work in pairs and give them a little time
you want to stay alive! But I’m lucky, I missed the really to prepare the questions. When they are ready, let them
dangerous years of Formula One. There’s no reason to be ask and answer in pairs, using the information from the
really afraid any more, not compared with the past. There Listening. Monitor and make sure they are using both
hasn’t been a death in Formula One for nearly twenty years tenses correctly.
now, since the great Ayrton Senna died in 1994, in the San
Marino Grand Prix. And that was a day after another driver Answers
lost his life, in qualification. Safety standards have got so Where has he just come back from?
much better since then. What did he do before he raced Formula One?
I And we’re all very thankful for that. So, we wish you all the Have many championships has he won?
best for next season. And thank you again for coming to When did he get his first Formula One car?
talk to us.
B My pleasure. And many thanks to all my fans out there – Roleplay
your support means a lot to me.
6 This activity could last a short while or nearly an hour,
3 Play the recording again. Ask students to work in pairs to depending on how you organize it (and whether you and
answer the comprehension questions. your class are interested). If you allow the sportspeople
and journalists about fifteen minutes to prepare, then
Answers have the interviews and record them, then listen to the
1 He’s Brazilian. recorded interviews for feedback, you should easily fill
2 He started with go-karting. an hour, depending on the size of your class. You could
3 None. He’s never done anything else. ask students to prepare their roles for homework. You
4 He has won two championships since joining Toro Bianco. could save some of the recorded interviews for the next
5 He thinks planning and quick thinking are most important class. The success of a roleplay often depends on the
in racing. effort put in during preparation.
6 Because he still finds it exciting.
Here are some ideas to help students prepare their roles.
7 Because safety standards are much better than they used
Sportspeople
to be.
Students should talk together to decide the following:
– the kind of sport they play / do
Language work – how long they have been in their profession
– who / what has influenced them in their career
The aim of these two exercises is to give further practice of
– how many competitions they have won
the Present Perfect.
– the countries they have been to
4 Ask students to work in pairs to make sentences. Give – what has made them successful
them one or two examples to get them started. Journalists
In the feedback, point out that the verb forms in the Students should work together to think of questions to
sentences from A are in the Past Simple, because they ask the sportspeople. They could use the ideas for
refer to definite time. The verb forms in the sentences sportspeople to help them, although they should also
from B are in the Present Perfect, because they refer to try to think of follow-up questions to get further
the past up to the present, and probably into the future. information.

Unit 7  . Fame 61
When students are preparing, the journalists will 2 She has won more Grand Slam titles than any other woman
probably be ready before the groups of sportspeople. If (the Grand Slam titles in tennis are the major competitions,
this happens, tell the journalists that they too are a group such as Wimbledon in the UK, and the US and Australian
of sportspeople and should prepare information. Open Championships).
Decide whether you want all the interviews to go on at 3 They don’t spend all their time going out to fancy and
the same time or one by one. The advantage of the latter expensive places – they spend most evenings at home
is that students are often interested in each other, and cooking and watching TV.
want to hear what the ‘groups’ have to say. However, they are both very famous, and get recognised
Recording students from time to time can also be useful. everywhere they go, especially Maria. They also don’t
spend a lot of time together when they are working and
travelling.
READING  (SB p58) 4 Maria has never been very interested in Formula One, so
she obviously doesn’t really like it, and she didn’t know
Celebrity interview much about it when she met Bruno. She knows a lot about
1 The aim of the lead-in is to get students talking about it now though, after being married to him for five years.
the topic of famous people. Ask students the questions, 5 They both know that they can’t stay at the top forever,
and discuss the events and lives of any famous people and they feel they can look forward to retiring, because
who are in the news at the moment, or in recent times. they feel satisfied with their wonderful careers. They plan
2 Ask students to look at the headline and photographs to spend more time together at home, and they would like
from Hi! Magazine. Ask students the questions in the to have children.
Student’s Book.
5 This vocabulary is a good opportunity for students
Note to practise guessing words in context. They may have
This text is based on a typical celebrity magazine article, already done this with these words while reading the
in which rich and famous people are interviewed in a text earlier, but it is still a good exercise to get them to
light and friendly way, usually at home. Your students think about what clues the contexts give to help them
may know examples of such magazines. guess what these words might mean. It’s also good for
them to recognise that they don’t need to know the exact
meanings of words in texts such as this, but just enough
3 Read through the questions that have been taken out of an idea of what they might mean to continue reading
of the magazine interview to check that the students meaningfully.
understand them. Then ask them to read through
Ask students to work in pairs to find the words and
the article quickly to match the questions with the
decide what clues the contexts give to their meaning.
paragraphs. This is an exercise in ‘skimming’ reading,
Students can then check them in a dictionary. After
where the reader doesn’t try to read and understand
discussing the meaning of each of the words, ask
every word, but just enough of each paragraph to match
students if they can think of other examples of how
it with one of the questions. It’s a good idea to set a time
the words might be used. Do the first one in class as an
limit for this activity, of about five minutes.
example.
Answers
Answers
4, 1, 2, 3
a treat  Maria is taking about the times when she and Bruno
4 Read through the comprehension questions with are together while working. This is a very positive thing,
students. This is a more intensive reading than the because they spend most of their working time apart. And she
skimming exercise. Give the students time to find and says it is a real treat because it doesn’t happen very often. So
write answers to the questions and let them check their a treat is something very positive that doesn’t happen very
answers in pairs. often. E.g. We usually have picnics in the garden, or in the
nearby forest, but sometimes, for a treat, we drive along way
Answers to the coast for a picnic.
1 Because Bruno is a very successful Formula One driver. passionate  Maria and Bruno feel passionate about their
Maria is the top female tennis player in the world. sports, so passionate is a feeling that people have about
something. It’s obviously very positive, and means to have
very strong positive feelings about something, to love it, e.g.
I’m passionate about football.

62 Unit 7  . Fame
fortune  Bruno doesn’t think that fame and fortune have Answers
changed him, and says that they don’t always go out to 1 together 4 only
expensive restaurants. So fortune is something that comes 2 still 5 nearly
with fame, and is connected with money. It means a very 3 Of course
large amount of money, e.g. Many people have made a
fortune starting Internet businesses. 4 Students work in pairs to complete the sentences.
dressing up  This is clearly connected with to dress, to put
Answers
on clothes, and is what you do when you go to an expensive
1 especially 4 just
restaurant. It means to put on your best, most expensive
2 too 5 At last
clothes for a special event, e.g. Everyone gets very dressed up
3 Exactly
when they go to the palace to meet the Queen.
fancy  This is used to describe a restaurant that is expensive,
so it’s another positive word for something very special. It Word pairs
means very high class, e.g. That’s a very fancy watch you’re
The aim of this activity is to introduce students to some
wearing.
common expressions consisting of two words joined by and.
tyres  This is connected with cars, and must be a part of a car,
like the engine. It means the black rubber part of the wheel of 1 Read through exercise 1 as a class.
a car, or bicycle.
2 Ask students to work in pairs to match the words. Do the
bring up  Maria is looking forward to bringing up her
first as an example.
children in their fantastic home, so it’s something that
parents do with children in their homes. It means to be a Answers
parent to children over the years it takes them to grow up ladies and gentlemen
into adults, e.g. You need to be caring, but also quite strict fish and chips
to bring up children well. now and then
yes and no
do’s and don’ts
Language work up and down
6 Ask students to choose the correct tense. peace and quiet
safe and sound
Answers salt and pepper
1 Bruno and Maria have been married for five years.
(Continues to the present) 3 T 7.7 [CD 1: Track 54] Ask students to complete the
2 They met after a tennis match. (An event in the finished sentences with the expressions. Play and pause the
past) recording. Students must try to remember the correct
3 They have lived in their new home since January. expression to complete each conversation.
(Continues to the present)
4 They like cooking a meal and watching TV. Answers and tapescript
5 They both have had wonderful careers. (Continues to the 1 ‘Do you still play tennis?’
present) ‘Not regularly. Just now and then, when I have time.’
2 This is a pretty relaxed place to work. There aren’t many
do’s and don’ts.
VOCABULARY   (SB p60) 3 Here you are at last! I’ve been so worried! Thank goodness
you’ve arrived safe and sound.
Adverbs 4 ‘Do you like your new job?’
‘Yes and no. The money’s OK, but I don’t like the people.’
1 Ask students to find adverbs that end in -ly in the 5 Sometimes there are too many people in the house. I go
interview on p58–9. into the garden for a bit of peace and quiet.
Answers 6 Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. It gives me great
incredibly, naturally, occasionally, really, obviously, pleasure to talk to you all tonight.
fortunately, certainly 7 ‘How’s your Gran?’
‘Up and down. There are good days, and then not such
2 Ask students to find the example adverbs in the text. good days.’
8 ‘Here’s supper. Careful! Its hot.’
3 Ask students to work in pairs to complete the sentences ‘Fish and chips! Yummy!’
with words from the box.

Unit 7  . Fame 63
Additional material
Yes, I do.
Workbook Unit 7
Ask students if they can remember any other phrases
Exercise 9  looks at nouns that refer to men and women,
used on the recording to add more information.
such as waiter and waitress.

EVERYDAY ENGLISH  (SB p61) 2 Ask students to work in pairs to complete the short
answers. Do the first as an example.
Short answers Answers
Short answers have been practised throughout the 1 No, I don’t. I prefer science fiction.
Workbook. The aim here is to bring them all together and 2 Yes, I did. It was a great game.
practise them orally. 3 No, I haven’t. I’m sorry. I haven’t got a penny on me.
1
T 7.8 [CD 1: Track 55] Read the instruction as a class. 4 Yes, I have. I went there last weekend with Frank.
Play the recording. Pause after each pair of
5 Yes, I suppose they are. But they give me a lot of
conversations and ask the questions. Students should be
freedom, too.
able to tell you that in the second of each pair of
6 No, I’m not. Why? What are you doing?
conversations the speaker uses short answers and a more Students work in pairs or groups of three to continue the
animated intonation to be more polite. conversations.
Tapescript At this stage, you could drill the conversations to practise
1 ‘Do you like learning English, Elsa?’ the pronunciation. Let students practise one or two
‘Yes.’ conversations in pairs.
‘Do you like learning English, Elsa?’ 3 Students work alone or in pairs to think of questions,
‘Yes, I do. I love it. It’s the language of Shakespeare.’ using the prompts.
2 ‘Are those new jeans you’re wearing?’
‘No.’ 4 Ask students to stand up and mingle, asking their
‘Are those new jeans you’re wearing?’ questions to as many different students as possible.
‘No, they aren’t. I’ve had them for ages.’ Learners often find short answers difficult. Although it is
3 ‘Have you got the time, please?’ a purely mechanical process to know which auxiliary to
‘No.’ use, and whether it should be positive or negative, these
‘Have you got the time, please?’ decisions have to be made so quickly in the natural
‘No, I haven’t. I’m so sorry.’ course of conversation that learners complain they don’t
4 ‘Can you play any sports?’ have time to think.
‘Yes.’ Try to be aware of short answers in your teaching
‘Can you play any sports?’ generally, and remind students of them whenever
‘Yes, I can, actually. I can play tennis.’ appropriate. The use of short answers, reply questions,
and question tags is often quoted as the sign of a
Read through the Caution Box as a class then ask successful speaker of English, as they are employed to
students to work in pairs to complete the short ‘lubricate’ conversation.
answers.
Don’t forget!
Answers
Do you like cooking? Yes, I do. Workbook Unit 7
Is it raining? No, it isn’t. Exercise 10 is a writing activity on relative clauses.
Have you been to France? Yes, I have. Exercise 11 asks students to write a biography.
Are you good at chess? No, I’m not. Word list
Can you speak German? Yes, I can. Photocopy the Word list for Unit 7 (TB pp126 –127) for
your students, and ask them to write in the translations,
Remind students that we cannot use I’ve, they’ve, he’s, learn them at home, and/or write some of the words into
etc. in short answers. their vocabulary notebook.
Drill the short answers by asking the class or
individuals the prompt questions above and eliciting
short answers with a good intonation pattern in
response.

64 Unit 7  . Fame
Introduction
to the unit
8 have (got) to • should/must
Words that go together
At the doctor’s
Do’s and don’ts

Language aims
Grammar – have (got) to  This might be the first time that your class has been
introduced to have to or have got to to express obligation. Must is often taught
This unit, ‘Do’s and don’ts’, introduces
in first-year courses to express the obligation of the speaker. This can cause
the functional language of obligation
students problems, as they don’t realize that must with second and third
and advice. In the two presentation
persons sounds too authoritarian. Should would be more appropriate. They
sections, ‘Work, work’, and ‘Problems,
also use must to refer to a general obligation, when have to sounds more
problems’, students talk about the
natural. In British English, particularly informal English, have got to is normally
duties and disadvantages of different
used when talking about one thing we are obliged to do, (e.g. I’ve got to do my
professions and what they have to do at
homework this evening), whereas have to is used when the obligation is habitual,
home, and offer advice to friends and
(e.g. I usually have to visit my family at the weekend). In American English only
to visitors to their country. In the
have to is used.
Listening section, students listen to
three people from different parts of the Common mistakes
world giving advice about holidays in *You’ve got hiccups. You must have a glass of water.
their countries, and the Reading section *My parents must work six days a week.
contains extracts from an online forum. In New Headway Plus Special Edition Pre-Intermediate, we do not introduce
must to express obligation. This is because the difference between must to
express the obligation of the speaker, and have (got) to to express obligation
in general, is too subtle for the level. However, must is used to express strong
advice or recommendation, for example, You must read his new novel – it’s
marvellous!
Students often find the verb have a problem, because it has so many guises. In
Unit 2, it was seen as a full verb with two forms, one with got and one with
do/does. In Unit 7, it was seen as an auxiliary verb in the Present Perfect. In this
unit, it is seen operating with another verb in the infinitive.
should/must  There is an introduction to modal auxiliary verbs on p137
of the Grammar Reference. Ask students to read this before you begin the
presentation of should and must to make suggestions and give advice.
Both must and should present few problems of meaning, but learners often
want to put an infinitive with to.
Common mistakes
*You should to do your homework.
*You must to see the doctor.
Vocabulary  Two areas of collocation are dealt with, verbs and nouns that go
together, and compound nouns.
Everyday English  The functional situation, At the doctor’s, is practised. It
introduces the vocabulary of illnesses and revises the language of advice.

Unit 8  .  Do’s and don’ts 65


Notes on the unit 2 The aim of this exercise is to focus students on the
positive, negative, and past forms of have to. Put students
Starter (SB p62) in pairs to complete the sentences. They may need to
listen to the recording again.
The aim of this Starter is to find out how well students can
use have (got) to. Ask students as a class some questions to Answers
get them started, for example: I have to work very long hours.
What’s good about your life? What’s bad about your life? Do you have to work at the weekend?
I don’t have to do the washing-up.
Put students in pairs to make sentences using the prompts
We had to learn the basics.
in the box.
I didn’t have to wait too long to get a job.

WORK, WORK  (SB p62) 3 Ask students to work in pairs to change the sentences.
Do the first as an example.
have (got) to Answers
1 T 8.1 [CD 2: Track 2] Look at the photograph and read He has to work very long hours.
the introduction as a class. Students listen to Steven Does he have to work at the weekend?
talking about his job, and answer the questions. Ask He doesn’t have to do the washing-up.
students to discuss the questions with a partner before He had to learn the basics.
you get feedback. He didn’t have to wait too long to get a job.
Answer and tapescript
Steven is a chef. grammar spot   (SB p62)
I = Interviewer S = Steven Read through the Grammar Spot as a class.
I What sort of hours do you work, Steven?
S Well, I have to work very long hours, about eleven hours a Answers
day. 3 What time do you have to get up?
I What time do you start? I don’t have to get up early.
S I work nine till three, then I start again at five thirty and Yesterday, I had to get up early.
work until eleven. Six days a week. So I have to work very
unsocial hours. Refer students to Grammar Reference 8.1 on p137.
I And do you have to work at the weekend?
S Oh, yes. That’s our busiest time. I get Wednesdays off. 4 Ask students to give you sentences about what
I What are some of the things you have to do, and some of other things Steven said he has to do. Insist on good
the things you don’t have to do? pronunciation.
S Er . . . I don’t have to do the washing-up, so that’s good! I Answers
have to wear white, and I have to be very careful about He has to work about eleven hours a day.
hygiene. Everything in the kitchen has to be totally clean. He has to work six days a week.
I What’s hard about the job? He has to work unsocial hours.
S You’re standing up all the time. When we’re busy, people He has to wear white.
get angry and shout, but that’s normal. He has to be very careful about hygiene.
I How did you learn the profession?
S Well, I did a two-year course at college. In the first year we
had to learn the basics, and then we had to take exams.
Practice  (SB p63)
I Was it easy to find a job?
S I wrote to about six hotels, and one of them gave me my Pronunciation
first job, so I didn’t have to wait too long.
I And what are the secrets of being good at your job? 1 T 8.2 [CD 2: Track 3] If your students don’t know
S Attention to detail. You have to love it. You have to be phonemic script very well, focus on the six different
passionate about it. pronunciations and drill them round the class. Ask
I And what are your plans for the future? students to listen to the sentences and write the correct
S I want to have my own place. When the time’s right. number next to the sentences according to the
pronunciations.

66 Unit 8  .  Do’s and don’ts


Answers and tapescripts 2 T 8.3
[CD 2: Track 4] Students listen and complete the
1 b I have a good job. d I have to work hard. sentences, using the phrases in the box.
2 a He has a nice car. e She has to get up early. Play the recording, allowing time for students to
3 c I had a good time. f I had to take exams. complete the conversations.

Play the recording again. There are pauses to allow your Answers and tapescript
class to repeat. Drill the sentences around the class. 1 ‘I’m working 16 hours a day.’
‘I think you should talk to your boss.’
2 ‘I can’t sleep.’
Jobs ‘You shouldn’t drink coffee at night.’
2 Check that students know all the jobs in the box, and 3 ‘I get seasick very easily.’
drill the longer words for pronunciation. Model the ‘I don’t think you should go on that boat trip next week.’
activity by choosing a job and getting students to ask you 4 ‘I’ve had terrible toothache for weeks.’
questions. Refuse to answer unless they ask a ‘You must go to the dentist.’
grammatically correct question, and make sure they are
trying to use have to in some of the questions. When Drill the sentences round the class, paying particular
they have guessed your job, put them in pairs to ask and attention to the strong stresses and wide intonation
answer. Monitor and correct errors. range used when giving advice.

3 Ask students to discuss as a class the jobs they would


like to do, and those they wouldn’t like to do. This ● ●

second question, Why?, should prompt examples of You should talk to your boss.
have to. Notice that students are expected to use the
third person plural here, not second person singular. ●
You must go to the dentist.
Talking about you Students practise the conversations in pairs.
4 Introduce the discussion by asking one or two students 3 Check students understand the vocabulary used in each
some of the questions or by telling students about what situation, and give them a few minutes to think of advice
you had to do when you lived at home with your for each. Model the first situation by reading out the
parents. Put students in small groups of three or four to sentence and getting advice from students. Put them in
discuss the questions. In the feedback, ask one student groups of three to do the exercise.
from each group to summarize some of the more
interesting comments made. grammar spot   (SB p64)
Additional material Answer the questions as a class.
Answers
Workbook Unit 8
These exercises could be done in class to give further 1 You should go on a diet. expresses a suggestion.
practice, for homework, or in a later class as revision. You must go to the doctor’s. expresses strong obligation.
Exercises 1–5  practise have to/had to, don’t have to/didn’t 2 We do not add -s in the third person, or use do or does
have to. in the question and negative. Questions are formed by
inverting subject and the modal verb. Negatives are
Problems, problems  (SB p64) formed by adding not or, more commonly, n’t.
3 Using I don’t think . . . makes the suggestion more
should, must tentative.
1 Match the problems and suggestions as a class. Read out
the problems, using intonation and mime to get over the Refer students to Grammar Reference 8.2–8.4 on p137.
meaning, and ask students to give you the correct
suggestion. Then ask students what advice they would
give. If any students use should or must correctly then
encourage them, but the aim at this stage is to set the
context and find out what they know.

Unit 8  .  Do’s and don’ts 67


PRACTICE  (SB p64) Tapescript and answers
Holidays in January
Grammar 1 Silvia
1 Students work in pairs or small groups to make In January the weather is wonderful. It’s the most perfect
sentences. You may wish them to write a few sentences time of year, not too hot, not too cold, but the temperature
for consolidation. can change a lot in just one day. It can go from quite chilly to
very warm, so you should perhaps bring a jacket but you don’t
Sample answers need any thick winter clothes. The capital city is the most
you have to work hard. populated city in the world and there are lots of things to see
you have to learn the grammar. and do there. We have lots of very old, historic buildings. We
you don’t have to go to are very proud of our history, with Mayan and Aztec temples.
If you want to learn English, university. But you should also go to the coast. We have beautiful
you should buy a dictionary. beaches. Perhaps you’ve heard of Acapulco.
you shouldn’t speak your You don’t need a lot of money to enjoy your holiday. There
language in class. are lots of good cheap hotels and restaurants, and of course
If you want to do well in life, you should go to university.
you must visit the markets. You can buy all kinds of pottery
you have to believe in yourself. and things quite cheaply, and don’t forget our wonderful
If you want to keep fit, you should do some sport. fruit and vegetables. We have one hundred different kinds
you shouldn’t eat too many of pepper. You should try tacos, which are a kind of bread
sweets. filled with meat, beans, and salad. And our fruit juices are
very good.
A trip to your country 2 Fatima
It’s usually quite mild in January, and it doesn’t often rain, so
2 Students work in groups to think of advice to give you don’t have to bring warm clothes. But you’ll need a light
someone coming to their country for six months. You coat or a jumper because it can get cool in the evenings.
could set this task for homework, so that when they start There is so much to see and do. We have some wonderful
to talk about it, students have some ideas prepared. museums, especially the museum of Islamic Art and the
mosques are beautiful, but of course what everyone wants
Additional material to see is the Pyramids. You must visit the pyramids. Go either
Workbook Unit 8 early in the morning or late in the afternoon, the light is much
Exercises 6–9  practise should, have to, and must. better then. And if you have time you should take a cruise
down the Nile, that’s really interesting, you can visit all sorts
of places that are difficult to get to by land.
LISTENING AND SPEAKING   (SB p65) The best place to try local food is in the city centre. You
should try koftas and kebabs, which are made of meat,
Holidays in January usually lamb. You should also try falafel, which is a kind of
1 Students discuss the questions in groups. Let this go on ball made of beans mixed with herbs, it’s fried until it’s crispy.
for as long as they are interested. Ask students to It’s delicious. One of the nicest things to drink is tea, mint
complete the sentence and read it out loud to the class. tea. It’s especially good if the weather is very hot, it’s really
refreshing.
Note 3 Karl
Many British people go abroad in summer, especially to Well, of course in January in my country it can be very cold,
Europe. Spain is the most popular destination. People with lots of snow everywhere, so you must bring lots of warm
also take holidays in Britain, either in the countryside clothes, coats and woolly hats, and, if you can, snow boots.
or on the coast, especially the south coast. Skiing Many people go skiing in the mountains at the weekends and
holidays in the winter, especially in the Alps, are when you are up so high and the sky is blue, the sun can feel
increasingly popular. really quite hot – warm enough to have lunch outside. You
can even sunbathe, so you should bring sun cream! But you
don’t have to go skiing, there are lots of other things to do
2 T 8.4 [CD 2: Track 5] Read the instructions as a class and and see. A lot of our towns are very pretty. They look exactly
look at the chart. Check that students understand key the same today as they did four hundred years ago. And we
words: chilly, temple, pottery, spicy, cool, cruise, have beautiful lakes. If the weather’s fine you can go for a
mint, melt. boat trip and you can get really wonderful views of the
Students listen and take notes. Stop the recording after mountains all around, from Lake Geneva you can sometimes
each section for students to compare notes with a partner. see as far as Mont Blanc.

68 Unit 8  .  Do’s and don’ts


The food you must try is fondue, which is cheese melted in a Speaking
pot. You put pieces of bread on long forks to get it out. Also
4 Students work in pairs to form the questions.
you could try rösti made with potatoes and cream – mmm!
They’re both delicious. Answers
Answers 1 What is the weather like in January?
2 What clothes should I take?
Weather and Things to Food and 3 What sort of things can I do?
clothes do, etc. drink 4 Are there any special places that I should visit?
Silvia It’s not too hot Visit historic Good, cheap 5 What food do you recommend?
and it’s not too buildings. Go restaurants.
cold. Bring a jacket to beautiful Tacos, fruit 5 Students work in pairs to practise asking the questions.
but you don’t beaches. juices.
need any thick
winter clothes. READING AND SPEAKING  (SB p66)
Online advice
Fatima It’s mild, and Go round The local
doesn’t often rain.museums food is Lead in by introducing students to the topic. Ask students
Take a light coat and koftas, about web forums where people can post their problems.
or a jumper. mosques. kebabs, What sort of problems do people post? Do you think these
Visit the and falafel. forums are a good idea? Why? Why not?
Pyramids. Mint tea is Would you post a problem? Do you ever read them?
Go on a Nile refreshing.
1 Read the introduction as a class. Ask students to
cruise.
read the three problems and summarize them in the
Karl Very cold, lots of Go skiing and Fondue feedback. What advice would they give?
snow, but in the walking. Visit is cheese
mountains it can the towns. melted in a 2 Ask students to read the problems more carefully and
be warm. Bring Go for a pot, and you match the advice to the problems. Let them check in
warm clothes and boat trip on eat it with pairs before feedback.
waterproof shoes. the lake. bread. Answers
A 2, 5  B 4, 6  C 1, 3
3 Answer question 1 as a class, then ask students to
discuss questions 2–6 in pairs. Question 6 might lead to 3 Ask students to choose the correct definitions.
a class discussion.
Answers
Answers 1 b  2 a  3 a  4 b  5 b  6 b
1 The first speaker, Silvia, is talking about Mexico. Her
capital city is the most densely populated in the world, 4 T 8.5 [CD 2: Track 6] Ask students to work in pairs to put
and that is Mexico City. She talks about Acapulco. The the lines into the reader’s advice. Then play the
second speaker, Fatima, talks about Egypt. She suggests recording for them to check.
visiting the Pyramids and going on a Nile cruise.
The third speaker, Karl, is talking about Switzerland, where
there are mountains and lakes. It is famous for its winter
sports.
2 a, b – Switzerland
c, d – Mexico
e, f – Egypt
3 The third speaker, Karl, talked about skiing.
4 The first speaker, Silvia, said that you don’t need a lot of
money to enjoy your holiday. There are good cheap hotels
and restaurants, and markets.
5 The second and third speakers suggested a boat trip.
Fatima talked about a cruise down the Nile, and Karl
talked about a boat trip on the lakes.
6 Students’ own answers.

Unit 8  .  Do’s and don’ts 69


Answers and tapescript 5 Students work in pairs to answer the questions. Let them
1 Diets are a waste of time! There are lots of ‘crash diets’ refer back to the text. The aim here is to make sure
that help you lose weight quickly, but they’re not healthy, students have a good detailed understanding of the
and as soon as you return to eating normally and healthily, letters and to get them to express their own opinions.
the weight will soon come back. You should make small
changes to your normal diet at first, and eat just a little Answers
less, so that your body can slowly get used to it. And Simone thinks diets can work (3)
you must do lots of exercise – then you can lose weight Marco suggests solving the problem by discussing it (6)
without worrying about what you eat, and feel great! Robert has also moved to another town (2)
Jill  San Francisco  USA Jerry thinks people shouldn’t take their work home with
them (4)
2 I know how you feel. I was worried about leaving my Chris didn’t study after leaving school (5)
home town to go to teacher training college, but now Jill suggests taking things more slowly (1)
I’m really glad that I did. It’s difficult to imagine finding
new friends that will be as important to you as your old Ask students which suggestions they agree with.
friends. But you should ask yourself: is it likely that of
all the people in the world, the only ones I can be good What do you think?
friends with live in my town?! Of course not! You have a
Put students in small groups to discuss the questions which
whole new life and some great new friendships waiting for
arise from the text. Ask one student from each group to
you in Toronto. Go for it!
summarize what was said.
Robert  Cape Town  South Africa
3 Like you, I’ve been on a few different diets. But I have
found one recently that works! It’s a no carbohydrate
Roleplay
diet, so no bread or pasta, and lots of high protein, low fat Put students in pairs to choose and roleplay one of the
foods such as fish and chicken. And you have to drink a situations. Give them time to prepare and encourage them
lot of water every day. You really should try it! Believe to use should and must and the ideas from the letters in
it or not, you can eat as much as you want if it’s the right exercise. When they are ready let some of the pairs perform
kind of food. their roleplays for the class.
Simone  Qala Malta
4 Why should you accept it? You aren’t their slave, they
Group work
don’t own you. You must make it clear that outside of Elicit a few typical ‘problem’ situations from students, for
work you have your own private world. And I totally agree example: I have lost my job, or less personal ideas such as
about people having work conversations in public. On my I can’t do my homework. Put students in small groups of
train ride home I want to be able to forget about work, three or four to write a short problem for an advice website
not listen to other people’s boring talk with colleagues and forum. When the groups have written their problems,
customers. exchange them with another group. Students must write a
Jerry Bristol UK reply using should or must. Return the problems and replies
to the group that wrote them and get feedback.
5 I think you’re right to think again about your plans. Why
do so many people think they have to go to university
to get a good job and have a career? Nobody in my family VOCABULARY  (SB p68)
has been to university, but we’re all very successful,
happy, and well-off! So, think hard, and take your time Words that go together
before making a decision.
1 Read the introduction as a class. See if students can
Chris  Perth Australia
give you any other common verb + complement. Put
6 You should have a word with your company and try to students in pairs to match the verbs and complements in
come to an arrangement with them. You could agree on the two boxes. They can refer to the problems from the
times when you will turn it off, and for those times when web forum to check their answers. You could save time
they want you to be contactable, you could ask for an by asking half the class to match the words in one box,
extra payment. That’s what happens with doctors – why and half to match the words in the other box. Check all
should it be any different for you? the answers as a class in the feedback.
Bill  Auckland  New Zealand

70 Unit 8  .  Do’s and don’ts


Answers EVERYDAY ENGLISH  (SB p69)
get a job
go to university At the doctor’s
discuss problems This section deals with the vocabulary and functional
go on a diet language of going to the doctor’s. Lead in to the situation by
lose weight asking students about their own experiences, without
do exercise getting too personal.
have a conversation
take your time When did you last go to the doctor? What’s your doctor like?
make a decision Alternatively, you could introduce the situation by writing a
few of the symptoms of a cold or ’flu on the board; a sore
2 Ask students to close their books and, in twos or threes, throat, a runny nose, a high temperature, a terrible headache,
to see how many sentences they can remember involving and telling students that they are all doctors. Say, for
the phrases in the boxes. Prompt students with a verb if example, I’ve got a terrible headache, what should I do? and
necessary. elicit advice from different students. This introduces
3 Read the introduction as a class. Drill the compounds vocabulary, revises advice, and previews the speaking
post office, headache, and horse-race to make the point activity at the end of the section.
about the stress being on the first word. You will 1 Read out the phrases in the box and drill any that are
probably need to exaggerate the stress pattern yourself difficult. Note that diarrhoea is pronounced /ˌdaɪəˈrɪə/.
as students’ natural inclination is to give both words Check students understand the words. You could mime
equal stress. some of the difficult words, swallow, sneeze, runny nose.
Students work in pairs to match the nouns to make new Ask students to work in pairs to complete the table and
words. Tell students that English people have to check answer the check question.
whether compounds are spelt as one word, two words, or
hyphenated, and dictionaries often disagree. Answers
Illnesses Symptoms
T 8.6 [CD 2: Track 7] Play the recording so that students
I’ve got a cold. I can’t stop sneezing, and my nose
can listen and check. Ask students to repeat the list, is runny.
making sure that the stress is on the first word. I’ve got ’flu. I’ve got a temperature, my whole
Answers and tapescript body aches, and I feel awful.
alarm clock hair-drier (can also be spelt hair-dryer) I’ve twisted my ankle. It hurts when I walk on it.
car park sunset I’ve got diarrhoea. I keep going to the toilet.
traffic lights earring (or ear-ring) I’ve got a sore throat. My glands are swollen, and it hurts
credit card signpost when I swallow.
ice-cream bookcase I’ve got food poisoning. I keep being sick, and I’ve got
sunglasses rush hour diarrhoea.
timetable text message I feel sick means I feel ill. It can also mean I want to vomit.
raincoat earthquake I was sick last night means I vomited last night.

4 On their own or in pairs, students think of sentences to 2 Read through the sentences with students and check any
define the compound nouns. Give some more examples unknown words, or alternatively students could try to
if necessary. guess the words from the context as they do the exercise.
Put students in pairs to put the sentences in order.
It wakes you up in the morning.
It’s where you leave your car. Answers
They have red, orange, and green lights. 1 I didn’t feel very well.
2 I phoned the doctor’s surgery and made an appointment.
Additional material 3 I went to the surgery and saw the doctor.
4 I explained what was wrong.
Workbook Unit 8
5 He took my temperature and examined me.
Exercise 10  is a vocabulary activity which practises verb +
6 He told me I had an infection.
noun collocations associated with job descriptions.
7 He gave me a prescription.
8 I went to the pharmacy, paid for the prescription, and got
some antibiotics.
9 After a few days, I started to feel better.

Unit 8  .  Do’s and don’ts 71


3 Focus students on the photo and set the scene with a few doctor’s questions first, noting that they are mostly in
questions. the Present Perfect.
Where is Hassan? 5 Ask students to imagine they feel a bit ill and write
What do you think is the matter? down a list of symptoms. Put them in pairs, and
What is the doctor saying? nominate one
You could pre-teach difficult words from the listening, student to be the doctor, the other to be a patient.
such as pale. Students roleplay the situation. You could change pairs
to give them more practice.
T 8.7 [CD 2: Track 8] Read through the questions with
students then play the recording. Let them check in pairs Don’t forget!
before getting feedback. They may need to listen twice.
Answers and tapescript Workbook Unit 8
1 He’s got a bit of a temperature, feels terrible, and has a Exercise 11 is an exercise on writing formal letters.
stomach ache. He’s been sick and he’s had diarrhoea. Word list
2 What seems to be the matter? Have you felt sick? Have Photocopy the Word list for Unit 8 (TB p127) for your
you had diarrhoea at all? Have you had anything to eat students and ask them to write in the translations, learn
recently which might have disagreed with you? them at home, and/or write some of the words into their
3 He thinks he has food poisoning. vocabulary notebook.
4 He prescribes something for a stomach ache and diarrhoea. Stop and check 2 (TB p132)
5 He tells him to drink a lot, spend a day or two in bed, and A suggestion for approaching the Stop and check tests is in
take things easy. the introduction on p5 of the Teacher’s Book.
6 Only the prescription, which is £6.
T 8.7
D = Doctor H = Hassan
D Hello. Come and sit down. What seems to be the matter?
H Well, I haven’t felt very well for a few days. I’ve got a bit
of a temperature, and I just feel terrible. I’ve got stomach
ache as well.
D Have you felt sick?
H I’ve been sick a few times.
D Mm. Let me have a look at you. Your glands aren’t swollen.
Have you got a sore throat?
H No, I haven’t.
D Have you had diarrhoea at all?
H Yes, I have, actually.
D Have you had anything to eat recently which might have
disagreed with you?
H No, I don’t think so . . . Oh! I went to a barbecue a few days
ago and the chicken wasn’t properly cooked.
D It could be that, or just something that was left out of the
fridge for too long.
H Yes, I started being ill that night.
D Well, you should have a day or two in bed, and I’ll give you
something that will look after the stomach ache and
diarrhoea. Drink plenty of liquids, and just take things easy
for a while. I’ll write you a prescription.
H Thank you. Do I have to pay you?
D No, no. Seeing me is free, but you’ll have to pay for the
prescription. It’s £7.
H Right. Thanks very much. Goodbye.
D Bye-bye.

4 Students look at the tapescript on p124 and practise the


dialogue in pairs. You could point out and drill the

72 Unit 8  .  Do’s and don’ts


Introduction
to the unit
9 Time clauses • if
Hot verbs
In a hotel
Unit
Goinghead from SB
places

Language aims
Grammar – will  The use of will to express an offer was presented in the
Everyday English section of Unit 4, and the use of will to express a future
The title of this unit is ‘Going places’.
intention or decision made at the moment of speaking was presented in Unit 5.
The future form will and its use in time
In this unit we see will as an auxiliary of the future, where it merely signals
and conditional clauses is introduced
future time. This use is also called ‘the neutral future’. The distinction is very
and practised in the context of two
fine, and not always discernible.
friends talking about their plans for a
gap year. There is a Reading text about The house will cost fifty thousand pounds is an example of the neutral future.
the biggest economies in the world, I’ll phone you when I arrive is an example of a decision.
and the Listening is an interview with I’ll see you tomorrow can have elements of both meanings.
Michio Kaku, a professor of theoretical We don’t suggest you explore this area with your students.
physics who explains how science will First conditional  Tense usage in any sentence containing the word if causes
revolutionize the 21st century. learners of English a lot of problems. In this unit, the first conditional is
presented, and in Unit 12 the second conditional is introduced. The problems
seem to be that there are two clauses to get right, and whereas will is used in the
result clause, it is not used in the condition clause, even though it might refer to
future time. In many languages, a future form is used in both clauses.
Common mistakes
*If it will rain, we’ll stay at home.
*If it rains, we stay at home.
Time clauses  This unit looks at clauses introduced by the time phrases while,
when, before, until, as soon as, and after. These phrases are often used to refer to
the future but generally they include a present tense. Tense usage in time
clauses presents the same problems as in the first conditional, i.e. a future verb
form is not used in the time clause, even though it might refer to future time.
Common mistakes
*When it rains, we’ll stay at home.
*When I will arrive, I’ll phone you.
*As soon as I arrive, I phone you.
Vocabulary  This is the second Hot verbs section in New Headway Plus Special
Edition Pre-Intermediate. It looks at common collocations of the verbs take, get,
do, and make.
Everyday English  Students practise the vocabulary and functional language
involved in staying at a hotel.

Unit 9  .  Going places 73


Notes on the unit grammar spot   (SB p70)
There is quite a lot to do and to understand in this
Starter (SB p70) Grammar Spot. It is a good idea to ask students to work
The aim of this activity is to preview the use of will in time in pairs to do each task, discussing each as a class before
clauses by getting students to talk about the future in a moving on to the next task.
personalized activity. Ask students to work in pairs to ask
the questions. Note how well students use the structures in Answers
the feedback. 1 while, if, before, until, when, as soon as, after
2 They are in the present tense but they refer to the future.
planning a trip  (SB p70) This is because in time and conditional clauses the verb
after if, when, etc. stays in the present form.
Time and conditional clauses 3 Sentences 1 and 5 use the Present Continuous to talk
about a future arrangement, something planned before
1 Look at the photo of Chris and Scott with students. Set speaking. Sentences 2 and 3 use going to + infinitive to
the scene by asking questions about the picture. talk about a future intention, a plan already decided
What are they doing? Where are they going? What are before speaking. Sentences 4, 7, and 8 use will to refer to
their plans? future time.
Read the introduction as a class. 4 Both sentences express future facts. The first sentence
T 9.1 [CD 2: Track 9] Ask students to work in pairs to with when expresses something that is sure to happen.
complete the sentences with phrases from the box. Play The second sentence with if expresses a possibility.
the recording so that they can check their answers. You could also ask students the following questions:
What’s the difference between when and as soon as?
Answers and tapescript Explain that when refers to a point in time whereas
1c 2f 3e 4b 5h 6a 7g 8d as soon as has the idea of immediately.
T 9.1 What’s the difference between when and while?
1 We’re travelling round the world before we go to Explain that when refers to a point in time whereas
university. while refers to a period of time.
2 We’re going to leave as soon as we have enough money. Refer students to Grammar Reference 9.1–9.3 on p138.
3 When we’re in Australia, we’re going to learn to scuba dive
on the Great Barrier Reef.
4 If we get ill, we’ll look after each other.
5 After we leave Australia, we’re going to the USA. PRACTICE  (SB p71)
6 We can stay with my American cousins while we’re in Los
Angeles. when, as soon as
7 Our parents will be worried if we don’t keep in touch. 1 Look at the first picture as a class. Elicit completed
8 We’ll stay in the States until our visas run out. sentences from students. Ask students to work in pairs to
complete the other sentences suggested by the pictures.
2 Either play and pause the recording for students to Tell them to think about whether to use will, the Present
repeat or drill some of the sentences open class. Ask Continuous, or going to + infinitive.
students to work in pairs then ask them to cover the box
T 9.2 [CD 2: Track 10] When they are ready, play the

and see if they can remember how to complete the
recording for them to compare their answers, but accept
sentences.
any variations from students if they are accurate.
Sample answers and tapescript
1 When I get home, I’m going to play with my son in the
garden.
2 As soon as this lesson finishes, I’m going to play football.
3 If I get this job, I’ll buy a car.
4 After I leave university, I’m going to graduate and get
a job.
5 While I’m in Dubai, I’ll do some shopping.
6 I’m going to travel the world before I get too old.

74 Unit 9  .  Going places


You could play and pause the recording at this stage for Extend the practice by getting students to make a
students to repeat for pronunciation. conversation in pairs about going on safari. Elicit a few
ideas to get them started. Have one or two pairs act out
What if . . . ? their conversation for the class at the end.
2 Do the sentences on the left about hopes for the future
all together as a class, and drill the sentences around the
Discussing grammar
class. Pay careful attention to contractions and sentence 4 Do the first two sentences as a class, then ask students to
stress. do the rest in pairs.
● ●
Answers
If I don’t go out so much, I’ll do more work.
1 before 5 If
Answers 2 when 6 before
If I do more work, I’ll pass my exams. 3 If 7 until
If I pass my exams, I’ll go to university. 4 until 8 before
If I go to university, I’ll study medicine.
If I study medicine, I’ll become a doctor.
If I become a doctor, I’ll earn a good salary. When I get to New York . . .
5 Read the introduction as a class. Ask students to work in
Ask students for suggestions to continue the sentences. pairs or small groups to complete the dialogue. Do the
Students work in pairs to do the same with the sentences first couple to give students the idea.
on the right.
T 9.3
[CD 2: Track 11] Play the recording so that
If I stop eating chocolate, I’ll have more money. students can check their answers.
If I have more money, I’ll save some every week. Answers and tapescript
If I save some every week, I’ll be rich when I’m thirty. M = Mary   P = Paul
If I’m rich when I’m thirty, I’ll have my own business. M Bye, darling. Have a good trip to New York.
If I have my own business, I’ll make a lot of money. P Thanks. I’ll ring you as soon as I arrive at the hotel.
If I make a lot of money, I’ll retire when I’m forty. M Fine. Remember I’m going to my mother’s this evening.
P Well, if you’re out when I ring, I’ll leave a message on the
What will you do? answerphone so you’ll know I’ve arrived safely.
M Great. What time do you expect you’ll be there?
3 Read the introduction and the examples as a class. You P If the plane arrives on time, I’ll be at the hotel about
could ask your students who can ski and who can’t then 10.00.
pair a novice skier with a good skier to do the exercise. M All right. Give me a ring as soon as you know the time of
Do the first three or four questions and answers as a your flight back, and I’ll meet you at the airport.
class, so students see what they have to do, then put them P Thanks, darling. Don’t forget to water the plants while I’m
in pairs. away.
Questions and sample answers M Don’t worry. I won’t. Bye!
A What will you do if you don’t like the food? Refer students to Grammar Reference 9.1 on p138.
B I’ll buy some from a shop.
A What will you do if it rains? Additional material
B I’ll wait for it to stop.
A What will you do if you don’t learn to ski? Workbook Unit 9
B I’ll go for walks in the snow. These exercises could be done in class to give further
A What will you do if you hurt yourself? practice, for homework, or in a later class as revision.
B I’ll go to the doctor. Exercises 1–4  practise will, will versus the Present Simple,
A What will you do if there’s nothing to do in the evening? and the first conditional.
B I’ll go to bed early. Exercises 5–9  practise the first conditional further and time
A What will you do if you don’t make any friends? clauses.
B I’ll read a book.
A What will you do if you lose your money?
B I’ll phone you and ask for some.
A What will you do if you get lost in a snowstorm?
B I’ll shout for help.

Unit 9  .  Going places 75


LISTENING AND SPEAKING  (SB p73) I What will happen to people who don’t have computers?
MK Everyone will have computers. The Internet will be free
Life in 2050 and available to everyone.
One way of introducing this activity and exploiting it I Will there be a world government?
subsequently is to incorporate current issues regarding new MK Very probably. We will have to manage the world and its
technology, both local to you and global, particularly resources on a global level, because countries alone are
computer technology and how that will change our lives. too small. We already have a world language called
Have a discussion about what is happening in the world, English, and there is the beginning of a world telephone
both the good news and the bad, and what life will be like in system, and that’s called the Internet.
2050. I Will we have control of everything?
MK I think we’ll learn to control the weather, volcanoes and
1 Read the introduction as a class. Put students in small earthquakes. Illness won’t exist. We will grow new livers,
groups to discuss the questions. If there is a lot kidneys, hearts, and lungs like spare parts for a car.
of interest, you could develop this into a full class People will live till about 130 or 150. For two thousand
discussion. years we have tried to understand our environment.
2 T 9.4 [CD 2: Track 12] Play the recording. Students Now we will begin to control it.
listen and make notes in response to the questions in I What are your reasons for pessimism?
exercise 2. They may wish to listen twice. In the MK People will still fundamentally be the same, with all
feedback, discuss whether their ideas differed from their intelligence and stupidity. There will still be cruel
Michio Kaku’s. people, people who want to fight wars against other
races and religions, people who don’t see that we have
Answers and tapescript to look after our forests, our oceans, our atmosphere,
• He is generally optimistic. He sees no reason why people who think that money is everything. We will
improvements can’t continue. have the technology. The question is, will we have the
• Some people think they are too old. He thinks we must wisdom to use the technology to our advantage?
learn to use new technology now.
• Yes and no. As we get richer, the population will stop 3 Ask students to work in pairs to answer the questions.
increasing. They may need to listen again.
• Everyone will have a computer.
• Probably. We will have to manage the world and its Answers
resources on a global level. 1 Improvements in healthcare and technology.
• We will begin to control the weather and the environment. 2 They say they are too old to understand. He says they
There will be no illness. must be educated.
• People will still be the same, intelligent but stupid and 3 Because we will all get richer.
cruel. They will want to fight wars, they won’t look after 4 To manage the world’s resources on a global scale.
forests, oceans and the atmosphere, and they will think Countries are too small.
money is everything. 5 The weather, volcanoes and earthquakes, illness and our
environment.
T 9.4 6 They will want to fight wars, neglect the environment, and
I = Interviewer MK = Michio Kaku think that money is everything.
I Are you optimistic about the future?
MK Generally, yeah. If we go back to 1900, most Americans
didn’t live after the age of 50. Since then we’ve had What do you think?
improvements in healthcare and technology. There’s no Encourage a class discussion.
reason why these won’t continue far into the 21st
Michio Kaku isn’t so sure about people – they will continue
century.
to be stupid, cruel and wasteful. He doubts whether we will
I Are we ready for the changes that will come?
have the wisdom to use the technology to our advantage.
MK Changes are already happening. The future is here now.
We have DNA, microchips, the Internet. Some people’s Additional material
reaction is to say ‘We’re too old, we don’t understand
new technology.’ My reaction is to say ‘We must educate Workbook Unit 9
people to use new technology now.’ Exercise 11  is a writing exercise on linking words to express
I Is world population going to be a big problem? advantages and disadvantages on the theme of travel.
MK Yes and no. I think that world population will stop
increasing as we all get richer. If you are part of the
middle class, you don’t want or need twelve children.

76 Unit 9  .  Going places


READING AND SPEAKING  (SB p74) Answers
A B
Sunset in the West economy (n) economic (adj)
1 The first exercise gets students to think about what they industrial (adj) industry (n)
know about the world economy, and the importance of produce (v) produce (n)
different countries in it, in the past, and in the future.
grow (v) growth (n)
Ask students to work in pairs to discuss the questions,
and decide whether the statements are true or false. You capitalism (n) capitalist (adj)
can discuss their answers to the questions and compare pollution (n) polluted (adj)
different ideas, but don’t give the answers yet, as they success (n) successful (adj)
will find the answers for themselves when they read the
Note
text in Exercise 2.
You could explain the contrast between the adjectives
2 Ask students to read the text to check their answers economic and economical, and the particular meaning of
to Exercise 1. This can be a scanning reading exercise, produce (n).
where the reader doesn’t try to read and understand economic = connected with the economy, e.g. an economic
every word of the text, but looks for those parts of the forecast
text that is connected with each question. Set a time economical = cheap to use, e.g. My new car is very economical
limit for this activity, of about five minutes. – it can do 100 km to the litre.
produce (n) is all the things that are produced by farmers, e.g.
Answers rice, milk, coffee.
1 True. The period when the first countries became
industrialised is known as the Industrial Revolution. It 4 Ask students to work in pairs to discuss the questions.
began in Britain, and then spread to other European They will need to read the text again, more intensively.
countries. Question 7 is a ‘scanning’ exercise. Students have to look
2 False. The populations are: US 311m, Japan 128m, and South for the numbers in the text and make a note of what
Korea 49m (in 2011). they refer to.
In the 1960s, the period that the text refers to, the
populations were: US 195m, Japan 99m, South Korea 29m. Answers
3 False. The US still has the biggest economy in the world. 1 Because they didn’t have big enough populations to
It’s likely that China will have the biggest by 2018. produce as much in their factories.
4 True. There are nearly 100. 2 Because most of the goods that used to come from
5 False. China’s population is now (2011) 1.3 billion, and India’s factories around the world are now made in China.
is 1.2 billion. 3 Because the very fast industrial growth has resulted in a
6 True. Many of the biggest IT companies use Indian teams serious pollution problem. Five out of 10 of the world’s
to develop their products. most polluted cities are in China.
7 True. The balance of economic power is already moving 4 Because of the ‘one child per family’ policy started in the
from West to East, to China and India. 1980s.
5 IT, science, and engineering.
3 This is an exercise in word formation, using some of the 6 It will soon no longer be the world’s most powerful nation.
key words connected with the topic of economics. Ask 7 10% The growth rate of the Chinese economy at
students to find the words in A in the text, and check the moment.
that they know what they mean. Then ask them to find 2018 The year in which China’s economy is
in the text the other parts of speech, and write them expected to become the world’s biggest.
in column B. Part of speech is a useful word to make 140m The number of private cars that will be on
students familiar with, as you can use it yourself often China’s roads by 2018.
when asking about new words, e.g. What part of speech 100 The number of billionaires in China.
is ‘gigantic’? 5 out of 10 The number of Chinese cities in the ten most
When you check the answers, it’s very useful to point out polluted cities in the world.
the stress pattern in the words, and how this can change 2000 The price in dollars of the cheapest new car
with the different parts of speech of the same word. The from India.
stress is shown with underlining in the table below. a million The number of Chinese and Indian graduates
in science and engineering.
a third China and India between them have a third of
the world population.

Unit 9  .  Going places 77


What do you think? Answers
Put students in groups to discuss and write down what they . . . suddenly everything we bought was ‘Made in Japan/South
think are the six largest cities in the world. It would help if Korea’. (line 5)
you first agree as a class what we mean by ‘city’, as there are It will also take America’s place as the world’s largest oil
two basic definitions: market, . . . (line 17)
. . . the working population of China will start to get smaller in
1 The urban built-up area that we think of as a city. 2015. (line 38)
2 The urban built-up area and all the surrounding suburbs . . . entering industry and doing research in university
that are closely connected to the city. departments. (line 65)
This will obviously change the results, so get them to decide 2 Read through the examples and check understanding,
which definition they think is the best. The tables below then students work in pairs to ask and answer.
cover both options. The stricter definition of ‘city’ gives the
clearest confirmation of the message of the text. 3 Ask students to work in pairs to put the phrases in the
correct column.
Answers
‘City’ as an urban area, not including surrounding suburbs Answers
1 Shanghai 13,831,900 TAKE two tablets a day, a photo, somebody out for a
2 Mumbai 13,830,884 meal, care
3 Karachi 12,991,000 GET back home, a cold, angry, on well with someone
4 Delhi 12,565,901 DO some shopping, me a favour
5 Istanbul 12,517,664 MAKE sure, friends, up your mind, a reservation,
6 São Paulo 11,244,369 a complaint
‘City’ as an urban area including surrounding suburbs 4 T 9.5 [CD 2: Track 13] Check students can use the
1 Tokyo 34.2m phrases by getting them to complete the sentences then
2 Mexico city 22.8m listen to the recording and check.
3 Seoul 22.3m
4 New York 21.9m Answers and tapescript
5 Sao Paolo 20.2m 1 I did some shopping while I was in Paris. I bought myself a
6 Mumbai 19.9m new sweater.
2 ‘I don’t know if I want tea or coffee.’
Ask the groups to make a list of the problems that cities ‘Make up your mind. You can’t have them both.’
like these face. Give students two or three suggestions 3 Bye-bye! See you soon. Take care of yourself.
to get them started, for example overcrowding, pollution 4 Aachoo! Oh dear. I think I’m getting a cold.
(‘smog’ is the pollution from traffic over cities), shortage of 5 ‘Are the doors locked?’
(affordable) accommodation, crime, poverty, poor health and ‘I think so, but I’ll just make sure.’
sanitation, traffic, public transport, disease.
They could briefly discuss some possible solutions to these 5 Finish with some personalized practice in which
problems. students work in pairs or small groups to ask and
answer the questions.

VOCABULARY  (SB p76)


EVERYDAY ENGLISH  (SB p76)
Hot verbs – take, get, do, and make
Lead in by writing take, get, do, and make on the board
In a hotel
and putting students in small groups to think of as many 1 Lead in and personalize the topic by asking students the
phrases as they can using these words. Give them a time questions in the Student’s Book. If they all come from
limit of three or four minutes. You could give each group a the same city, you could put them in small groups to
different word. discuss their answers first. Alternatively, you could ask
them What’s the best hotel you’ve ever been to?, or you
1 Read the introduction as a class and get students to
could bring in hotel brochures and start the lesson with a
find the examples in the text.
skimming task. Ask students to look at the brochure(s)
quickly and answer the following questions:

78 Unit 9  .  Going places


How much is a double room? 4 Students work in pairs to prepare the conversation
What facilities does the hotel have? between Robert Palmer and the receptionist. It is a good
Would you like to stay there? Why/Why not? idea to brainstorm what you have to do when you check
into a hotel to give students some ideas for their
2 Read through the information about the Grand Hotel
dialogue: fill in a form, get the key, order meals. Monitor
with students. Model and drill the example question and
and help them prepare. Make sure they are using the
answer, paying particular attention to the intonation of
language of polite requests correctly: I’d like … , Could
the question form.
I … , Could you … , please? Write these phrases on the
board as prompts to help them. When students are
Where’s the conference centre? ready, let them perform their dialogues for the class.
Point out that we say on the second floor but in the 5 This activity gives students further practice in making
basement, then ask students to work in pairs to practise. requests in a hotel. Give them time to think how to make
the initial request, (e.g. Could you bring me an extra
Note pillow, please?), then put them in pairs to improvise
In British English, the ground floor is the floor at street conversations.
level, and the first floor is the one above it. In American
English, the floor at street level is called the first floor. Don’t forget!
Workbook Unit 9
3 T 9.6 [CD 2: Track 14] Ask students to work in pairs to
Exercise 10  is a vocabulary exercise on preposition + noun.
re-order the conversation. Do the first as a class to get
them started. When they have finished, play the Word list
recording so that they can check their answers. Photocopy the Word list for Unit 9 (TB pp127–128) for
your students, and ask them to write in the translations,
Answers and tapescript learn them at home, and/or write some of the words into
R = Receptions   C = Client their vocabulary notebook.
R Hello, the Grand Hotel. Cathy speaking. How can I help
you?
C I’d like to make a reservation, please.
R Certainly. When is it for?
C It’s for two nights, the thirteenth and the fourteenth of
this month.
R And do you want a single or a double room?
C A single, please.
R OK. Yes, that’s fine. I have a room for you. And your name
is?
C Robert Palmer. Can you tell me how much it is?
R Yes. That’s £95 a night. Can I have a credit card number,
please?
C Yes, sure. It’s a Visa. 4929 7983 0621 8849.
R Thank you. And could I have a phone number?
C Uh huh. 01727 489962.
R That’s fine. We look forward to seeing you on the
thirteenth. Bye-bye.
C Thanks a lot. Goodbye.

At this stage you could drill the sentences around the


class for pronunciation, and/or ask students to work in
pairs to practise reading the conversation.

Unit 9  .  Going places 79


Introduction
to the unit
10 Verb patterns 2
manage to, used to
-ed/-ing adjectives • Exclamations
Unit head
Scared to death
from SB

Language aims
Grammar – verb patterns and infinitives  This is the second presentation
section that deals with verb patterns. They were also dealt with in Unit 5, where
The title of this unit is ‘Scared to death’,
the emphasis was on patterns that referred to the future. This unit focuses on go
and the texts all reflect this theme.
+ -ing for an activity, used to + infinitive to talk about past states and habits,
The opening presentation text is an
and then several verbs followed by either the infinitive or -ing. It also focuses on
article about a frightening adventure in
the use of the infinitive in English.
the mountains of southern Spain, the
Reading text is about a young man lost These verb patterns do not present students with many problems of concept.
in Alaska, and the Listening is about the However, students often make mistakes of form, as they inevitably confuse
sinking of the Titanic. The opening text those verbs that are followed by an infinitive with to and those that are followed
provides a context for the grammar of by an infinitive without to, and once -ing forms have been looked at, students
the unit, verb patterns and infinitives. begin to put -ing where it doesn’t belong!
The introduction of used to has the Common mistakes
subsidiary aim of allowing revision of *He enjoyed write.
the Past Simple and comparing and *He enjoyed to write.
contrasting similarities and differences *Let’s go to shop.
in their uses.
Start is one of the few verbs that can be followed by either the infinitive or the
-ing form with no change of meaning. However, English doesn’t like two -ing
forms together, so in a continuous tense form, we use the infinitive.
It’s starting to rain. (NOT *It’s starting raining.)
We also deal with adjectives followed by the infinitive (It’s easy to learn
English.) and the infinitive to express purpose (I went to the shops to buy a
paper.) Students often translate this second item from their own language and
insert for, which is wrong in English.
Common mistakes
*I went to the shops for to buy a paper.
*I went to the shops for buy a paper.
used to  Used to may well be a new structure for your students. The aim of the
practice here is to compare life now with life as a child, thus putting used to in a
very clear context and contrasting it with a common confusion: the use of
usually and the Present Simple.
Used to + infinitive exists only in the past, and expresses past habits or states
that do not happen now. The Past Simple can express the same idea but needs a
clear context and/or an adverbial expression of frequency to convey the idea of
habit. Compare the following sentences:
When I was a child, we went to Kuwait for our holidays.
When I was a child, we used to go to Kuwait for our holidays.
The first sentence needs the addition of often or every year to convey habit,
otherwise it could mean once only, because the Past Simple is also used to talk
about an event that happened only once in the past. Used to cannot do this.

80 Unit 10  .  Scared to death


Students may find it strange that this structure only exists to Does the path look safe? How would you feel if you had to
express past habit, not present habit and sometimes they try walk across it?
to use it in the present. Ask students to read the story and answer the question
Common mistake in the Student’s Book.
*He uses to get up at seven o’clock.
Answers
The pronunciation of used to /juːstʊ/ or /juːstə/ compared Before the adventure began, he was very excited.
with the verb to use /juːz/ can also cause students problems, On the footpath he was very frightened and thought he was
and needs to be highlighted. going to die.
Another problem is that the pronunciation of used to is the At the end, he was shaking, covered in sweat from heat and
same in positive and negative sentences. This means that fear, and exhausted.
students forget to drop the ‘d’ in the negative when writing
the structure I used to /juːstʊ/ play tennis. I didn’t use to 2 T
T 10.1 [CD 2: Track 15] Ask students to complete the
/juːstʊ/ play tennis. text with the phrases in the box, then play the recording
so that they can check their answers.
Common mistake
*I didn’t used to play tennis. Answers and tapescript
Vocabulary  Participle adjectives such as bored/boring, I have always enjoyed walking. When I was a boy, I used to go
surprised/surprising are practised. These pairs of words are walking at weekends with my father. We (1) went camping
often confused. and climbing together.
I try to visit a new place every year. Last year I decided to
Common mistakes walk a path in Spain called El Camino del Rey, which means
*I am very interesting in science. the King’s Way. It is one of the highest and most dangerous
*It was an embarrassed situation. footpaths in Europe. It used to be very safe, but now it is
Everyday English  Exclamations with so + adjective/adverb falling down.
and such + noun are introduced, as are so many/so much + I took a train to the village of El Chorro and started to walk
count and uncount nouns. So is used to make the meaning towards the mountains. I was very excited.
of the adjective much stronger. Then the adventure began. The path was about three feet
Common mistake wide and there were holes in it. It (2) used to have a handrail,
*He is so handsome man. but not any more. I didn’t know what to do – should I go on
my hands and knees, or stand up? I (3) decided to stand up
and walk very slowly. At times the path was only as wide as
Notes on the unit my two boots. I stopped to have a rest, but there was
nowhere to sit.
Starter (SB p78) I (4) began to feel very frightened. It was impossible to look
This starter is a lead-in to the theme of the unit. It gets down or look up. I was concentrating so hard that my
students talking about fears and dangers. You could body (5) started aching. There was no thrill of danger, no
introduce vocabulary around the subject of fear here: afraid, enjoyment of the view. I thought I was going to die.
scared (to death), frightened, terrified, scary, dangerous. I finally managed to get to the end. I was shaking, and I was
Put students in small groups to discuss the questions then covered in sweat from heat and fear. I fell to the ground,
feed back to the class. Allow time to hear what students are exhausted.
afraid of.
3 Ask students to work in pairs to answer the
Answers comprehension questions.
Cartoon 1 She’s afraid of spiders.
Cartoon 2 She’s afraid of confined spaces. Answers
Cartoon 3 He’s afraid of heights. 1 walking
Cartoon 4 He’s afraid of the dark. 2 He used to go walking, camping and climbing with him.
3 No. He goes to a new place every year.
4 No. It is falling down.
A WALK WITH DEATH  (SB p78) 5 Because there was nowhere to sit.
6 Because he was too frightened. There was no thrill of
Verb patterns and infinitives danger, no enjoyment of the view. He thought he was
going to die.
1 Focus students on the photograph of El Camino del Rey.
Ask them questions.

Unit 10  .  Scared to death 81


grammar spot   (SB p79) 2 Students work in pairs to choose the correct form.
There are two ways of approaching this. You could work Answers
through all the tasks in the Grammar Spot with students, 1 to stop 4 go
letting them do each discovery or gap fill task in pairs 2 to find 5 to eat
before discussing as a class. Alternatively, you could do 3 shopping 6 to make
one activity then follow it with the relevant activities in
the Practice section before moving on to the next.
When I was young, I used to . . .
1 Answers
3 T
T 10.2 [CD 2: Track 16] The aim of this activity is to
enjoy + -ing try + infinitive decide + infinitive compare used to for past habit and the Present Simple
start + -ing begin + infinitive manage + infinitive for present habit in controlled written and oral practice.
Exercises 1 and 2 of the Practice section practise these Read through the introduction and the prompt
uses. questions in the chart. Tell students to listen to the man
2 Read through the rules of form, use, and talking about his childhood and his life now and make
pronunciation with students. notes. Put students in pairs to compare their notes. They
may need to listen more than once. When they have
Answers complete notes, ask them to work in pairs to write one
I used to go walking (line 7) sentence for each question using used to. They could
It used to be very safe (line 17) refer to the tapescript on p125 to check their answers.
It used to have a handrail. (line 27) Conduct a feedback session, making sure students are
pronouncing used to correctly.
You could briefly drill used to /juːstʊ/ with the whole
class and then get individuals to repeat it. You could Answers and tapescript
highlight at this point the difference between /s/ in Life as a child
/juːstʊ/ and the /z/ in the verb to use /juːz/. Ask students 1 He used to go fishing with his father.
to repeat the sentences above and make sure they 2 He used to watch TV and do his homework.
pronounce the weak form of to /tʊ/, or /tə/. 3 He used to go camping in Europe.
Alternatively, you could simply model the sentences 4 He used to play rugby, tennis, swimming, hockey.
yourself. 5 He used to watch cartoons and comedies.
Exercise 3 in the Practice section practises used to + 6 He used to love beans, pizza, fizzy drinks, and chips.
infinitive. T 10.2
1 Now I usually go shopping at the weekend and I play
3 Answers tennis. When I was a child, I used to go fishing with my
I used to go walking at weekends. father.
I didn’t know what to do. 2 In the evening I used to watch TV and do my homework.
I stopped to have a rest. Now I read, or go out with friends.
It was impossible to look down. 3 We go to a hotel somewhere hot and just do nothing.
There was nowhere to sit. When I was young, we used to go camping in Europe. We
went everywhere – France, Italy, Austria, Germany.
Exercises 4 and 5 in the Practice section practise 4 I was very sporty. I used to play everything. Rugby, tennis,
infinitives. swimming, hockey. Now I just play tennis.
Refer students to Grammar Reference 10.1–10.4 5 I like documentaries and sport. When I was a kid, I used to
on p139. like cartoons and comedies.
6 I liked all the things that kids like. Beans, pizza, fizzy drinks.
I used to love chips. Still do. Now I eat everything. Except
PRACTICE  (SB p79) peppers. I really don’t like peppers.

Discussing grammar
1 Students work in pairs to complete the sentences.
Answers
1 swimming 4 swim
2 to swim 5 swimming
3 to swim 6 to swim

82 Unit 10  .  Scared to death


Note 4 ‘Don’t talk to me. I have nothing to say to you.’
Point out to your students that it is more common to ‘Oh, dear! What have I done wrong?’
ask questions about past habit in the Past Simple and 5 ‘Do I turn left or right? I don’t know where to go.’
answer with used to, rather than to ask the questions ‘Go straight on.’
using used to. ‘What did you use to do?’ is not very 6 ‘I’m bored. I haven’t got anything to do.’
common. ‘Why don’t you read the dictionary?’
7 ‘Can you get some meat?’
‘Sure. Tell me how much to buy.’
Read through and drill the example questions and
‘A kilo.’
answers with your students and then put them in pairs
8 ‘I feel lonely. I need somebody to talk to.’
to ask and answer questions from the chart.
‘Come and talk to me. I’m not doing anything.’
Formation of questions
Ask students to think of replies in pairs then play the
What do/did you do at the weekend?
recording so that they can check. Let students practise
What do/did you do in the evening?
the dialogues in pairs, using their replies or those on the
Where do/did you go on holiday?
recording.
What sports do/did you play?
What TV programmes do/did you like?
What kind of food do/did you like? Check it
6 Students work individually to choose the correct form.
Conduct a feedback session with the whole class. Ask
This could be done for homework.
different pairs to give you examples of their questions
and answers. Answers
1 to buy 4 to say
Infinitives 2 reading 5 swimming
3 to go
4 Check that students understand that we use the infinitive
here to express purpose, to say why we do something, Ask students to read Grammar Reference 10.1–10.4 on
why we go to these places. It is a good idea to ask p139, perhaps before they do some of the Workbook
students how they express this idea in their language. exercises for homework (see below).
Many languages use for to express purpose.
Do the example, then do a prompt drill with the class, Additional material
asking Why do you go to the post office/bookshop, etc. … ?
Workbook Unit 10
and prompting a response from the class. Put students in
These exercises could be done in class to give further
pairs to ask and answer questions about other places.
practice, for homework, or in a later class, as revision.
Sample answers Exercises 1–4  practise verb patterns.
post office to buy stamps, to send a parcel, to pay a bill, Exercises 5–6  practise used to.
to post a letter
petrol station to buy/get petrol
bookshop to buy a book
VOCABULARY  (SB p81)
pharmacy to buy medicine/aspirin
library to borrow a book, to return a book
-ed/-ing adjectives
market to do your shopping, to buy fruit/vegetables/ You could lead in to this activity, get students talking, and
meat/cheese/clothes link the lesson with the theme of the unit by asking students
What’s the most frightening experience you have ever had?
5 T
T 10.3 [CD 2: Track 17] Ask students to work in pairs 1 Read through the words in the box, drilling them for
to match the parts of the sentences. pronunciation. Put students in pairs to match the
Answers and tapescript adjectives with an experience. Do the first as an example.
1 ‘I’m hungry. I need something to eat.’ Sample answers
‘Have a sandwich.’ 1 frightening, terrifying
2 ‘I’m going to a formal dinner, but I don’t know what to 2 exhausting
wear.’ 3 frightening, exciting, terrifying
‘I think you should wear your black dress.’ 4 frightening, terrifying
3 ‘My CD player’s broken. Can you show me how to repair it?’ 5 boring
‘I’m sorry. I haven’t a clue.’ 6 surprising

Unit 10  .  Scared to death 83


Ask students how people feel when they get stuck in a READING AND SPEAKING  (SB p82)
lift. Elicit They’re frightened/terrified.
2 Ask students how the people in the photos feel. Into the wild
1 Lead in by discussing the picture on the page with your
Answers students. Put them in pairs or small groups to discuss the
He’s exhausted. questions.
He’s bored.
He’s worried. Sample answers
He’s interested. The country is Alaska.
Conditions are extreme. There are a lot of mountains and
T 10.4
[CD 2: Track 18] Play the recording. Students listen rivers. It is often cold, with little daylight.
and repeat to practise the pronunciation of the words.
Ask students to work in pairs to say how people feel in 2 Read the introductory paragraph and the words in bold
the other situations. Conduct a feedback session. as a class. Put them into pairs and give them a few
minutes to decide whether the statements are true or
Tapescript false. Then get feedback on their ideas. Ask them what
frightened excited surprised terrified bored exhausted else they want to know about Chris.
Read through the rules in the Caution Box for using Answers
‑ed/-ing adjectives with students. • True • True
3 Ask students to work in pairs to complete the sentences • False. He was found by • False. He says, ‘It’s
using the adjectives in the box. hunters. great to be alive.’
• False. He had a good life. • True
Sample answers
1 ‘I met a famous football player today.’ ‘Really? How 3 Focus students on the questions then ask them to read to
exciting!’ line ending “… Thank you!’ his diary reads.” and answer
2 ‘I spent four hours going round a museum.’ ‘Was it them. Put students in pairs to check before feedback.
interesting?’ ‘No, it was boring.’
Answers
3 ‘I haven’t heard from my parents for two months.’ ‘You
1 No. They last heard from him in June 1990.
must be worried.’
2 He needed no possessions because he wanted to survive
4 ‘Wow, Maria! What are you doing here?’ ‘Why are you so
with nature.
surprised to see me?’
3 He needed nothing. He didn’t need possessions or money.
5 I failed my exam. I worked really hard for it. I’m so
4 He had total freedom to live how he wanted and work
disappointed.
when he wanted. He felt it was great to be alive.
6 ‘Smoke started to come from the front of the plane.’
‘Weren’t you worried/frightened?’ 4 Focus students on the choices then ask them to read to
7 My computer’s broken, and I don’t understand the manual. line ending “… I didn’t know where he was.” and choose
It’s so confusing. the best answers. Put students in pairs to check before
feedback.
T 10.5
[CD 2: Track 19] Students listen to the
beginnings of the lines and have to remember how to Answers
complete them. Pause the recording after each line and 1 Chris didn’t get on with his father because his father tried
ask individuals to complete. Make sure they say the to tell Chris what to do.
adjectives with appropriate feeling. 2 When the parents didn’t hear from Chris, they got in
touch with the police.
Really? How exciting! 3 In July 1992 his mother is sure that she heard Chris
4 Give students a little time to prepare, then put them calling her.
in pairs or small groups to discuss TV programmes
5 Read through the summary with students. They must
and books. Monitor and make sure they are using the
read the rest of the text then correct the mistakes in pairs.
adjectives correctly.
Answers
Chris hitchhiked to Alaska, and arrived in April 1992. He lived
in a bus, and there was a bed and a stove in it. He was very
happy. There was very little to eat – small animals, fruit and
vegetables, which he found in the wild.

84 Unit 10  .  Scared to death


After three months of living alone, he started to feel ill. He events of the story. As they are working, go round the
had no strength because he was eating poisonous plants, and groups and monitor, but try to avoid overcorrecting. Do,
he knew this was the reason. He couldn’t eat any more. He however, make sure that students are telling the story
died of starvation. using past tenses, and not present historic.
He knew he was dying. He wrote a note to his parents, and 4 T 10.6
[CD 2: Track 20] Students listen and put the
took a photo of himself. He seemed at peace to die in these pictures in the order they are talked about. Let students
circumstances. discuss their ideas in pairs or small groups before giving
them the correct order. Ask for their suggestions and see
What do you think? if the others agree.
Ask students to discuss these questions in pairs. Try to Answers
encourage a class discussion if your students are interested 1 A  2 C  3 E  4 D  5 B  6 F  7 G  8 H
in the issues raised. T 10.6
Sample answers The sinking of the Titanic
• Total freedom, living with nature, and being at peace were A What do you know about the Titanic?
important. Money, possessions and, arguably, his family B The Titanic? You mean the ship that sank? The one they
were not important. called ‘the unsinkable’?
• He was trying to live his life on his own terms, to escape A Yes, that’s right. The biggest ship of its time.
from the rat race, to live with nature, to be totally free. B Well, er . . . it was about a hundred years ago, wasn’t it?
• Because they want freedom and independence. A Yep, 1912, to be exact.
B And wasn’t it going across the Atlantic, from England to
New York?
LISTENING AND SPEAKING  (SB p84) A That’s it. It left Southampton on 10 April 1912 with 1,324
passengers on board and 900 crew members. And the
The sinking of the Titanic night of Sunday the fourteenth, it was very clear and very
cold, and two other ships in the area actually told them to
The listening consists of two people sharing what they know be careful because there were icebergs around.
about the sinking of the ship, the Titanic. This disaster is B So they did know that it was dangerous?
one of the most well-known of the twentieth century, so A Yes, but they didn’t want to worry the passengers. The
it is probable that your class will know a little about it. Of people just carried on eating and enjoying themselves.
course, it is also possible that they have never heard of it. It B But if they knew it was dangerous, why didn’t they just stop?
is equally possible that they know a lot. A Well, the owner of the boat was on board, a Mr Bruce Ismay,
Regardless of your students’ previous knowledge, the and he told the captain to go faster and faster, because he
pictures provide a lot of support to the storyline of the wanted the Titanic to be the fastest ship to cross the
listening exercise, and the language content is relatively Atlantic. The record was four days and nineteen hours . . .
straight-forward. B No! Really? But that’s terrible!
A And then someone saw the iceberg in front of them. At
1 Ask students to discuss as a class what they know about
first they thought it was too small to do much damage, but
the sinking of the Titanic.
in fact, the iceberg was huge – about thirty metres higher
2 Read the question as a class. Students work in pairs to think than the ship. And then the ship hit it.
of questions they would like answered. There are, of course, B Why didn’t everyone just get off the ship immediately?
no prescribed questions, but here are some suggestions A Because they thought it was impossible for the Titanic to
for you to prompt with if your students dry up. sink. So no one started to get the lifeboats out for an hour.
Was the Titanic going fast? To begin with, it was women and children first, but then
Was this its first voyage? people started to realize that there weren’t enough
Did they know there were icebergs in the area? lifeboats – there were only twenty – and a lot of people
How many people were on board? were going to die.
Were there enough lifeboats? B Is it true that the ship sank really quickly?
How many survivors were there? A Yes, it took just two hours after hitting the iceberg for the
Write the most interesting questions on the board. ship to sink.
B Incredible. How many people died?
3 In small groups, students look at the pictures and tell A About 1,500.
the story in their own words. You might like to point B And how many survived?
out that the pictures are not in the exact order of the A 706.

Unit 10  .  Scared to death 85


5 In pairs, students work out what the numbers refer to. so many + plural noun
so much + uncount noun
Answers We use so many/so much to make expressions of quantity
1,324: There were 1,324 passengers on board. more emphatic.
900: There were 900 crew members. Compare:
two: There were two other ships in the area. I have a lot of money.
four days and nineteen hours: This was the record for crossing I have so much money!
the Atlantic.
twenty: There were only twenty lifeboats. Drill the sentences round the class.
two hours: It took two hours for the ship to sink.
3 T 10.8
[CD 2: Track 22] Ask students to work in pairs to
1,500: About 1,500 people died.
complete the sentences. Play the recording so that they
706: 706 people survived.
can check their answers.
6 Students work in pairs to match a line of dialogue to a Answers and tapescript
picture. 1 Their house is such a mess! I don’t know how they live in it.
2 There were so many people at my wedding! We had to
Answers
order more food.
1 A 4 C 7 E
3 I’m so hungry! I could eat a horse.
2 B 5 D 8 H
4 Noor and Nabeel are such nice people! But I can’t stand
3 G 6 F
their kids.
5 I’ve spent so much money this week! I don’t know where
Roleplay it’s all gone.
Students work in pairs to conduct the roleplay. You could 6 A present! For me? You’re so kind! You really didn’t have to.
ask some of the pairs to act out their interview in front of 7 We’ve had such a nice time! Thank you so much for
the class. inviting us.
8 Molly’s such a clever child! She understands every word I
say.
Everyday English  (SB p85)
Students practise in pairs. Monitor and make sure they
Exclamations with so and such are putting a lot of emphasis on so and such.
1 T 10.7
[CD 2: Track 21] Ask students to read and listen to 4 Put students in small groups to think of ideas using so
the sentences on the recording. Drill students, making and such. Get class feedback to check their ideas and
sure they attempt the stress and intonation pattern of correct any mistakes.
the sentence with so.
Don’t forget!
● ● Workbook Unit 10
He was so scared! Exercises 7–9  practise infinitives.
Discuss the questions as a class. Exercises 10 and 11  are vocabulary exercises on -ed/-ing
adjectives, and words which rhyme.
Answers
This use of so is more spoken. Word list
It has the effect of making the adjective stronger, more Photocopy the Word list for Unit 10 (TB p128) for your
emphatic. The whole sentence is more dramatic. students, and ask them to write in the translations, learn
them at home, and/or write some of the words into their
2 Put students in pairs or groups of three to look at the vocabulary notebook.
sentences and work out the rules of use. Progress test
There is a Progress test for Units 6–10 on p141 of the
Answers Teacher’s Book.
so + adjective
such a + singular, count noun before a word beginning with a
consonant
such an + singular, count noun before a word beginning with a
vowel
such + plural noun
such + uncount noun

86 Unit 10  .  Scared to death


Introduction
to the unit
11 Passives
Verbs and nouns that go together
Notices
Things that changed the world

Language aims
Grammar – passives  The unit introduces four passives: Present Simple passive,
Past Simple passive, Present Perfect passive, and Future Simple passive. In the
The title of the unit is ‘Things that
opening presentation section, ‘A photograph that changed the world’, they are
changed the world’ and the theme is
introduced together rather than dealt with one at a time. There is a lot of
the history of some internationally
emphasis on how to form the passive and when and why to use it. With this
well-known discoveries and
approach, students at this level can cope with studying and practising four
inventions: X-rays, paper, DNA, the
passive tenses at one time, especially as the tense use is the same as for the
Google search engine and chewing
active, and your students should already be familiar with this.
gum. Texts about these in the
presentation and skills sections It is worth reminding yourself that English generally makes more use of the
contextualize the grammatical area passive voice than many other languages where the equivalent of one is used to
of the unit, passive forms, and avoid it – for example on in French and man in German. In English, one is
provide many opportunities for rarely used and it can sound very formal and distant.
practice. They is sometimes used to replace the passive in English. It is less formal.
They make good cars in Sweden./Good cars are made in Sweden.
Vocabulary  This activity is on words that go together (collocation). In the first
exercise in this section students have to say which nouns go with which verbs.
It is important to introduce students to the idea of collocation quite early in the
learning of English. It is a language with many synonyms or near synonyms,
and so it is important for students to develop an awareness of which words go
together.
Everyday English  This is an exercise on recognizing notices in common
locations around Britain.

Notes on the unit


Starter (SB p86)
This Starter introduces students to the form of the Present Simple passive in a
context and use that they have probably come across before. As such, it is a
good way of gently easing students into the grammatical area of the unit.
1 Ask students in pairs to make sentences from the chart in open class.
Answers
Rice is grown in Japan and China. Coffee is grown in Brazil.
Ferraris are made in Italy. Pineapples are grown in Hawaii.
Nikon cameras are made in Japan.

2 Ask them to work in pairs to write some sentences about what is made or
grown in their own country.

Unit 11  .  Things that changed the world 87


A PHOTOGRAPH THAT CHANGED THE WORLD  (SB p86) Active and passive
Passives 1 Ask your students to do this on their own, then check with
a partner before feedback. Do the first as an example.
About the text
Answers
This text is a natural context for passive forms, as the
Active
subject of the text, X-rays, receives rather than
1 They make Rolls Royce cars in Britain.
performs the action of the verb.
2 Over 5 million people visit the Eiffel Tower every year.
An X-ray is a form of electromagnetic radiation. 3 Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone in 1876.
The Nobel Prize is awarded annually in Sweden to 4 Thieves stole £40 million worth of diamonds from a store
scientists and writers for outstanding achievement. in London in 2010.
You may wish to check the difference between the 5 They have sold a James Bond Aston Martin for £2.6 million.
following science words: an invention, a discovery, 6 More than 2,000 people have climbed Mount Everest.
an experiment. 7 BMW will produce 200,000 Mini cars next year.
8 Did Alexander Flemming discover penicillin?
1 To introduce the topic ask your students a few general 9 Bell didn’t invent television.
questions about X-rays. Ask, What is an X-ray? Why is it Passive
useful? Have you ever had an X-ray? Why? When do you 1 Rolls Royce cars are made in Britain.
think X-rays were discovered? 2 The Eiffel Tower is visited by over 5 million people every year.
3 The telephone was invented by Alexander Graham Bell
Ask students to read the text and decide whether the in 1876.
sentences are true or false. Let students check their 4 £40 million worth of diamonds were stolen from a store in
answers in pairs before discussing as a class. London in 2010.
Answers 5 A James Bond Aston Martin has been sold for £2.6 million.
1 False 4 True 6 Mount Everest has been climbed by more than 2,000 people.
2 False 5 False 7 200,000 Mini cars will be produced by BMW next year.
3 True 8 Was penicillin discovered by Alexander Flemming?
9 Television wasn’t invented by Bell.

grammar spot   (SB p86)


The aim here is to check the form and establish that the PRACTICE   (SB p88)
passive is used when the main interest and focus is on
the object of the sentence not the subject.
Active and passive
1 Read through the rule carefully as a class. You may 1 Put students in pairs to discuss the questions, What is
wish to write the example sentences on the board, paper made of? and Who invented it? You could ask
and label them to show the rule of form: students to think of other questions about paper that
they would like to know the answer to.
to be + past participle
X-ray machines  are used  every day. T 11.1
[CD 2: Track 23] Ask students to read the text to
2 and 3  Ask students to work in pairs to complete the check their answers to the questions. Then ask them to
put the verbs in brackets in the correct form. Let
table and discuss the questions.
students discuss their answers in pairs before going
Answers through them as a class. Play the recording to check the
Present Past Present will answers.
Simple Simple Perfect future
Answers
are (clearly) was taken have been used will be
1 is used 6 kept
  seen were have been   used
2 wrote 7 was brought
is (still) used   discovered   caught
3 started 8 was built
is called were made have been
4 was invented 9 has been made
are found was awarded   discovered
5 was made 10 uses
3 X-rays are the main interest of the text. We use the
T 11.1
passive because we are more interested in X-rays, the
Today, paper is used for hundreds of everyday things – books
object of the active sentence.
and newspapers, of course, but also money, stamps, cups, bags,
Refer students to Grammar Reference 11.1 on p140. and even some clothes.

88 Unit 11  .  Things that changed the world


Long ago, before paper, people wrote on animal skins, bones Answers and tapescript
and stones. Then in 2700 BC, the Egyptians started to make 1 Paper is only used to make newspapers and books.
papyrus, which was similar to paper. But the first real paper No, it isn’t. It’s used to make hundreds of everyday things.
was invented in AD 105 by a Chinese government official, 2 All clothes are made out of paper.
Ts’ai Lun. It was made from a mixture of plants and cloth. The No, they aren’t. Only some are made out of paper.
Chinese kept their invention secret for centuries. 3 Before paper, people wrote on trees.
Finally, in the 10th century, paper was brought to Europe by No, they didn’t. They wrote on animal skins, bones, and
the Arabs. The first European paper mill was built in Spain in stones.
1150. Since the 18th century, most paper has been made out of 4 Paper was invented by a Chinese scientist.
wood, because it is much stronger than cloth. No, it wasn’t. It was invented by a Chinese government
Nowadays, each person uses about 300 kg of paper every official.
year. That’s a lot of paper. 5 The Chinese gave their invention to the world immediately.
No, they didn’t. They kept it secret for centuries.
6 They made paper out of wood.
Questions and answers No, they didn’t. They made it out of a mixture of plants
2 Ask students to match question words and answers. and cloth.
7 The first paper mill in Europe was built in France.
Answers No, it wasn’t. It was built in Spain.
When? In AD105., In the 10th century. 8 Paper has been made out of cloth since the 18th century.
Where? In China., In Spain. No, it hasn’t. It’s been made out of wood.
Who/by? Ts’ai Lun
How long? Since the 18th century.
How much? About 300 kg. Check it
5 This exercise checks the rules of form and use of
3 T 11.2
[CD 2: Track 24] Ask students to work in pairs to
passives. It could be done in class or for homework with
write questions using the prompts in exercise 2. They must
some other exercises from the Workbook.
use the passive form. Monitor and help with question
forming, then play the recording for students to check. Answers
You could drill these questions for pronunciation at this 1 were 4 sells 7 been eaten
stage. Write the question words on the board as prompts, 2 by 5 don’t carry
model each question with a clear pronunciation, and get 3 has stolen 6 drunk
the class, then individuals, to repeat.
Refer students to Grammar Reference 11.1 on p140.
Ask students to ask and answer in pairs.
Answers and tapescript Additional material
When was paper invented? In AD 105.
Where was the first real paper invented? In China. Workbook Unit 11
Who was it invented by? Ts’ai Lun. These exercises could be done in class as further practice,
When was it brought to Europe by the Arabs? In the 10th century. for homework, or in a later class as revision.
Where was the first paper mill built? In Spain. Exercises 1–5  practise the passive.
How long has paper been made out of Since the 18th
  wood? century. VOCABULARY AND SPEAKING   (SB p89)
How much paper is used by each person About 300 kg.
  every year? Verbs and nouns that go together
The aim of this exercise is to develop students’ awareness of
4 T 11.3
[CD 2: Track 25] Read through the examples with
the collocations of some common verbs. The verbs in this
students, then let them work in pairs to complete the
exercise have been chosen because they should all be
mini-conversations. Play the recording so that they can
familiar to students, but they are often incorrectly used in
check. Before letting students practise the dialogues in
relation to some nouns. You may wish to do it as a
pairs, play the recording again, pausing after each
dictionary exercise, developing students’ ability to use
conversation for students to repeat.
dictionaries to extend their vocabulary.

Unit 11  .  Things that changed the world 89


1 Ask your students to work in pairs to find the noun that 6 Have you, or a friend, ever made a complaint in a
does not go with the verb. They could do this by restaurant?
guessing, or by having a guess then checking in a No, but my dad often complains. I find it embarrassing, but
dictionary. Tell your students to check the nouns in the he says it’s important to do it.
dictionary first. This is more likely to tell them which 7 Have you ever been homesick? Did you miss your family or
verbs go with them than vice versa. your friends?
Answers Oh, yes, when I went on an exchange to Germany when I
You can’t say: was 16. I missed everybody.
discover Aspirin make homework 8 What is the best advice you’ve ever been given?
tell hello give a complaint If you can’t say anything nice, don’t say anything at all.
lose the bus carry a watch
keep an idea miss the way
READING AND SPEAKING   (SB p90)
2 Ask the same pairs of students to write sentences. Then
ask several students to read aloud their sentences for the A discovery and an invention that changed the
others to comment on. world
3 Ask students to discuss which verbs go with the odd
nouns in each group. Have a brief feedback. About the text
This is a jigsaw reading. In groups, students read one of
Answers two different texts, and answer gist and specific
invent Aspirin do homework information questions. Then, in an information gap
say hello make a complaint task, they must share their answers with a partner who
miss the bus wear a watch read the other text. There are opportunities for
have an idea lose the way students to discuss their own opinions and experiences.
Ask students to complete the sentences with the correct A genome is the complete set of genes in a living thing.
verb. Star Trek was an incredibly popular American sci-fi TV
series, which began in the 1960s. In it, the crew of an
Answers imaginary starship visited strange new worlds in
1 invented 4 Say 7 lost distant galaxies. Much of its imaginary technology has
2 did 5 make 8 had inspired scientists.
3 wore 6 missed Difficult vocabulary from the texts is covered in the
prediction task of exercise 4.
Talking about you
4 Give students a few minutes to think of answers to the 1 Ask students to look at the list, and check that they know
questions. Then put them in pairs to ask and answer. what each invention or discovery is. Ask them to tell you
T 11.4
[CD 2: Track 26] Play the recording. Ask students which are inventions, and which discoveries.
to listen and compare their answers. You could ask students if they know when, and by
whom, the discoveries and inventions were made.
T 11.4
1 Do you always wear a watch? Answers
Yes, all the time. Don’t you? the telephone: invented by Alexander Graham Bell in 1876
2 Are you good at telling jokes? radium (the first known radioactive element): discovered by
No, I’m hopeless. I can never remember the ending. Marie and Pierre Curie in 1897
3 What was the last present you gave? Who to? penicillin (the first antibiotic): discovered by Alexander
Mmmm. I think it was when I gave some flowers to my mum. Fleming in 1928
4 What was the last phone call you made? Who to? Why? television: invented by John Logie Baird in 1926 (many other
Just before I came into class. I called a friend to ask if she’s people were involved in its development)
doing anything this evening. the Internet: invented by no one person – first developed in
5 Do you keep a diary? the 1970s
Yes, but I don’t write very personal things in it, in case the atom: discovered by John Dalton in 1808
someone finds it. the electric light: invented by Humphrey Davy in 1800
(Thomas Edison improved on this invention and was the first
to produce a long-lasting light bulb)

90 Unit 11  .  Things that changed the world


2 Divide students into small groups of three or four. Ask 5 Very. You can catch criminals with DNA testing.
them to write down the discoveries and inventions in 6 You may be able to cure diseases, choose what babies look
exercise 1 and add three more to their list. Then get like, or pick the best person for a job.
groups to exchange their list with another group. Google
1 Larry Page and Sergey Brin
3 The second part of the task is for each group to discuss
2 About two years
and choose their top three inventions and discoveries
3 Yes – nobody would give them money.
from the list they have. Give them three or four minutes
4 1995 (Page and Brin met), 1996 (decided to make a search
to do that.
engine), 1998 (cheque for $100,000), 2002 (biggest search
When the groups are ready, ask a spokesperson for each engine on Internet)
group to read their list to the class. Write the lists in order 5 Very. You can find answers to questions very quickly.
on the board. Find out whether there is agreement on any 6 All the world’s information might be on the Internet, so that
invention or discovery. Then ask different groups to give you could find everything.
reasons why they think more contentious inventions or
discoveries in their list should be included in the final
class list. Try to come to an agreed final ‘class list’ of three. What do you think?
The aim here is to round off the lesson with a personalized
4 Ask students to work in pairs to research the words in
discussion. You could do it open class, or in groups.
their dictionaries, and do the prediction task. Monitor
and help with ideas. Extra idea
Answers If you have access to computers in your school (or you
DNA is a discovery. (somebody found it – they didn’t make it – could set it as a homework task), you could ask
it was there already) students to go to the Google search engine, and see who
Google is an invention. can be first to find out the answer to the opening
question in the Google text. If students type in
5 Divide students into two groups at this stage, Group A ‘common words Shakespeare’, the first two results will
and Group B. If you have a large class, have two or three give the answer – 1700. Students could also research
sets of each group. You don’t want more than four or five one of the discoveries and inventions in exercise 1. Set
students in each group. Make sure they know which text some questions. For example, When was it invented/
to read. discovered? Who invented/discovered it? Why is it
Ask students to read their text quickly and find out useful? How many people have one/use it every year?
which words from exercise 4 are in their text. Have a Ask students to present their findings to the class, or
brief class feedback. write them up for homework.

Answers
DNA: structure, disease, cure, cell, contain, commit (a crime),
be related to LISTENING AND SPEAKING  (SB p92)
Google: weblink, company, search engine, result, borrow, dream
The world’s most common habit: chewing gum
6 Ask students to read their text more carefully and find 1 Lead in to the listening by asking one or two students the
answers to the questions. When they have finished following questions.
reading, ask them to discuss their answers with their Do you ever chew gum? When do you chew gum? Where
group. Tell them to make brief notes. do you chew gum?
7 Tell students to stand up, walk round, and sit down with How often do you chew gum? What sort of gum do you
a student who read the other text. Students must chew?
compare their answers to each question.
Set up the mini-survey. Focus students on the questions
Answers in the Student’s Book and the chart. They may need to
DNA copy it so that they can write down other students’
1 Friedrich Miescher names as they walk round the classroom.
2 84 years Ask students to walk round asking questions and
3 Yes – other scientists thought it was too simple to be the completing their charts. However, don’t let it go on too
map of human development. long, especially if you have a large class.
4 1869 (discovered), 1953 (structure discovered), 1962 (Nobel
Prize), 1986 (DNA testing first used), 1990 (Human Genome 2 Discuss the questions as a class. It will probably be quite
Project began), 2000 (Human Genome Project completed) light-hearted.

Unit 11  .  Things that changed the world 91


3 Ask students to check the words in their dictionary. To LW We chew to clean our teeth and freshen our breath but
freshen (the breath), to wrap, and packet have the most also because we just like chewing. The ancient Greeks
obvious connections, as mint-flavoured gum does chewed a gum called mastica, which is a type of tree
freshen your breath, and gum usually comes wrapped in sap. They thought it was good for their health and
a packet. Students may speculate that it is made from women really enjoyed chewing it as a way to sweeten
tree sap and often advertised on billboards. their breath. Then in the first century AD we know that
4 T 11.5
[CD 2: Track 27] Ask students to work in pairs to the Mayan Indians in South America liked to chew a tree
read the statements and decide whether they are true or sap, called chiclay. They wrapped it in leaves and put it in
false. Have a quick feedback. There will probably be a lot their mouths so this was, if you like, the first packet of
of disagreement, but don’t tell them the answers yet. chewing gum. The American Indians also chewed tree
Play the recording. Students must check their ideas. sap – they gave it to the English when they arrived, but
it wasn’t until a few hundred years after, that it became
Answers and tapescript really popular in America.
1 False. 100,000 tons is chewed.
2 True After the feedback, ask students to correct the false
3 True sentences in pairs.
4 False. It was made of tree sap and honey. 5 T 11.6
[CD 2: Track 28] Ask students if they know
5 False. They are born wanting just to chew. anything about William Wrigley. They may recognize
6 True his name from chewing gum packets. Read through the
7 True. However, the gum was wrapped in leaves, so it wasn’t questions then play part two.
a packet in the modern sense.
8 False. The North American Indians gave it to the English. Answers and tapescript
T 11.5 1 He was a salesman, a business and advertising genius who
P = Presenter I = Interviewer popularized chewing gum.
LW = Leanne Ward, chewing gum expert 2 He hired ‘the Wrigley girls’ to walk up and down in the
A  B = Interviewees street handing out gum, and had huge electric signs and
Part one billboards.
P Today in Worldly Wise, the world’s most common habit . . . 3 Millions of pieces.
Yes, chewing gum. We chew 100,000 tons of it every year 4 A mile long.
but how many of us actually know what it’s made of? 5 It’s a secret recipe.
I Excuse me, I see you’re chewing gum . . . T 11.6
A Yeah. P = Presenter  LW = Leanne Ward, chewing gum expert
I Have you got any idea what it’s made of? Part two
A Nah – no idea. Never thought about it. P The history of modern chewing gum begins in 19th
I Have you any idea what chewing gum is made of? century America. In 1892 a clever young salesman called
William Wrigley decided that chewing gum was the thing
B Er . . . no, not a clue. Rubber maybe?
of the future. Wrigley was a business genius. He was the
I And do you have any idea who invented it?
first to use advertising to sell in a big way. Here’s Leanne.
A The Americans?
LW William Wrigley was really an advertising genius. He
B Yeah – sure – I reckon it was invented in America, yeah. hired hundreds of girls, who he called ‘the Wrigley girls’.
P Well no. It wasn’t the Americans who invented chewing They walked up and down the streets of Chicago and
gum. It was the Swedes. The Swedes, I hear you say? But New York City handing out free gum. Millions of pieces
listen to Leanne Ward, a chewing gum expert. were given away. He also had huge electric signs and
LW The history of chewing gum goes back thousands of billboards – one billboard was a mile long, it ran along
years. In Sweden in 1993, the skeleton of a teenager was the side of the train track. So with all this, chewing gum
found, he was nine thousand years old. And in his mouth became very popular all over the USA. I understand it was
was gum made of tree sap and sweetened with honey – even taken into space by the first astronauts.
the first known chewing gum. P So what exactly is it made of?
P It seems we’ve always chewed things of no real food LW Well, the strangest thing about gum today is that nobody
value. Babies are born wanting to chew. Everything goes knows what it’s made of. Nobody will tell you. The
straight into their mouths. So why do we chew? Here’s chewing gum industry keeps the recipe top secret.
Leanne again.
Let students check their answers in pairs before feedback.
They may wish to listen to the recording a second time.

92 Unit 11  .  Things that changed the world


What do you think? 3 A Hi. Can I pay for my petrol, please.
End with a short personalized discussion in groups or open B Which pump?
class. A Er ... pump number ... five.
B Forty-one pounds 78p, please.
Possible homework Customer and shop assistant at a petrol station. Most
Ask the class to underline all the examples of passive forms petrol stations in Britain are self-service, so you fill up
in the tapescript on p126. your own tank and pay in the shop.
4 The 7.56 from Bristol is now arriving at platform 4. Virgin
EVERYDAY ENGLISH  (SB p93) Rail would like to apologize for the late arrival of this
service. This was due to circumstances beyond our control.
Notices At a railway station. The station announcer is apologizing
because the train is late.
Introduce the topic by asking your students for examples of
any typical notices in their country. Ask which ones might 3 Students work in pairs. Ask them to choose two other
be difficult for foreigners visiting there to understand. places from the list and write very short dialogues
1 Put students into pairs or small groups to do this. Check typical for those places.
through the answers with the whole class. Ask the pairs to read their dialogues aloud, taking
different parts. Tell the rest of the class to listen and try
Answers
to guess where they are taking place.
2c 3b 4j 5e 6h 7i 8d 9f 10a 11g 12l
Additional material
Note
Workbook Unit 11
a Banbury is near Oxford in the centre of England. Exercise 6  contains more notices and could be used after
Trains from London to Banbury often stop in the Everyday English section.
Slough, Reading, and Oxford.
g The opposite of vacant is engaged on a toilet door. Don’t forget!
h The Jubilee Line and the Bakerloo Line are just two Workbook Unit 11
of the lines on the London Underground. Some of Exercise 7  is a contrast between the active and passive.
the other lines are: the Northern Line, the Piccadilly Exercise 8  is a vocabulary exercise which practises
Line, the Victoria Line. homonyms (words with more than one meaning).
Exercise 9  Students are guided towards writing a short
2 T 11.7
[CD 2: Track 29] These four dialogues take place in review of a book they have read.
one of the places in exercise 1. Play the dialogues one at Word list
a time and after each ask your students: Photocopy the Word list for Unit 11 (TB pp128 –129) for
Where are the people? Who are the people? your students, and ask them to write in the translations,
How can you tell where they are? What are they talking learn them at home, and/or write some of the words into
about? their vocabulary notebook.

Answers and tapescript


1 A Are we nearly there yet, Dad?
B No. It’s miles to go, but we’ll stop soon and have
something to eat.
Father and child in a car, probably on a motorway.
2 A How much is it to send this letter to Australia?
B Give it to me and I’ll weigh it. That’s . . . £1.20.
A OK. That’s fine.
Customer and clerk in a post office. You can buy stamps in
some shops, but you can’t have letters weighed to find out
how much it costs to send them.

Unit 11  .  Things that changed the world 93


Introduction
to the unit
12 Second conditional • might
Phrasal verbs
Social expressions 2
Dreams and reality

Language aims
Grammar – second conditional  The first conditional was introduced in Unit 9.
The title of this unit is ‘Dreams and The concept of the conditionals does not seem to cause students as much
reality’. There are two presentation difficulty as the formation. There are two common problems with this area:
sections. In the first, a text about the 1 The tenses used in the main clause and if clause do not seem logical.
global village provides the context 2 The complicated structural patterns are difficult for students to manipulate
to introduce and highlight unreality and get their tongues around.
in the use of the second conditional.
Where the second conditional is concerned, the use of a past tense in the if
In the second, ‘Who knows?’, two
clause to express an unreal present or improbable future often strikes students
students, one decisive, one unsure, talk
as strange and illogical, especially as in many languages unreality is expressed
about what they are going to do after
by separate subjunctive verb forms.
university, and this is the context used
to introduce might. Common mistake
*If I would live in the country, I would have a garden.
The combined Reading and speaking
section contains a text about a The subjunctive has largely disappeared from English, but one last remnant is
supervolcano, which provides the use of were in all persons of the verb to be in the second conditional, for
opportunities to talk about what might example:
happen in the future. If I were rich, I’d buy a new car.
If I were you, I’d go to the doctor.
If he were here, he’d know what to do.
However, nowadays this too seems to be disappearing, and it is equally
acceptable to say:
If I was rich, … etc.
The contraction of would to ’d can also be a problem, not only in terms of
pronunciation but also because ’d can also be a contraction for the auxiliary
had.
might  The use of might is very common in English but much avoided by
learners of English, who often prefer to use maybe/perhaps + will to express
lack of certainty about the future, for example:
Maybe she will come.
Perhaps I will play tennis this afternoon.
These are not incorrect, but it sounds much more natural to say:
She might come.
I might play tennis this afternoon.
We are not suggesting that your students will immediately start using might
after studying this unit, but we hope their awareness of it will be raised and
might could eventually become part of their repertoire.

94 Unit 12  .  Dreams and reality


Vocabulary  Students will already be familiar with some grammar spot   (SB p87)
phrasal verbs. There are so many in English that it is
Go through the questions with the whole class to
impossible to study the language for even a short time and
establish the form and use of the second conditional.
not come across some of the more common ones, for
example: put on, take off (a coat, etc.), get on, get off (a bus, Answers
etc.). 1 The first sentence describes the real world. The
In the vocabulary section there is a gently-staged second is imagined. (We use the second conditional to
introduction to the different types of phrasal verbs. There describe unreal, imagined situations.)
are four exercises which move from literal use of these verbs 2 It is acceptable to use either was or were here,
to non-literal use and finally to problems of word order. although were is considered more correct, particularly
when writing formally.
Everyday English  Some very common social expressions 3 The first sentence, which uses the first conditional
are practised. They are the sort of expressions that occur
form, is more probable.
very frequently in any day-to-day English conversation.
In the first sentence, the conditional clause is formed
with if + the Present Simple tense. In the result
Notes on the unit clause, we use the auxiliary verb will + the infinitive
without to.
Starter (SB p94) In the second sentence, the unreal conditional clause
The aim of this starter is to get students using the second is formed with if + the Past Simple tense. In the result
conditional in a personalized speaking activity. clause, we use the auxiliary verb would + the infinitive
without to. Would is often reduced to ’d.
1 and 2 Discuss the questions as a class or let students
discuss them in small groups first. Note how Refer students to Grammar Reference 12.1 on p141.
competently students manipulate would.

THE GLOBAL VILLAGE  (SB p94) PRACTICE   (SB p94)

Second conditional Discussing grammar


These are very controlled exercises to give further practice.
1 Ask questions to set the scene, for example How many
people are there in the world? What is the population of 1 Ask students to do this orally in pairs. Ask them to make
China/India/your country? What do you think the phrase the most natural sounding sentences.
‘global village’ means?
Sample answers
Ask students to read the text and check their predictions. If I were a politician, I’d always tell the truth.
Put students in pairs to complete the sentences with If I were you, I’d ask the teacher/I’d accept the job.
verbs from the box. If I had the answer, I’d tell you.
Answers If I had the time, I’d travel the world/I’d help you.
2 would be 6 wouldn’t know If I found a £50 note, I wouldn’t keep it.
3 would live 8 would control If I knew the answer, I’d tell you.
5 wouldn’t have 10 would die If I didn’t know the answer, I’d ask the teacher.
If I didn’t live in a big city, I’d be bored.
2 Put students in pairs to ask and answer the questions.
NOTE
Answers
It is important to point out to students that the
How many people would be women? 49
sentence parts can be reversed and the main clause can
How many people would live in poor housing? 80
equally well come before the if clause, for example:
Would everybody have enough food? No
Would most people have electricity? Yes I’d accept the job if I were you.
How many people would be very rich? 5 Notice that there is no comma when this happens.
Would most people have access to the Internet? No
2 Ask students to do this exercise on their own and then
compare with a partner before you check through the
exercise with the whole class.

Unit 12  .  Dreams and reality 95


Answers 3 ‘I found it difficult to wake up in the morning.’
1 If I were rich, I’d travel round the world. First I’d go to ‘Why’s that?’
Canada, then I’d go to New York. ‘I always feel like I need more sleep.’
2 If he worked harder, he’d have more money. ‘If I were you I’d go to bed earlier.’
3 I’d go to work if I felt better, but I feel terrible. ‘Yes, I really must do that.’
4 If I could speak perfect English, I wouldn’t be in this 4 ‘My car won’t start in the morning.’
classroom. ‘If I were you, I’d buy a new one. Yours is so old.’
5 What would you do if a stranger gave you £1 million? ‘I know it’s old, but I can’t afford a new one.’
6 What would you say if I asked you to marry me? ‘Well, take it to a garage. Let them have a look at it.’
‘All right.’
5 ‘My neighbours make a lot of noise.’
What would you do? ‘Do they? That’s awful.’
3 The aim here is for some less controlled speaking ‘Mmm. We can’t get to sleep at night.’
practice. Students might warm to some topics more than ‘Have you spoken to them about this?’
others. Put students into pairs or small groups to discuss ‘No, we’re too frightened.’
the situations. The aim is to practise the result clause ‘If I were you, I’d invite them round to your flat for coffee
only, and ideally there will be a rapid exchange of ideas. and say that you’re having problems.’
Encourage students to give their real opinions. ‘That’s probably a good idea. I’m not sure they’ll come, but
I’ll try it.’
Sample ideas
• I’d go back to the shop and tell them.
• I’d say thank you very much then put it in a drawer and Additional material
forget about it. Workbook Unit 12
• I don’t know what I would do. These exercises could be done in class as further practice,
• I’d take it to the police or, if there was an address inside I’d for homework, or in a later as class revision.
return it to the owners and hope for a reward. Exercises 1–5  practise the second conditional.
• I’d try to find a policeman. I wouldn’t interfere.
Note
Bring the class together to share some of the ideas.
At this point you might like to take a break from
grammar and move forward to the Reading and
If I were you . . . speaking on p98, before doing the grammar
4 T 12.1
[CD 2: Track 30] Explain to students that we often presentation of might on p96.
use the second conditional structure If I were you, I’d …
to give advice. Play the recording. Students listen and
repeat the examples. Put students in pairs to take turns
giving and receiving advice about the problems. WHO KNOWS?  (SB p96)
T 12.2 [CD 2: Track 31] Students listen and check. Let might
some pairs perform one of their conversations for the
class. Two contrasting texts, one about a teenager from Cape
Answers and tapescript Town, and one about a teenager in St Petersburg,
1 ‘I have no money. What am I going to do?’ provide the context for the use of might. This
‘If I were you, I’d try to spend less.’ introduction to might also provides a good opportunity
‘What do you mean?’ to revise the Present Continuous and going to for future
‘Well, you buy a lot of clothes, designer clothes. Stop plans and arrangements.
buying such expensive clothes.’ Cape Town is a multi-cultural city with a mixed
‘But I like them!’ population. It is on the southern coast of South Africa,
2 ‘I’ve got a toothache.’ and overlooked by Table Mountain. Poorer people live
‘Have you seen a dentist?’ in shanty towns or townships on the edge of the city.
‘No.’ St Petersburg is a large city in northern Russia.
‘Well, if I were you, I’d make an appointment right now.’ You may wish to pre-teach the following key vocabulary:
shanty town (an area in or near a town where poor people
live in houses made of wood, metal, and cardboard), junk
(household rubbish such as old furniture).

96 Unit 12  .  Dreams and reality


1 Ask your students to look at the pictures of the two Answers
students. Ask the questions in the Student’s Book. He might go to university.
He might become a writer.
2 T 12.3
[CD 2: Track 32] Play the recording. Ask students
He might study Russian language at university.
in pairs to listen and complete the texts.
He might live in Germany for a while.
Answers and tapescript
Nisa Isaacs grammar spot   (SB p96)
I live with my parents in a shanty town outside the city. My
parents collect old newspapers and junk to sell. They don’t Read through the Grammar Spot as a class.
make much money, so we’re poor. But I’m going to change all
Answers
that. I love school. I’m studying very hard, because I’m taking
2 We do not add -s with he/she/it. Might, like all modal
my high school exams next year. Then I’m going to get a job
auxiliary verbs, remains the same in all persons.
in an office in town. But that isn’t my main ambition. I really
We do not use do/does in the negative. We use not
want to go to university. So I’m going to work for a while to
after the modal auxiliary verb.
save some money. I’m hoping to be an architect, then I can
build my parents a proper house. Refer students to Grammar Reference 12.2 on p141.
Viktor Panov
I’m studying for my certificate of Education, but I’m not
sure what to study afterwards. I love studying literature, PRACTICE  (SB p97)
so I might go to university. That would be fun. I might
become a writer. But I also enjoy the Russian language Discussing grammar
writer, so I might study that at university. I’ll have to get These exercises bring together all the grammar points in this
good exam results to do that. I’d also like to try living in unit.
another country. I’ve got family in Germany, so I might live
there for a while. Perhaps I could study literature in Berlin. 1 You could do this as a quick oral reinforcement activity
That would be great! with the whole class, or you could ask your students to
work on their own and underline the correct answers,
3 Ask students to discuss the questions in pairs. then check with a partner before you conduct a feedback
session.
Answers
1 Nisa is certain. Viktor isn’t. Answers
2 Nisa is more ambitious. She comes from a very poor 1 We’re having 4 I’m having
background but wants to become an architect. 2 It’ll be 5 I might
3 Nisa lives in a shanty town. Her parents sell newspapers 3 he might be
and junk.
4 Literature
5 Viktor
Possibilities
6 Nisa wants to be an architect. Viktor wants to be a writer. 2 This aims to give further controlled practice of might.
You could do it as a writing exercise, but it is best as a
4 This exercise revises future tenses in a controlled written sort of prompt drill. Do the first as an example question
exercise. Ask students to write sentences. and answer with your students. Then put students in
pairs to make conversations with the other prompts.
Answers
She’s taking her high school exams next year. Answers
She’s going to get a job in an office in town. 1 What sort of car are you going to buy?
She’s going to university. I don’t know/I’m not sure. I might buy a Fiat, or I might buy
She’s going to save some money. a Toyota.
She’s going to be an architect. 2 Where are you going on holiday?
I’m not sure. I/we might go to Turkey, or I/we might go to
5 This exercise checks the contrasting use of might to Jordan.
express possibilities. Ask students to write sentences. 3 What are you going to have to eat?
Make sure they don’t try to follow might with to. I’m not sure. I might have the steak, or I might have the
fish.
4 Who is going to help you fix your computer?
I don’t know. I might ask Kamal, or I might ask Aziz.

Unit 12  .  Dreams and reality 97


Get pairs of students to act out the questions and 2 Ask students to read the first part of the article and
answers to the whole class. discuss their answers in pairs.
3 This is a short and freer personalized activity. Students Answers
take it in turn to ask their partner. 1 False 3 False 5 False
What are you doing/going to do after the lesson? etc. 2 True 4 True 6 True (in the ‘near’ future)
If the partner is sure the answer is: I’m going to … or
3 Ask students to read the second part of the article and
I’m … ing … .
order the events. Check the answers as a class. Get
If the partner is not sure the answer is: I’m not sure/I students to read out their answers in pairs in order to
don’t know. I might … . practise the second conditional.

Check it Answers
1 = 2, 2 = 1, 3 = 6, 4 = 3, 5 = 5, 6 = 4
4 Ask students to work in pairs to correct the mistakes.
4 Discuss the question as a class.
Answers
1 If I had a car, I’d give you a lift. Answer
2 They might call their baby Lily, but they aren’t sure yet. Because an eruption is unlikely to happen in the next few
3 I’d visit you more often if you didn’t live so far away. centuries.
4 I might play tennis tomorrow, but I’m not sure.
5 If I was/were younger, I’d (would) learn to speak French, 5 Ask students in pairs to search the text, and find what the
but I’m too old now. numbers refer to.
Check through the answers with the whole class. Ask Answers
students to say why the sentences are wrong. 3 million visitors (to Yellowstone every year)
1960s scientists discovered that Yellowstone was a
Additional material supervolcano
9,000 square metres (size of the park)
Workbook Unit 12 40 number of supervolcanos
Exercises 6–9  practise might. 74,000 years ago (most recent supervolcano explosion)
640,000 years ago (when Yellowstone erupted)
READING AND SPEAKING (SB p98) 250kmph speed that ash and rock would shoot up
87,000 people would die if Yellowstone erupted
Supervolcano 3/4 of the USA would be covered in ash
90% of sunlight would be blocked by a volcanic winter
About the text
The text is about the supervolcano in Yellowstone
National Park, Wyoming, USA. The text is exploited
What do you think?
by true/false questions and ordering tasks. It Divide students into small groups of four or five to discuss
contextualizes the use of the second conditional. the questions. Ask one student to chair the discussion,
You may wish to pre-teach vocabulary around the making sure that everybody else has a chance to speak.
topic of volcanoes: active, extinct, erupt, ash, rock, lava,
geyser, contaminated.

1 Lead in by putting students in pairs to discuss the


questions. Have a brief class feedback.
Some famous volcanoes
Active: Cotopaxi, Mauna Loa, Vesuvius, Mount Etna, Stromboli
Extinct: Aconcagua, Kilimanjaro, Orizaba, Fuji

98 Unit 12  .  Dreams and reality


VOCABULARY  (SB p100) 1 Read through the examples with your students to make
sure they have an idea what is meant by a phrasal verb.
Phrasal verbs Ask them to do this exercise on their own. Stress that
Students will have already met quite a few phrasal verbs the words in this exercise are used literally and therefore
because they are so common in English. These four they should be able to work out the answers quite
exercises are staged in such a way as to illustrate some of the logically and easily. Tell them that one of the words is
different types of phrasal verbs and to show that they can used twice.
have both literal and non-literal (idiomatic) meaning. Ask students to check their answers with a partner, and
then go through the answers quickly with the whole class.
Note
Here for your information is a description of the types Answers
of phrasal verb. We do not suggest that you pass on this 1 on 2 out 3 up 4 out 5 back
information to your students, but it is useful to remind
yourself of the types so that you can deal with any Focus students on the phrasal verbs in the box. Put them
queries that arise. in small groups to do or mime the actions. The other
students must guess which words they are doing or
There are four types: miming.
Type 1: verb + adverb (no direct object)
2 Read through the introduction and make it clear that
The plane took off. here the phrasal verbs have a non-literal, idiomatic
We sat down. meaning. In other words you cannot work out the
(This type is not highlighted for students in these meaning logically from the parts. The three examples
exercises although examples appear.) should illustrate this.
Type 2: verb + adverb + direct object Ask them to work in small groups to do or mime the
He put on his hat/put his hat on. He put it on. actions. The other students must guess which words they
She looked up the word/up. She looked it up. are doing or miming. They may need to look up the
I turned off the light/turned the light off. I turned it verbs in a dictionary, but they should try to guess the
off. meaning from the context of the whole phrase.
The adverb can change position, but not if the object Note
is a pronoun. Tell your students to be careful when looking up
(These are highlighted in exercise 3.) phrasal verbs, as many of them have more than one
Type 3: verb + preposition + object meaning, for example put out can also mean cause
inconvenience.
He fell down the stairs. He fell down them.
She’s looking for her purse. She’s looking for it. Do not be tempted to start discussing all the uses! This
He looked after the baby. He looked after her. would be very confusing. These exercises do not aim to
‘tell all’ about phrasal verbs, just to provide an
The preposition cannot change position.
introduction.
(These are highlighted in exercise 4.)
Type 4: verb + adverb + preposition + object 3 This and the next exercise aim to highlight and practise
Anna doesn’t get on with her brother. She doesn’t get problems of word order with phrasal verbs.
on with him. Read through the introduction as a class and the
Billy’s looking forward to the summer. He’s looking instructions for the exercise. Put students in pairs to
forward to it. complete the sentences with phrasal verbs. They must
(These also appear in exercise 4 because the adverb use the correct pronoun and phrasal verbs in the boxes
and preposition cannot change position.) in exercises 1 and 2.
Answers
1 . . . I threw it away. 3 . . . I’ll look after her.
2 . . . Turn them off. 4 . . . I’ll fill it in later.

4 Ask students to work in pairs to complete the sentences.


After you have checked that they have the answers
correct, let them ask their partner the questions.

Unit 12  .  Dreams and reality 99


Answers 2 T 12.4
[CD 2: Track 33] Play the dialogues and pause after
1 How do you get on with your parents? each for students to check their answers. After each one
2 Do you ever fall out with your brothers or sisters? ask the pairs to practise saying that dialogue together.
3 What are you looking forward to doing on holiday? At the end of all four, allocate a pair for each dialogue to
4 Have you ever run out of petrol in your car? read and act it for the whole class. Ask the other students
5 Where did you grow up? Or have you always lived here? to comment on the pronunciation. You could play the
recordings again at any point to establish a good model.
Additional material 3 Round off the lesson by prompting some of the
Workbook Unit 12 expressions from students.
Exercise 10  is a vocabulary exercise which revises many of
the phrasal verbs students have met in New Headway Don’t forget!
Plus Special Edition Pre-Intermediate. Workbook Unit 12
Exercises 11 and 12  are writing exercises: adverbs and
EVERYDAY ENGLISH  (SB p101) writing a story
Word list
Social expressions 2 Photocopy the Word list for Unit 12 (TB p129) for your
students, and ask them to write in the translations, learn
1 Focus students on the illustrations. Ask them what they
them at home, and/or write some of the words into their
think the people are saying in each situation. Ask
vocabulary notebook.
students to work in pairs to complete the conversations
with expressions from the boxes. Stop and check 3 (TB p134)
A suggestion for approaching the Stop and check tests is in
Answers and tapescript the introduction on p5 of the Teacher’s Book.
T 12.4
1 A Excuse me! Can I get past?
B Pardon?
A Can I get past, please?
B I’m sorry. I didn’t hear you. Yes, of course.
A Thanks a lot.
2 A  I hear you’re going to get married soon.
Congratulations!
B  That’s right, next July. July 21. Can you come to the
wedding?
A Oh, what a pity! That’s when we’re away on holiday.
B Never mind. We’ll send you some wedding cake.
A That’s very kind.
3 A  Oh, dear! Look at the time! Hurry up, or we’ll miss the
train.
B  Just a minute! I can’t find my umbrella. Do you know
where it is?
A I haven’t a clue. But you won’t need it. It’s a lovely day.
Just look at the sky!
B Oh, all right. Let’s go, then.
4 A Good luck in your exam!
B Same to you. I hope we both pass.
A Did you go out last night?
B  No, of course not. I went to bed early. What about
you?
A Me, too. See you later after the exam. Let’s go out for a
pizza.
B Good idea.

100 Unit 12  .  Dreams and reality


Introduction
to the unit
13 Present Perfect Continuous
Word formation
Adverbs • Telephoning
Earning a living

Language aims
Grammar – Present Perfect Simple  In Unit 7 several uses of the Present
Perfect Simple were presented and practised.
The title of this unit is ‘Earning a
living’. The story of how Andy earns a Your students should be familiar with the form of the Present Perfect by now,
living provides the context for but it is most unlikely that their production of the tense is accurate. This is for
contrasting the Present Perfect Simple the reasons mentioned in the teaching notes to Unit 7. Although a similar form
and Present Perfect Continuous to talk of have + the past participle exists in many other European languages, its use in
about unfinished past. The unit also English is dictated by aspect (i.e. how the speaker sees the event), not
looks at the Present Perfect Continuous necessarily time. The Present Perfect is probably the most difficult tense form
to express the present result of a past for learners to master, and it is not an exaggeration to say that this process takes
activity. years.
The Reading and speaking section However, this is not to say that nothing can be done to help! If students can be
contains texts about unusual ways in shown how the tense is used in context, and where it is not used, their
which people earn a living, and the understanding will gradually increase. There is a case for saying that you are
listening is a conversation between a always teaching the Present Perfect. When a student makes a mistake, you
young man who has just started his first might decide to remind your class of the rules. If an interesting example occurs
job, and his mother. It provides further in a reading or listening text, you might decide to draw their attention to it.
practice of the Present Perfect This is not to say that you should correct every mistake. Students would become
Continuous. very frustrated! But seeing the tense in context, again and again and again, is
the only way that their familiarity with this tense will increase.
Present Perfect Continuous  Many of the above comments are true of the
Present Perfect Continuous, too. This tense is sometimes introduced
idiomatically in first-year courses, and in this unit of New Headway Plus Special
Edition Pre-Intermediate, it is not examined in any great depth. This is because
the subtleties of it are too complex for the level. There are two aspects which
students have to perceive, the perfect aspect and the continuous aspect, and
it is unreasonable to expect them to be able to do this immediately. As it is a
continuous verb form, there are more ‘bits’ for students to get wrong.
Common mistakes
*I been learning English for three years.
*I’ve learn English for three years.
*I’ve been learn English for three years.
The concepts expressed by the Present Perfect Continuous are often expressed
by either a present tense verb form in other languages, or by a form of the
Present Perfect Simple. Many languages (quite sensibly) dispense with the need
to express the ideas inherent in the continuous aspect, but English has it, and
where it is possible, prefers to use it. I’ve been learning English for three years
sounds much more natural than I’ve learned English for three years. But I’ve
lived here all my life sounds better than I’ve been living here all my life, because
of the temporariness expressed by the continuous aspect.

Unit 13  .  Earning a living 101


When the Present Perfect is used to refer to an activity with 1 Focus students on the photograph of Andy.
a result in the present, it can be very difficult to know Ask questions.
whether to use the simple or the continuous. I’ve painted the Where is he? What is he doing? Why?
bathroom and I’ve been painting the bathroom refer to the
Ask students to read the text. Ask them why homeless
same action, but mean very different things. The first refers
people sell The Big Issue.
to a completed action, but the second refers to a recent
activity which may or may not be finished. The area is
Note
further complicated by the fact that, if a completed quantity
The Big Issue is a street paper which was set up in 1991
is stated, the Present Perfect Simple must be used, not the
to give homeless people the chance to have an income.
Continuous. This is because of the idea of activity in
Homeless people can often be seen selling the paper on
progress expressed by the continuous aspect and the idea of
street corners in Britain’s major cities. It campaigns on
completion expressed by the simple aspect: I’ve written three
behalf of homeless people and highlights the major
letters today.
social issues of the day. It allows homeless people to
Common mistakes voice their views and opinions.
*I learn English for three years.
*I’ve been knowing her for a long time.
*I’ve been writing three letters today. 2 T 13.1
[CD 2: Track 34] Students work in pairs to match
*I’m hot because I’ve run. the questions and answers. Do the first as an example.
Play the recording so that they can check their answers.
It is for the above reasons that the Present Perfect
Continuous is not dealt with in too much detail in this unit! Answers and tapescript
Vocabulary  There are exercises on word formation and 1e 2f 3b 4c 5a 6d
shifting stress as a word changes class (for example, from T 13.1
noun to verb). There are two activities on -ly adverbs. 1 How long have you been sleeping on the streets?
For a year. It was very cold at first, but you get used to it.
Everyday English  In this section, using the telephone is 2 Why did you come to London?
practised in both formal and informal situations. I came here to look for work, and I never left.
3 How long have you been selling The Big Issue?
Notes on the unit For six months. I’m in Covent Garden seven days a week
selling the magazine.
Starter (SB p102) 4 Have you made many friends?
Lots. My problem is I’m homeless. I want a job, but I need
This is a quick question and answer session to preview the
somewhere to live before I can get a job. So I need money
new structure introduced in this unit.
to get somewhere to live, but I can’t get money because I
1 Students work in pairs to ask and answer the questions. can’t get a job, and I can’t get a job because I haven’t
2 Answer your students’ questions. got somewhere to live. So I’m trapped.
5 How many copies do you sell a day?
Usually about fifty.
STREET LIFE  (SB p102) 6 How many copies have you sold today?
So far, ten. But it’s still early.
Present Perfect Continuous
3 Drill the Present Perfect questions round the class
Note briefly. Model the conversation with a student then put
Ask students to read the Grammar Reference on the students in pairs to practise. They should take it in turns
Present Perfect Continuous for homework before to cover the questions then the answers and act out the
beginning this presentation. conversation.
As was explained in Language aims, the Present Perfect
Continuous is dealt with relatively lightly in this unit.
It is unrealistic to expect students to perceive all the
differences of meaning between the simple and the
continuous, and the perfect aspect will continue to
present problems.

102 Unit 13  .  Earning a living


grammar spot   (SB p102) Answers and tapescript
A How long have you been trying to find a job?
Answer the questions as a class.
B For three years. It’s been really difficult.
1 Answers A How many jobs have you had?
Questions b and e are in the Present Perfect Continuous. B About thirty, maybe more. I’ve done everything.
The other tenses are the Present Simple (a), the Present A How long have you been standing here today?
Perfect (c and d), and the Past Simple (f). B Since 8.00 this morning, and I’m freezing.
A How did you lose your business?
Point out the form of the Present Perfect Continuous at B I owed a lot of money in tax, and I couldn’t pay it.
this stage: A Who’s your best friend?
Question word + have + subject + been + -ing … ? B A chap called Robbie, who’s also from Scotland, like me.
A Where did you meet him?
How long + have + you + been + selling … ?
B I met him here in London.
2 How long have you been selling The Big Issue? asks A How long have you known each other?
about the activity of selling. B About ten months. I met him soon after I came to
How many copies have you sold today? asks about the London.
number of copies sold.
3 Answers PRACTICE  (SB p103)
I have been learning English since I was 16.
I have learnt ten new words today. Discussing grammar
The first sentence refers to an activity which started in 1 Students work in pairs or small groups to choose the
the past and continues until now. correct verb form. Do the first one as a class as an
I was 16 example. Expect students to make mistakes with this
Past Present exercise, and tell them not to worry. As you correct,
remind them of the rules.
The second sentence refers to the number learnt
during a period of time up to now. Answers
x? x? x? x? x? 1 have you been living (because the activity began in the
Past Present past and continues to the present)
Refer students to Grammar Reference 13.1 on p142. 2 has found (because this is a completed activity – the
action of finding doesn’t last a long time, unlike look for)
4 T 13.2
[CD 2: Track 35] Ask students to work in pairs to 3 have been going (because the activity began in the past
make questions. Do the first two as an example with the and continues to the present)
class to show students that a number of different tenses 4 bought (because we have a definite time – a few months
are needed. When they are ready, play the recording so ago)
that they can check and correct their questions. 5 have you had (because have to express possession is
a state verb, not an activity, so it cannot go into the
Answers and tapescript continuous)
• How long have you been trying to find a job? 6 has been working (because he is still working as a
• How many jobs have you had? policeman)
• How long have you been standing here today? 7 ’ve been writing (The sentence is stressing the continuous
• How did you lose your business? activity, not the fact that the essay is written. It may or
• Who’s your best friend? may not be finished.)
• Where did you meet him? 8 ’ve written (The continuous is not possible because the
• How long have you known each other? quantity (six) is stated.)
Play and pause the recording for students to repeat or
drill the questions round the class. Pay close attention to Talking about you
the weak pronunciation of have /əv/ and been /bɪn/ in
the Present Perfect questions. 2 Ask students to work in pairs to do this exercise. Check
the answers then drill the questions. Ask the questions
5 T 13.3
[CD 2: Track 36] Students work in pairs to ask the round the class. Finally, put students in pairs to interview
questions and invent Andy’s answers. Play the recording each other using the questions.
so that students can compare their answers.

Unit 13  .  Earning a living 103


Answers prepare questions using the question word prompts.
1 How long have you been coming to this university? Monitor and help them prepare. When they are ready,
2 How long have you used this book? change the pairs so that one Student A is with a Student
3 Which book did you have before this one? B. Model the activity briefly by asking one or two
4 How long have you known your best friend? questions, then let students ask and answer to complete
their information.
What have they been doing? Questions
3 This activity practises the other use of the Present Perfect Student A
Continuous to talk about present results of a past
activity. It differs from the similar use of the Present Who does she work for?
Perfect Simple, practised in exercise 4, which is used to Where was she born?
talk about results of a completed past action, and tends When did she return to Saudi Arabia?
to be used when we say how many. How much does the Gulf One Bank have in its investment
Read the introduction and look at the example sentence fund?/How much has the Gulf One Bank got in is
as a class. Students work in pairs to make a sentence investment fund?
about the people. How many times has Dr. Taher been named
Sample answers Businesswoman of the Year?
b His back hurts because he’s been digging the garden. Student B
c He’s got paint on his clothes because he’s been painting How long has she been running the bank?
the room.
d He’s got dirty hands because he’s been mending his bicycle. Which university did she go to in the UK?
e He has no money because he’s been shopping. How many men does the National Commercial Bank
f They’re tired because they’ve been playing tennis. employ?
g His eyes hurt because he’s been studying. What/Which language do the employees speak at
h He’s wet because he’s been cleaning the car. Gulf One Bank?
i He’s got a red face because he’s been cooking.
What number was Dr. Taher in a list of the worlds
100 most powerful women?
4 Students work in pairs to make sentences. Ask them
why we use the Present Perfect here (because we are
COMPLETE TEXT
talking about the completed action and we talk about
Dr. Nahed Taher works for the Gulf One Investment
how many).
Bank. She is their Chief Executive Officer (CEO),
Answers and has been running the bank since 2005, when she
1 He’s run five miles. became the first female CEO of a bank in the Gulf
2 He’s spent all his money. region.
3 He’s read five books today. Nahed was born in 1964, in Saudi Arabia, and studied
4 They’ve played six games. at the King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah. She then
5 He’s made a cake and a pie. went to Lancaster University in the UK to do an MSc
and PhD.
Getting information In 2001 she returned to Saudi Arabia, where she
first worked as a Senior Economist at the National
5 In this information gap activity students must ask each Commercial Bank. She was the first female to become a
other questions to find out about the businesswoman, senior manager at the bank, which employs 4,000 men.
Nahed Taher. In an activity of this kind the more
Under her management, The Gulf One Bank has been
preparation and setting up you do, the more likely that
growing successfully, and now has $2 billion in its
students will do it accurately and well.
investment fund. The bank has 50 employees of 34
Photocopy the information cards on p122 of the nationalities, and they all speak English at work.
Teacher’s Book. Give half the class Student A cards, and
Dr. Taher has been named Businesswoman of the
half the class Student B cards. Ask them to read their
Year two times, and in 2006 she was 72 in a list of the
information and check any words they don’t know. Then
world’s 100 most powerful women.
ask them to work with a partner with the same card to

104 Unit 13  .  Earning a living


Additional material 2 Ask students to work in pairs to complete the sentences.
Workbook Unit 13 Answers
Exercises 1–4  Present Perfect Simple 1 Promise 6 comfortable
Exercises 5 and 6  Present Perfect Continuous 2 dead 7 description
Exercises 7–9  Present Perfect Simple or Continuous? 3 wealthy, successful 8 advice
4 peace 9 feeling
5 advertisement
VOCABULARY  (SB p105)
Students could follow up this activity by working in pairs
Word formation to write sentences using some of the other words in the
1 Ask students to work in pairs to complete the charts and charts.
mark the stress. Do one or two as an example. Ask students
to guess what they think the missing word is before Adverbs
checking in the dictionary. These activities take longer These two activities provide a further focus on adverbs,
to do than you might think because students have to use which were dealt with earlier in Unit 7.
dictionaries to find the new word and its stress pattern.
Put students in pairs to complete the sentences.
Answers
Answers
Noun Verb
1 1 Possibly 3 nearly
death die
2 really 4 mainly
waste waste
beˈlief beˈlieve
adˈvertisement ˈadvertise Answers
ˈpromise ˈpromise 2 1 fluently 3 exactly
ˈfeeling feel 2 carefully 4 seriously
adˈvice adˈvise
deˈscription deˈscribe You could provide further practice by getting students to
inˈvention inˈvent think of new sentences containing the adverbs.
ˈgovernment ˈgovern
Noun Adjective READING AND SPEAKING  (SB p106)
death dead
ˈhonesty ˈhonest A funny way to earn a living
vaˈriety ˈvarious 1 The aim of this game is to lead in to the topic and revise
ˈmadness mad the vocabulary area of jobs. Do it as a class, or divide
ˈmystery myˈsterious students into groups of five or six if you have a large
ˈbeauty ˈbeautiful class. If possible, get students to sit in a circle. One
wealth ˈwealthy student says a job beginning with A, the next student
sucˈcess sucˈcessful repeats the same job beginning with A, and adds another
ˈcomfort ˈcomfortable beginning with B. It is a memory game. Be prepared to
peace ˈpeaceful help with jobs for letters that students can’t think of.
When you have the answers, ask several students to say Don’t let this activity go on too long. If it begins to drag,
the words, and correct any pronunciation mistakes. stop it.
2 Discuss the questions as a class. This could lead to an
possible problems interesting discussion in a multilingual class. It can be
• In longer words, it is important to make the main interesting to hear about other people’s countries. You
stress strong, so that in comparison, the other could extend this by writing some jobs on the board, for
syllables are unstressed. The most common sound example, doctor, teacher, nurse, coal miner, farmer, sales
in unstressed syllables is the schwa /ə/, of which manager, and asking students to discuss which jobs are
there are many in the words in the box. most highly-paid, and which they think should be
• Many learners of English find it hard to pronounce highly-paid and why.
the word adˈvertisement. They want to put the stress
on the third syllable. The situation is further
confused by the stress on the verb (ˈadvertise) being
on the first syllable.

Unit 13  .  Earning a living 105


Note 5 Divide students into groups of three, each student
In Britain, the average salary is £22,000. Professional having read a different text. They must work together to
jobs such as doctors, dentists, and lawyers, are find the answers.
considered good jobs. Very highly-paid jobs exist in the
financial sector, advertising, and marketing. People Answers
working in the private sector often earn more than 1 Cathy.
people working in the public sector. 2 Probably Terry.
3 Because, in 1660, King Charles II made a Royal Decree that
there should always be six ravens there.
Answers 4 To keep them safe from cats and foxes.
1 Derrick is really the only one who has a regular job with 5 Chairs, tables, tins of food, a box of DVDs, and lots of
regular hours and a regular income. bottles with messages in them.
2 All of them like their jobs. 6 You have to find a way to live a simple, honest life, and
not chase money and things you don’t need.
3 Ask students to look at the pictures and headlines quickly 7 Since she was ten.
and answer the questions. Discuss their answers briefly as 8 Between 0 and 15 hours, depending on the weather.
a class. It doesn’t matter if students don’t have the right
answers. The aim is to create context and raise interest. In the feedback, ask students which of these jobs they
would like and why.
4 This is a jigsaw reading activity. Students decide which
text they would like to read. Try to ensure that a more or
less equal number of students read each text. Read
What do you think?
through the questions with students, then let them read Have a whole class discussion on this subject. Encourage
their text and answer the questions. Ask them to find students to give reasons for their answers.
somebody who has read the same text so that they can
check their answers. Language work
Answers Ask students to find five adverbs in the text about the
Derrick loves live-in job at the Tower beachcomber.
1 Outdoors. Answers
2 Since 1999. nearly (line 5)
3 He looks after ravens at the Tower of London. mainly (line 8)
4 He was a Beefeater at the Tower. really (line 11)
5 Yes. He has a strict routine to follow. actually (= in fact) (line 13)
6 Just over £20,000 a year. possibly (line 19)
7 Because it’s a lot of fun and it gives him a lot of pleasure.
Life on the beach
1 Outdoors.
2 Seventeen years.
LISTENING AND SPEAKING  (SB p108)
3 He’s a beachcomber. He walks up and down beaches
looking for things.
Giving news
4 He was a policeman. This activity takes quite a while to do, as there are several
5 No. His life is rich in variety. parts to it. Students first listen to one side of a telephone
6 Not much. He doesn’t need money. conversation between Craig and his mother. They only hear
7 His job allows him to live a simple, honest life, rich in Craig. Then they work in pairs to imagine what his mother
variety. He has everything he wants. said. Finally, they hear the complete conversation.
Flying for a living Because students have to think what the mother said, they
1 Outdoors. need time to understand the nature of the activity. They
2 Twelve years (professionally). then use the clues and their imagination to complete the
3 She takes people on balloon trips. conversation.
4 She has only ever had one job.
The conversation contains many examples of the Present
5 No. She flies different balloons and never knows where
Perfect Simple and Continuous.
she will land.
6 £25,000 a year. This will provide students with further exposure to these
7 She loves being in the countryside and hates routines, and two tenses, but when students are trying to imagine the
she loves flying balloons. mother’s side of the conversation, it is not expected that
they will always use the tenses accurately. When they

106 Unit 13  .  Earning a living


have heard the complete conversation, you can draw their whether they get the exact words, as long as their
attention to the tenses. suggestions are logical.
Read the introduction together. If you have a multinational Complete the first four or five gaps as a class, so that
class, ask them if students in their country usually move to students see what they have to do. Stop the recording
another part of the country when they first get a job. after It’s me, Craig. and ask What did his mother say?
(Something like Hello, or How are you?). Play the
1 T 13.4
[CD 2: Track 37] Before they listen, ask students to
recording again, and stop after I’m just … so … . Ask
read through the statements. Check that there are no
What did his mother say? (It has to be tired). Continue to
problems of vocabulary. Students listen to Craig’s side of
play and pause and take time to prompt answers. Once
the conversation.
students have got the idea, you could ask them to write
Students work in pairs to decide if the statements are their answers then compare them in groups at the end.
true or false. If they are false, ask students to say why.
If you think this activity might be too difficult for your
Answers and tapescript class, you could give them a copy of the tapescript.
1 We don’t know. He doesn’t say. He leaves work at eight Working from the written word would be easier than
o’clock every evening. working from the spoken word. Make sure you give them
2 True the tapescript without the mother’s words!
3 False. He goes out to eat. 3 T 13.5
[CD 2: Track 38] Students listen to both sides of the
4 True conversation, and compare their ideas. This could be
5 False. John lives near Craig. done as a class. You will need to be careful when
6 True accepting or rejecting students’ suggestions. Try to
7 True correct their ideas for content and logic rather than
8 False. He’s been relaxing after his trip. language, as this is more of a fluency activity (both
9 False. Next Tuesday. listening and speaking) than accuracy.
10 False. He’ll take her out for a meal.
T 13.4 Tapescript
C Hi Mum. It’s me, Craig. C Hi Mum. It’s me, Craig.
C Work’s OK – I think. I’m just . . . so . . . M Craig! Hello! How lovely to hear from you. How are you?
C I am tired, really tired. I’ve been working so hard and How’s the new job going?
everything’s so new to me. I’m in the office until eight C Work’s OK – I think. I’m just . . . so . . .
o’clock every night. M Tired? You sound tired. Are you tired? What have you been
C Yes, yes – I’ve been eating OK. After work, John and I go doing?
out for something to eat in the restaurant round the C I am tired, really tired. I’ve been working so hard and
corner. We’re too tired to cook. everything’s so new to me. I’m in the office until eight
C We work together in the same office – he’s been working o’clock every night.
here for a while, so he’s been helping me a lot. He’s really M Eight o’clock! Every night? That’s terrible. And when do you
nice. You’d like him, Mum, he lives near me. eat? Have you been eating well?
C Ah yes. Dad. How is he? What’s he been doing recently? C Yes, yes – I’ve been eating OK. After work, John and I go
C Oh, yes of course. He’s been working in Amsterdam, hasn’t out for something to eat in the restaurant round the
he? Well, I’m glad he’s relaxing now. And what about you, corner. We’re too tired to cook.
Mum? M John? Who’s John?
C Next Tuesday. That’s great! Of course you can stay at my C We work together in the same office – he’s been working
flat. I’ll try to leave work earlier that day and I’ll meet you here for a while, so he’s been helping me a lot. He’s really
after the conference. We’ll go out for a meal. nice. You’d like him Mum, he lives near me.
C Me too. See you next week. Bye for now. Love to Dad! M Mmm. Your father says ‘Hello’.
C Ah yes. Dad. How is he? What’s he been doing recently?
2 T 13.4
Play and pause the recording. Get a number of M Well, he’s just returned from a business trip to Holland, so
suggestions from various students as to what Craig’s he hasn’t been to work today, he’s . . . he’s been relaxing.
mother says after each sentence from Craig. Students C Oh, yes of course. He’s been working in Amsterdam, hasn’t
should be trying to use the Present Perfect and the he? Well, I’m glad he’s relaxing now. And what about you,
Present Perfect Continuous, so prompt this. Mum?
It is very important that you stop the recording at the
M Well, I was going to ring you actually. You see I’m coming
right moment, so that students can work out from to London next Tuesday. I’m going to a teachers’
Craig’s replies what his mother said. It doesn’t matter conference at the university, and I wondered if I could stay
at your flat.

Unit 13  .  Earning a living 107


C Next Tuesday. That’s great! Of course you can stay at my 1 Tell students the following information about phone
flat. I’ll try to leave work earlier that day and I’ll meet you numbers in England.
after the conference. We’ll go out for a meal. Telephone numbers are said one by one. We don’t put
M Lovely! I’m looking forward to it already. two together as many languages do. 71 is seven one, not
C Me too. See you next week. Bye for now. Love to Dad! seventy-one.
M Bye, Craig. Take care.
0 is pronounced /əʊ/.
Language work Two numbers the same are usually said with double, for
example, double three.
Students read the tapescript on p127 to find examples of the
Practise the telephone numbers first as a class, then in
Present Perfect Simple and Continuous.
pairs. This is to establish a correct model. Try to get a
pause after each group of numbers.
Roleplay Example
1 Depending on how you and your class feel after the 020 (pause) 7927 (pause) 4863
listening activity, you might want this roleplay to last a
short time or a long time, or you might decide to do it T 13.6
[CD 2: Track 39] Put students in pairs to practise
on another day. Here is a possible approach, which is the numbers then play the recording so that they can
best done on another day. check. Play the recording a second time. Students listen
and repeat.
Photocopy the complete tapescript. (You could begin by
using part of the recording as a dictation.) 2 T 13.7
[CD 2: Track 40] Students listen to the American
Ask two students to start reading the text. Stop after phone numbers. The difference is that Americans say
What have you been doing? Ask students What tense is zero, not O, and say two two, etc, not double two.
this? Ask the two readers to carry on, and ask the rest of Play the recording again. Students listen and repeat.
the class to say Stop! when they find an example of the
Present Perfect Simple or the Continuous. Tapescript
307 4922
Read the introduction to this activity in the Student’s 1–800–878­–5311
Book. Put the question What have you been doing? on 315 253 6031
the board. Remind students that it is Friday evening, and 517 592 2122
ask for some possible answers. 212 726 6390
I’ve been watching TV.
We’ve been playing football. 3 T 13.8
[CD 2: Track 41] Students listen to the recording
I’ve been cooking. and answer the questions. Ask students to check their
Be careful with the suggestions you accept. The Present answers in pairs, then have the feedback.
Perfect Continuous will not always be the right tense. Tapescript
We’ve just had a meal. P = Peter J = John
I went to a match last night. 1 P Hello. 793422.
Ask for some other questions you might ask, and put J Hello, Peter. This is John.
them on the board. P Hi, John. How are you?
J Fine, thanks. And you?
What have your parents been doing?
P All right. Did you have a nice weekend? You went away,
What did you do last night? Did you go out?
didn’t you?
2 Ask students to work in pairs to have a chat on the J Yes, we went to see some friends who live in the
telephone. Finally, ask one or two pairs to have their country. It was lovely. We had a good time.
conversation again so everyone can hear. P Ah, good.
J Peter, could you do me a favour? I’m playing squash
tonight, but my racket’s broken. Can I borrow yours?
EVERYDAY ENGLISH  (SB p109) P Sure, that’s fine.
J Thanks a lot. I’ll come and get it in half an hour, if that’s
Telephoning OK.
You need to photocopy tapescript T 13.8 to do this section, P Yes, I’ll be in.
and sufficient role cards for your class. They are on p123 of J OK. Bye.
the Teacher’s Book. P Bye.

108 Unit 13  .  Earning a living


A = Receptionist B = Student C = Shereen, a teacher 5 There are six role cards. A works with B, C with D, and E
2 A Good morning. International School of English. with F. Make sure you get your sums right when you are
B Hello, could I speak to Shereen, please? deciding how many copies to make! Every A needs a B,
A Hold on. I’ll connect you. every C needs a D, and every E needs an F. If you have
C Hello. an odd number of students, you will have to take a role
A Hello. Can I speak to Shereen, please? yourself. Give out the cards and let students prepare on
C Speaking. their own. Say you will give them a role card which tells
A Ah, hello. I saw your advertisement about English them who they are and who’s phoning who. On each
classes in a magazine. Could you send me some one, there are decisions to be made. Give an example
information, please? from A’s card: You are at home. It’s 7.00 in the evening.
C Certainly. Can I just take some details? Could you give What are you doing? Watching TV? Reading? Doing your
me your name and address, please? homework?
A = Mike’s flatmate B = Jim When you feel students are ready, ask the As to find a B,
3 A Hello. the Cs to find a D, and the Es to find an F. They can do
B Hello. Is that Mike? the roleplay standing up. Remind them that A, C, and E
A No, I’m afraid he’s out at the moment. Can I take a must start the conversation.
message?
B Yes, please. Can you say that Jim phoned, and I’ll try When they have finished, ask two or three pairs to do
again later. Do you know what time he’ll be back? their roleplay again in front of the class so everyone can
A In about an hour, I think. hear. It’s a nice idea to put two chairs back to back when
B Thanks. Goodbye. doing this, so students can’t see each other’s lips and
A Goodbye. have to rely on what they hear.
Answers
Don’t forget!
1 Peter is speaking to John.
John wants to borrow a squash racket. Workbook Unit 13
They know each other well. Exercise 10  is a vocabulary exercise which revises many of
2 A girl speaks first to a receptionist, then to Shereen. the phrasal verbs students have met in New Headway
The girl wants some information about English classes. Plus Special Edition Pre-Intermediate.
They don’t know each other. Exercises 11 and 12  Students are asked to write a formal or
3 Jim speaks to a friend of Mike’s. informal email.
Jim wants to speak to Mike, but Mike isn’t in. Word list
Jim doesn’t seem to know the man he talks to. Photocopy the Word list for Unit 13 (TB p129) for your
students, and ask them to write in the translations, learn
1 Read through the expressions in the Caution box as a them at home, and/or write some of the words into their
class. vocabulary notebook.
2 Complete the expressions as a class.
Answers
Could I speak to Shereen?
I’m afraid he’s out at the moment.
Can I take a message?
I’ll try again later.
Drill the expressions around the class.
Answers
3 Hold on. I’ll connect you is what a receptionist says
when he or she is putting you through to the extension
you want. Hold on means Wait.
We say Speaking when someone asks to speak to, say,
Mrs Black, and you are Mrs Black.

4 Ask students to look at the tapescript on p127 of the


Student’s Book and practise the dialogues in pairs.

Unit 13  .  Earning a living 109


Introduction
to the unit
14 Past Perfect
Reported statements
Saying goodbye
Family ties

Language aims
Grammar – Past Perfect  All perfect tenses (Present Perfect, Past Perfect, and
Future Perfect) express the idea of an action being completed before a certain
The theme of this unit is family
time. The Present Perfect expresses an action which happened before now; the
relationships. In the first presentation,
Past Perfect expresses an action which happened before another action in the
students read a newspaper article about
past. Neither the form nor the concept of the Past Perfect present learners with
twins reunited after 40 years and
any great difficulty. There are none of the complexities of use that confront
examine the Past Perfect in relation to
students with the Present Perfect.
the Past Simple. In the second
presentation, reported statements are However, students still need to perceive the relationship between the Past
practised. The link between the Past Simple and the Past Perfect, and to understand when the latter tense is needed
Perfect and reported speech is that the to show one action finished before another one started. There is also the
Past Perfect is used in reporting past problem that ’d is the contracted form of both would and had, and there are
tense verb forms. exercises to practise this in the Student’s Book and the Pronunciation book.
In the Vocabulary and speaking section, Reported statements  Tense usage in reported speech is relatively
students are invited to examine the straightforward and logical. Students need to perceive the mechanics of ‘one
difference between bring/take and tense back’. This unit does not go into areas such as here changing to there, and
come/go. yesterday changing to the day before, or any of the occasions when the verb
form does not shift one tense back in reported speech. However, it does look at
In the Reading and speaking section,
the difference between say and tell, which is often confused as this distinction
students read a folk tale called ‘The
does not exist in many languages.
Three Princes’. In the Listening and
speaking section, students listen to Common mistake
two people who live abroad talking *He said me that he liked me.
about their families. Everyday English  As this is the final activity in New Headway Plus Special
Edition Pre-Intermediate, the Everyday English section practises different ways
of saying goodbye.

Notes on the unit


Starter (SB p110)
Students work in pairs to match a line in A with a line in B. The aim is to revise
past and present tenses which have already appeared in this book. The past
perfect is not included in this starter.
Answers
John met Pete in 1986.
They were working in Paris when they met.
They’ve been good friends for a long time.
They play tennis every Thursday.
They’ve been working together recently.

110 Unit 14  .  Family ties


FAMILY REUNITED  (SB p110) grammar spot   (SB p111)
Read and answer the questions as a class.
Past Perfect
Answers
suggestion 1 In text A the events of the story are told in the order
This is probably the first time your students have been in which they happened. The verbs are in the Past
formally introduced to the Past Perfect, although they Simple tense.
may well have come across it in their reading, and it has
2 Their mother had died . . .
been used occasionally in previous units of New Headway
They hadn’t seen each other . . .
Plus Special Edition Pre-Intermediate. You might want to
In text B, the two tenses used are Past Simple and
present the tense yourself before beginning this unit. Here
Past Perfect.
is one possible deductive approach.
3 In the first sentence, they were in the middle of
Write the following two sentences on the board.
leaving as we arrived.
When we arrived, Anna made some coffee. In the second sentence, we arrived and immediately
When we arrived, Anna had made some coffee. they left.
Ask students the following questions: In the third sentence, they left before we arrived.
What are the tenses in the first sentence? (both Past Simple) Refer students to Grammar Reference 14.1 on p142.
Which action happened first, we arrived or Anna made
some coffee? (we arrived) 3 T 14.1
[CD 2: Track 42] Play the recording and ask
You could ask similar questions about the second students to read and listen to text B. They should
sentence if you think students might know the answer, underline examples of the Past Perfect.
or you might choose to tell them. Answers
In the second sentence, had made is the Past Perfect. It Their mother had died
is used to show that one action happened before they hadn’t seen
another action in the past. So in the second sentence, David had always known
Anna made some coffee before we arrived. They had lived
The Past Perfect is formed with the auxiliary verb had they had both had cats
and the past participle. they had both studied
they had both married
You could put the following on the board.
We arrived.    She made coffee. In pairs, students practise reading the text aloud.
Action 1 Action 2 4 Ask students to work in pairs to correct the sentences.

She had made some coffee.     We arrived. Answers


1 They hadn’t seen each other for thirty years.
Action 1 Action 2 2 They didn’t live together because their mother had died.
3 He had always known he had a brother.
4 They’d both studied languages.
1 Ask students to look at the headline. They write
questions that they would like answered. Share the
questions as a class. Write the most interesting question PRACTICE  (SB p111)
on the board.
2 Students read the two versions. Did they find any of the Speaking
answers to the questions they wrote in exercise 1? What 1 Ask students to work in pairs and to tell the story in the
was the question? What was the answer? pictures. Stress the fact that they must do this first in
Do this before addressing the more substantial task of chronological order. Ask What tense will you use? The
comparing the two texts. Don’t let this go into too much answer is the Past Simple.
depth. The simple answer, and the only one that is really
necessary here, is that in text A, the information is Sample answer
presented in chronological order very factually. In text B, They spoke for hours on the phone, telling each other about
the information is presented in a more dramatic style, their lives. They sent each other photos of their families. They
and events are not told in the order in which they visited the hospital where they were born. They met at Bob’s
happened in real life. house.

Unit 14  .  Family ties 111


2 Discuss this as a class. WHAT DID HE SAY?   (SB p112)
Answer Reported statements
When they met at Bob’s house, they had already swapped
photos. This is the true sentence, because the swapping of 1 T 14.3
[CD 2: Track 44] Ask students to listen and
photos happened before they met. complete what Ben says. In the feedback, read them out
one by one, and ask students to identify the tense.
3 Students now tell the story again, beginning at picture 4.
Answers and tapescript
Sample answer ‘I like John very much.’
When Bob and David met again at Bob’s house, they had ‘I met him at university.’
spoken to each other on the phone for hours, and had told ‘We’re quite similar.’
each other many stories from their lives. They had also sent ‘We’ve travelled a lot together.’
each other lots of photos of their families, and had visited ‘I’m seeing John this evening.’
the hospital where they had been born. ‘I’ll phone him to arrange a time.’

4 Students work in small groups to write a similar 2


T 14.4 [CD 2: Track 45] Play the recording.
newspaper article. Students listen.

Sample answer Tapescript


Jane Williams and her long-lost sister, Amy, met each other at A What did Ben tell you?
the Carlton Hotel yesterday. Their parents had disappeared in B He told me that he liked John very much. He said that he’d
a hurricane while the family were on holiday in the met him at university and that they were quite similar. He
Caribbean, and they hadn’t seen each other for 15 years. They told me that they’d travelled a lot together. He said that he
found each other through friends. They had lived in the same was seeing John this evening and that he’d phone him to
town, they had studied at the same university, and they had arrange a time.
gone shopping in the same mall, but they had never met.
3 Students practise the sentences. Insist that they use
contracted forms.
Grammar and pronunciation
grammar spot   (SB p112)
5 Students work in pairs to make sentences from the
chart. Do one or two as a class as an example. Answer the questions as a class.

Sample answers and tapescript Answers


I was delighted because I’d passed all my exams. 1 Tenses move ‘one back’.
I was hungry because I hadn’t had any breakfast. 2 Say is used without an object:
I went to bed early because I’d had a busy day. He said that he liked him.
Our teacher was angry because we hadn’t done the homework. Tell is used with an object:
My leg hurt because I’d fallen over playing football. He told me that he liked him.
The plants died because I’d forgotten to water them. Refer students to Grammar Reference 14.2 on p142.
The road was wet because we’d had rain the night before.

T 14.2
[CD 2: Track 43] Play the recording so that suggestion
students can check their answers. Then play and pause Your students might enjoy some freer practice. Put
and ask students to repeat, paying attention to the students in groups of three. Give them three or four
contracted forms of had (’d) and had not (hadn’t) /hædnt/. minutes to write down as many ‘secrets’ as they can
think of. They don’t have to be real. Give them a few
Additional material ideas to start: I love chocolate, I’ve met the Queen, etc.
Workbook Unit 14 Model the activity by whispering a ‘secret’ in a student’s
Exercises 1–4  practise the Past Perfect. ear. They must pass on your secret using He/She said …
or He/She told me that … Once they have the idea, let
suggestion them take it in turns to pass on ‘secrets’. In the
Your students might be tired of doing accuracy work, feedback, find out what secrets they heard and correct
and might prefer to do some fluency work before any errors involving reported statements.
beginning the second presentation. You could do the
reading activity on p114.

112 Unit 14  .  Family ties


PRACTICE  (SB p112) VOCABULARY AND SPEAKING  (SB p113)
An interview Hot verbs – bring, take, come, go
1 T 14.5
Students listen to an interview with Bob Taylor. 1 Read the introduction as a class.
Tapescript 2 Students underline the examples of the verbs, than ask
I So, Bob, what was it like when you met David? and answer them.
B Well, I didn’t know about him, but I’m pleased that I know
Sample answers
him now. We met each other for the first time a few weeks
1 I brought my book and my dictionary.
ago, and we have a lot in common.
2 I sometimes take some flowers.
I You now live in Oxford, is that right?
3 My friends come to visit me.
B Yes, I’ve been married for ten years. I live with my wife,
4 I usually go into town for a coffee.
Beth, in Oxford. She’s a photographer.
I When are you and David seeing each other again? 3 Look at the picture and read the explanation with the
B David’s coming to see me next week, and he’s bringing his class.
three children. I’m sure they’ll get on well with my
children. 4 T 14.7
[CD 2: Track 48] Ask students to work in pairs to
complete the conversations. Then play the recording for
2 T 14.6
[CD 2: Track 47] Ask the students, in pairs, to them to check.
complete the report of the interview.
Answers and tapescript
Answers and tapescript 1 A Goodbye, everyone! I’m going on holiday tomorrow.
In my interview, Bob Taylor said that he (1) had never known B Where are you going?
about David, but he (2) was pleased that he (3) knew him A Australia. I’m taking my family to visit their cousins in
now. They (4) had met each other for the time a few weeks Sydney.
ago, and they found they (5) had a lot in common. B Lucky you! When you come back, bring me a T-shirt!
He told me he (6) had been married for ten years, and that 2 A Listen, class! Please finish your work before you go
he now (7) lived in Oxford with his wife, Beth, who (8) was a home. And tomorrow, don’t forget to bring in your
photographer. money for the school trip. We’re going to the Natural
He said that David (9) was coming to see him next week, and History Museum.
he was bringing his three children. He was sure they B Oh, Miss Jones! Can’t you take us somewhere more
(10) would get on well with his children. exciting?
3 A Martin, you were very late last night. What time did you
come home?
Check it B It was before midnight, Mum, honest. Mick brought me
3 Ask students to work in pairs to report the statements. home in his car.
Alternatively, you could set this for homework. 4 A I’ve been decorating my new flat. You must come and
visit me on Saturday. And bring Emma and Jane with
Answers you. I’ll cook you a meal.
1 Jim said (that) he liked Anna. B Great! We’ll bring some ice-cream for dessert.
2 Anna said (that) she was staying with her aunt. 5 A I’ll miss you when I go back home to Morocco. You must
3 Sue said (that) Mr Walker had phoned before lunch. come and visit me next year.
She said (added) (that) he hadn’t left a message. B I’d love to! I want you to take this photo with you. It
4 Ken said he didn’t think it would rain. will remind you of the day we went to Oxford together.
5 Sue said (that) Ken had gone home. A OK. And when you visit, bring me some more English
She said (added) (that) he had gone early. books to read!
6 Anna told Jim (that) she would ring him that evening. 6 A I’m going to London tomorrow, so tonight my best
friend is coming round to my house to say goodbye.
Refer students to Grammar Reference 14.2 on p142 for
She’s bringing a present she wants me to take to her
homework.
sister in London.
Additional material B Well, have a good trip!

Workbook Unit 14
Exercises 5 and 6  practise reported speech.
Exercise 7  practises the verbs say and tell.

Unit 14  .  Family ties 113


READING AND SPEAKING  (SB p114) Answers
1e to set off / out on a journey = to start a journey
The Three Princes – a folk tale 2f to come to a crossroads = to arrive at a place where the
Introduce the topic by asking students for the names of roads meet
some folk tales they know. They could be from their own, 3d to meet up with some friends = to meet some friends
or another culture. Help them with the vocabulary they socially, after arranging it
need if they are trying to translate the titles from their own 4b to get on a bus / plane / boat = to enter a bus / plane /
language. If you have time, you could ask them to give brief boat (train etc.) You get in a car.
summaries of the stories, but don’t let this go on for too long. 5c to go back to your own country = to return to your own
country, after going abroad
1 Exercises 1 and 2 are vocabulary exercises that will help 6a to pick up some paper on the floor = to use your hand to
students to understand the text. Ask students which take some paper from the floor
of the objects in the box they would expect to find in
a folk tale. Make sure that they know: a jar of cream – 3 T 14.8
[CD 2: Track 49] Ask students to read and listen to
this could be something that you rub on your skin to the first part of the story. You can play the recording, or
make it feel better, a crystal ball – a ball made of glass, read the story aloud yourself if you prefer. If the students
a crossroads – where three or four roads meet, a flying hear the story as they read it, it will help them understand
carpet – the carpet is in the illustration. it, and make sure that they all finish at the same time.
Students can work in pairs or groups to discuss the
words. You can then check the answers as a class. What do you think?
Answers Ask students to discuss the questions with a partner. There
a prince You often find princes in folk tales. They are are no definite answers to the questions, so you can discuss
the sons of kings, and are often looking for a them as a class and compare different answers.
princess to marry. Sample answers
a jar of cream This not something you would expect to find • The king is probably about 45, the princess is probably
in a folk tale (but it appears in this one). about 21, the princes are probably about 19, 21, and 23, and
a crystal ball This is common in folk tales. People often Ziyad is probably about 75 or 80.
use them to see what is happening in • They probably each told the others why they thought they
another place. would be the princess’s first choice as husband. Whatever
a sofa No, this is too modern a word for a folk tale. the students suggest, remind them that the princes are
a banana No, definitely not common in folk tales! very arrogant.
a policeman No, this is another word that’s too modern • It’s a common theme in fairy tales for the king to give a
for a folk tale. challenge to anyone who wants to marry his daughter. It’s
a king Yes, definitely. a way to test that the person is good and strong enough
a princess Yes, a common character. to marry the princess. In this case, it is also a way to decide
a crossroads Yes, it is common to have a crossroads in which of the princes should marry the princess.
folk tales. • They probably wanted to see what objects the other
a flying carpet Yes, especially in Middle Eastern folk tales. brothers had found, so that they could think of reasons
a palace Yes, this is where the king, queen, prince, why their object was the best. This answer should be an
and princess live. opportunity to practise the Present Perfect.
2 Ask students to match the phrasal verbs with the nouns. 4 T 14.9
[CD 2: Track 50] Ask students to read and listen to
They will know some of the phrasal verbs, and will be the second part of the story.
able to get an idea of what the others mean from trying
to match them with the nouns. Discuss the answers as a What do you think?
class. All of these verbs appear in the text, so give plenty
of examples and ask questions using the verbs (e.g. Ask students to discuss the questions with a partner. Again,
What time do you set off for college in the mornings?), so there are no definite answers to the questions, and the
that students will be familiar with them. first two questions are an opportunity for personalised
discussion, so you can discuss them as a class and compare
different answers. Without placing too much emphasis on
it, try to repeat the idea that the cream can make someone
young again if the right person uses it, as this is important
at the end of the story. The last question is a good way to
create interest in how the story ends.

114 Unit 14  .  Family ties


5 T 14.10
[CD 2: Track 51] Ask students to read and listen to P No, the journey took five days. They landed in New York and
the last part of the story. stayed there for two years. Then they moved to Philadelphia,
where my grandfather worked in the port. He was a ship-
6 Ask students to work in pairs to decide whether
builder. My grandmother washed clothes, and she brought
the sentences are true or false, and correct the false
up the kids. My father was born in Philadelphia in 1943, and
sentences.
when he was sixteen they moved to Pittsburgh. He’d finished
Answers school by then, and he went to work in the factories. I
1 False. When the princes returned, the king and Ziyad were What was he doing?
looking anxious. P He was in the steel mills.
2 True. When the cream was used, the princess felt better I When he was just sixteen?
seconds later. P Oh, yes. They started young in those days. Then he met
3 False. Ziyad asked the princess who she wanted to marry. and married my mother, Eileen, and I was born, and my
4 False. The princess rubbed the cream on Ziyad’s hand. two sisters were born. We all went to school in
5 True. The princes had a little less arrogance than before. Philadelphia, and now I work in the police force. I’m a
detective. Now Peggy, my wife, and I are second
generation Americans. I’m American, my kids are American,
Language work and we love it!
Ask students to work in pairs to complete the sentences. D = Daniel  I = Interviewer
There may be some slight differences in the way the answers Daniel
are phrased, but this isn’t important. It’s more important to I Where is your family from, Daniel?
make sure they are using the Past Perfect correctly. D We’re all from England. My dad’s from the north of
Answers England, and my mum’s Scottish.
1 ... he had known her / the princess since she was a small I And now you’re all living in the Middle East?
child / little girl. D That’s right, in Dubai, in the United Arab Emirates.
2 ... they had travelled for one week. I When did your family move abroad?
3 ... what they had brought back / found. D Well, my parents left the UK in 1986 and came to the
4 ... had fallen / had become gravely / very / seriously ill. Middle East because of my father’s job. He’s in the oil
5 ... had saved ... industry. He works for Shell – he’s been with them for over
twenty years.
I And where did they live at first?
LISTENING AND SPEAKING  (SB p116) D First, er, first they were in Riyadh, the capital of Saudi
Arabia. Then they were in Jeddah, on the coast, next to the
Families that live abroad Red Sea.
I How long had they been in Riyadh before they moved?
1 Discuss the questions as a class. D Erm ... let me think. I was born in Riyadh in 1987, and we
2 Discuss the questions as a class. moved when I was three, so that makes it 1990 when we
went to Jeddah, so they’d been in Riyadh for four years . . .
3 T 14.11
[CD 2: Track 52] Students listen to Patrick and yeah, four years.
Daniel and answer the questions. Play the recording and I And all this time your father worked for the oil company?
get the answers for Patrick first, then play the interview D Yeah, he was an area manager. And my mother was an
with Daniel. English teacher. She taught at the King Abdul Aziz
Answers and tapescript University in Jeddah, teaching first year business students.
P = Patrick  I = Interviewer Then we all moved to Dubai in 1992, and we’ve been here
Patrick ever since.
I Where are you from originally, Patrick? I You have a sister, right?
P Well, my family is originally from Ireland. My grandfather D Yeah, Sasha. She’s three years younger than me.
and his wife came to the United States from Ireland in I Where did you go to school?
1935. They came from Cork, so they’d travelled from Cork D Well, there’s an international British School in Jeddah that
to Dublin by train, and then they took the boat from we both went to. I’m now studying at university, business
Dublin to New York. studies, and Sasha’s still at school, another international
I I bet that was a long journey. How long? A week? school here in Dubai. She wants to be a doctor.
I Oh, really? That’s great. And do you like it in Dubai?
D Sure! It’s a great life. The climate’s ideal, and there’s lots to
do as long as you’ve got some money in your pocket!

Unit 14  .  Family ties 115


Answers Suggested ideas
Patrick • Goodbye. Make sure you keep in touch. Look after
1 His grandfather and his wife went to the United States. yourself.
They went to New York because they were emigrating to • Goodbye. I’ve really enjoyed the holiday.
the United States and the boat went from Dublin to New • Goodbye. Have a nice weekend.
York. • Goodbye. Thank you for everything. / Keep in touch.
2 They lived in New York.
3 They had been in the United States for two years.
4 On the first map, students should draw a line from Cork to Don’t forget!
Dublin to New York, labelled 1935. They should also draw a
line from New York to Philadelphia, labelled 1943, and a Workbook Unit 14
line from Philadelphia to Pittsburgh, labelled 1959. Exercise 8  is a vocabulary exercise on words that are often
5 His grandfather worked in the port as a ship-builder. His confused, e.g. say and tell, lend and borrow.
grandmother washed clothes. His father worked in Exercise 9  Students are given the beginning and ending of a
factories. story, and are asked to write the middle.
6 He has two sisters. Word list
7 They all went to school in Philadelphia. Photocopy the Word list for Unit 14 (TB p129) for your
8 They love it. students, and ask them to write in the translations, learn
Daniel them at home, and/or write some of the words into their
1 His father and mother went to Riyadh, in Saudi Arabia, vocabulary notebook.
because of his father’s job. Progress test 3
2 They lived in Riyadh. There is a Progress test for Units 11–14 on p144 of the
3 For four years. Teacher’s Book.
4 On the second map, students should draw a line from Stop and check 4 (TB p136)
Riyadh to Jeddah, and write 1986 next to Riyadh and 1990 It’s time for the final revision.
next to Jeddah. They should then draw a line from Jeddah
to Dubai, labelled 1992. A suggestion for approaching the Stop and check tests is in
5 His father works in the oil industry. His mother was an the introduction on p5 of the Teacher’s Book.
English teacher.
6 He has a sister.
7 He and his sister went to an international school in Jeddah.
She is now at an international school in Dubai. He is at
university.
8 Yes. Life is great.

What do you think?


Students look at the pictures and discuss the questions.

EVERYDAY ENGLISH  (SB p117)


Saying goodbye
1 Ask students to work together to match the sentences
with the photos.
Answers
1c 2h 3e 4b 5g 6d 7a 8f

2 T 14.12
[CD 2: Track 53] Students listen to the sentences
and check their answers. Ask students to work in pairs
to practise saying the sentences.
3 In pairs, ask students to prepare short conversations for
the situations. Let some pairs act out one of their
conversations for the class.

116 Unit 14  .  Family ties


Photocopiable material
UNITS 1–14

Unit 1  Getting information (SB p8)

Student A Student B
Jack Dawson started working as a postman Jack Dawson started working as a
… (When?). He rides a bike because he postman thirty years ago, when he was
delivers letters to a lot of small villages. 22. He rides a bike because … (Why?).
He gets up at … (What time?) and starts He gets up at 3.30 in the morning and
work at 5.00. Every day he cycles about starts work at … (When?). Every day he
… miles (How many miles?). He finishes cycles about 15 miles. He finishes work
work at 2.00 in the afternoon. at … (What time?).
After work he goes … (Where?) and has After work he goes home and has lunch
lunch with his wife, Joy. She has a with … (Who … with?). She has a part-
part-time job. She works … (Where?). time job. She works in a shop. They like
They like gardening, so they spend the … (What … like doing?), so they spend
afternoon outside in their garden. the afternoon outside in their garden.
They have … children (How many?), who They have two children, who both live in
both live in California. Last year Jack and … (Where?). Last year Jack and Joy went
Joy went … (Where?) and visited their to Los Angeles and visited … (Who?).
children and four grandchildren. They They stayed for a month.
stayed for … (How long?). They’re going … (Where?) next month
They’re going to Australia next month because some friends are having a big
because … (Why?). It’s their friends’ celebration. … (Why?)
wedding anniversary, and they want
everyone to be there.

© Oxford University Press 2014  Photocopiable Unit 1  .  Photocopiable material 117


Unit 2  Getting information (SB p16)
Student B

Name and age Town and country Family Occupation Free time/holiday Present activity
Mohamed, 26 Dubai, UAE two works for a • surfing the Internet watching TV
brothers computer company • Europe
Sarah, 38 Amman, Jordan a son and • reading and reading a book
a daughter part-time teacher cooking
• Egypt
Nicole, 15

Jeff, 54, and


Wendy, 53

Student B

Name and age Town and country Family Occupation Free time/holiday Present activity
Mohamed, 26 Dubai, UAE two works for a • surfing the Internet watching TV
brothers computer company • Europe
Sarah, 38 Amman, Jordan a son and • reading and reading a book
a daughter part-time teacher cooking
• Egypt
Nicole, 15

Jeff, 54, and


Wendy, 53

118 Unit 2  .  Photocopiable material © Oxford University Press 2014  Photocopiable


Unit 3  Exchanging information (SB p25)
Student B
Read the article on this page. You do not have the same information as your partner.
Ask and answer questions to complete the information about the teenager.

Teenager goes on spending spree


with brother’s credit card
Teenager Hugo Fenton-Jones borrowed his elder brother Peter’s credit card while Peter was …
(What?). He then flew to Paris and stayed at the … Hotel (Which hotel?). His room cost £800
a night. Next he took a taxi to … (Where?). While he was shopping, he bought expensive
clothes, a Cartier watch and Armani sunglasses.
Back at the hotel, Hugo phoned his friends … (Why?). They were having lunch in the
restaurant at the Ritz when Peter phoned.
He was furious with his brother and … (What?).
Hugo flew back early next morning. When he arrived at London airport, his … waiting
for him (Who?). ‘They aren’t speaking to me at the moment,’ said Hugo yesterday.
‘They’re too angry.’

A B
What did Hugo Fenton-Jones borrow? He borrowed his brother’s credit card.

He was working on his computer. What was his brother doing?



Student B
Read the article on this page. You do not have the same information as your partner.
Ask and answer questions to complete the information about the teenager.

Teenager goes on spending spree


with brother’s credit card
Teenager Hugo Fenton-Jones borrowed his elder brother Peter’s credit card while Peter was …
(What?). He then flew to Paris and stayed at the … Hotel (Which hotel?). His room cost £800
a night. Next he took a taxi to … (Where?). While he was shopping, he bought expensive
clothes, a Cartier watch and Armani sunglasses.
Back at the hotel, Hugo phoned his friends … (Why?). They were having lunch in the
restaurant at the Ritz when Peter phoned.
He was furious with his brother and … (What?).
Hugo flew back early next morning. When he arrived at London airport, his … waiting
for him (Who?). ‘They aren’t speaking to me at the moment,’ said Hugo yesterday.
‘They’re too angry.’

A B
What did Hugo Fenton-Jones borrow? He borrowed his brother’s credit card.

He was working on his computer. What was his brother doing?

© Oxford University Press 2014  Photocopiable Unit 3  .  Photocopiable material 119


Unit 6  Comparing four capital cities (SB p48)
Student A

Paris (Île de France) Beijing


Founded 990 Founded 1272 BC
Population 10,500,000 Population 10,819,000
Area 12,012 km2 Area 16,808 km2
Temperatures Jan: 4°C July: 20°C Temperatures Jan: –4°C July: 26°C
Rainfall Jan: 56 mm July: 59 mm Rainfall Jan: 4 mm July: 250 mm
Km from the sea 150 Km from the sea 180

Damascus Brasilia
Founded ____________ Founded ____________
Population ____________ Population ____________
Area ____________ Area ____________
Temperatures ____________ ____________ Temperatures ____________ ____________
Rainfall ____________ ____________ Rainfall ____________ ____________
Km from the sea ____________ Km from the sea ____________

Student B

Paris (Île de France) Beijing


Founded ____________ Founded ____________
Population ____________ Population ____________
Area ____________ Area ____________
Temperatures ____________ ____________ Temperatures ____________ ____________
Rainfall ____________ ____________ Rainfall ____________ ____________
Km from the sea ____________ Km from the sea ____________

Damascus Brasilia
Founded 6300 BC Founded 1960
Population 1,711,000 Population 1,492,500
Area 105 km2 Area 5,814 km2
Temperatures Jan: 12°C July: 36°C Temperatures Jan: 20°C July: 19°C
Rainfall Jan: 43 mm July: 0 mm Rainfall Jan: 94 mm July: 46 mm
Km from the sea 80 Km from the sea 600

120 Unit 6  .  Photocopiable material © Oxford University Press 2014  Photocopiable


Unit 7  Find someone who . . . (SB p55)

Find someone who has Find someone who has Find someone who has
been to France. been to Portugal. written a poem.

Find someone who has


Find someone who has Find someone who has
had a picnic with more
been to Australia. been skiing.
than ten people.

Find someone who has Find someone who has Find someone who has
tried Thai food. flown in a balloon. been ice-skating.

Find someone who has Find someone who has Find someone who has
climbed a mountain. won a competition. been sailing.

Find someone who


Find someone who has Find someone who has
has read a book by a
broken a bone. been wind-surfing.
British author.

Find someone who Find someone who


Find someone who has
has had an adventure has lost something
been to university.
holiday. important.

Find someone who has Find someone who has Find someone who has
been to Italy. worked in a shop. never failed an exam.

© Oxford University Press 2014  Photocopiable Unit 7  .  Photocopiable material 121


Unit 13  Getting information (SB p104)

Student A Student B
Dr. Nahed Taher works for ... (Who ... for?) She Dr. Nahed Taher works for the Gulf One
is their Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and has Investment Bank. She is their Chief Executive
been running the bank since 2005, when she Officer (CEO), and has been running the bank
became the first female CEO of a bank in the since ... (How long?), when she became the first
Gulf region. female CEO of a bank in the Gulf region.
Nahed was born in 1964 in ... (Where?), and Nahed was born in 1964, in Saudi Arabia, and
studied at the King Abdulaziz University in studied at the King Abdulaziz University in
Jeddah. She then went to Lancaster University Jeddah. She then went to ... (Which?) University
in the UK to do an MSc and PhD. in the UK to do an MSc and PhD.
In ... (When?) she returned to Saudi Arabia, In 2001 she returned to Saudi Arabia, where
where she first worked as a Senior Economist at she first worked as a Senior Economist at the
the National Commercial Bank. She was the first National Commercial Bank. She was the first
female to become a senior manager at the bank, female to become a senior manager at the bank,
which employs 4,000 men. which employs ... (How many?) men.
Under her management, The Gulf One Bank has Under her management, The Gulf One Bank
been growing successfully, and now has $... has been growing successfully, and now has
(How much?) in its investment fund. The bank $2 billion in its investment fund. The bank has
has 50 employees of 34 nationalities, and they 50 employees of 34 nationalities, and they all
all speak English at work. speak ... (What language?) at work.
Dr. Taher has been named Businesswoman of Dr. Taher has been named Businesswoman
the Year ... times (How many times?), and in of the Year two times, and in 2006 she was ...
2006 she was 72 in a list of the world’s 100 most (What number?) in a list of the world’s 100 most
powerful women. powerful women.

Student A Student B
Dr. Nahed Taher works for ... (Who ... for?) She Dr. Nahed Taher works for the Gulf One
is their Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and has Investment Bank. She is their Chief Executive
been running the bank since 2005, when she Officer (CEO), and has been running the bank
became the first female CEO of a bank in the since ... (How long?), when she became the first
Gulf region. female CEO of a bank in the Gulf region.
Nahed was born in 1964 in ... (Where?), and Nahed was born in 1964, in Saudi Arabia, and
studied at the King Abdulaziz University in studied at the King Abdulaziz University in
Jeddah. She then went to Lancaster University Jeddah. She then went to ... (Which?) University
in the UK to do an MSc and PhD. in the UK to do an MSc and PhD.
In ... (When?) she returned to Saudi Arabia, In 2001 she returned to Saudi Arabia, where
where she first worked as a Senior Economist at she first worked as a Senior Economist at the
the National Commercial Bank. She was the first National Commercial Bank. She was the first
female to become a senior manager at the bank, female to become a senior manager at the bank,
which employs 4,000 men. which employs ... (How many?) men.
Under her management, The Gulf One Bank has Under her management, The Gulf One Bank
been growing successfully, and now has $... has been growing successfully, and now has
(How much?) in its investment fund. The bank $2 billion in its investment fund. The bank has
has 50 employees of 34 nationalities, and they 50 employees of 34 nationalities, and they all
all speak English at work. speak ... (What language?) at work.
Dr. Taher has been named Businesswoman of Dr. Taher has been named Businesswoman
the Year ... times (How many times?), and in of the Year two times, and in 2006 she was ...
2006 she was 72 in a list of the world’s 100 most (What number?) in a list of the world’s 100 most
powerful women. powerful women.

122 Unit 13  .  Photocopiable material © Oxford University Press 2014  Photocopiable
Unit 13  Everyday English (SB p109)

Student A Student B
Phone number 322 4987 Information You’re at home. It’s 7.00 in the evening.
Information You’re at home. It’s 7.00 in the It’s time to do tonight’s English homework, but you
evening. have a problem. You’ve forgotten what it is, and
You’re watching TV. You’ve already done your you’ve left your copy of New Headway Plus Special
homework. It was the vocabulary exercise on page Edition Pre-Intermediate at school. You’re going to
phone your friend A, who’s in the same class.
105 of New Headway Plus Special Edition Pre-
Intermediate. Decision What are you doing for the rest of the
evening? If you need to borrow a copy of New
Decision What are you doing for the rest of the Headway Plus Special Edition Pre-Intermediate,
evening? Going out? Staying in? could you go round to A’s house? What time?
The phone call Your friend B, who’s in the same The phone call Phone A . A will start the conversation.
class as you, is going to phone. When the phone Ask How are you? and have a little chat before you
rings, pick it up and say your number. ask about the homework. Say I’ve forgotten what
tonight’s homework is. Do you know?

Student C Student D
Phone number 899 0452 Information You’re French, and your name is
Information You’re Mr/Mrs Carr, and you’re Daniel/Denise. You live in Paris. Today is the 18th.
English. You live in London. Your address is 22, Next week, on the 25th, you’re going to England
Hill Road, and your house is about ten minutes for a month to learn English. You’re going to stay
from Highgate tube station, which is on the with Mr and Mrs Carr, who are English. They live
Northern Line. It’s 7.00 in the evening. You’re at in Highgate, which is in North London, but you
home. Today is the 18th. Next week, on the 25th, don’t know the exact address. You’re going to
Student D, Daniel/Denise, from France, is coming phone them to tell them how you’re travelling, and
to stay at your house while he/she learns English what time you expect to arrive.
for a month, but you don’t know how he/she is
travelling to London, or what time he/she expects Decision How are you going to travel? By plane?
to arrive. By boat and train? What time does the plane/train
arrive? Do you want Mr/Mrs Carr to meet you?
Decision Are you going to meet D if he/she comes If you are going to get the tube to their house, you
by plane? What about if he/she comes by train? need to ask Which is the nearest tube station?
The phone call D is going to phone you. When the The phone call Phone C . C will start the
phone rings, pick it up and say your number. Ask conversation. Say I’m phoning to tell you how
questions such as How are you?, Have you packed I’m coming to London. Don’t forget to ask for the
yet? At the end of the conversation, say We’re
address.
looking forward to meeting you.

Student E Student F
Phone number 622 9087 Information It’s 7.00 in the evening. You want to
talk to a friend of yours called Martin. It’s very
Information You’re at home in your flat, which you important. You’ve found a second-hand car that
share with a man called Martin. It’s 7.00 in the you think he’d like to buy.
evening. Martin is out at the moment.
Decision If he isn’t in, are you going to leave a
Decision Where is Martin? When will he be back? message? Are you going to phone back later, or do
Do you know what he’s doing tonight, or not? you want Martin to phone you? Are you in for the
The phone call Someone is going to call. When the rest of the evening, or are you going out?
phone rings, pick it up and say your number. If it’s The phone call Phone Martin. The other person
for Martin, Say Can I take a message? starts the conversation.

© Oxford University Press 2014  Photocopiable Unit 13  .  Photocopiable material 123
Word list
Here is a list of most of the hard (work) ​adj ​/hɑːd/ support v ​/səˈpɔːt/ factory ​n ​/ˈfæktəri/
new words in the units of New hieroglyphics ​n pl ​/ˌhaɪrəˈglɪfɪks/ system ​n ​/ˈsɪstəm/ fast asleep ​adj ​/fɑːst əˈsliːp/
Headway Plus Special Edition Pre- history ​n ​/ˈhɪstəri/ T-shirt ​n ​/ˈtiːˌʃɜːt/ fish ​v ​/fɪʃ/
Intermediate Student’s Book. How many … ? ​/ˌhaʊ ˈmeni/ technology ​n ​/tekˈnɒlədʒi/ flag ​n ​/flæg/
adj = adjective How much … ? ​/ˌhaʊ ˈmʌtʃ/ tell a joke ​v ​/ˌtel ə ˈdʒəʊk/ free time ​n ​/ˌfriː ˈtaɪm/
adv = adverb huge ​adj ​/hjuːdʒ/ tell lies ​v ​/ˌtel ˈlaɪz/ game reserve ​n ​/ˈgeɪm rɪˌzɜːv/
US = American English human ​n ​/ˈhjuːmən/ tell the truth ​v ​/ˌtel ðə ˈtruːθ/ get used to (sth) ​v ​/get ˈjuːst tuː/
coll = colloquial idea ​n ​/aɪˈdɪə/ together ​adv ​/təˈgeðə/ giraffe ​n ​/dʒɪˈrɑːf/
conj = conjunction infinite ​adj ​/ˈɪnfɪnət/ train ​n, v ​/treɪn/ glamorous ​adj ​/ˈglæmərəs/
pl = plural influence ​n ​/ˈɪnflʊəns/ transform ​v ​/trænsˈfɔːm/ go jogging ​v ​/ˌgeʊ ˈdʒɒgɪŋ/
prep = preposition Internet ​n ​/ˈɪntənet/ translator ​n ​/trænzˈleɪtə/ gold ​adj ​/gəʊld/
pron = pronoun invite ​v ​/ɪnˈvaɪt/ unique ​adj ​/juːˈniːk/ grape ​n ​/greɪp/
pp = past participle kind ​adj, n ​/kaɪnd/ until ​conj ​/ʌnˈtɪl/ habit ​n ​/ˈhæbɪt/
n = noun unusual ​adj ​/ʌnˈjuːʒʊəl/ have in common ​v ​
v = verb last ​adj ​/lɑːst/
look after ​v ​/lʊk ˈɑːftə/ wall ​n ​/wɔːl/ /ˌhæv ɪn ˈkɒmən/
whale ​n ​/weɪl/ head office ​n ​/hed ˈɒfɪs/
make a promise ​v ​/ˌmeɪk ə health ​n ​/helθ/
ˈprɒmɪs/ Which … ? ​/wɪtʃ/
Unit 1 make yourself at home ​v ​
/ˌmeɪk jɔːˌself ət ˈhəʊm/
Whose … ? ​/huːz/ ice hockey ​n ​/ˈaɪs ˌhɒki/
in a hurry ​adv ​/ɪn ə ˈhʌri/
married ​pp ​/ˈmærɪd/ immigrant ​n ​/ˈɪmɪgrənt/
advice ​n ​/ˈədˈvaɪs/
alphabet ​n ​/ˈælfəbet/ mean ​adj, v ​/miːn/ Unit 2 in control ​adj ​/ˌɪn kənˈtrəʊl/
ancient society ​n ​/ˈeɪnʃənt media ​n ​/ˈmiːdɪə/ incredible ​adj ​/ɪnˈkredəbl/
səˈsaɪəti/ message ​n ​/ˈmesɪdʒ/ aborigine ​n ​/ˌæbəˈrɪdʒɪniː/ inhabitants ​n pl ​/ɪnˈhæbɪtənts/
anger ​n ​/ˈæŋgə/ mobile phone ​n ​ abroad ​adv ​/əbrɔːd/ inland ​adj ​/ɪnˈlænd/
architect ​n ​/ˈɑːkɪtekt/ /ˌməʊbaɪl ˈfəʊn/ accident ​n ​/ˈæksɪdənt/ island ​n ​/ˈaɪlənd/
as usual ​ /ˈæz ˈjuːʒʊəl/, /əz modern ​adj ​/ˈmɒdən/ alone ​adv ​/əˈɪəʊn/ lake ​n ​/leɪk/
ˈjuːʒəl/ monkey ​n ​/ˈmʌŋki/ amount ​n ​/əˈmaʊnt/ lifestyle ​n ​/ˈlaɪfstaɪl/
at least ​adv ​/ət liːst/ museum ​n ​/mjuːˈzɪəm/ architect ​n ​/ˈɑːkɪtekt/ lion ​n ​/ˈlaɪən/
bee ​n ​/biː/ nobody ​pron ​/ˈnəʊbɒdi/ barbecue ​n ​/ˈbɑːbɪkjuː/ lonely ​adj ​/ˈləʊnli/
bike ​n ​/baɪk/ noise ​n ​/nɔɪz/ baseball ​n ​/ˈbeɪsbɔːl/ mainly ​adv ​/ˈmeɪnli/
book ​v ​/bʊk/ north ​n ​/nɔːθ/ based ​adv ​/beɪst/ marriage ​n ​/ˈmærɪdʒ/
born (Where were you born?) ​pp ​ bungalow ​n ​/ˈbʌŋgələʊ/ miserable ​adj ​/ˈmɪzrəbl/
paper ​n ​/ˈpeɪpə/
/bɔːn/ past ​n ​/pɑːst/ careful ​adj ​/ˈkeəfl/ miss (miss home) ​v ​/mɪs/
borrow v /ˈbɒrəʊ/ persuade ​v ​/pəˈsweɪd/ celebs ​n ​/səˈlebz/ miss (miss the match) ​v ​/mɪs/
can ​v ​/kæn/, /kən/ philosophy ​n ​/fɪˈlɒsəfi/ certainly ​adv ​/ˈsɜːtənli/ motorbike ​n ​/ˈməʊtəˌbaɪk/
climb ​v ​/klaɪm/ photography ​n ​/fəˈtɒgrəfi/ clear up ​v ​/ˌklɪə(r) ˈʌp/ nearly ​adv ​/ˈnɪəli/
come round (= visit) ​v ​ play ​v ​/pleɪ/ climate ​n ​/ˈklaɪmət/ northern ​adj ​/ˈnɔːðən/
/ˌkʌm ˈraʊnd/ pleased to meet you ​/ˈpliːzd tə coast ​n ​/kəʊst/
colleague ​n ​/ˈkɒliːg/ only ​adj ​/ˈəʊnli/
communicate ​v ​/kəˈmjuːnɪkeɪt/ ˈmiːt juː/ organized ​adj ​/ˈɔːgənaɪzd/
communication ​n  poetry ​n ​/ˈpəʊətri/ community ​n ​/kəˈmjuːnəti/
company ​n ​/ˈkʌmpəni/ original ​adj ​/əˈrɪdʒənl/
​/kəˌmjuːnɪˈkeɪʃn/ postlady ​n ​/ˈpəʊstleɪdi/ outdoors ​adv ​/aʊtˈdɔːz/
compared to ​/kəmˈpeəd tə/ present ​n ​/ˈpreznt/ complain ​v ​/kəmˈpleɪn/
probably ​adv ​/ˈprɒbəbli/ computer ​n ​/kəmˈpjuːtə/ parliament ​n ​/ˈpɑːləmənt/
course ​n ​/kɔːs/
public speaking ​n ​/ˈpʌblɪk construction ​n ​/kənˈstrʌkʃn/ partner ​n ​/ˈpɑːtnə/
depend ​v ​/dɪˈpend/ consultant ​n ​/kənˈsʌltənt/ pear ​n ​/peə/
development ​n ​/dɪˈveləpmənt/ ˈspiːkɪŋ/
contrast ​n ​/ˈkɒntrɑːst/ pet (= animal) ​n ​/pet/
drama ​n ​/ˈdrɑːmə/ quiet ​adj ​/ˈkwaɪət/ cosmopolitan ​adj  popular ​adj ​/ˈpɒpjələ/
(know) each other ​v ​/ˌiːtʃ ˈʌðə/ retired ​adj ​/ rɪˈtaɪəd/ ​/ˌkɒzməˈpɒlɪtən/ population ​n ​/ˌpɒpjʊˈleɪʃn/
e-mail ​n ​/ˈiːmeɪl/ ring ​n, v ​/rɪŋ/ cosy ​adj ​/ˈkəʊzi/ poster n /ˈpəʊstə/
Egyptian ​adj ​/ɪˈdʒɪpʃn/ Russian ​adj ​/ˈrʌʃən/ couple ​n ​/ˈkʌpl/ pour down (rain) ​v ​/pɔː(r) daʊn/
elephant ​n ​/ˈelɪfənt/ send ​v ​/send/ credit card ​n ​/ˈkredɪt ˌkɑːd/ project ​n ​/ˈprɒdʒekt/
enjoy ​v ​/ɪnˈdʒɔɪ/ sense ​n ​/sens/ cricket ​n ​/ˈkrɪkɪt/ relax ​v ​/rɪˈlæks/
essay ​n ​/ˈeseɪ/ show ​v ​/ʃəʊ/ descent (of European descent) ​n ​ rent ​v ​/rent/
exchange ​v ​/ɪksˈtʃeɪndʒ/ single ​adj ​/ˈsɪŋgl/ /dɪˈsent/ robot ​n ​/ˈrəʊbɒt/
explain ​v ​/ɪksˈpleɪn/ sound ​n ​/saʊnd/ designer ​n ​/dɪˈzaɪnə/ rugby ​n ​/ˈrʌgbi/
face ​n ​/feɪs/ speak (a language) ​v ​/spiːk/ diamonds ​n pl ​/ˈdaɪəməndz/ salmon ​n ​/ˈsæmən/
fax ​n ​/fæks/ special ​adj ​/ˈspeʃl/ distance ​n ​/ˈdɪstəns/ sheep ​n ​/ʃiːp/
funny ​adj, n ​/ˈfʌni/ spoken word ​n ​ dream ​n ​/driːm/ shift ​n ​/ʃɪft/
future ​n ​/ˈfjuːtʃə/ /ˈspəʊkən ˈwɜːd/ exhausting ​adj ​/ɪgˈzɔːstɪŋ/ snowboard ​n ​/ˈsnəʊbɔːd/
government ​n ​/ˈgʌvənmənt/ stay v ​/steɪ/ export ​v ​/ekˈspɔːt/ soccer store ​n US ​/ˈsɒkə ˌstɔː(r)/
grow up ​v ​/grəʊ ˈʌp/ social life ​n ​/ˈsəʊʃl laɪf/

124 Word list © Oxford University Press 2014  Photocopiable


sofa ​n ​/ˈsəʊfə/ drive ​v ​/draɪv/ passenger ​n ​/ˈpæsɪndʒə/ butter ​n ​/ˈbʌtə/
solar energy ​n ​/ˈsəʊlə ˈenədʒi/ drop ​v ​/drɒp/ pay day ​n ​/ˈpeɪ deɪ/ by the way ​ /ˌbaɪ ðə ˈweɪ/
south-east Asian ​adj ​ education ​n ​/ˌedʒʊˈkeɪʃn/ perfect ​adj ​/ˈpɜːfekt/ canal ​n ​/kəˈnæl/
/ˌsaʊθiːst ˈeɪʒn/ employ ​v ​/ɪmˈplɔɪ/ pick someone up ​v ​ carrot ​n ​/ˈkærət/
space (in your home) ​n ​/speɪs/ employed ​pp ​/ɪmˈplɔɪd/ /pɪk sʌmwʌn ˈʌp/ cashier ​n ​/kæˈʃɪə/
speedometer ​n ​/spiːˈdɒmɪtə/ enjoy ​v ​/ɪnˈdʒɔɪ/ polite ​adj ​/pəˈlaɪt/ changing rooms ​n pl ​
strange ​adj ​/streɪndʒ/ enter ​v ​/ˈentə/ present ​n ​/ˈpreznt/ /ˈtʃeɪndʒɪŋ ˌrʊmz/
stranger ​n ​/ˈstreɪndʒə/ essay ​n ​/ˈeseɪ/ prison ​n ​/ˈprɪzən/ chic ​adj ​/ʃiːk/
sun-tanned ​adj ​/ˈsʌntænd/ even so ​/ˌiːvn ˈsəʊ/ publisher ​n ​/ˈpʌblɪʃə/ coat ​n ​/kəʊt/
thick ​adj ​/θɪk/ examine ​v ​/ɪkˈsæmɪn/ rare ​adj ​/reə/ cold (I’ve got a cold) ​n ​/kəʊld/
train ​v ​/treɪn/ factory ​n ​/ˈfæktri/ receive ​v ​/rɪˈsiːv/ conditioner ​n ​/kənˈdɪʃənə/
transportation ​n ​ fair ​adj ​/feə/ responsible ​adj ​/rɪsˈpɒnsɪbl/ count (your money) ​v ​/kaʊnt jɒr
/ˌtrænspɔːˈteɪʃn/ famous ​adj ​/ˈfeɪməs/ revise (for an exam) ​v ​/rɪˈvaɪz/ ˈmʌniː/
uniform ​n ​/ˈjuːnɪfɔːm/ fare ​n ​/feə/ routine ​n ​/ruːˈtiːn/ crisps ​n pl ​/krɪsps/
feel ill ​v ​/ˌfiːl ˈɪl/ run away ​v ​/rʌn əˈweɪ/ customer ​n ​/ˈkʌstəmə(r)/
variety ​n ​/vəˈraɪəti/ run out of ​v ​/rʌn aʊt ɒv/
Vietnamese ​adj ​/viˌetnəˈmiːz/ finally ​adv ​/ˈfaɪnəli/ deodorant ​n ​/diˈəʊdərənt/
forget ​v ​/fəˈget/ say sorry ​v ​/ˌseɪ ˈsɒri/ edition ​n ​/ɪˈdɪʃn/
Walkman ​n ​/wɔːkmən/ friend ​n ​/ˈfrend/ scandal ​n ​/ˈskændl/
wildlife ​n ​/ˈwaɪldlaɪf/ exactly ​adv ​/ɪgˈzæktliː/
get ready ​v ​/ˌget ˈredi/ science ​n ​/ˈsaɪəns/
wool ​n ​/wʊl/ security camera ​n ​/sɪˈkjuːrɪtiː fantastic ​adj ​/fænˈtæstɪk/
go away (on holiday) ​v ​ fascinating ​adj ​/ˈfæsɪneɪtɪŋ/
zebra ​n ​/ˈzebrə/, /ˈziːbrə/ /ˌgəʊ əˈweɪ/ ˈkæmərə/
serious ​adj ​/ˈsɪəriəs/ fine ​adj ​/faɪn/
go wrong ​v ​/ˌgəʊ ˈrɒŋ/ floating market ​n ​/fləʊtɪŋ
set off ​v ​/set ɒf/
Unit 3 govern ​v ​/ˈgʌvən/
government ​n ​/ˈgʌvənmənt/ shock ​n ​/ʃɒk/ ˈmɑː(r)kət/
for sale ​/fəˈseɪl/
greatest ​adj ​/ˈgreɪtɪst/ show ​v ​/ʃəʊ/
academic ​adj ​/ækəˈdemɪk/ similar ​adj ​/ˈsɪmələ/ furniture ​n ​/ˈfɜː(r)nɪtʃə(r)/
guilt ​n ​/gɪlt/
admit ​v ​/ədˈmɪt/ snow ​n ​/snəʊ/ glasses (to see) ​n pl ​/ˈglɑːsɪz/
advice ​n ​/ədˈvaɪs/ habit ​n ​/ˈhæbɪt/ special ​adj ​/ˈspeʃl/ global ​adj ​/ˈgləʊbl/
agree ​v ​/əˈgriː/ happy ​adj ​/ˈhæpi/ speed limit ​n ​/ˈspiːd lɪmɪt/
have a shower ​v ​/ˌhæv ə ˈʃaʊə/ hairbrush ​n ​/ˈheəbrʌʃ/
alone ​adj ​/əˈləʊn/ spend ​v ​/spend/ hand-made rug ​n ​
ambition ​n ​/æmˈbɪʃŋ/ hear ​v ​/hɪə/ steal ​v ​/stiːl/
help ​v ​/ˈhelp/ /ˌhænd meɪd ˈrʌg/
angry ​adj ​/ˈæŋgri/ teller (in a bank) ​n ​/ˈtelə/ handbag ​n ​/ˈhændbæg/
antique ​adj ​/ænˈtiːk/ help yourselves ​v ​/ˌhelp
jɔːˈselvz/ think ​v ​/θiŋk/ herb ​n ​/ˈhɜː(r)b/
appear ​v ​/əˈpɪə/ tidy ​adj ​/ˈtaɪdi/ high-class ​adj ​/ˌhaɪ ˈklɑːs/
arm ​n ​/ɑːm/ hide ​v ​/haɪd/
hit ​n, v ​/hɪt/ tip ​n ​/tɪp/ icon ​n ​/ˈaɪkɒn/
athlete ​n ​/ˈæθliːt/ translation paper ​n 
awful ​adj ​/ɔːfl/ however ​adv ​/haʊˈevə/ jumper ​n ​/ˈdʒʌmpə/
​/ˈtrænsˌleɪʃən ˈpeɪpə(r)/
back door ​n ​/ˌbæk ˈdɔː/ immediately ​adv ​/ɪˈmiːdɪətli/ trip ​n ​/trɪp/ lace ​n ​/leɪs/
billion ​n ​/ˈbɪljən/ impatiently ​adv ​/ɪmˈpeɪʃəntliː/ locally ​adv ​/ˈləʊkəliː/
improvement ​n ​/ɪmˈpruːvmənt/ use ​v ​/juːz/
bit (= small piece) ​n ​/bɪt/ medium (size) ​adj ​/ˈmiːdɪəm/
break ​v ​/breɪk/ industry ​n ​/ˈɪndʌstri/ wall ​n ​/wɔːl/ middle shelf ​n ​/ˌmɪdl ˈʃelf/
broken ​pp ​/ˈbrəʊkən/ intruder ​n ​/ɪnˈtruːdə(r)/ weak ​adj ​/wiːk/ millionaire ​n ​/mɪljəˈneə/
business ​n ​/ˈbɪznəs/ investigation ​n ​/ɪnvestɪˈgeɪʃn/ wheel ​n ​/wiːl/ mineral water ​n ​
invitation ​n ​/ɪnvɪˈteɪʃn/ whole ​adj ​/həʊl/ /ˈmɪnərəl ˌwɔːtə/
care ​v ​/keə/ irritably ​adv ​/ˈɪrɪtəbliː/ wonder ​v ​/ˈwʌndə/
carpet ​n ​/kɑː(r)pɪt/ narrow ​adj ​/ˈnærəʊ/
catch a plane ​v ​/ˌkætʃ ə ˈpleɪn/ jewellery ​n ​/ˈdʒuːəlri/ need ​v ​/niːd/
central heating ​n ​/ˌsentrəl
ˈhiːtɪŋ/
laugh ​v ​/lɑːf/
leave (sb/sth somewhere) ​v ​/liːv/
Unit 4 nephew ​n ​/ˈnefjuː/
olive oil ​n ​/ˌɒlɪv ˈɔɪl/
champion ​n ​/ˈtʃæmpiən/ legal ​adj ​/ˈliːgl/ a dozen eggs ​/ə ˌdʌzən ˈegz/ onion ​n ​/ˈʌnjən/
character ​n ​/ˈkærəktə(r)/ licence ​n ​/ˈlaɪsns/ a loaf of bread ​n ​/ə ˌləʊf əv owe (money) ​v ​/əʊ/
clue ​n ​/kluː/ listen (to the radio) ​v ​/ˈlɪsn/ ˈbred/
collection ​n ​/kəˈlekʃn/ literature ​n ​/ˈlɪtrɪtʃə(r)/ packed (with sth) ​adj ​/pækt/
a pint of milk ​/ə ˌpaɪnt əv ˈmɪlk/ palm tree ​n ​/ˈpɑːm ˌtriː/
comb (your hair) ​v ​/kəʊm jɒr lose ​v ​/luːz/ a pound of cheese ​
heə(r)/ pavement ​n ​/ˈpeɪvmənt/
meet ​v ​/miːt/ /ə ˌpaʊnd əv ˈtʃiːz/ pick (= choose) ​v ​/pɪk/
continue ​v ​/kənˈtɪnjuː/ mend ​v ​/mend/ accountant ​n ​/əˈkaʊntənt/
cook ​v ​/kʊk/ picnic ​n ​/ˈpɪknɪk/
missing ​adj ​/ˈmɪsɪŋ/ aftershave ​n ​/ˈɑːftəʃeɪv/ post office ​n ​/ˈpəʊst ˌɒfɪs/
court ​n ​/kɔː(r)t/ motor racing ​n ​/ˈməʊtə ˌreɪsɪŋ/ ancient ​adj ​/ˈeɪnʃənt/
credit card ​n ​/ˈkredɪt ˌkɑː(r)d/ postman ​n ​/ˈpəʊstmən/
mud ​n ​/mʌd/ antique ​adj ​/ænˈtiːk/ product ​n ​/ˈprɒdʌkt/
crime ​n ​/kraɪm/ aromatic ​adj ​/ærəʊˈmætɪk/
cry (= with tears) ​v ​/kraɪ/ note ​n ​/nəʊt/ record shop ​n ​/ˈrekɔːd ˌʃɒp/
notice ​v ​/ˈnəʊtɪs/ assistant ​n ​/əˈsɪstənt/
cut ​v ​/kʌt/ attractive ​adj ​/əˈtræktɪv/ roll (= bread) ​n ​/rəʊl/
danger ​n ​/ˈdeɪndʒə/ obviously ​adv ​/ˈɒbviːəsliː/ sausages ​n pl ​/ˈsɒsɪdʒɪz/
odour ​n ​/ˈəʊdə/ backpack ​n ​/ˈbækˌpæk/
dead ​pp ​/ded/ bargain ​n ​/ˈbɑː(r)gɪn/ shampoo ​n ​/ʃæmˈpuː/
develop ​v ​/dɪˈveləp/ organize ​v ​/ˈɔːgənaɪz/ share ​v ​/ʃeə/
overtake ​v ​/əʊvəˈteɪk/ brand ​n ​/brænd/
discuss ​v ​/dɪsˈkʌs/ busiest ​adj ​/ˈbɪziəst/ shaving foam ​n ​/ˈʃeɪvɪŋ ˌfəʊm/
do an exam ​v ​/ˌduː ən igˈzæm/ pack ​v ​/pæk/ shopkeeper ​n ​/ˈʃɒpkiːpə/

© Oxford University Press 2014  Photocopiable Word list 125


shopping list ​n ​/ˈʃɒpɪŋ ˌlɪst/ Good luck! ​/ˌgʊd ˈlʌk/ worried ​adj ​/ˈwʌrɪd/ opposite ​prep ​/ˈɒpəzɪt/
shorts ​n pl ​/ʃɔːts/ grandfather ​n ​/ˈgrænfɑːðə/ worry ​v ​/ˈwʌri/ path ​n ​/pɑːθ/
snake ​n ​/sneɪk/ grow up ​v ​/ˌgrəʊ ˈʌp/ penny ​n ​/ˈpeni/
soap ​n ​/səʊp/ guilty ​adj ​/ˈgɪlti/ polluted ​adj ​/pəˈluːtɪd/
sore throat ​n ​/ˌsɔː ˈθrəʊt/ gun ​n ​/gʌn/ Unit 6 pond ​n ​/pɒnd/
sparkling (mineral water) ​adj ​ headache ​n ​/ˈhedeɪk/ primitive ​adj ​/ˈprɪmətɪv/
/ˈspɑːklɪŋ/ health club ​n ​/ˈhelθ ˌklʌb/ afford ​v ​/əˈfɔːd/
spice ​n ​/spaɪs/ railway bridge ​n ​/ˈreɪlweɪ ˌbrɪdʒ/
heavy ​adj ​/ˈhevi/ baker(’s) ​/ˈbeɪkə(z)/ river ​n ​/ˈrɪvə/
spoonful ​n ​/ˈspuːnfʊl/ hobby ​n ​/ˈhɒbi/ behind ​prep ​/bɪˈhaɪnd/
still (mineral water) ​adj ​/stɪl/ running water ​n ​/ˌrʌnɪŋ ˈwɔːtə/
hope ​n, v ​/həʊp/ between ​prep ​/bɪˈtwiːn/
stomach ache ​n ​/ˈstʌmək ˌeɪk/ break up (a relationship) ​v ​ sauna ​n ​/ˈsɔːnə/
survey ​n ​/ˈsɜːveɪ/ involved in ​adj ​/ɪnˈvɒlvd ɪn/ save ​v ​/seɪv/
/ˌbreɪk ˈʌp/
sweets ​n pl ​/swiːts/ lads ​n pl ​/lædz/ brilliant (very good) ​adj ​ second hand ​adj ​/ˌsekənd
tie (to wear) ​/taɪ/ lend ​v ​/lend/ /ˈbrɪlɪənt/ ˈhænd/
tissues ​n pl ​/ˈtɪʃuːz/ lonely ​adj ​/ˈləʊnli/ building ​n ​/ˈbɪldɪŋ/ spicy ​adj ​/ˈspaɪsi/
toilet paper ​n ​/ˈtɔɪlət ˌpeɪpə/ lucky ​adj ​/ˈlʌki/ stare ​v ​/steə/
championship ​n ​/ˈtʃæmpɪənʃɪp/ stick together ​v ​/stɪk təˈgeðə/
toothbrush ​n ​/ˈtuːθbrʌʃ/ mad about (sth) (= passionate)  chemist(’s) ​n ​/ˈkemɪst(s)/
toothpaste ​n ​/ˈtuːθpeɪst/ ​/ˈmæd əˌbaʊt/ successful ​adj ​/səkˈsesfl/
community ​n ​/kəˈmjuːnəti/ supermarket ​n ​/ˈsuːpəˌmɑːkɪt/
towel ​n ​/ˈtaʊəl/ miserable ​adj ​/ˈmɪzrəbl/ cosmopolitan ​adj 
traffic ​n ​/ˈtræfɪk/ move (house) ​v ​/muːv/ ​/ˌkɒzməˈpɒlɪtən/ take five minutes ​v ​
trainers ​n pl ​/ˈtreɪnəz/ need ​n ​/niːd/ cottage ​n ​/ˈkɒtɪdʒ/ /ˈteɪk ˈfaɪv ˈmɪnɪts/
tropical ​adj ​/ˈtrɒpɪkl/ nervous ​adj ​/ˈnɜːvəs/ crowded ​adj ​/ˈkraʊdɪd/ tall ​adj ​/tɔːl/
underwear ​n ​/ˈʌndəweə/ normal ​adj ​/ˈnɔːməl/ thief ​n ​/θiːf/
darkness ​n ​/ˈdɑːknəs/
village ​n ​/ˈvɪlɪdʒ/ opportunity ​n ​/ɒpəˈtjuːnəti/ daylight ​n ​/ˈdeɪlaɪt/ wet ​adj ​/wet/
depressing ​adj ​/dɪˈpresɪŋ/ windy ​adj ​/ˈwɪndi/
water taxi ​n ​/ˈwɔːtə(r) ˌtæksiː/ painful ​adj ​/ˈpeɪnfəl/ wood ​n ​/wʊd/
well-known ​adj ​/ˌwel ˈnəʊn/ passion ​n ​/ˈpæʃn/ diverse ​adj ​/daɪˈvɜːs/
dry ​adj ​/draɪ/ wrap up (= put on warm clothes) ​
wheel ​n ​/wiːl/ personally ​adv ​/ˈpɜːsənəli/ v ​/ˌræp ˈʌp/
wide ​adj ​/waɪd/ persuade ​v ​/pəˈsweɪd/ enthusiasm ​n ​/ɪnˈθjuːziæzəm/
pick (sth) up (from the floor) ​ especially ​adv ​/ɪˈspeʃəli/

Unit 5
/ˌpɪk ˈʌp/
poor ​adj ​/pɔː, pʊə/
eventually ​adv ​/ɪˈventʃuəli/ Unit 7
farm ​n ​/fɑːm/
post ​v ​/pəʊst/ fed up ​adj ​/ˌfed ˈʌp/ a whole load (= lots) ​coll ​
A levels ​n pl ​/ˈeɪ ˌlevəlz/ present ​v ​/prɪˈzent/ flower shop ​n ​/ˈflaʊə ˌʃɒp/ /ə ˌhəʊl ˈləʊd/
a day off (= not at work) ​n ​ project (at work) ​n ​/ˈprɒdʒekt/ fluency ​n ​/ˈfluːənsi/ accuse ​v ​/əˈkjuːz/
/ə ˌdeɪ ˈɒf/ protest ​n ​/ˈprəʊtest/ foreign ​adj ​/ˈfɒrən/ adore ​v ​/əˈdɔː/
abroad ​adv ​/əˈbrɔːd/ push ​n ​/pʊʃ/ founded (the city was founded in afraid of ​adj ​/əˈfreɪd əv/
ambition ​n ​/æmˈbɪʃn/ record ​v ​/rɪˈkɔːd/ 1177) ​pp ​/ˈfaʊndɪd/ appear ​v ​/əˈpɪə/
astronaut ​n ​/ˈæstrənɔːt/ relationship ​n ​/rɪˈleɪʃnʃɪp/ at last ​/ət ˈlɑːst/
gate ​n ​/geɪt/
boot ​n ​/buːt/ religion ​n ​/rɪˈlɪdʒən/ gift ​n ​/gɪft/ award ​n ​/əˈwɔːd/
cash ​n ​/kæʃ/ remember ​v ​/rɪˈmembə/ greengrocer(’s) ​n ​ be prepared ​v ​/ˌbiː prɪˈpeəd/
Cheer up! ​/ˈtʃɪə(r) ˈʌp/ responsibility ​n ​/rɪspɒnsəˈbɪləti/ /ˈgriːngrəʊsə(z)/ biography ​n ​/baɪˈɒgrəfi/
choice ​n ​/tʃɔɪs/ retire ​v ​/rɪˈtaɪə/ break (= rest) ​n ​/breɪk/
right ​n ​/raɪt/ heating ​n ​/ˈhiːtɪŋ/
close ​v ​/kləʊz/ high ​adj ​/haɪ/ bring up (children) ​v ​/brɪŋ ˈʌp/
club ​n ​/klʌb/ rocket ​n ​/ˈrɒkɪt/ by hand ​adv ​/ˌbaɪ ˈhænd/
hill ​n ​/hɪl/
coach (= trainer) ​n ​/kəʊtʃ/ sea shore ​n ​/ˈsiː ʃɔː/ honey ​n ​/ˈhʌni/ career ​n ​/kəˈrɪə/
cool ​adj ​/kuːl/ secret ​n ​/ˈsiːkrət/ horrible ​adj ​/ˈhɒrəbl/ celebrity ​n ​/səˈlebrəti/
cost ​v ​/kɒst/ shift ​n ​/ʃɪft/ copy (of a book) ​n ​/ˈkɒpi/
crazy ​adj ​/ˈkreɪzi/ sky ​n ​/skaɪ/ imagine ​v ​/ɪˈmædʒɪn/
immigrant ​n ​/ˈɪmɪgrənt/ couple (= two people) ​n ​/ˈkʌpl/
crowded ​adj ​/ˈkraʊdɪd/ spill ​v ​/spɪl/ crime novel ​n ​/kraɪm ˈnɒvl/
surrounding ​adj ​/səˈraʊndɪŋ/ independence ​n ​/ɪndɪˈpendəns/
dentist ​n ​/ˈdentɪst/ in front of ​prep ​/ɪn ˈfrʌnt əv/ dangerous ​adj ​/ˈdeɪndʒərəs/
depressed ​adj ​/dɪˈprest/ tear ​n ​/tɪə/ insulated ​adj ​/ˈɪnsjʊleɪtɪd/ dress up ​v ​/dres ˈʌp/
discover ​v ​/dɪˈskʌvə/ terrible ​adj ​/ˈterəbl/
drop ​v ​/drɒp/ tests (in hospital) ​n pl ​/tests/ kind ​adj ​/kaɪnd/ especially ​adv ​/ɪˈspeʃəli/
tough ​adj ​/tʌf/ knee ​n ​/niː/ exactly ​adv ​/ɪgˈzæktli/
easily ​adv ​/ˈiːzəli/
extravagant ​adj ​/ikˈstrævəgənt/ trainer (= person) ​n ​/ˈtreɪnə/ library ​n ​/ˈlaɪbrəri/, /laɪbri/ fancy ​adj ​/ˈfænsi/
unlike ​prep., adj ​/ʌnˈlaɪk/ look forward to ​v ​ fortune ​n ​/ˈfɔːtʃuːn/
fantastic ​adj ​/fænˈtæstɪk/ /ˌlʊk ˈfɔːwəd tuː/ fussy ​adj ​/ˈfʌsi/
fed up ​adj ​/ˌfed ˈʌp/ unwell ​adj ​/ʌnˈwel/
upset ​v ​/ʌpˈset/ luxurious ​adj ​/lʌgˈʒʊərɪəs/ gardener ​n ​/gɑːdnə/
fighting ​n ​/ˈfaɪtɪŋ/
fish ​v ​/fɪʃ/ view ​n ​/vjuː/ make a will ​v ​/ˌmeɪk ə ˈwɪl/ go camping ​n ​/ˌgəʊ ˈkæmpɪŋ/
fit (= healthy) ​adj ​/fɪt/ violence ​n ​/ˈvaɪələns/ mixture ​n ​/ˈmɪkstʃə/ go-kart ​n ​/ˈgəʊ kɑːt/
flu ​n ​/fluː/ nature ​n ​/ˈneɪtʃə/ good taste ​n ​/ˌgʊd ˈteɪst/
wedding ​n ​/ˈwedɪŋ/ Gran ​n coll ​/græn/
forever ​adv ​/fəˈrevə/ wire ​n ​/ˈwaɪə/ next to ​prep ​/ˈnekst tuː/
garbage ​n US ​/ˈgɑːbɪdʒ/ with a bit of luck ​ noisy ​adj ​/ˈnɔɪzi/ hard (person) ​adj ​/hɑːd/
go far (in life) ​v ​/ˌgəʊ ˈfɑː/ /wɪð ə ˌbɪt əv ˈlʌk/ on the corner ​/ˌɒn ðə ˈkɔːnə/ in her thirties ​/ˌɪn hə ˈθɜːtiz/

126 Word list © Oxford University Press 2014  Photocopiable


ironing ​n ​/ˈaɪənɪŋ/ available ​adj ​/əˈveɪləbl/ signpost ​n ​/ˈsaɪnpəʊst/ get on well with (sb) ​v ​
join ​v ​/dʒɔɪn/ be sick (= vomit) ​v ​/ˌbiː ˈsɪk/ slave ​n ​/sleɪv/ /ˌget ɒn ˈwel wɪð/
bill (pay the bill) ​n ​/bɪl/ sneeze ​v ​/sniːz/ gigantic ​adj ​/dʒaɪˈgæntɪk/
last ​v ​/lɑːst/ soldier ​n ​/ˈsəʊldʒə/ graduate ​n ​/ˈgrædʒuət/
love at first sight ​ bookcase ​n ​/ˈbʊkkeɪs/
boss ​n ​/bɒs/ sore throat ​n ​/ˌsɔː ˈθrəʊt/ ground floor ​n ​/ˈgraʊnd ˈflɔː/
/ˌlʌv ət ˌfɜːst ˈsaɪt/ speciality ​n ​/speʃiˈæləti/ grow ​v ​/grəʊ/
luxury ​n ​/ˈlʌkʃəri/ career ​n ​/kəˈrɪə/ stomach ache ​n ​/ˈstʌməkˌeɪk/ growth ​n ​/grəʊθ/
mate (= friend) ​n coll ​/meɪt/ chilly ​adj ​/ˈtʃɪli/ strict ​adj ​/strɪkt/
company ​n ​/ˈkʌmpəni/ health care ​n ​/ˈhelθ ˌkeə/
naturally ​adv ​/ˈnætʃrəli/ surgery ​n ​/ˈsɜːdʒəri/ heart ​n ​/hɑːt/
contact ​v ​/ˈkɒntækt/ swallow ​v ​/ˈswɒləʊ/
nearly ​adv ​/ˈnɪəli/ hurt yourself ​v ​/ˈhɜːt jəˌself/
novel ​n ​/ˈnɒvəl/ decorator ​n ​/ˈdekəreɪtə/ switch off from ​v ​
dentist ​n ​/ˈdentɪst/ /swɪtʃ ˈɒf frɒm/ industry ​n ​/ˈɪndəstri/
novelist ​n ​/ˈnɒvəlɪst/ industrial ​adj ​/ɪnˈdʌstriəl/
detective ​n ​/dɪˈtektɪv/ swollen ​pp ​/ˈswəʊlən/
obviously ​adv ​/ˈɒbvɪəsli/ diarrhoea ​n ​/daɪəˈrɪə/ keep in touch ​v ​/ˌkiːp ɪn ˈtʌtʃ/
only ​adj ​/ˈəʊnli/ sympathy ​n ​/ˈsɪmpəθi/
diet ​n ​/ˈdaɪət/ symptom ​n ​/ˈsɪmptəm/ kidney ​n ​/ˈkɪdni/
opposite ​adj ​/ˈɒpəzɪt/ document ​n ​/ˈdɒkjʊment/ tape recorder ​n ​/ˈteɪp rɪˌkɔːdə/ leader ​n ​/ˈliːdə/
passionate ​adj ​/ˈpæʃənət/ earring ​n ​/ˈɪərɪŋ/ liver (= body organ) ​n ​/ˈlɪvə/
peace ​n ​/piːs/ text message ​n ​/ˈtekst ˈmesɪdʒ/
earthquake ​n ​/ˈɜːθkweɪk/ timetable ​n ​/ˈtaɪmˌteɪbl/ locked ​pp ​/lɒkt/
pen ​n ​/pen/ examine ​v ​/ɪgˈzæmɪn/ lung ​n ​/lʌŋ/
penny ​n ​/ˈpeni/ tin opener ​n ​/ˈtɪn ˌəʊpənə/
exploit ​v ​/ɪkˈsplɔɪt/ tough (with sb) ​adj ​/tʌf/ luxury ​adj ​/ˈlʌkʃəri/
pepper ​n ​/ˈpepə/
prefer ​v ​/prɪˈfɜː/ farmer ​n ​/ˈfɑːmə/ traffic lights ​n pl ​/ˈtræfɪk ˌlaɪts/ main road ​n ​/ˌmeɪn ˈrəʊd/
firefighter ​n ​/ˈfaɪəˌfaɪtə/ twisted ​adj ​/ˈtwɪstɪd/ make a complaint ​v ​
race ​v ​/reɪs/ flu ​n ​/fluː/ /ˌmeɪk ə kəmˈpleɪnt/
recognize ​v ​/ˈrekəgnaɪz/ uniform ​n ​/ˈjuːnɪfɔːm/
food poisoning ​n ​/ˈfuːd unsocial ​adj ​/ˌʌnˈsəʊʃl/ make a reservation ​v ​
related (to sb) ​pp ​/rɪˈleɪtɪd/ ˌpɔɪzənɪŋ/ /ˌmeɪk ə resəˈveɪʃn/
retire ​v ​/rɪˈtaɪə/ vet ​n ​/vet/
get one free ​/ˌget wʌn ˈfriː/ visa ​n ​/ˈviːzə/ make sure ​v 
ride ​v ​/raɪd/ ​/ˌmeɪk ˈʃɔː/, /ˈʃʊə(r)/
rubbish (= no good) ​adj coll ​ give up ​v ​/ˌgɪv ˈʌp/ waste of time ​n ​/weɪst ɒv ˈtaɪm/
glands ​n pl ​/glændz/ make up your mind ​v ​
/ˈrʌbɪʃ/ well-off ​adj ​/wel ˈɒf/ /ˌmeɪk ʌp jəˈmaɪnd/
go on a diet ​v ​/ˌgəʊ ɒn ə ˈdaɪət/
safety ​n ​/ˈseɪfti/ medicine ​n ​/ˈmedsn, medɪsn/
salt ​n ​/sɔːlt, sɒlt/ hairdrier ​n ​/ˈheədrɑɪə/ mess ​n ​/mes/
science fiction ​nkk ​/saɪəns have a word with (sb) ​v ​
/ˌhæv ə ˈwɔːd wɪð/
Unit 9 message ​n ​/ˈmesɪdʒ/
ˈfɪkʃn/ microchip ​n ​/ˈmaɪkrəʊˌtʃɪp/
several (books) ​/ˈsevrəl/ headache ​n ​/ˈhedeɪk/ airline ​n ​/ˈeəlaɪn/
health ​n ​/helθ/ airport ​n ​/ˈeəpɔːt/ ocean ​n ​/ˈəʊʃn/
short story ​n ​/ˌʃɔːt ˈstɔːri/ optimistic ​adj ​/ˌɒptɪˈmɪstɪk/
shy ​adj ​/ʃaɪ/ horse-race ​n ​/ˈhɔːsˌreɪs/ answerphone ​n ​/ˈɑːnsəˌfəʊn/
spend time ​v ​/ˌspend ˈtaɪm/ housewife ​n ​/ˈhaʊswaɪf/ available ​adj ​/əˈveɪləbl/ pass exams ​v ​/ˌpɑːs igˈzæmz/
split up ​v ​/ˌsplɪt ˈʌp/ in public ​/ˌɪn ˈpʌblɪk/ basement ​n ​/ˈbeɪsmənt/ pessimism ​n ​/ˈpesɪmɪzm/
spoil ​v ​/spɔɪl/ infection ​n ​/ɪnˈfekʃn/ behaviour ​n ​/bɪˈheɪvɪə/ pick (sb) up (= meet in a car) ​v ​
strict ​adj ​/strɪkt/ invention ​n ​/ɪnˈvenʃn/ bite ​v ​/baɪt/ /ˌpɪk ˈʌp/
superstar ​n ​/ˈsuːpəˌstɑː/ pillow ​n ​/ˈpɪləʊ/
keep fit ​v ​/ˌkiːp ˈfɪt/ capitalism ​n ​/ˈkæpɪtəlɪzm/ pilot ​n ​/ˈpaɪlət/
support ​n ​/səˈpɔːt/ kill (= hurt; My back’s killing me.) ​ capitalist ​adj /ˈkæpɪtəlɪst/ plant ​n ​/plɑːnt/
term (school) ​n ​/tɜːm/ v ​/kɪl/ century ​n ​/ˈsentʃəri/ pollute ​v ​/pəˈluːt/
travel book ​n ​/ˈtrævl ˌbʊk/ lawyer ​n ​/ˈlɔːjə/ communist ​n ​/ˈkɒmjʊnɪst/ pollution ​n ​/pəˈluːʃn/
treat ​n ​/triːt/ likely ​adj ​/ˈlaɪkli/ conference centre ​n ​ poster ​n ​/ˈpəʊstə/
tyre ​n ​/ˈtaɪə/ liquid ​n ​/ˈlɪkwɪd/ /ˈkɒnfərəns ˌsentə/ produce ​v ​/prəˈdjuːs/
usually ​adv ​/ˈjuːʒəli/ local ​adj ​/ˈləʊkl/ corner of the world ​ product ​n ​/ˈprɒdʌkt/
watch (to tell the time) ​n ​/wɒtʃ/ low fat ​adj ​/ləʊ fæt/ /ˈkɔːnə(r) əv ðə ˌwɜːld/
cousin ​n ​/ˈkʌzən/ race of people ​n ​/ˌreɪs əv ˈpiːpl/
west ​n ​/west/ mechanic ​n ​/mɪˈkænɪk/ reaction ​n ​/riˈækʃn/
miner ​n ​/ˈmaɪnə/ cruel ​adj ​/ˈkruːəl/
religion ​n ​/rɪˈlɪdʒən/
overweight ​adj ​/ˌəʊvəˈweɪt/ DNA ​n ​/ˌdiː en ˈeɪ/ research ​n ​/rɪˈsɜːtʃ/
Unit 8 plumber ​n ​/ˈplʌmə/
do me a favour ​/ˌduː miː ə ˈfeɪvə/
double room ​n ​/ˌdʌbl ˈruːm/
resources ​n pl ​/rɪˈzɔːsɪz/
poetry ​n ​/ˈpəʊətri/ revolutionize ​v ​/revəˈluːʃənaɪz/
accommodation ​n ​ earthquake ​n ​/ˈɜːθkweɪk/ room service ​n ​/ˈruːm ˌsɜːvɪs/
/əˌkɒməˈdeɪʃn/ prescribe ​v ​/prɪˈskraɪb/
prescription ​n ​/prɪˈskrɪpʃn/ economic ​adj ​/ekəˈnɒmɪk/ safari ​n ​/səˈfɑːri/
adventurous ​adj ​/ədˈventʃərəs/ economy ​n ​/ɪˈkɒnəmi/ salary ​n ​/ˈsæləri/
advice ​n ​/ədˈvaɪs/ prison ​n ​/ˈprɪzn/
engineering ​n ​/endʒɪˈnɪərɪŋ/ save (money) ​v ​/seɪv/
alarm clock ​n ​/əˈlɑːm ˌklɒk/ raincoat ​n ​/ˈreɪnkəʊt/ environment ​n ​/ɪnˈvaɪrənmənt/
receptionist ​n ​/rɪˈsepʃənɪst/ scuba dive ​v ​/ˈskuːbə ˌdaɪv/
ambulance driver ​n ​ fight a war ​v ​/ˌfaɪt ə ˈwɔː/ single room ​n ​/ˌsɪŋgl ˈruːm/
/ˈæmbjələns ˌdraɪvə/ recommend ​v ​/ˌrekəˈmend/
regular hours ​n pl ​ flight (on a plane) ​n ​/flaɪt/ snow storm ​v ​/ˈsnəʊ ˌstɔːm/
anniversary ​n ​/ˌænɪˈvɜːsəri/ forest ​n ​/ˈfɒrɪst/ spare part ​n ​/ˌspeə ˈpɑːt/
antibiotics ​n pl ​/ˌæntibaɪˈɒtɪks/ /ˌregjələ(r) ˈaʊəz/
runny nose ​/ˌrʌni ˈnəʊz/ fundamentally ​adv ​ statistics ​n pl ​/stəˈtɪstɪks/
appointment ​n ​/əˈpɔɪntmənt/ /ˌfʌndəˈmentəli/ stupidity ​n ​/stjuːˈpɪdəti/
argue ​v ​/ˈɑːgjuː/ rush hour ​n ​/ˈrʌʃ ˌaʊə/
gap year ​n ​/ˈgæp ˌyɪə/ success ​n ​/səkˈses/
arrangement ​n ​/əˈreɪndʒmənt/ shop assistant ​n ​/ˈʃɒp əˌsɪstənt/ successful ​adj ​/səkˈsesfl/
get ill ​v ​/ˌget ˈɪl/

© Oxford University Press 2014  Photocopiable Word list 127


sunset ​n ​/ˈsʌnset/ forgive ​v ​/fəˈgɪv/ terrorist ​n ​/ˈterərɪst/ inhale ​v ​/ɪnˈheɪl/
tablets ​n pl ​/ˈtæbləts/ freedom ​n ​/ˈfriːdəm/ thin ​adj ​/θɪn/ invent ​n ​/ɪnˈvent/
take care ​v ​/ˌteɪk ˈkeə/ frightened ​pp ​/ˈfraɪtənd/ thrill ​n ​/θrɪl/ joke ​n ​/dʒəʊk/
to our advantage ​ get rid of (sth) ​v ​/get ˈrɪd əv/ total ​n ​/ˈtəʊtl/
trapped ​pp ​/træpt/ keep off ​v ​/ˌkiːp ˈɒf/
/tuː ˌaʊə(r) ədˈvɑːntɪdʒ/ go climbing ​v ​/ˌgəʊ ˈklaɪmɪŋ/
top floor ​n ​/ˌtɒp ˈflɔː/