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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

INDORE
CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Jnnurm
JAWAHARLAL NEHRU NATIONAL URBAN RENEWAL MISSION

INDORE MUNICIPAL CORPORATION

TECHNICAL SUPPORT

MEHTA &ASSOCIATES
ARCHITECTS & PLANNERS, INDORE

I
INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

PREFACE

To keep pace with the changing practices of City management globally, it was long felt by the
Indore municipal corporation that it ought to adopt some aspects of the work culture of private
corporations. This is especially with regard to the maintenance of quality standards.

The City development Plan of Indore has been prepared in accordance with the chartered
prescribed requirements for development plans under Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban
renewal mission. The formulation of the City Development Plan was unique. This was largely
because it adopted a participatory process involving the elected and the administrative wings
of the Corporation, as well as citizens of varied interests, and other organisations concerned
with the city’s growth and development. It is one of the community oriented plans intended to
help guide public policy, investment and decisions through 2021 planning horizon. The CDP is
designed to make fuller use of the energy and potential sectors in service delivery and
management and in implementing the reform agenda. Accordingly it provides for the
participation of business, industry, civic groups and communities in local decision making.

In the context of the 74th Constitutional Amendment, which gives the urban local bodies more
freedom and power in executing their functions, the study has provided IMC invaluable inputs
regarding the intricacies of urban governance and finance. Today, when every urban local
body is striving to provide its citizens with the best of governance, only those like Indore figure
where decentralised efforts in improving the city’s living environment are clearly visible and are
above all other interests. It is this context that the Indore Municipal Corporation is trying to
define its presence in the city. Its strategy is to move from ‘tackling issues’ to ‘not allowing
issues to emerge’ by means of effective, integrated and phased plans.

With such a long-term goal to be fulfilled and delivered to its citizens by 2021, the City
Development planning process warranted a high level of public participation. The
overwhelming response to the workshop as well as the zone level and ward level consultative
meetings helped chalk out the purpose of the short-term strategic plan as ‘To foresee an
issueless 2021’.

The City Development Plan for Indore deals with a comprehensive, cohesive and concise
manner, all the important elements of governance in the form of themes: Urban Growth
Management/ Development Planning, Urban Basic Services and Infrastructure, Transportation
and Traffic Management, Housing and Slums, Urban Environment, Social Development, Urban
Governance and Management and Urban Finance and Management apart from Demographic
Trends, Economy Pattern, etc with a long term strategic vision.

It is the belief of IMC that this effort will bring in a corporate vision and a change that the
citizens of Indore will contribute to, and ultimately benefit from.

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

We put on record our special thanks to Smt. Uma Shashi Sharma, Mayor, Indore Municipal
Corporation, Shri Vivek Agarwal, District collector, Indore, Shri. P. Narahari, Municipal
Commissioner, Indore, Mr. Madhu Verma, Chairman Indore Development Authority, Indore
and Shri C. B. Singh, C.E.O. Indore Development Authority, Indore for their support and
suggestions throughout the preparation of the City Development Plan. They have been
instrumental in helping us complete and present this document well ahead of the financial year
2005-06, the starting year of the Plan Period.

This document is a synthesis of what has been done in the city of Indore over the past and
what is going to be done in the future. This process involved extensive gathering of data,
information and material from various other organisations and individuals apart from the
various departments of the IMC including their Zonal and Ward Offices, all of whom are the
planning partners of the city. While compiling this information itself is a time- consuming job,
co-ordinating every aspect of this process is the base for the final form of this document and
this has been possible only with the special efforts of all the departmental Heads of IMC. We
offer special thanks to all others who have remained in the background of this process.

This final report is the result of draft reports prepared earlier, the review of which was done by
each department of IMC. Several officials were involved in this process and they have
continuously monitored the progress with their timely reviews and updates. The feedback
received during this review process has been tremendously encouraging and our
acknowledgements are due to all the high-ranking officials of District Administration, IMC, IDA,
MPPWD , Mandi samiti and Other agencies. Inputs for Identification of various projects were
given by the various committees at various levels involving District level committee headed by
District Collector was a great help in the preparation of Plan. Accordingly, IMC as a Nodal
agency for the project and all the Parastatal Agencies like IDA, MPPWD, Mandi samiti, ICTS
Ltd, MPHB and Others departments need a special mention.

It is the involvement of the citizens of Indore through their participation in the Questionnaire
Survey that has produced a Development Vision for the City as well as a direction to this
emerging concept of the City Development Plan. The process started with the “City
Development Strategy” workshop conducted in December 2005 in Indore and was attended by
a large number of representatives from various citizens’ groups, industry and trade
organisations, NGOs, political parties, the elected and administrative wings of the Indore
Municipal Corporation and many others who are actively involved in the growth and
development of the city.

Lastly we put on record thanks to all those who have helped us directly or indirectly in
preparing this document.

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

CDP ADVISORY

Smt. Uma Shashi Sharma


(Mayor, IMC)

Shri. Vivek Aggarwal, IAS


District Collector, Indore

Shri. Madhu Verma


(Chairman IDA)

Shri. P. Narahari, IAS


(Municipal Commissioner, IMC)

Shri. C. B. Singh,
(C.E.O., IDA)

Shri. S. C. Garg
Chief Engineer (West Zone)
MPPWD

Shri C. M. Shukla
(Deputy Collector, Indore)

Shri V. P. Kulshrestha
Joint Director T&CP

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

PROJECT TEAM PLANNING TEAM

Shri. P. Narahari, IAS Mehta and Associates


(Municipal Commissioner, IMC)

Shri. C. B. Singh, Hitendra Mehta


(C.E.O., IDA)

Shri Ramesh Bhandari Jitendra Mehta


(Dy. Commissioner, IMC)
Rajeev Bangar
Shri Kumar Purshottam
(Dy. Commissioner, IMC) Ajit Mali

Dr. A. K. Puranik Ms. Neli Kools


Chief Health Officer, IMC
Pawan Kabra
Shri. H. K. Jain
City Engineer, IMC
Yogendra Patidar
Shri. Narendra Tomar
City Engineer E&M, IMC Anand Joshi

Shri. Harbhajan Singh Deepak K. Parmar


City Engineer Slums, IMC

Shri. J.P. Pathak For Capacity Building & Reforms


City Engineer Water Supply & City Managers Association M.P
Sewerage, IMC

Shri. Prabash Sankhala Ashish Agarawal


Project manager Sewerage, IMC
Renu Handa
Shri. Anoop Goyal
Executive Engineer, IMC Anubhav Shrivastav

Shri. R.S. Jha


Account Officer, IMC
Financial Operating Plan
Shri P.K. Mistri
Chief Engineer, IDA
Accounts Department IMC
Shri. D. L. Goyal
Chief City Planner, IDA

Shri S.R. Pawar


Dy. Housing Commissioner, MPHB

Shri. B. N. Shrivastava
Executive Engineer, MPPWD

Shri. Vijay Marathe


OIC Planning, IDA

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CONTENTS
Preface II
Acknowledgement III
CDP Advisory IV
Project Team V
Planning Team V
Contents VI
Abbreviations Acronyms and Key Terms X
List of Tables XII
List of Illustrations XV
List of Maps XVI

SECTION I INTRODUCTION

1.0 Introduction
1.1 Backgrounds 1
1.2 City Development Planning 1
1.3 Previous Planning Interventions in Indore 3
1.4 Approach towards the Indore City Development Plan 4
1.5 Report Structure 9
2.0 Implementing Agencies
2.1 Urban Local Bodies and New Context of Local Government 10
2.2 Indore Municipal Corporation- Nodal Agency 11
2.3 Parastatal Agencies 18
SECTION II EXISTING SITUATION ANALYSIS

3.0 City Profile


3.1 Historical Background 20
3.2 Location and Linkages 22
3.3 Physical and Geographical Character 22
3.4 Natural Drainage 23
3.5 Regional Setting and Growth Pattern 23

4.0 Demographic and Social Profile


4.1 Population Growth Trends 25
4.2 Population Density 26
4.3 Literacy 27
4.4 Sex Ratio 27
4.5 Age Structure of the Population 27
4.6 Social Structure 28
4.7 Conclusions 28

5.0 Economic Base


5.1 Registered Establishment 30
5.2 Trade and Commerce 30
5.3 Industries 31
5.4 Employment 32
5.5 Income Profile 33
5.6 Conclusion 34

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6.0 Land Use


6.1 Land Use Classifications 35
6.2 Existing Land Use 2001 35
6.3. Conclusion 36
7.0 Infrastructure and Environment
7.1 Water supply 37
7.2 Sewerage 41
7.3 Solid Waste Management 43
7.4. Storm Water Drainage 45
7.5 Transport System 46
7.6 Environment 48
7.7 Conclusion 55
8.0 Housing and Slums
8.1 Housing Situation in Indore 57
8.2 Urban Poverty 60
8.3 Slums in Indore 60
8.4 Characteristic of Slums 62
8.5 Earlier Public Interventions of Slum Improvements 68
8.6 Conclusion 70
9.0 Inner City
9.1 Background 83
9.2 Inner City Area 83
9.3 Problem of Inner City 84
10.0 Urban Heritage
10.1 Urban Heritage 85
11.0 Organization, Institutional Setup & Finance
11.1
11.1.1 Introduction 87
11.1.2 Institutions and Organization 87
11.1.3 Area of Fragmentation 89
11.1.4a Organization Structure 91
11.1.4b Executive Wing 94
11.1.4c Zonal Offices 94
11.1.4d Municipal Financial Powers 95
11.1.5 Key Observations and Issues 96
11.1.6 Strategic Elements for Program Design 97
11.2 Indore Municipal Corporation Governance Overview 98
11.3 Urban Governance Issues and Strategies 100
12.0 Problems and Issues
12.1 Water Supply 104
12.2 Sewerage 104
12.3 Solid Waste Management 104
12.4 Storm Water Drainage 105
12.5 Transportation 105
12.6 Environment 106
12.7 Inner City Area 106
12.8 Urban Heritage 106

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12.9 Slums 106


12.10 Strengths of City 107
12.11 Constraints of the City 107

SECTION III DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVE AND VISSION

13.0 Vision and Goals


13.1 Vision of City 108
13.2 Goals 110

SECTION IV CITY INVESTMENT PLAN

14.0 City Investment Plan - Strategies and Action Plan


14.1 City Investment Plan 114
14.2 Urban Planning & Growth Management- Strategies & Action Plan 114
14.3 Urban Renewal – Strategies and Action Plan 115
14.4 Water Supply –Strategies and Action Plan 117
14.5 Sewerage - Strategies and Action Plan 119
14.6 Storm Water Drainage–Strategies and Action Plan 122
14.7 Solid Waste Management–Strategies and Action Plan 123
14.8 Transport System (Roads, Bridges, Traffic Management, Parking
Lots, Goods And Mass Transport) - Strategies And Action 125
14.9 Housing for Urban Poor– Strategies & Action Plan 136
14.10 Environment -Strategies & Action Plan 138
14.11 Heritage Structure-Strategies & Action Plan 140
14.12 Special Projects Strategies and Action Plan 141

15.0 Reforms and Capacity Building


15.1 Agenda 145
15.2 GIS Application 145
15.3 Capacity Building 151
15.4 The Training Perspective 154
15.5 Recommendations and Implementation Strategy 157
15.6 Action Plan 159

SECTION V FINANCIAL OPERATING PLAN

16.0
16.1 Strategy 164
16.2 Financial Operating Plan 165
16.3 Forecast of Revenue Expenditure 166
16.4 Forecast of Capital Income and Expenditure 167
16.5 Income Expected from Projects identified under JNNURM 167
16.6 Projects Identification Under JNNURM 169
16.7 Financial Operating Plan for IMC(FOP) Results 169
16.8 Fund requirement by IMC and other Agencies 170

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ABBREVATIONS, ACCRONYMS AND KEY TERMS


AC Asbestos Cement
ADB Asian Development Bank
ASI Archaeological Survey of India
BDO Block Development Officer
BMW Bio Medical Waste
BPL Below Poverty Line
CAA Constitutional Amendment Act
CBD Central Business District
CDP City Development Plan
CDS Community Development Societies
CI Cost Iron
CIP City Investment Plan
COD Chemical Oxygen Demand
DI Ductile Iron
DUDA District Urban Development Authority
EDP Electronic Data Processing
EIUS Environmental Improvement of Urban Slums
EWS Economically Weaker Section
FOB Foot Over Bridges
GDP Gross Domestic Product
GI Galvanic Iron
GOI Govt. of India
ha. Hectare
HIG High Income Group
IDA Indore Development Authority
IDP Indore Development Plan
IMC Indore Municipal Corporation
JNNURM Jhawhar Lal National Urban Renewal Mission
LIG Lower Income Group
Lcpd Liters Capita per Day
MC Municipal Corporation
MGD Million Gallons per Day
MIC Mayor-in-Council
MIG Medal Income Group
MLD Million Letter Per Day
M.P Madhya Pradesh
MPHB Madhya Pradesh Housing Board
MPPCB Madhya Pradesh Pollution Control Board
MIS Management Information System
MPTNCP Madhya Pradesh Town and Country Planning
MS Mild Still
MSL Mean See Level
MSW Municipal Solid Waste
Mos Marginal Open Space
MoU Memorandum of Understanding
MPSRTC Madhya Pradesh State Regional Transport Corporation
MT Metric Tone
NGOs Non Governmental Organization
NRW Non Revenue Water
NTACH Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage
PCU Passenger Car Unit
PHED Public Health Engineering Department

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

PPOUL Prevention of Pollution of Upper Lake


PPTA Preliminary Project Technical Assistance
PSC Pubic Service Commission
PSP Public and Semi Public
PWD Public Work Department
ROW Right of Way
SC Schedule Caste
SFC State Finance Commission
SPM Suspended Particulate Matter
SPS Sewage Pumping Station
Sq Square
ST Schedule Tribe
STPs Sewage Treatment Plants
SWM Solid Waste Management
ULBs Urban Local Bodys
VAMBAY Valmiki Ambedkar Awas Yojna
UPAP Urban Poverty Alleviation Program
WTP Water Treatment Plant

Semi pucca semi permanent


Pucca permanent
Rickshaw 3-wheeler motorized vehicle
Nagar sewa Public buses that run within the city

Human poverty The lack of essential human capabilities, notably literacy and nutrition
Income poverty The lack of sufficient income to meet minimum consumption
Patta Slums notified in Madhya Pradesh Gazette under Madhya Pradesh
Patta Act.

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

LIST OF TABLES

SECTION I INTRODUCTION

1.0 Introduction
2.0 Implementing Agencies
Tab. 2.1 Structure of Deliberative Wing of IMC 13
Tab. 2.2 Indore Municipal Corporation Management Team 13
Tab. 2.3 Distribution of wards in Each Zone of Indore Municipal Corporation 15
Tab. 2.4 Zonal Administrations 16

SECTION II EXISTING SITUATION ANALYSIS

3.0 City Profile


Tab. 3.1 Mean Monthly Temperature Recorded in different Seasons 23
Tab. 3.1 Growth of Indore Planning Area 1975-2002 24

4.0 Demographic and Social Profile


Tab. 4.1 Population Trends 1901- 2001 Indore Municipal Area 25
Tab. 4.2 Population Trends in Indore Planning Area 1971-2001 25
Tab. 4.3 Population projections for year 2011 and 2021 26
Tab. 4.4 Ward wise Population and Density 26
Tab. 4.5 Literacy Rate Comparison 27
Tab. 4.6 Age Structure of the Population 2001 28
Tab. 4.7 Cast Structure 28
5.0 Economic Base
Tab. 5.1 Growth trends in Work Force Participation, Indore 29
Tab. 5.2 Trend in Occupational Structure, Indore 29
Tab. 5.3 Commercial Establishments Indore 30
Tab. 5.4 Commercial Establishments Indore 30
Tab. 5.5 Commercial Establishments Indore 31
Tab. 5.6 Commercial Establishments Indore 31
Tab. 5.7 Summery of Employment by Income Group 32
Tab. 5.8 Summery of Employment by Income Group 33
Tab. 5.9 Summery of Employment by Income Group 33
6.0 Land Use
Tab. 6.1 Status of Indore Planning Area 36
Tab. 6.2 Existing Land use 2001 36
7.0 Infrastructure and Environment
Tab. 7.1 Status of Indore Planning Area 37
Tab. 7.2 Water Reservoirs 38
Tab. 7.3 Water Distribution 39
Tab. 7.4 Operation and Maintenance Cost 40
Tab. 7.5 Diameter wise Break up of Existing Sewerage System 42
Tab. 7.6 Diameter wise Break up of Sewerage System Laid by IDA 42
Tab. 7.7 Areas other than Municipal limits Connected to the Sewerage System 43
Tab. 7.8 Ward wise Solid Waste Generation and Collection 43
Tab. 7.9 Ward wise Biomedical Waste Generation and Collection 44
Tab. 7.10 Strom Water Discharge in River 46

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Tab. 7.11 Growth Trend of Registered Vehicles in Indore District 47


Tab. 7.12 Growth Trend of Registered Vehicles in Indore District 48
Tab. 7.13 Growth Trend of Registered Vehicles in Indore District 48
Tab. 7.14 Road Accidents Trend in Indore 48
Tab. 7.15 Changes in the Ambient Air Quality in Indore 50
Tab. 7.16 SPM Respirable Dust Concentration at Indore 50
Tab. 7.17 Average Particulates in Ambient air Along the Roadsides at the
Respirable Zones 51
Tab. 7.18 Surface Water Quality in Khan River Indore 51
Tab. 7.19 Ground water Quality (Month- May 2001) 52
Tab .7.20 Surface Water Quality (Month- May 2001) 53
8.0 Housing and Slums
Tab. 8.1 Housing Need Stock and Shortage during different Period 57
Tab. 8.2 Household Profile 59
Tab. 8.3 Slum Population in Indore City 61
Tab. 8.4.Slums Notified by Madhya Pradesh (Slum Clearance and Improvement) Act
on 25-5-1999 63
Tab. 8.5 List Slums Developed in ODA Project, Slums Notified Under Gezzette by
Municipal Corporation and Slums Resettled by Administration 72
9.0 Inner City
Tab. 9.1 Core Area Land Use Break Up 84
10.0 Urban Heritage
11.0 City Governance & Institutional Setup
Tab. 11-1 Agency responsibilities for City Services in Indore 90
Tab. 11-2 Financial Powers 95
Tab. 11-3 Urban Governance and Institutional Strengthening Strategies 101
12.0 Problem and Issues
SECTION III DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVE AND VISSION

13.0 Vision and Goals


Tab. 13.2.1 Water Supply 110
Tab. 13.2.2 Sewerage 111
Tab. 13.2.3 Storm Water Drainage 111
Tab. 13.2.4 Solid Waste Management 111
Tab. 13.2.5 Roads And Transports 112
Tab. 13.2.6 Slum Rehabilitation and Basic Services to Urban poor 112

SECTION IV CITY INVESTMENT PLAN

14.0 City Investment Plan - Strategies and Action Plan


Tab 14.1 Sub Mission For Urban Infrastructure And Governance 116
Tab 14.2 Water Supply 118
Tab 14.3 Sewerage 120
Tab 14.4 Sub Mission For Urban Infrastructure And Governance 122
Tab 14.5 Solid Waste Management 124
Tab 14.6 Roads And Bridges (IMC) 127

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Tab 14.7 Widening Of Existing Bridges, Construction Of New River Bridges,


Construction Of Rob, Flyovers And Grade Separators (IMC) 132
Tab 14.8 Sub Mission For Urban Infrastructure And Governance 133
Tab 14.9 Slum Rehabilitation/Relocation And Slum Area Improvement 137
Tab 14.10 Environmental Up gradation, City Beautification And Urban Forestry 139
Tab 14.11 Heritage Structures 141

15.0 Reforms and Capacity Building


Tab 15.1 Present status of various E-governance applications 146
Tab 15.2 Departmental Concerns 152
Tab 15.3 Action Plan With Verifiable Indicators 154
Tab 15.4 List of Training Programs for Municipal Personnel 159
Tab 15.5 Broad Training Process Flow 161

SECTION V Financial Operation Plan

16.0 Financial operating plan


Tab 16.1 Assumption adopted for forecasting realization under various heads 166
Tab 16.2 Assumption adopted for forecasting items of Revenue expenditure 166
Tab 16.3 Assumption adopted for forecasting items of Capital Income and
Expenditure 168

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

SECTION I INTRODUCTION

Illust. 1.1 Process of Formulating a City Development Plan 2


Illust. 1.2 City Development Plan Preparation 8
SECTION II EXISTING SITUATION ANALYSIS

Illust. 3.1 H. H. Maharajadhiraja Shrimant Malhar Rao I Holkar I Bahadur 20


1733 - 1766
Illust. 3.2 H.H. Maharani Shrimant Akhand Soubgahyavati Ahilya Bai Sahiba. 21
1767 - 1795
Illust. 4.1 Age Structure of the Population 2001 28
Illust. 4.2 Caste Structure 28
Illust. 5.1 Trend in Occupational Structure, Indore 30
Illust. 6.1 Status of Indore Planning Area 36
Illust. 6.2. Land Use Break Up Indore Planning Area 2001 36
Illust. 7.1 Traffic Load on Various City Roads 47
Illust. 7.2 Growth Trend of Registered Vehicles in Indore District 48
Illust. 7.3 Population Growth V/S Green Spaces in Indore City 54
Illust. 8.1 Decadal Increase in Housing Shortage 58
Illust. 8.2 Distribution of Population in Different Subsystems 58
Illust. 8.3 Area V/s Population in Different Subsystems 58
Illust. 8.4 Household Income Groups in Indore 59
Illust. 9.1.Core Area Land Use Break Up 84
Illust 11.1 Indore Municipal Corporation 90
Illust.11.2 The organisation structure of the Deliberative Wing of IMC 93
Illust.11.3 The organisation structure of the Executive Wing of IMC 93

SECTION III DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVE AND VISION

SECTION IV CITY INVESTMENT PLAN

15.0 Reforms and Capacity Building


Illust. 15.1 Simple Model of Training Process 156
Illust. 15.2 Elaborate Model of Training Process 156
Illust. 15.3 Training Detail 162

SECTION V FINANCIAL OPERATION PLAN

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LIST OF MAPS

Map: Location Map


Map: Indore Planning Region
Map: River Basin
Map: Physical Map
Map: River Khan & Its Tributaries
Map: Contour Map
Map: Evolution of Indore
Map: Existing Land Use 2001
Map: Land Use as Per Indore Development Plan – 1991
Map: Indore Municipal Limits
Map: Ward wise Population Density
Map: Existing Industries
Map: Old Water Supply System Network
Map: Narmada Water Supply System
Map: Ward Wise Distribution of Tube Wells / Hand Pumps/ PVC Tanks
Map: Proposed Drainage Sewerage Project
Map: Open Sewer out fall / Proposed Sewage Treatment Plant
Map: Indore Vikas Bond Roads & Bridges
Map: Transport Networks
Map: Public Transport Routes (TEMPO)
Map: Public Transport Routes (MINI Bus)
Map: Street Lighting
Map: Air Pollution and Traffic
Map: Slums
Map: Government / Semi Government Offices
Map: Historical Places / Religious Places

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increasing population pressure is resulting


Chapter in deterioration of infrastructure facilities,
loss of productive agricultural lands, green

1 Introduction open spaces, loss of surface water bodies,


depletion of ground water aquifer zones, air
pollution, water contamination, health
hazards and many micro-climatic changes.
1.1. Background Therefore, the environmentally compatible
urban planning must begin with a
Most of the developing countries are facing comprehensive look on the use of land. It is
problems of rapid urbanisation. India's level in this regard, the development plan or
of urbanization is projected to rise from Master Plan of the city must be reviewed
about 28 per cent in 2001 to 36 per cent by every 5 to 10 years to take care of the
2026 - when the total urban population population pressure and provide better
could number roughly half a billion. In 2001 quality of life in the city and its environs.
there were thirty-five 'million plus' cities, it
seems likely that there will be nearly The Master Plan is a legal document
seventy by 2026. And because the urban specifying the allocation of broad land use
population is becoming increasingly in the city for the future development. Such
concentrated, these seventy cities could plans propose the new areas for the
contain around half of all the country's development as well as extension of urban
urban inhabitants. Delhi and Greater infrastructure.
Mumbai – will probably each contain thirty
million people. In the preparation of an environmentally
compatible urban development plan, it is a
Cities and towns have a vital role in India’s prerequisite to understand linkages and
socio-economic transformation and interactions that exist between different
change. Apart from their contribution to the components of the urban environment.
country’s gross domestic product (GDP), Secondly, the data collected on different
which is currently placed at about 50-55 per aspects of the urban environment has to be
cent, and their growing role in the global translated into useful information for the
markets, cities in India are the center-point purpose of urban development. Thirdly,
of innovations and hub of many activities. there is also a need to aggregate this
At the same time, most cities and towns are information according to
severely stressed in terms of infrastructure administrative/natural and hierarchical
and service availability. In 2001, 50.3 per units.
cent of urban households had no piped
water within premises, and 44 per cent of 1.2. City Development
them were devoid of sanitation facilities.
Even with a relatively high economic Planning
growth registered during the 1990s, 23.6
A City Development Plan (CDP) is both a
per cent of the country’s urban population
perspective and a vision for the future
continued to be below the poverty line.
development of a city. It presents the
According to the Census of India 2001,
current stage of the city’s development –
14.12 per cent of urban population lives in
where are we now? It sets out the
slums, with a significant proportion of it
directions of change – where do we want to
without access to even the most basic
go? It identifies the thrust areas — what do
services. The inner areas of cities face
we need to address on a priority basis? It
widespread dereliction, decadence, and
also suggests alternative routes, strategies,
neglect, with significant negative economic
and interventions for bringing about the
consequences.
change– what interventions do we make in
order to attain the vision?
The studies on various human settlement
analysis shows that the rapid and
haphazard growth of urban sprawl and

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Illust. 1.1 Process of Formulating a City Development Plan

Source; As Suggested by JNNURM Tool Kit

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

It provides a framework and vision within collective vision of the future direction
which projects need to be identified and expressed in terms of expectations and
implemented. It establishes a logical and often-even goals, such as “water for all”.
consistent framework for evaluation of
investment decisions. (iii) Formulating a strategy for bridging
the gap between where the city is and
A CDP is anchored on the Jawaharlal where it wishes to go: It is in this stage
Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission that strategies and interventions are
(JNNURM) goal of creating economically identified for attaining the vision and future
productive, efficient, equitable and development perspectives. This stage is
responsive cities. As a step to achieving used to first identify the options and
this goal, the CDP focuses on the strategies and second, to evaluate the
development of economic and social strategies from the perspective of their
infrastructure, strategies that deal contribution to the goals and objectives of
the JNNURM. The chosen strategies are
specifically with issues affecting the urban
translated into programmes and projects in
poor, strengthening of municipal
this stage. This is the phase where the city
governments and their financial accounting needs to decide which programmes would
and budgeting systems and procedures, contribute most to the vision and medium–
creation of structures for bringing in term perspectives. It is at this stage where
accountability and transparency, and criteria are selected, with appropriate
elimination of legal and other bottlenecks consultative processes, for prioritizing the
that have stifled the land and housing strategies, programmes and projects.
markets. It provides a basis for cities to
undertake urban sector reforms that help (iv) Preparing a City Investment Plan
direct investment into city-based (CIP) and a financing strategy: An
infrastructure. Preparation of a CDP is a investment plan and a financing strategy
multi-stage exercise, involving: are an integral part of the CDP. It is an
aggregate investment plan indicating, for
(i) In-depth analysis of the existing instance, the cost involved in providing 24/7
situation, covering the demographic, water supply from the present level of 10/7;
economic, financial, infrastructure, it is not a financial estimate of a project for
physical, environmental and increasing the capacity of a water plant
institutional aspects: The purpose of this from 1,00,000 MLD to 1,50,000 MLD.
stage is to review and analyse the current Crucial to this stage is a plan that considers
status of the city with regard to the state of the alternative sources of financing the
its development, systems and procedures, vision and the accompanying strategy and
as equally its institutional and financial programmes.
context. This stage is meant to identify the
strengths and weaknesses in the city’s
development and to provide an 1.3. Previous Planning
understanding of what impedes service Interventions in Indore
delivery and management within the
existing set-up and what contributes to Unlike other cities in the Madhya Pradesh
better service provision. This stage offers state or else where in the country, Indore
an opportunity to bring out the unique had the benefit of consciousness of Holkars
features of the city that may distinguish it and the civic authorities towards proper and
from other cities. planned development of the city. Some of
the significant efforts made in the past are
(ii) Development of a perspective and a discussed below.
vision of the city: Using the results of the
first stage of analysis combined with In 1912 Shri H.V. Lancaster was invited, by
consultations with key stakeholders and the local body to advice in respect of
civil society, this stage is meant to develop expansion of the city and improvement in
a vision for the future development – a the sanitary conditions in residential areas.
shared vision of where the city wants to be
in a medium-term perspective. It is a

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE. 3


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

In 1918 Sir Patrick Geddes was invited by Improvement Trust is in progress. The
Maharaja Tukoji Rao Holker to advise the circulation plan of the city will have to take
Government and local body regarding note of this pattern and incorporate it as far
improvement and expansion of the city. He as possible in the Development plan.
prepared drainage and water supply
schemes, Industrial Development Indore Development Plan (1974-1991) was
‘schemes, Suburban Development, published and adopted under 18 & 19 of
Housing Schemes and Landscaping etc. Town & Country Planning Organisation Act
- 1973. The plan envisaged planning area
Sir Geddes advocated segregation of was 21,410 ha. 12,145 ha. were provided
working area (particularly industries) from under different uses for 12.5 lakhs
residential area and yet maintains ‘work population.
place and Folk place’ relationship.
Development of Industrial area on the
Northeastern side of the city and residential 1.4. Approach to Indore City
area for cotton and other industrial workers Development Plan
within distance of one kilometer from these
industries’ is the most valuable scheme
implemented on his advice. This has given
a proper direction for industrial The CDP will be the IMC’s operating
development in the city. blueprint for achieving greater efficiencies
and to deliver the highest possible level of
Sir Geddes suggested planting of flowering service to the community. As mentioned
trees in suitable position and ‘roadside’ earlier, the plan is developed on the basis
trees in the form of boulevard along the of extensive consultations and a
participatory process that began in Aug
Western and Eastern banks of the river,
2005, through the initiative of the “City
which flows in the center of the city.
Development Plan” under the JNNURM
Unfortunately this scheme has not been Programme.
implemented and most of the space is now
occupied by jhuggis and slums. The CDP focuses on the key issues
identified under the JNNURM. This is
In 1938 Shri R. H. V. Stamper, consulting
surveyor to the Government of Bombay the first plan of its kind for the city.
was invited by Holkars to seek his advice Through the plan the citizens of Indore
for improvement and expansion of the city will share a vision for the future and
on proper lines. His report was devoted to identify issues in various sectors a city
improvement of circulation pattern, development in the short, medium and
although he advised on development of long run. This establishes priorities and
some residential colonies also. investment decisions can be made for
Shri Stamper suggested seven traffic the desired future when the next CDP is
routes to inter connect different localities prepared.
and provide for heavy intra-city and inter-
city traffic. These traffic routes were named The City Development Plan will be focusing
as Route No. 1, 11, III, IV, V VI and VII. Out on the components to which JNNURM will
of the seven traffic routes, Route No. I and be providing its assistance. The City
Route No. 11, now known as Subhash Development Plan is prepared taking in to
Marg and Jawahar Marg, were constructed view the deficiencies and requirements of
after acquisition of urban property along the city till 2021. It targets for a sustainable
these routes. These now form lifelines of and harmonious development of the city of
the city. Indore would have been a city of Indore, to be fulfilled by 2021. This will
chaos without these two important roads. indirectly phase the development period in
Besides these T. Route No. IV and VI have two stages of seven years each. The first
also been constructed in parts. Scheme for seven years will be focusing upon the
construction of T Route No. III by Town utilization of funds under JNNURM as

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE. 4


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

envisaged by JNNURM and expecting the Mehta & associates, Indore in 2004, Indore
same for next 7 years. sewerage Project by Montgomery Watson
in 2002, Settling of Municipal Waste
1.4.1. Planning Process Process complex by ILFS in 2005, Energy
Saving for street Lighting and tension
The various steps undertaken for the
Pumps by Asian Electronics in 2003,
formulation of the Indore City Development
Capacity enhancement of Yeshwant Sagar
Plan are discussed below
Dam by Water & Power Consultancy in
2003. Similar studies for Water Supply,
Step 1: In depth analysis of the existing
Solid Waste Management and Drainage by
situation of the city under following sectors
consultants of Asian Development Bank
(ADB) in 2002. Thus IMC has wide
‰ City Profile
database and deep understanding of the
‰ Demographic and Social Profile
shortcomings and the necessities of the
‰ Economic base.
city.
‰ Land Use
‰ Infrastructure and Environment
For the formulation of the CDP, the future
‰ Housing and Slums
vision of the city was developed through a
‰ Inner City and Heritage Conservation
participatory approach by the IMC,
‰ Organization, institutional setup and
initiated in Aug. 2005. Broadly, IMC has
Governance.
conducted this in following ways:
Step 2: Identification of the Problems The preparation specifically for CDP under
Issues and Potentials regarding the Sectors JNNURM started on Aug. 2005. For the
discussed in previous step consolidating purpose of this, meetings were conducted
the Problems Issues and Potentials as per
with various departments like Road and
the priorities to the different Sectors. Bridge Cell, Health, Sanitation and Water
Special priority will be given to the Supply Department, Revenue Deptt.,
components under JNNURM. Garden and Park Department etc. and the
12 zones of IMC. The Suggestions and
Step 3: Deciding vision for development of
proposals from the officers and HOD’s of
the City with the sectoral goals and the various departments were compiled
objectives by taking into consideration the
and presented before the Mayor in Council.
development perspective of the city.
At the Zonal level, IMC had conducted
Step 4: Formulating the Strategy for filling meetings with the Municipal Councillors
up the Sectoral deficiencies as well as and identified stakeholder’s ward wise. A
meeting the future requirements of the city list of the stakeholders presents in the
and correlating it with City investment Plan meeting(s) and importantly the minutes of
and Financial Strategy. This will involve the above meeting(s) at zonal level have
enlisting of the projects as per the priorities been documented. The documentation
identified in the step 2 and phasing them in included the photography and videography
suitably in the plan period. of these deliberations.

1.4.2. Plan Formulation Responsibilities were assigned to the


The IMC has been involved in development various zones and departments of IMC for
of Indore and providing the Basic the distribution and collection of
infrastructure facilities as per section 66 of questionnaires from the identified
Municipal Corporation Act 1956. For this stakeholders. Owing the responses found
purpose IMC has been conducting studies from the various stakeholders in the
to assess the current situation and future submission of the duly filled in
demand, to name a few Comprehensive questionnaire, efforts are underway to
traffic & Transportation study by C.E.S in collect the filled-in questionnaires.
2004, studies of the slums in the city under
Slum less Indore Project for Urban poor by

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE. 5


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

The responses to the questionnaires were (SLNA), and it was approved by the SLNA
fed into the computer of the IMC. The under JNNURM on 28.01.2006 (refer
evaluation and analysis of the suggestions Annexure)
in the questionnaires received till date has
being carried out to attain the satisfaction The plan will be revised regularly and the
level regarding the existing services corporation will prepare annual progress
provided by IMC reports on plan implementation including
proposed development works. This will be
IMC is creating an effective database of the supported by annual departmental
detailed existing services to work out the community surveys on the services that
CDP. It will also be helpful to know the IMC provides to its citizens.
present scenario of the different services
provided by the corporation, thereby The plan will also propose a Financial
framing intrinsic and concise “City Operating Plan for 2006-2021 based on the
Development Plan”. long-term financial vision and identify high
priority investment requirements. It will also
Though the members of the IMC Council focus on capacity building of the
are Corporators and Public representatives, institutional, financial and technical aspects
to encourage participatory approach IMC of the corporation to strengthen urban
conducted Workshop from 27.12.2005 to services’ delivery.
28.12.2005. The workshop was attended
by public representatives, technocrats, 1.4.4 Plan Implementation
citizens, government and nongovernmental
The implementation of the plan will be
organisations. The details of the workshops
successful when the resource allocation
and the suggestions are enclosed in the
decisions are made in a coordinated
Annexure. An open house discussion was
manner with the other agencies involved.
also initiated by IMC. The Outcome i.e. the
The investment strategies will be linked to
suggestions of the people were
achieve the plan’s goals
incorporated in the CDP.
For certain sectors like transport and
Key Stakeholders and Planning communication, development of
Partners: outgrowths, etc, which are not under the
‰ Members of Parliament, Members of purview of IMC directly, the strategies
Legislative Assembly Elected Members under such themes is to identify other
of Urban local Body and Other elected agencies like IDA, MPPWD, MPHB, Mandi
representatives Samiti, ICTS Ltd, non-profit organizations
‰ Representatives of Government and citizen groups with whom the
Departments and Parastatal Agencies corporation will work in a coordinated
from the City manner to support an array of activities and
‰ The City’s Community Planning services. In such cases the primary
Partners comprising of NGO’s and responsibility vests with the other agencies,
CBO’s the corporation will take up the secondary
‰ Corporate Bodies in Industrial, responsibility.
Commerce and Other Sectors
1.4.5 Plan Monitoring and
1.4.3 Plan Approval Evaluation
The Draft of the CDP was again reviewed Regular monitoring and annual evaluation
by the respective department of the IMC on of plan implementation is an envisaged
05.01.2006 and presented before the IMC essential. The corporation perceives that
Council on 12.01.2006 The council “Seeing is Believing” and hence the plan
approved the Draft CDP on 12.01.2006 implementation will be regularly monitored
vide resolution 176 (refer Annexure). by way of site visits by the concerned
Therefore the draft of the CDP was sent for officials. Sets of sustainability indicators are
approval to the State Level Nodal Agency developed under each sector to help

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE. 6


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

constant monitoring of the resultant


changes in the social, economic and
environmental set up of the city.

While monitoring and evaluation are carried


out in concordance, annual evaluation
reports will be prepared by each division of
the corporation and compiled into an
annual progress report of the CDP. This will
help ensure consistency within and among
the plan themes. The evaluation reports will
lead to both plan amendments and
improved ability to predict future scenarios.
The corporation will strive to find improved
means to communicate with its citizens and
involve them in planning and decision-
making. Progress in this direction has
already been achieved through its online
communication method.

1.4.6 Plan Review


Plan review will be the final stage of the
CDP process that sets agenda for the
following CDP. Since the plan period
extends for a period of seven years, it is
essential that a critical review of the current
plan’s success and failures with regard to
the goals and objectives of the CDP as well
as with those of the long term strategic plan
is carried out at the end of the five year
plan period. Plan reviews will also be
carried out annually based on the extent of
implementation evaluated through progress
reports.

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE. 7


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Illust. 1.2 City Development Plan Preparation

Existing Situation Review &


Defining City Vision & Goals and
Arriving at “City Development
Plan”
Review of current service delivery
levels from citizen’s perspective
Agenda note preparation on visions
and goals of the CDP in consultation
with planning partners
Review of state and local level
organisations/ institutional operations

Agenda for Future


Draft CDP
(Various Sectoral Strategies)
(City Vision and Goals)

Plan Review
Annual reports and progress Draft Plan Formulation and
assessments Identification of Capital
Improvement Programme
Identification of shortcomings
Areas of focus for forthcoming Address issues and identify
CDP. future requirements within
plan period
Identify tasks to address
strategies formulated to cater
to future needs.
Annual Progress
Identify institutions involved

Plan Monitoring and


Evaluation CDP CDP
Review of sustainability (Amendments) (Draft for Public
indicators
Identification of key areas of
deficiencies
Public Consultation, Plan
Approval and Finalisation
Critical review and approval
Final City CDP of plan by citizen groups/
public representatives,
(For Implementation) elected councilors and
l i

Source: Coimbatore City Development Plan

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE. 8


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

o Transportation
1.5. Report Structure
o Air and Water Quality

The report is divided into Five Sections. ‰ Housing and Slum


The sections are divided on the basis of the
City Development Planning Process. o Housing Situation in the city

‰ Section I – Introduction. o Shelter and Urban Poor (Slums)

‰ Section II – Existing Situation o Basic Services for Urban Poor


Analysis. (Slums)

‰ Section III – Development ‰ Inner City and


Perspective and Vision.
‰ Urban Heritage
‰ Section IV – City Investment Plan:
Strategies and action plan Section III: Development Perspective
and Vision
‰ Section V – Financial Operating
Plan This Section Deals with drawing an over all
vision of the city and deciding Sectoral
Section I: Introduction Goals to achieve it. The sectoral goals are
further supplemented by aims and
Introduces the City Development Plan and objectives of the sector.
the key agencies involved in Plan
Preparation, Formulation and Section IV: City Investment Plan:
Implementation. This Section is divided in Strategies and Action Plan
to two chapters. First chapter focuses on
City Development Planning Process and This Section Deals with preparation of
Approach towards the Indore City Strategy for achieving the Goals, Aims and
Development Plan, while the second Objectives identified in section III. The
chapter introduces the Implementing strategy will involve identification of the
Agency Indore Municipal Corporation and projects to meet the goals and objectives
other Parastatal Agencies. within a stipulated period of time

Section II: Existing Situation Analysis Section V: Financial Operating Plan

It has been divided in to 10 Chapters. It This Section specifies the total financial
analyses the existing situation of the city outlay in the plan period. Amount of central
and elaborates Problems and Issues sponsorship envisaged under JNNURM,
particularly regarding to the following UBL’s own contribution and Private sector
components in the JNNURM with respect involvement in financing the development
to the City profile, Demography and Social as per the projects identified in the
Profile, Economic Base and Land Use Development Strategy.

‰ Infrastructure and Environment

o Water Supply

o Sewerage

o Solid Waste Management

o Storm Water Drainage

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE. 9


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

duties, tolls and fees in accordance with the


Chapter procedures subject to limits.
Implementing
2 Agencies Twelth Schedule (Section 243 W –
74th Constitutional Amendment Act)

2.1. Urban Local Bodies and ‰ Urban planning including town


New Context of Local planning
‰ Regulation of land-use and
Government
construction of buildings
‰ Planning for economic and social
The 74th Constitutional Amendment Act, development
1992 has imparted constitutional status to ‰ Roads and bridges
Urban Local Bodies and has assigned ‰ Water supply for domestic, industrial
appropriate functions to them. The and commercial purposes
relationship of Urban local bodies with the ‰ Public health, sanitation
State Governments with respect to their conservancy and solid waste
functions and powers, ensuring of timely management
and regular elections and arrangements for ‰ Fire services
revenue sharing etc., now have ‰ Urban forestry, protection of the
constitutional backing. This is unlike earlier, environment and promotion of
when the urban local bodies continued to ecological aspects
be under the control of state governments ‰ Safeguarding the interests of
especially for their finances. Urban local weaker sections of society, including
bodies were made responsible with the handicapped and mentally
additional powers to play a key role in the retarded
preparation of local development plans and ‰ Slum improvement and up gradation
programmes for ensuring social justice as ‰ Urban poverty alleviation
envisaged in the Twelfth Schedule of the ‰ Provision for urban amenities and
Constitution, This is facilitated by Section facilities such as parks, gardens and
243 (W) of the 74th Constitutional playgrounds
Amendment Act, 1992. ‰ Promotion of cultural, educational
and aesthetic aspects
2.1.1 Functions and Powers ‰ Burials and burial grounds;
cremations, cremation grounds and
In conformity with the 74th CAA, of the electric crematoriums
Madhya Pradesh Municipal Corporation ‰ Cattle pounds; prevention of cruelty
Act, 1956 were amended. Now ULB’s are to animals
entrusted with the functions listed in the ‰ Vital statistics including registration
Twelfth Schedule of the constitution or of births and deaths
Section 243 (W) of the Constitutional ‰ Public amenities including street
Amendment (74th) Act, 1992. lighting, parking lots, bus stops and
public conveniences
2.1.2 Finances and Taxes ‰ Regulation of slaughter houses and
tanneries
The 74th CAA also provides for the
constitution of a State Finance Commission
(SFC) to review the financial position of the
municipalities and make recommendations.
Article 243-X of the Constitution provides
the State legislature to authorise a ULB to
levy, collect and appropriate such taxes,

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE. 10


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Besides these ULB’s are also empowered documents in urban planning and
with certain other financial powers. incorporated many of the aspects that are
currently considered desirable, like peoples
The 74th Constitutional Amendment Act participation and need for future growth.
lays specific emphasis on Urban Soon the municipality became the first city
Environment Management and Integration to have an elected municipal government
of Rural and Urban Development Plans in responsible for the welfare and growth of
any district or metropolitan area. the city. A city improvement trust was
created and sanitation and waste disposal
2.2. Indore Municipal was undertaken in a scientific and planned
manner. The Indore method of composting
Corporation- Nodal city wastes was a successful model
Agency followed in several other towns. Regular
cleaning of the city and sprinkling of water
along the roads was initiated and made
2.2.1 History of Municipal mandatory.
Government in Indore
After independence, Indore city was
Before 1818, when the capital of Holkars included into Madhya Bharat and declared
was shifted from Maheshwar, Indore was a as the first category of municipality by the
small town. Later, the city prospered and local government department of Madhya
became a major center for opium trade. Bharat. In the year 1956, during the
Despite it's prosperity till 1870, Indore reorganisation of states, Indore was
lacked planned development in regards to included in Madhya Pradesh and in the
facilities like water supply, drainage, same year it was declared a municipal
sanitation, and waste disposal. In 1870, the corporation.
first municipality was constituted in Indore
and Bakshi Khajan Singh was appointed Despite such a long lead time in planned
Chairman. With the formation of the development, Indore unfortunately is
Municipality, the then rulers of the Indore reeling under the set of problems that most
State, the Holkars, initiated some bold modem cities are facing, air pollution, water
initiatives. Trade and Commerce were scarcity and problems in maintaining a
given leverage to strengthen the city quality environment, problems of solid
economy to ensure a positive growth. waste collection and disposal, lack of
Piped water supply system was established adequate revenues and the vagaries of the
at the turn of the century to cope with the current democratic and bureaucratic
demand of the city. In 1906; the city started institutions.
its own powerhouse and established a new
water supply system from the Bilaoli water 2.2.2 Landmarks in Municipal
body. The municipality was also given Governance of Indore
enough authority to initiate scientific
planning and management. In 1910, Some of the important landmarks indicating
extensive landuse mapping was initiated the evolution of the Indore Municipal
and the city was mapped in 100 sheets. A Corporation are:
city sanitation project was initiated in 1912 ‰ In 1856 Octroi on 21 items and transit
under the expert supervision of Mr. tax on Agra-Bombay Road was
Lancaster. During this period, the city introduced to promote trade and
shifted from its traditional opium and commerce in Holkar State.
agricultural trade and commerce to modern ‰ 1893-94 piped water supplies from
industries, predominantly textiles. Realising Sirpur and Piplyapala water reservoirs
the potential of new industries, the Holkars were introduced.
invited Mr. Patrick Geddes, who prepared ‰ 1904 Municipality was given judicial
the first authentic "master-plan' for the city. powers equivalent to class III
Geddes plan was not restricted to land use, Magistrate.
but is one of the most comprehensive

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE. 11


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

‰ 1906 Juna power house was ‰ 1925 primary education was made
established at Indore and power compulsory for all.
generated here was used to provide ‰ 1926 Indore Municipality bought a
street lighting for the city, prior to this vehicle for lifting wastes and spraying
kerosene lit water on roads.
‰ 1906 Octroi and opium tax were ‰ 1929 detailed aerial photography
abolished and arrangements were survey was done under Holkar's
‰ made to compensate this revenue loss initiative for then Holkar State of
from Govt's exchequer. ‰ Indore (6 detailed survey sheets are
‰ 1906 completion of construction of available, presently with City Engineer's
Bilawali Tank. Office).
‰ 1910 Mr. Ramchandra Rao and his ‰ 1938 Mr. R.H.V. Stamper prepared a
team developed a detailed survey map report on improvement of city circulation
(in 100 sheets) of Indore City, promoted pattern. Jawahar Marg and Subhash
by then Holkar ruler. This set of maps - Marg - now form lifelines of the city -
still the most authentic documentation have been constructed as per the
of valuable property and urban recommendations of Stamper.
agglomeration ‰ 1939 completion of Yeshwant Sagar
development - is still available and in Dam under Maharaja Yeshwant Rao
use by City Engineer's Office. Holker's initiative to overcome water
‰ 1912 Municipality was made a semi- crisis of Indore. The dam - still a
autonomous institution through a major source of water supply to the
municipality act. city - was designed by the eminent
‰ 1912 Mr. H.V. Lancaster was invited by civil engineer Dr. M.
the local body to give advice regarding Vishweshwaraiya.
expansion of the city and improvements ‰ 1956 Indore municipality was upgraded
in the sanitary conditions in residential to Municipal Corporation and the late
areas. Ishwarchandra Jain became its first
‰ 1913 Limbodi-Bilawali water supply Mayor.
scheme was made operational to ‰ 1984 commissioning of Narmada
control acute water crisis, which the city Project Phase I.
faced from time to time in the past ‰ 1992 commissioning of Narmada
years. Project Phase II.
‰ 1918 Mr. Patrick Geddes (eminent city ‰ Till 1995 tenure of mayor was for one
planner of that period) prepared a year. Since then the tenure of the
developmental plan for planned mayor was increased to five years (from
development of Indore City under 1995-99).
Holkar rule. ‰ 2000, modernizations of Indore
‰ 1920 For the first time people used their Municipal Corporation through various
right affranchise to elect 15 (out of 30) programs like e-Governance, municipal
members of Indore Municipality. asset management, etc.
‰ In 1923 entertainment tax and vehicle
taxes were introduced in the municipal
area of Indore.
2.2.3. Municipal Governance in
‰ In 1924 overall control of Municipal Indore
government was handed over to
elected representatives and Indore Indore Municipal Corporation, despite its
became first city of central India to have limited resources, is trying to revive its
an elected municipal government. glorious past of good governance, which
‰ In 1924, based on the recommendation respects its citizens, their aspirations and
of Mr. Patrick Geddes, city encourages their participation in all its
improvement trust was constituted with efforts towards city's overall development.
a view to ensure cities planned
development.

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE. 12


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Tab. 2.1 Structure of Deliberative Wing of IMC

CITY COUNCIL
(Members: Chairman, Mayor, Member of Parliament (2)*, Member of State Legislative
Assembly from Indore Municipal Area (5)*, 69 Ward Councilors)
Appeal Accounts Mayor in Council
Committee Committee
Chairman-1 Mayor
Members-6 Chairman of the following committees-
Councilors-3 Housing & Environment,
Water Works,
Education,
Revenue, Market,
Planning & Rehabilitation,
Food & civil Supplies,
Law& General Administration,
Health and
Women & Child Development Advisory Committee
Advisory Committees (Each contains a Chairman and 9
Councilors
Housing &Environment, Water Works, Education,
Revenue, Market, Planning & Rehabilitation, Food & civil
Supplies, Law& General Administration, Health and
Women & Child Development Advisory Committee
Wards Committee (12), 1/ Zone
Each committee has a chairman and 5-8 Councilors of
wards in a zone
Source; Various Office Orders, 2001, Note: * have no Voting Powers

Tab. 2.2 Indore Municipal Corporation Management Team

Department Other Key Officials Main Departmental Functions


Heads
Mayors

Commissioner office
Office

Commissioner Chief Executive Officer


Council Office
Secretary Office Superintendent General Administration (46)
Public Relation Officer Public Relation and Protocol 15)
Commissioner

Manger Ravindra Natya Griha (6)


Manger Nehru Stadium (13)
Manger Community Hall (3)
Librarian Library (26)

IMC Head Office

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE. 13


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Additional General Administrative General Administration (71)


Commissioner officer
Records Department (12)
Stores Officer Stores (41)
Nodal Officer Poverty Alleviation Department (56)
Law Officer Law Department (20 + 19*)
Garden Officer Garden Department (500)
Garden Officer Swimming Pool (52)
Zoo In charge Zoo (57)
Public Analyst Laboratory (19)
Accounts Department
Accounts officer Office Superintendent General Administration (5)
Chief Cashier Treasury (27)
Accountant Contingency (24)
Establishment (18)
Pension Unit (10)
Revenue Department
Additional Deputy Commissioner General Administration (25)
Commissioner Revenue
Revenue Office Superintendent
Assessment Officer Assessment Section (78)
Zonal Offices (84)*
Revenue Officer Market & Rent Section (68)
Land & Building Section (14)
Encroachment Removal Section (39)
Advertisement Section (3)
Vehicle Tax & Animal Encroachment
Section (86)
Assessment Officer Tax Collection Section (71)
Property Tax Collection Section (41)
Health Department
General Administration (43+10+22)
Health Officer Disease Prevention & Birth & Death
Registration Section (68)
Malaria Prevention (137)
Cleaning of Public Toilets and
Drainage Section (240)*
Sanitation Service Section (2613)*
Garbage Collection Section (135)*
Veterinary Doctor/Meat Veterinary Section (64)
Inspector
Public Works Department and Planning Department
City Engineer • Zonal Executive Gen Admn. (80)
(Public Works) Engineers Planning & Dev. Cell (91)
• Assistant Engineer Encroachment Removal Section (57)
• Sub Engineer Survey Design & planning Section (24)
• Office Building works Maintenance (428+8)
Superintendent RDDC Cell Bridge Cell
• Senior Clerk Bill

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE. 14


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

City Engineer • Building Officer Building permission , removal of illegal


Planning • Building Inspector constriction,
• Vigilance Daroga
• Building Clerk

Water Work and Drainage Department


City Engineer Executive Engineers Water supply and maintenance, Tube
• Assistant Engineer well maintenance, Drainage
• Sub Engineer constriction and maintenance
• Office
Superintendent
Electrical and Mechanical Department
City Engineer Executive Engineers Maintenance of Vehicles Street light
• Assistant Engineer maintenance, Fire Fighting
• Sub Engineer
• Office
Superintendent
Source; IMC Establishment Schedule, 2000

Table 2.3: Distribution of Wards in Each Zone


S.No. Zone No of Wards Ward Nos.
Included
1. Hegdewar (Killa Maidan) 7 2,3,4,5,6,7,20
2. Lalbhadur shastri (Subhash 7 17,18,19,21,24,25,27
Chowk )
3. Bhagat sing (Jawahar Marg) 7 22,23,47,48,49,50,54
4. Harciddhi 7 43,44,45,46,56,57,58
5. Maharana pratap (Hawa 4 1,51,52,53
Bangla )
6. Pt.Dindayal (Bilawali) 5 55,59,67,68,69
7. Chtripati sevaji (Stadium) 6 41,61,63,64,65,66
8. Gangadhar Tilak (Saket 5 9,34,36,39,62
Nagar )
9. Bhimrao Ambedekar 5 31,33,35,37,38
(shatri- pancham ki Phel)
10. Dr. Shayama Prasad (Vijay 4 10,11,12,32
Nagar )
11. Subhash Chandra Bose 5 13,14,15,16,8
(Subhash Nagar)
12 Mahatama Gandhi 7 26,28,29,30,40,42,60
Source: IMC

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE. 15


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Table2.4: Zonal Administration


Executive Wing Deliberative Wing

Commissioner, IMC Chairman


Additional Commissioner-1 for 6 Zone
Additional Commissioner-2 for 6 Zone
Department Functions Key Staff Members per Wards Committee
Heads Zone
Water Supply & Asst Engineer – 1 Councilors of
Drainage Sub Engineer - 1 or 2 every Ward Which
Maintenance come under a
Public Works Asst Engineer – 1 zone
(Building permission, Sub Engineer – 1 or 2
Maintenance, Building Inspector – 1
Construction Control)
Health & Sanitation Sanitation Inspector – 2
Sanitation Sub Inspector -2
Sanitation Supervisor – 6
or 7
Cleanliness Workers – 220
Revenue Collection Rev Sub Inspector – 1
Bill Collectors - 6 or 7
Peons – 3
Office Clerks & peons – 2* Words Committee
Office Staff
Source: Various IMC Office Orders, 2001 (*competent persons derived from workforce in
the zone)

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE. 16


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

The appeal committee has mayor and four


At present, municipal area is divided in 12
elected councilors where mayor is ex-officio
zones and 69 wards of various sizes and
chairman of it. Main responsibility of the
population, for effective decentralized
committee is to examine appeal against the
planning and implementation. The
order of the commissioner and subordinate
deliberative and executive Wings of IMC
officer.
are the pillars, which provide strength and
balance to its organizational structure; a
brief description of the same is given as
2.2.4 Organisational Structure
under. Table 2.1 ahead describes composition of
IMC's existing organizational structure. A
As per the provision of Madhya Pradesh few analytical observations regarding the
Municipal Corporation Act, 1956, IMC has a organisational structure of IMC are
mayor (chairperson), elected through direct presented below:
election, councilors (Refer Table 2.1)
elected by direct election from 69 wards, 2 ‰ Massive size, especially due to large
members of Parliament and 5 members of number of conservancy workers at
State Legislative Assembly representing head office and zonal offices. The
constituencies within municipal areas. In present strength of conservancy
accordance with the 74th constitutional workers is about 2,613. In accordance
amendment, 25 seats out of 69 are with, the WHO norms, IMC had decided
reserved for women. There is a provision to to recruit 2,000 more such workers.
nominate 6 persons having special Large number of clerks, supervisors,
knowledge and experience in the city peons, messengers create relatively
council, which have been nominated unproductive workforce in various
recently. departments.
‰ Poverty Alleviation Department, which
Mayor - ex-officio chairman of mayor in manages various welfare and social
council (MIC) - along with councilors, security schemes, lacks skilled persons.
commissioner and MIC are entrusted to ‰ IMC's laboratory, which is entrusted
carry out provisions of M.P. Municipal with important responsibilities like
Corporation Act, 1956. Presently as per the regular monitoring of quality of water
provisions, MIC has 10 members -each supplied and food adulteration, is under
heading an advisory committee of various staffed.
departments of IMC. Composition of ‰ Planning and design section of Public
advisory committee and MIC is described in Works Department also lacks in skilled
annexure IV. staff.
‰ There are large number of supervisors
Municipal account committee is constituted and labourers, instead of trained
under Section 131-A of MPMC Act 1956. coaches and lifeguards at swimming
pool.
As per provisions, it consists of 7 members ‰ Lack of proper documentation and
elected by the elected councilors by secret record keeping puts a question mark on
ballot from amongst themselves. It has no existing huge clerical staff in sections of
member from MIC. The members of the various departments.
committee also select from amongst
themselves a chairman. The prime 2.2.5 Decentralization of Municipal
responsibility of the committee is to Administration
examine the accounts of the corporation,
ensuring appropriation of funds and grant Decentralization of municipal functions and
for expenditure, also to examine, scrutinize activities through twelve zonal offices and
and ensure appropriation of money shown their respective wards committees is a
in the accounts, and disbursed in significant achievement of IMC, which has
accordance with the allotment for the same. received encouraging response from
citizens as it has made dissemination of

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 17


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

information, revenue collection, grievance


redressed, etc., simpler and effective.
2.3. Para Statal Agencies

To ensure efficiency and effectiveness in 2.3.1 Indore Development Authority


municipal governance, the whole of city
area is organized in eleven zones, each Until 1973, the city had a 'City Improvement
comprising of 5-7 wards. IMC plans to Trust', to assist the Indore municipal body
develop all its zonal offices as mini in its developmental activities. In 1973, the
corporations. The system has been Improvement Trust was converted to Indore
designed to decentralize municipal Development Authority (IDA) under the
governance in a true sense. Madhya Pradesh Town and Country
Planning Act, 1973. Primarily, IDA develops
As presented in the Table 2.4 (Annexure new residential areas. During the early
IV), the chairperson of wards committee stages of development of such areas, IDA
heads the deliberative wing at the zonal is responsible for developing basic
office level, where councilors of wards, infrastructure. Once a sizable number of
which fall in a particular ward, are the plots are sold, the area is formally
members of the committee. These transferred to IMC, which is then
committees for their territorial areas are responsible for the maintenance of the
empowered to: infrastructure in the area. So far, four
residential colonies developed by IDA has
i) Sanction up to an amount of Rs. been handed over to IMC with all the legal
50,000 for the function of the formalities.
committee,
ii) Inspect and supervise any work. Major Apart from developing residential areas,
responsibilities entrusted towards IDA has taken up a number of
committees are as under: development schemes like construction of
‰ Construction of new roads and some major roads, traffic squares,
drains Krishnapura Lake, Meghdoot Garden, etc.
‰ Maintenance of existing roads and
drains The Commissioner of IMC is the ex-officio
‰ Arrangements for water supply and
member on the board of IDA.
sanitation
‰ Recommendations for all types of
After publication and adoption of the lndore
licenses Development Plan 1991 u/s 18,19 of Nagar
‰ Collection of tax, rent and fees
Tatha Gram Nivesh Adhiniyam 1973, the
‰ Implementation of national main implementing agency IDA has played
programs relating to social an important role. lndore Development
welfare services and social Authority has taken so far 80 schemes on
security schemes. an area of about 4500 ha. Out of which
‰ Removal of encroachments.
development in 33 schemes covering an
‰ Development and maintenance of
area of about 1900 ha has been
gardens, public places. completed. Twenty-eight schemes (area
‰ Supervision of primary schools,
about 1000 ha) have been dropped due to
primary health centers and various reasons. In 19 schemes (area of
public distribution systems. about 1600 ha) the process of land
‰ Environmental improvements
acquisitions is in progress.

To carry out the responsibilities entrusted 2.3.2 Madhya Pradesh Public Works
to it, wards committees are expected to Department
prepare proposals and submit them to the
municipal commissioner in the month of Public Works Department (PWD) deals with
October for perusal in the next financial the construction and maintenance of
year. buildings, roads, and bridges. Irrigation,
flood control works.

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 18


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

2.3.3 Madhya Pradesh Pollution 2.3.8 Madhya Pradesh Town and


Control Board Country Planning (MPTNCP)
MPPCB monitors air quality, water quality
T&CP department in Indore was
and noise levels at various sampling points
established under MPTNCP act of 1973.
distributed throughout the city. It is also
The main function of T&CP is to prepare
mandated to monitor industries and
master plans and give permission for
enforce pollution control measures.
development of schemes in accordance
MPPCB is the nodal agency appointed to
with master plan.
implement the 'National River Conservation
Plan.
2.3.9 Krishi Upaj Mandi samiti,
2.3.4 Public Health Engineering Indore
Department Government of Mandi samiti’s main function is to provide a
Madhya Pradesh set up for the farmers of the regional area
The Public Health Engineering Department to sell their commodities. Presently there
(PHED), a State Government body, is are three main mandis functioning under
charged with a number of responsibilities in Krish Upaj mandi samiti, Indore. Out of the
water supply and sanitation. It is a state three the Grain mandi at Chavvani is ill
level body; presently the staff is deputed to placed in highly congested area.
Indore to oversee the Narmada water
project. 2.3.10 Indore City Transport Services
Ltd.
2.3.5 Madhya Pradesh Housing
Board This is an unique imitative that have been
taken by Dist. Administration and IMC by
MPHB functions as per the MP housing setting up a fully Govt. owned Company
development act of 1972. It has named Indore City Transport Services
constructed about 20000 units in Indore city
Limited (ICTSL) to provide with an
of HIG, LIG, MIG, EWS, Shops, Offices and
Halls and about 4000 developed plots. The
efficient transport system in the city.
MPHB have been constructing and
developed in 21 colonies in the city. MPHB
works in collaboration with IMC for
maintenance of services.

2.3.6 Indore Development Fund Ltd.


A limited company, Indore Development
Fund Ltd, has been formed to mobilize
funds for repair and construction of Roads
in the city. The company id fully owned by
IMC.

2.3.7 District Urban Development


Authority
It function under the administration of the
Indore District Collector’s office and finally
reports to the Urban Development
department of the state government.

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 19


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Chapter

3 City Profile
Indore, a 2.0 million plus city today has
transformed from a traditional commercial
urban center into a modern dynamic
commercial capital of the state.

Indore, the most prominent city of Madhya


Pradesh and the district headquarter of the
district with the same name is situated on
the western part of the Malwa (historically
known as Deccan plateau) on the banks of
two small rivers, the Khan and the
Saraswati. Indore is 17th among the 23
million plus cities of India enumerated in
the 2001 census. The city is currently the
most populated city of Madhya Pradesh.
Illust. 3.1 H. H. Maharajadhiraja
Indore has been a center of affluence due Shrimant Malhar Rao Holkar I
to flourishing trade and commerce right (1733 – 1766)
from the beginning. It is the biggest
commercial center and is termed as the
business capital of Madhya Pradesh. documents in the late 17th century during
the rule of Aurangjeb, the famous Mogul
ruler.
3.1. Historical Background
The little village grew as an important
3.1.1. Early Indore- Juni Indore
halting place for pilgrims traveling between
Indore owes its early growth to trade and great religious cities, Ujjain on the bank of
commerce, which is still a dominant feature the Holy River; Narmada and
of the city. The present city is about 400 Omkerashwar. Later, in addition to the
year’s old settlement. Till the end of 15th halting place it also became a camping
century its original nucleus was a riverside place for forces of Moghul's and Marathas
village, which occupied the bank of river who frequently moved to South and North
Saraswati. This area is now known as Juni for expanding their kingdoms. The
Indore. Zamindars of village Kampel (about 10 km.
S.E) visualized the opportunity of
Indore situated on the plateau of ‘MALWA’ flourishing trade in this settlement and
was just a village called Indur/Indurpuri. settled on the banks of the River Khan. To
The name Indore is attributed to the withstand the foreign invasions, Zamindars
Rashtrakut ruler ‘Indra’ on whose name the built a castle, giving this village a character
village must have derived its name. of a walled town, although the town hardly
According to some myth the name of suffered the destruction of feudal wars.
Indore was derived from the name of
Indrashewar temple. The Indore ‘Kasba’ is 3.1.2. Holkar’s Indore
mentioned in some of the
There is no firm date about establishment
of Indore as a city. It is believed that the
village of Indrashewar gradually developed

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 20


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

into a ‘Kasba’, then to a ‘Pargana’ and roads, location of defense establishments


finally as a important town on 29th July were at a reasonable distance from the
1732, when Bajirao Peshwa-I granted civil population. The town, which was
Holkar State (Jagir) by merging 28 and half called ‘Indur’, under the influence of
parganas and then providing this Jagir to Maratha rulers, must have been called
the ‘MALHARRAO HOLKAR’, the founder ‘Indoor’ which under the influence of
ruler of Holkar Dynasty. British must have further distorted to
‘ Indore’.
He ruled the state from 1728 to 1766.
During this period development was During the period of Maharaja Tukoji Rao II
primarily for military and commercial efforts were made for the planned
establishment. Later the boundaries of the development and industrial development of
state were amended and Maheshwar was Indore (1852-86). It was during his time that
also included in the Jagir. In 1818 the Krishnapura Bridge, Krishna Bai Chattri
capital was shifted from Maheshwar to and roads were constructed. With the
Indore, through the proposal was initiated introduction of Railways in 1875 the
by Rani Ahilya Bai, daughter-in-law of business in Indore flourished. During the
Malhar Rao holkar. regime of Maharaja Shivaji Rao, Holkar
college, Moti Bunglow was constructed.
Indore retained its status of being the
administrative capital till the regime of
Yashawant Rao Holkar who due to some
military reasons established his capital seat
Bhanpura. As the British defeated the
Holkars (Tukojirao II) and Scindia at
Mahidpur, a Mandsaur treaty was signed
by virtue of which Indore was again made
the capital. A residency with British resident
was established at Indore, but Holkars
continued to rule mainly due to the efforts
of their Dewan Tatya Jog. In fact during
that time Indore was established as Head
office of British Central agency.

3.1.3 British Indore

In 1903 Maharaja Shivaji Rao Holkar left


the throne in favor of his son Maharaj
Tukoji Rao –III during whose regime also
the development of city continued.
Manikbag palace, Maharani Saraya,
Gandhi hall, Old High Court Building,
Illust. 3.2 H.H. Maharani Shrimant Yashwant Niwas, Tukoji Rao Hospital were
Akhand Soubgahyavati Ahilya Bai Sahiba. constructed during his tenure. In 1906
1767 - 1795 Electric supply was started in the city. Fire
brigade was established in 1909 and in
Establishment of Holkars capital at Indore 1918 to promote proper development of
provided new forces for development of Indore Master Plan was prepared by noted
the city. In view of the defense needs, the Architect and Town Planner Patrick
three roads, one leading to polo ground, Geddes.
the other to State stable now M.T. Cloth
Market, and the third Topsham Road were 3.1.4 Post Independence Indore
first to develop. All the defense
establishments were located on these In 1948, the Holkar State acceded to Indian
Union. With the formation of Madhya

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 21


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Bharat State, Indore became the summer E longitude. Indore is located at an average
capital of the state. The present altitude of 550 mts. above MSL.
Commissioner Office then was used as
Ministry office and the assembly session 3.3. Physical and
were held in Gandhi hall.
Geographical Character
The first ever-planning intervention in the
post independence period was in the form 3.3.1 Physical Features
of Indore Development Plan (1974-1991),
The entire city of Indore, having a muncipal
which was published and adopted under 18
area of 134.0 Sq. Km. lies in Khan River
& 19 of Town & Country Planning
basin. The river and its tributaries traverse
Organisation Act - 1973. The plan
through the densely populated area of the
envisaged planning area was 21,410 ha,
city. The city occupies a relatively flat
out of which 12,145 ha. were provided
plateau having a gentle slope towards
under different uses for 12.5 lakhs
north.
population.
The hinterland of the city is scattered with
Indore Development Authority and Madhya
some hillocks. There are no physical
Pradesh Housing Board have played an
constraints except Pipaliyapala Tank on the
important role in implementing the
southeastern side and Sirpur Tank in the
Development Plan 1991 besides private
southwest, which may limit or condition the
colonizers and Co-operative Housing
growth of the city. The highest and the
Societies.
lowest contour levels in the city are 590 m
Indore a nearly 2.0 million city today has and 540 m, respectively.
transformed from a traditional commercial
The city has black cotton soil varying in
urban center into a modern dynamic
depth from place to place. The cross
commercial capital of the state.
section at various places shows an order of
soft soil till 5 ft., hard soil till 15 £., red-soils
3.2. Location and Linkages till 30 ft, after this the rocky terrain extends
Indore city is linked by three modes of oil 100 ft and below.
transportation viz. Road, Rail and Air;
Regional road pattern fans out in all 3.3.2 Climatic Conditions
directions. The National Highway (Mumbai- The city enjoys a composite climate with
Agra Road) passes through the city’s extended hot humid period from July to
habited area. State Highways and other September, winter period from November
roads connect the city with the State to February, summer period from April to
Capital Bhopal, all District Head Quarters of June and a temperate climate from October
the Division and important towns within the to March. The climate of the area is
District. typically seasonal. There are three distinct
dry, wet and cold seasons. The mean daily
The city is, served by a broad gauge and temperature is about 25.1° C throughout
meter gauge railway line. The Railway line me year.
passes through the heart of the city, which
forms a physical barrier for, inter Winter
communications within the city. The city is
In winter (November-February), the night
also served by a regular air service, which
low is around 10°C At the peak of winter, it
connects it to Mumbai, Bhopal and New
can be as low as 2° to 3°C. The record low
Delhi.
is +1.5°C.
Indore City is located in the center of Indore
District. It is situated on fertile Malwa
plateau, located at 22 43 N latitude, 76 42

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 22


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Tab. 3.1 Mean Monthly Temperature


Recorded in different Seasons
near Krishnapura Bridge. Cenotaphs of the
Holkars, popularly known as Krishnapura
Hot Chattris, have been built in the confluence
Summer Winter area. A large area surrounding this site is
Humid
Attributes (April- (Nov- flood prone and hence lying vacant. With
(July-
June) Feb) proper planning, this historical site has the
Sept)
potential to be developed as an integrated
Mean recreational and cultural site
Monthly 44 32 29.3
Max. oC. River Khan flows from south to north and
Mean traverses through the densely populated
Monthly Min 28.5 25 8 area of Indore city. Various Nallahs joining
o
C. River Khan (Map No. 3) are as follows:

Max Relative Piliakhal Naliah, flowing through populated


68 91 75 area from eastern Indore joins River Khan
Humidity (%)
at Kulkarni Bhatta.
Source; PHED Indore
‰ Palasia Nallah flowing through
Summer westernIndore joins Khan river near
Sukhaliya village.
During summer (April-June), the days are
hot (35°-40°C) with the peak summer (May) ‰ Bhamori Nallah, another nallah flowing
day temperature sometimes touching 45°C. through eastern part joins Khan river at
Due to its location on the southern edge of Kabit Khedi.
the Malwa Plateau, however hot it may be
during the day, in the late evening, cool The rivers are non-perennial. After January,
breezes make the evenings quite pleasant, there is practically no flow beyond village
and thus Indore is referred to as Shab-e- Kelod. The domestic and industrial
Malwa. wastewater from the entire city has its
outlet in the rivulets. This water is utilised
Monsoon: for farming purposes in the downstream
Indore gets moderate rainfall of 30-35 areas.
inches (~80cms) during June -September
from Southwest Monsoon. Apart from this, The slope of the riverbed upstream is 1:500
there is spurious rainfall during winter and downstream 1:650. The slope is
months. greater till the confluence point and after
this point the riverbed becomes relatively
Wind Direction flatter. The riverbed has a gradual slope
The prevalent wind direction is west and towards north, without many undulations.
southwest in summer months and north
and northeast in winter. 3.5. Regional Setting and
3.4. Natural Drainage Growth Pattern
Indore is the biggest city located in Malwa
"The drainage of the city, as mentioned plateau region and occupies relatively plain
earlier, is provided by the river system of plateau having a very gentle slope towards
Khan including the Rivers Khan and North. The hinterland of the city is also flat
Saraswati along with their tributaries. Khan but intermixed with some hillocks like
River originates about 11 km south of Bijasan, Gadha, Tekri, Bhuri Tekri,
Indore. Three kms. from the origin, it is Deoguradia and depressions at Sirpur ,
joined by the Saraswati River, which has its Piplyapala and Bilawali tanks. An area of
origin near Machal village. The confluence about 4798 sq.km around Indore city has
of the two rivers lies in the heart of the city been identified as Indore influence region,

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 23


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

which includes 7 major urban towns and Growth Pattern


946 villages. The region forms part of the
The physical growth of Indore city from the
Ganga Drainage System. The four major
year 1975 to 2002 has been studied with
rivers of the region viz. The Chambal, The
Gambhir, The Khan and The Shipra flow the help of multi-date remote sensing data
more or less parallel to one another. All viz. Landsat TM, IRS LISS- II, IRS LISS-III
and IRS PAN data employing both visual
these rivers are non-perennial. The region
consists of seven districts viz. Indore, and digital techniques and with limited field
checks. This map depicts details on
Dewas, Ujjain, Ratlam, Mandsaur, Dhar
and Jhabua. The region is relatively more physical growth of the city and direction of
urbanized and industrialized as compared growth. Sprawl period and area are shown
to other regions of the state. Out of seven in Table-3.2. From the table it is clear that
the rate of the growth of the city was higher
districts, the three urban center i.e. Indore,
Dewas and Ujjain, which are located in a during the period 1996- 2002 compared to
the growth rates during the period 1990-
triangular manner in close proximity to each
other, are more urbanized. Dewas is only 1996. The average annual growth rate from
35 km. Dewas and Ujjain are 37 km apart. 1996 to 2002 is 6.40 per cent. Spatial
distribution of urban sprawl is shown in
The city of Indore is the commercial capital Map
of the state and is of significant importance
to the country. The city is having direct Tab. 3.2. Growth of Indore Planning
linkages with the Mumbai, Bhopal, and Area 1975-2002
Delhi etc. Indore is located midway on the
1000 km long Mumbai Agra National
Highway – NH-3. Also it is connected by URBAN SPRAWL
rail to all Metros. Sr. Year Area in Ha Growth in %
No
Pithampur; referred to as Detroit of India 1 1975 2284
due to heavy concentration of Automobile 2 1990 6115 167.73
Industry, is close (25km) to Indore. It has 3 1996 7747 26.68
plants of Kinetic Honda, Bajaj Tempo, 4 2002 10725 38.44
Eicher Motors, Hindustan Motors, Larson &
Source; IRS LISS II, IRS LISS III,
Tubro etc. It has also steel plant of Pratap Panchromatic data and SOI maps
Steel, Kusam, Prestige and Chirag Ingots.
Electronics consumer goods plants of
Crompton Greaves, Kores India, Onida
Saka etc. are also located here.

Dewas; another industrial town is also


close (35km) to Indore. Among the notable
industries here are Tata Exports, Gajra
Group, Steel Tubes, Kesari Steel, S.
Kumars, Prestige Soya, Ruchi Soya,
Ranbaxi Laboratories. Devas also has
Bank Note Press of the Govt. of India.

Mhow; The cantonment town of Mhow


(Military Headquarters Of War) established
during WW as a base for British troops in
Central India, is also close (22km) to the
city. The latter has a thriving ready-made
garment industry as well as shoe and metal
cottage industry. Smocking (a type of
design) dresses and leather horses of
Mhow are quite famous.

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 24


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Chapter Tab. 4.1. Population Trends 1901- 2001


Demographic Indore Municipal Area

4 and Social Profile POPULATION TRENDS


Year Pop. Area Deca Pop.
Indore has experienced very rapid MC dal Den.
population growth during the last 20 years. Sq Variat (P/Sqk
This rapid growth in a very short time span Km ion m)
is actually the hallmark of Indore’s 1901 99880
demographic trends. 1911 57235 -42.7
1921 107948 88.6
4.1. Population Growth 1931 147100 36.27
1941 203695 38.47
Trends 1951 310859 52.61
1961 359000 55.8 15.61 6433.6
The population of Indore City increased 1971 572622 5960
from 57,235 in the year 1911 to 16.39 lacs 1981 829000 44.68
in 2001 as shown in Tab 4.1. On an 1991 1104000 130.1 29.86 8481.2
average the growth rate in the city has 2001 1639000 130.1 48.46 11857.2
been of the order of 40%. Thus the average
increase for Indore has been higher as Source; Census of India
compared to the national growth rate (@
22%), which can be attributed mainly to the Population Growth in Planning Area
rapid urbanisation of the city. However the
The population data collected from the year
decadal growth rate compares very well
1971to 2001 census is presented in Table-
with the state growth rate for urban areas,
4.2. This table also shows growth rate of
which stands at 44.9%.
population in percent for periods 1971-81,
1981-91 and 1991-2001.
As per the census data, the city had
experienced a decadal growth rate of 88%
The percentage increase of population in
during the decade from 1911-21 and later
1981, over population of 1971 was 53.80%.
52% from 41-51. The growth rate between
The population growth from 1981 to 1991
for the city had experienced a sharp fall at
was observed as 34.50 % and between
27% between the years 1951 to 1961. For
1991 to 2001 as 47.90 %. It has been
the periods of 1961-'71 and 1971-'81
observed from these figures that increase
respectively the growth rate has matched
in population of 1991-2001 was
the state urban growth rate, while it has
tremendous. The high rate of growth of
slightly decreased to 30% during 81-91.
population during this period is mainly
Considering the present population at
attributable to the rapid industrial and
about 16.39 as per present census, the
commercial development in Indore planning
growth rate matches the state growth rate.
area.
Tab. 4.2. Population Trends in Indore
Planning Area 1971-2001
Year Indore Municipal Indore Planning
Corporation Area (IMC + 37 +
53 Villages)
Populati Growth Populati Grow
on % on th %
1971 573000 575457
1981 829327 44.68 884775 53.80
1991 1104000 29.86 1189797 34.50
2001 1639000 48.46 1759532 47.90

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 25


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Migration
Migration is also an important and a 4.2. Population Density
dynamic factor in projecting the future
population. However, there are no figures, The population density of the Indore
which can suggest the migration rate or its Planning area as per 2001 census is as
pattern. But there are enough evidences to high as 1028 persons per ha. particularly in
show that migration is indeed a very the CBD area. This figure is too high even
important criteria for projecting the when compared to the population density
population. Many people from small to figures of other cities in Madhya Pradesh
medium towns come to Indore. Moreover, State and Indore District. Spatial
people from one area cross over to another distribution of population density of Indore
area in the same city due to many reasons. city (ward wise) is presented in map. It can
Though these are not seen in overall notice that the density is ranging from a
figures, but have a major effect on the meager 100 persons/ha in the peripheral
housing and residential patterns of the city. areas to as high as 1000 persons per ha in
Such micro level changes and habits have the core of the city. Therefore, there is
not been taken into consideration as the tremendous pressure on the existing land
figures of growth of population incorporate and needs to be regularized in the
these figures. development plan.
Tab. 4.3. Population projections for
year 2011 and 2021
Pop. (In Average Decadal
Year
lakhs) Growth-rate (%) Tab. 4.4. Ward wise Population and
1981 8.84 +44.68 Density

1991 11.04 +29.86 WARD WISE POPULATION 2001


2001 16.39 +48.46 Ward Area Pop,
Pop, Den. (P/Ha)
No Ha (2001)
2005 1 342.56 29008 85
20.57
(Estimated) 2 102.36 15594 152
3 471.77 33994 72
2011
25.34 4 145.72 17851 123
(Projected)
5 293.54 52136 178
2021 6 77.64 24643 317
36.71
(Projected) 7 955.9 28862 30
8 912.02 32733 36
Source; Census of India, and IDP 2011 Draft
9 1070.86 47843 45
10 247.76 71423 288
Population Projections 11 113.34 34470 304
12 145.35 34470 237
The population projections for the Indore
Planning Area up to the year 2011 were 13 53.06 15390 290
made on the basis of different standard 14 58.59 15625 267
statistical procedures. The projected 15 29.17 11390 390
population is presented in Table-4.3. It can 16 88.63 16160 182
be Noticed that presently the Indore 17 222.49 23010 103
planning area is having 20.57 lakhs 18 49.81 15795 317
population and will be 25.34 lakhs in 2011 19 89.33 12963 145
and 36.71 in 2021.nearly in next 15 years 20 73.62 20682 281
population of Indore will increase by about 21 76.84 26700 347
more than1.5 times. 22 198.05 22801 115
23 68.26 20453 300
24 17.09 9336 546

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 26


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

WARD WISE POPULATION 2001


Ward Pop.
4.3. Literacy
Area Ha Pop. Den. (P/Ha)
No (2001)
25 22.55 17192 762
26 29.68 15517 523 The literacy rate in Indore Municipal area in
27 99.88 12165 122 1991 was higher than the average all India
28 91.48 12968 142 literacy levels. With regards to the literacy
29 116.67 19934 171 rates, the figures for Indore city are
30 57.75 12737 221 noteworthy. Although female literacy is
31 31.31 18235 582 lower compared to male literacy the
32 42 19671 468 improvement from 68.4% in 1991 to 74.6%
33 37.92 17428 460
in 2001 is quite impressive.
34 104.7 16913 162 Tab. 4.5. Literacy Rate Comparison
35 186.47 10978 59
% Literacy
36 365.24 25579 70
Total Male Female
37 139.13 20599 148
All India 2001 75.0 65.7 83.3
38 22.12 13541 612
M.P Urban 2001 70.8 81.3 58.9
39 35.72 14865 416 Indore (IMC 77.1 84.9 68.4
40 170.91 17961 105 1991)
41 338.8 20018 59 Indore (IMC 82.1 88.9 74.6
42 87.99 14414 164 2001)
43 14.67 8076 551
Source; Census of India, and IDP 2011 Draft
44 18.17 13864 763
45 29.6 10531 356
46 330.73 8319 25
47 11.41 6940 608
4.4. Sex Ratio
48 26.87 9411 350
49 11.23 11309 1007 The city has shown a continuous growth in
50 40.79 16259 399 the female population. According to 1991
51 90.81 14353 158 Census, the city had 900 females per 1,000
52 526.01 56760 108 males which is almost equal to the State
53 55.9 23766 425 average (Urban) of 912 females per 1,000
54 146.28 11997 82 population, but it is lower than the other
55 115.69 26431 228 class I cities of the Region which have not
56 75.08 55355 737
been subjected to sudden migration and
57 33.47 21223 634
are socially more stabilised. A lower female
ratio indicates difficult housing situation
58 20.1 17350 863
prevailing in the city. The migrant worker
59 102.07 38424 376
has a tendency to leave his family behind
60 68.94 15336 222
unless he is hopeful of obtaining a house
61 361.77 22025 61
within his rent paying capacity. Increased
62 205.55 37335 182 rate of house construction will certainly
63 479.96 16539 34 improve social and cultural life of the city,
64 594.13 31104 52 which is essential for creative and
65 122.04 26335 216 productive life.
66 129.35 24444 189
67 437.25 33509 77
68 1006.63 12656 13
4.5. Age Structure of the
69 377.42 38920 103 Population
Total 13016.98 1542618 119
From the table it can be observed that
Source; Census of India, and IDP 2011 Draft
about two fifth of population of Indore are
children in the age group of 0-14 year. The
working age population group (15-45

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 27


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

years) is about 56.7 per cent and only 8.8% Illust. 4.2. Caste Structure
of the population in above 50 year of age
group. Caste
Indore is a young city. Nearly 55% of its 3%
population is below 24 years of age. 14%
With abundance of academic
institutions in the city the teenager
group is the prime consuming segment
of population in the city.
83%

Illust. 4.1. Age Structure of the


Population 2001
Others SC ST

Age Structure of the Population Source; Census of India


2001
Tab. 4.7. Caste Structure
4% 5%
9%
36% Caste Structure 2001

15%
Caste Population In Lakhs
11% 10% 10% Others 12.94
0-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 SC 2.09
30-39 40-49 50-59 above 60 ST 0.39
Total 15.42
Source; Census of India Source; Census of India

Tab. 4.6. Age Structure of the 4.7. Conclusion


Population 2001
Age Structure of the Population 2001 There is rapid growth in Population in the
Age Percentage Cumulative Indore City and in near future it’s expected
group percentage to grow faster than earlier.
0-14 34.5 34.5
15-19 10.4 44.9 Growth due to Migration can be said to be
20-24 10.1 55 a major component in growth because
25-29 11.4 66.4 natural growth (though there is no data but
30-39 15.4 81.8 higher literacy level justifies it) is average
40-49 9.4 91.2 and the growth due to jurisdictional change
is very minor component.
50-59 4.3 95.5
above 60 4.5 100 Even lower Sex Ratio suggests the large
Total 100 amount of migrated population where male
member in the hinterland and other areas
Source; Census of India comes to Indore for employment.

4.6. Social Structure The effect of Population Growth on Shelter,


Services and Infrastructure will be
discussed in later chapters.
As per the census 2001 14% of the
population was of Scheduled Caste
Category whereas 3% of the Population
was of Scheduled Tribes Category

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 28


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Chapter
Indore Urban Agglomeration had estimated

5 Economic Base 3.30-lakh workers in 1991. The workforce


increased from a size of 1.13 lakh in 1961
recording an average annual growth rate of
Indore is the largest city and is the 3.64% per annum during 1961-1991. Table
business and trading capital of the state. 5.1 shows the trends in workforce of Indore
Located at the crossroads of western and Urban Agglomeration.
central India, Indore has relatively good
Tab. 5.1. Growth trends in Work
connectivity and has been the hub of trade Force Participation, Indore
and commerce, not only for the state but
also for western India. The city holds a Workers
dominant position and is a vibrant center Number WFPR
Year Decadal
for trade and commerce in (%)
Growth (%)
Lakhs
Cotton textiles are the city's major product,
but iron and steel, chemicals, and 1961 1.13 - 30.9
machinery are also manufactured there. 1971 1.47 29.4 25.0
The textile industry is presently on the
1981 2.47 68.6 28.8
decline and is being replaced by a variety
of new manufacturing industries. Still it is 1991 3.30 33.2 28.9
the one of the largest textile industry in 2001 5.16 51.2 30.0
India. Old-time industries which flourished
in Indore were handloom, hand dyeing,
Source; CTTS Report Consulting
manufacture of niwar, oil extraction by
Engineering Services (CES)
ghani, manufacture of bamboo mats,
baskets, metal utensils, embossing and
engraving of gold and silver ornaments, The workforce participation rate (WFPR)
shellac industry etc. Ayurvedic and Unani was 28.9% in 1991 and 30% in 2001. It
medicines from roots and herbs were remained almost static between 1981-1991
manufactured under state patronage. in percentage terms. The maximum growth
Today Indore can boast of a phenomenal (68.6%) took place during the decade
industrial and business development. It has 1971-1981 followed (51.2%) during 1981-
one of the largest trans-shipment centres 2001.
for truck transport.
In terms of occupational structure, there is
Apart from textile industry, Indore has oil a distinct shift in workforce towards tertiary
seed extraction industry, confectionery, sector, which showed an increase from
paper and straw board, factories for 54.4% in 1961 to 63.4% in 1991. The share
asbestos products, RCC pipes and poles, of secondary sector workforce is on a
machine tools and accessories, electrical decline
machinery and appliances, electronics
goods, bicycles and ready-made garments Tab. 5.2. Trend in Occupational
etc. Indore accounts for about one third of Structure, Indore
the total "Namkeen" (variety of gram flour Sectors 1961 1971 1991
snacks) production of India. Due to its trade
Primary 2.3 2.2 3.2
and industry, the residents of the city love
to refer Indore as Mini Bombay. Secondary 43.3 39.4 33.4
Tertiary 54.4 58.4 63.4
Source; C TTS Report Consulting
Engineering Services (CES)

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 29


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Illust. 5.1. Trend in Occupational


Structure, Indore the city: Pithampur to the south and Dewas
to the northeast. Although they are outside
Trend in Occupational Structure, the municipal area, with more than 120
Indore 1991 large and 480 small and medium units,
3% these estates have a considerable impact
33% on the economy. Many of the industries are
capital intensive and high tech. Dominant
sectors are automobiles, engineering,
pharmaceuticals and textiles and include
64% names such as Hindustan Motors, Indo
Rama Synthetics, Eicher Motors and Navin
Chemicals. Many of the employees and
Primary Secondary Tertiary particularly the managers and executives of
these companies live in Indore with
Source; C TTS Report Consulting resulting demand for public and private
Engineering Services (CES) services including government services
5.1. Registered such as schools and hospitals. There are
Establishments three main industrial areas within the city,
Sanwer Road, Pologround and Udyog
Indore Nagar Nigam had estimated 47,956- Nagar with 1272, 137 and 67 small and
registered establishments (2000). Of these medium units respectively. The dominant
while ‘producers’ accounted for eight sectors are engineering pharmaceuticals,
percent, ‘retailers’ were 37 percent while fabrication and food processing.
‘others’ were 44 percent respectively. The Tab. 5.3. Commercial Establishments
maximum establishments were of food Indore
items (28%) followed by commercial
services (15%) and textiles & cosmetics
Shops Commercial
(12%) respectively.
Work Work
5.2. Trade and Commerce Year Nos. Nos.
ers ers

As with many cities, recent years have 1998-99 85142 36144 16534 19769
seen a restructuring of the economy and a 1999-2000 90560 39197 18181 22057
decline of traditional industries. In Indore,
2000-2001 92501 40438 18780 23297
traditional industries were oil extraction
confectionary, pulses industries, machine 2002-2003 2402 3105 179 569
tools, electrical equipments, RCC pipes 2003-2004 15486 25893 1112 4781
and poles, asbestos products, readymade
garments and jewellary. However, many of 2004-2005 17247 26689 2179 10953
the more traditional industries, most of
which were labour intensive, have now Source; District Administration
either closed down or restructured with Tab. 5.4. Commercial Establishments
considerable retrenchment of the Indore
workforce.
Hotels Cinema Halls
Worke
Trade and commerce, the financial sector Year No. Workers Nos.
rs
and new higher tech companies have come 1998-99 7676 6640 33 290
to replace the older industries. There are 1999-2000 8183 7154 33 290
about 250 banking and insurance 2000-2001 8354 7327 33 290
establishments, more than 7,000 hotels 2002-2003 61 243 6 164
and restaurants, around 80 hospitals, 1670 2003-2004 198 1023 8 97
educational establishments and nearly 2004-2005 316 2100 9 100
80,000 registered shops Commercial
establishments are the largest employer. Source; District Administration
There are two main industrial areas outside

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 30


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Discussions with city officials, chambers of Agriculture Export Zone


trade and the business community reveal
There are also Central Government
some major concerns for the health of
proposals for an Agriculture Export Zone
some industries, partly due to power and
near Indore. This Zone would offer
water crisis, road congestion (within the
incentives for processing and export of
city) and difficulties in matching global
specific crops. A feasibility study is being
competition. Industrial growth is reported to
undertaken for a number of crops including
be declining and hotels, travel and tourism
vegetables, wheat and seed spices. Details
are affected. However, despite these
of the proposals are being drown up and
concerns, the overall picture is one of
the proposed size and potential impact on
growth, with banking, insurance, trade and
Indore is uncertain. Again, it is imperative
commerce being the driving sectors.
for the Municipality that GOI plans for this
type of zone are properly master planned
Special Economic Zone and Agricultural
and take due consideration of housing,
Export Zone
employment and infrastructure
The most critical issue for the future requirements both for the Zone and for
economic development and growth Indore.
potential for Indore is the proposed
establishment of a special Economic Zone 5.3. Industries
near Pittampur Industrial area. Permission
for the Zone has already been granted by Expanding flatted industries and industrial
the National Government and Madhya development in the region has also given to
Pardesh State Industrial Development this city a status of an industrial center.
Corporation Ltd has been given There are large number of manufacturing
responsibility, as the nodal agency. The establishments, producing goods like cloth,
SEZ will give tax, planning, labour, finance iron and steel, chemical, wood products,
and other special incentives to enterprises paper and paper products, building
establishing within the zone. An export- material, transport equipment, cycle parts,
processing zone is also planned within the electrical goods etc.
SEZ but plans are not yet finalized.
The traditional industries are being
A total of 1038 ha has been identified, of abandoned due to various reasons such as
which 377 has been acquired. Some Infrastructure crises. The numbers of
infrastructure work has been undertaken industrial establishments in the City are
and the first phase is proposed to be given in Tab. 5.5 and 5.6.
developed in the next 3 years.
Tab. 5.5. Commercial Establishments
The long-term proposals for the SEZ Indore
include residential development as well as Khadi Gram Udyog
industrial and commercial. However if the Years Nos. Employers Investment
SEZ is successful in the early phases, 2000-2001 144 799 325.72
there will be considerable pressure on 2001-2002 132 683 471.28
Indore, particularly for housing and public 2002-2003 140 1083 752.00
2003-2004 121 1220 504.10
services. State policy regarding the SEZ is
under preparation. It is imperative for Source; District Administration
Indore municipality that proper master Tab. 5.6. Commercial Establishments
planning is undertaken for the Zone and the Indore
potential impact on the city is thoroughly
District Industries Center
assessed. In particular, due consideration
Years No. Employers Investment
needs to be that the benefits can be
2000-2001 227 1258 1588.5
maximized and the Municipality has the 2001-2002 88 755 911.31
capacity to meet the population and other 2002-2003 43 355 287.28
resource pressures that the SEZ will entail. 2003-2004 660 1511 437.87
Source; District Administration

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 31


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

% HHs
5.4. Employment with Main
Income 10.6 2 5 3.4 5.3 5.2
The social economic survey revealed key
Earner
employment data, including number of
Female
income earners per household,
employment in formal and informal sectors % HHs
with Main
by the type of skills. A summary of key data
is shown is Tab 5.7. Income
Earner in 89 68 38 20 64 38
There is a strong correlation between Informal
income category and number of persons of Employm
working age. Although this is to be ent
expected, the relationship is particularly Source; District Administration
marked. Also as would be expected, the
main income earner in the high-income sales and service sector; whilst the next
group is likely to be in formal employment, highest proportion is the HIG earners in the
in comparison to the lower income groups professional and managerial sector.
where less than half of the main income
earners considered themselves to be in In Indore, as per household survey data
formal employment. 63.7% households had their income earner
in informal employment. The graph shows
Out of all households surveyed 3.5% and that among the EWS households nearly
88% had the main income earners 89% were in informal employment, which
engaged in professional / managerial was the highest among all the income
position and clerical / sales/ services, groups, and among the HIG households it
respectively. The remaining 2% were was lowest 20%. Among the BPL
involved in agricultural production activities households instances of main income
and about 6.5% in non-classified activities. earner in informal employment was
The graph proportion of each income recorded at 91%. A further analysis
groups engaged in each occupational reveals that the intermediate poor
category. It also reveals that the highest households had the highest proportion 91%
proportion of all groups is in clerical, sales of main income earners in informal
and service sector; whilst the next highest employment. Among the transitional poor
proportion is the HIG earner in the and the Core poor households it was also
professional and managerial sector. as high as 81% and 89% respectively.
Tab. 5.7. Summery of Employment by
Income Group Only 5.4% of all the households in Indore
reported that the main income earner has
Over
more than one job out of which 10.8%
All Inc. belonged to BPL households. Out of the
EWS LIG MIG HIG All
Grps households was the main income earner
Avg
had more than one job nearly 23% and
HH Size 5 6.3 7.5 8 6.3 6.3 7.5% belonged to transitional and
No of intermediate poor households respectively.
Persons of The core poor household reported to have
2.7 3.7 4.8 5.5 3.8 4
Working the lowest 3.4% number of such instances
Age and non-poor households had 66.5% of
Total Income earners: them.
Of which
10 25 50 76 35 61 Among all the households only 5.3% had
Formal %
main income earners who were females out
Of which
of them 25% belonged to BPL households.
Informal 90 75 50 24 65 39
In Indore, only 2% of the all the surveyed
%
households had income earners below the

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 32


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Tab. 5.9. Summery of Employment by


age 14 years. Among the child labourers Income Group
34.1% and 17.9% belonged to transitional
and intermediate poor households Average Poor Category
respectively. In comparison to the other Inc./
poor households the core poor households Exp. TP IP CP BPL
had the lowest 3.2% number of working (Rs)
children under the age of 14. Nearly 45% of Total
the child labourers belonged to non-poor Mon. 3023 2250 1103 2119
households. Inc.
Total
Mon. 2762.45 2165.19 1287.63 2065.07
5.5. Income Profile Exp.
1836.11 1443.76 903.06 1382.07
Food
The mean household income varies 66.50% 66.70% 70.10% 66.90%
considerably across the different income 221.3 170.47 86.4 160.88
Edu.
groups and so also the expenditure pattern 8% 7.90% 6.70% 7.80%
(shown in Tab 5.8 and 5.9). Total 190.03 155.64 70.67 145.95
Elect.
monthly expenditure ranges from 63% of 6.90% 7.20% 5.50% 7.10%
the total income for HIG households to 97% 29.27 18.42 13.57 17.87
for BPL households. Core poor household Water
1.10% 0.90% 1.10% 0.90%
expenditure exceeds monthly income by Garb. 2.02 1.55 0.68 1.45
16%. It was observed the MIG, LIG and Colln. 0.10% 0.10% 0.10% 0.10%
EWS households spent more than 50% of
their total expenditure on food, rising to Source; District Administration
more than 70% of monthly expenditure
amongst core poor expenditure of nearly to highest (14.5%) among the HIG
67% on food. Expenditure on education households. The BPL households had an
was observed expenditure of nearly 67% on food.
Tab. 5.8. Summery of Employment by Expenditure on education was observed to
Income Group highest (14.5%) among the HIG
households against a city level average of
Avg Income Group 10.8% and the lowest 6.7% recorded
Inc./ amongst the core poor households.
Exp. HIG MIG LIG EWS Avg. Citywide expenditure on water was
(Rs) recorded at 1% of the total household
Total expenditure with the EWS households
Mon. 16861 7612 3910 1812 5272 spending the highest 1.6%. Expenditure on
Inc. solid waste / garbage collection was
Total observed to be very low 0.1% among all
Mon. 10687 6110 3449.13 1743.85 4176.65 the households.
Exp.
5310 3355 2074 1218 2391 A monthly saving was observed to be
Food
49.70% 54.90% 60.20% 69.90% 57.30% highest among the HIG households 87%
1545 751 297 101 450 compared to an average of 39% for the
Edu. city. Nearly 17.5% of the BPL households
14.50% 12.30% 8.60% 5.80% 10.80%
674 461 257 122 299 reported that made savings every month.
Elect. Among the poor households 27% of the
6.30% 7.60% 7.50% 7% 7.20%
78 61 36 27 42 transitional poor, 19% of core poor and
Water 17% of the intermediate poor households
0.70% 1% 1% 1.60% 1%
said they made savings every month. Loan
Garb. 8 8 2 1 3
Colln. 0.10% 0.10% 0.10% 0.10%
from informal sources was highest among
0.10%
the LIG households 16%compared to an
average of 13% for the city. The survey
Source; District Administration data also revealed that nearly 12% of the
BPL households took lone form informal

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 33


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

sources. Loan from formal financial ‰ It is a noticeable fact that the


institution was found to be highest among expenditure on water was highest
the HIG households 22% and lowest between the LIG and Core poor
among the core poor households 2.3%. households (1.6%) with a citywide
average of 1.0% across all income
groups.

5.6. Conclusion
‰ Indore is the business and trading
capital of the state. The city holds a
dominant position and is a vibrant
center for trade and commerce.

‰ It has a firm industrial base too. The


textile industry is presently on the
decline and is being replaced by a
variety of new manufacturing industries.
Still it is the one of the largest textile
industry in India.

‰ The Work Force Participation Rate in


Indore City is 30%, while 63.4% of the
Work Force is employed in Tertiary
Sector.

‰ There are proposals for Special


Economic Zone and Agricultural Export
Zone proposed near Indore which will
provide incentives regarding Taxation
finances and promotion in respective
zones.

‰ 39% of the income earners are


engaged in the informal sector, which is
a sizable amount at the same time 38%
of the households, have its main
income earner in informal sector.

‰ The Average Household income in the


all income groups of the city is Rs. 5272
per month while in case of BPL families
it is Rs. 2119 per month.

‰ The average monthly expenditure of the


Poor category households is more than
Household Income (118% in Core Poor)
while it is lowest in case of HIG with
65% of the Income.

‰ The average monthly expenditure of the


Poor category households is more than
Household Income (116% in Core Poor)
while it is lowest in case of HIG with
63% of the Income.

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 34


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Chapter 6.2.2 Commercial:


The Commercial use, which was,

6 Land Use envisaged in the Development Plan 1974-


1991, was of the order of 648HA but only
463ha has been developed. By the same
logic there is over densification of
6.1. Land Use Classification commercial establishments in the core.

6.2.3. Industrial:
The planning area was revised and notified The development plans 1974-1991
under sub-section (2) of section 13 of the envisaged 1498ha of land for industrial
Act, which came in to effect from development. Only 956ha of land has been
28/6/2001. Total area covered within the developed in 30 years. The development of
planning area is 504.87 sq. km. (This new industrial growth centers at
includes Municipal Corporation area also). Pithampura, in southwest and industrial
growth centers in Dewas in north may have
In the development plan 1974-1991 various discouraged the industrial development.
landuse classification categories were Some of the traditional industrial areas
industries, commerce, residences, schools, dealing with cloth have been shut due to
roads etc. in order to comprehend the inadequate infrastructure.
quantum of land utilization for various uses,
their functional Interrelationship,
environmental problems etc. 6.2.4 Public and Semi Public:
1. Residential Performance of the human settlements has
2. Commercial to be examined and evaluated on the basis
3. Industrial of functional efficiency, to improve the
4. Public-Semi-Public And Utilities quality of life, desired level of amenities and
5. Recreational services are to be provided. The land for
6. Transportation PSP use, which was proposed in the
7. Agriculture development plan of Indore, was 1427ha,
8. Wasteland out of which 1230 ha land was developed
9. Forest for this purpose.
10. Water Bodies
6.2.5 Traffic and Transportation:
6.2. Existing Land Use 2001 Development plan of Indore 1974-1991
envisaged an area of 2105ha for different
components of transportation. Only 1543
6.2.1. Residential ha have been utilized under this use. This
poor implementation can be due to the
In the development plan (1974-1991),
fiscal constraints and the Acquisition
5060ha of land was proposed for
Problems. Many of the Roads proposed
residential purpose out of which 4660 Ha
under IDP 1991 are not been implemented
has been utilized up to the year 2001. Even
due to the same reasons.
after achieving the population 1.5 times
more than the Plan it has covered the
6.2.6 Recreational:
proposed Residential Area under 1991 IDP.
It can be said that the growth of Indore From the study of the recreational
during the period has been below the development, it is observe that in the
proposed Density in IDP1991. due to such development plan 1971-1991 for the
under utilization of land laying of recreational use, 1417ha was reserved but
infrastructure has become expensive only 873 ha has been developed. This poor
percentage indicates lack of integrated

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 35


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

development and fiscal and legal Illust. 6.2. Land Use Break Up Indore
constraints in Land Development. Planning Area 2001
Tab. 6.1. Status of Indore Planning
Area
EXISTING LANDUSE
Indore Planning Area - 2001 2001
Sr
No Area Area In Ha. 14%
1 Developed Area 10725
2 Undeveloped Area 39762
Total Planning Area 50487 9%

Source; Indore Development Plan 2011 Draft


Illust. 6.1. Status of Indore Planning 8%
Area

11% 54%
INDORE PLANNING AREA
2001 4%

21%
RESIDENTIAL

COMMERCIAL

PUBLIC &
SEMIPUBLIC
RECREATIONAL

INDUSTRIAL
79%

DEVELOPED AREA Source; Indore Development Plan 2011 Draft


UNDEVELOPED AREA

Source; Indore Development Plan 2011 Draft 6.3. Conclusions

Tab. 6.2. Status of Indore Planning ‰ Under Utilisation of Land leading to


Area make infrastructure provision an
expensive affair.
Existing Landuse 2001
Area In ‰ Lacks of Integrated development have
Sr. No Landuse Ha made the City devoid of Social and
1 Residential 5660 Physical infrastructures.
2 Commercial 463
3 Public & Semipublic 1230 ‰ Indore city lack in terms of recreational
4 Recreational 873 spaces as many of the regional and city
5 Industrial 956 parks proposed under the master plan
6 Transportation 1543 are not developed.
Total 10725
‰ There is lack of coordination between
Source; Indore Development Plan 2011 Draft different agencies related to the land
development.

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 36


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Chapter
Infrastructure Tab. 7.1. Status of Indore Planning
Area

7 and Environment Water Supply Sources


Dist Abstr
fro actio
7.1. Water Supply S
Source
m n of
Remarks
N City Raw
(km Water
) (MLD)
7.1.1. Water Resources Rain
dependent
The first water supply system in Indore Bilawali
1 6 4 Unsustainabl
used natural water tanks such as at Tank
e source.
Bilawali as water sources until the
Yeshwant Sagar dam on river Gambhir was Rain
Yaswant
constructed in 1939. The Yeshwant Sagar Sagar
dependent.
dam now provides the Indore Municipal Generally
2 dam on 21 27
Corporation (IMC) with 27 MLD of water in sustainable
Gambhir
addition to about 4MLD from the Bilawali river
tank.
Perennial
river,
With the rapid population growth the Narmada
3 70 172 sustainable
demand for water exceeded the locally River
source
available sustainable supply and so other
reliable sources had to be developed. The Non-
only source that would provide an adequate sustainable,
water supply for long term planning was the Ground subject to
4 - 13
Narmada river, about 70 km away from the Water contaminatio
city. The first phase of the Narmada water n
supply scheme was developed between
1977 and 1990 for providing 172 MLD. Source; Integrated Urban Development in
Madhya Pradesh for Indore, ADB
Ground water supplies about 13 MLD
7.1.2 Treatment and Transmission
though 1,500 motorized tube wells. In
addition there are about 446 privately of Water
owned hand pumps, which supplement
water requirements of many individuals. The treatment and transmission of water
are carried out in three independent
However, the increase in population networks, operating from three different
exceeded predictions and water production sources.
is again not enough to meet5 the
increasing demand of the city. Even with The wear from Bilawali tank used to be
the continued use of ground water the total treated in 5(five) pressure filter units, which
water production in Indore is about 216 have since become defunct.
MLD.
The raw water from Yaswant Sagar dam is
The present water supply is from 3 main conveyed to the water treatment plant
sources as shown in Table Below. (WTP) located at Deodharan through a 700
mm dia CI rising main 13.4 km long and
treated in a conventional rapid sand gravity
plant. The installed capacity of Deodharan
treatment plant is 40 MLD but because of
limited yield of Yashwant Sagar source only
27 MLD is produced. The treated water is

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 37


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

then transmitted to different service 7.1.3. Distribution system


reservoirs in the city through 2 nos. of 10
Except Bilawali unit all plants have well
km gravity mains. The scheme was
equipped laboratory with qualified chemists
installed in 1936, although remedial works
have been undertaken in the past, the plant for quality control. The new unit under
is in need of a complete overhaul. construction at Bilawali, however, has
provision of a laboratory.
The raw water from river Narmada is
conveyed to a WTP by 1200 mm and 600 Indore Municipal Corporation is divided into
69 wards (some new wards have been
mm dia MS rising mains, each 3.7 km long
running in parallel and treated in a added recently). The total number of
conventional rapid sand gravity plant. The households distributed in these wards is
treated water is pumped to a break about 350,000 of which 136,730 have
water supply house connections. Supply is
pressure tank (BPT) located 18.5 km away
at an elevation of 500 m though a 1200 mm also made to the public though 7,263
community stand posts. About 54% of the
dia MS pipe with the help of 3 (three)
intermediate pumping stations. From the population residing in the 69 municipal
BPT by gravity of 48 km length. The wards presently has access to the piped
water supply system but supply is only for 1
scheme was installed in 1977 for 86 MLD
and augmented to 172 MLD in 1990. All the hour a day and at low pressure. In addition
1,024 and 1,354 connections are given to
pumping machinery and equipment are in
good working condition. commercial and industrial establishments
respectively. Except the commercial and
Tab. 7.2. Water Reservoirs industrial connections all domestic
connections are un-metered.
Storage
Area Use of From Narmada water supply transmission
Name Location Capacity
in ha water pipeline 11 MLD is provided to the military
Cu Sec
Out side headquarter at Mhow and about 2 given to
Yashwant Water villages before reaching Indore itself. A
IMC 14 500
Sagar Supply further 9 MLD of treated water is directly
Boundary
Out side sent to Dewas through a separate
Water transmission pipeline. Thus, only about 160
Bilawali IMC 2.97 415
Supply
Boundary MLD of treated water is available from the
Partially Narmada to the IMC. Adding to this another
Sirpur
inside
2.2 160
Water 32 MLD of treated water from Yashwant
IMC Supply Sagar and Bilawali tank a total of 192 MLD
Boundary of treated water is distributed to Indore city
With in through 4 major trunk mains, 84 nos city
Water
Pipliyapala IMC 0.64 100 service reservoirs of total 34 MLD capacity
Supply
Boundary and about 1,400 km of distribution mains of
80-750 mm. Diameter. After offsetting the
Source; Integrated Urban Development in losses in process and distribution the
Madhya Pradesh for Indore, Asian present per capita availability of water to
Development Bank. Indore is about 86 liter per day.
Except at Bilawali, all WTPs and pumps run
for 24 Hrs. there are however no meters or
direct measuring devices at any of the
plants to record actual water production.
There is 5% loss of water in processing
from filter washing, evaporation,
percolation, plant maintenance, etc. and
about 3% loss is estimated in losses from
the transmission lines.

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 38


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Tab. 7.3. Water Distribution

W. Population Populatio % of W. Population Population % of


N n Served Population N Served by Population
o. by Piped Served by o. Piped Served by
Water Piped Water Water Piped Water
Supply Supply Supply Supply
1 29,008 23,206 80 36 25,579 15,347 60
2 15,594 6,238 40 37 20,599 14,419 70
3 33,994 13,598 40 38 13,541 9,479 70
4 17,851 10,710 60 39 14,865 8,919 60
5 52,136 20,854 40 40 17,961 15,267 85
6 24,643 9,857 40 41 20,018 10,009 50
7 28,862 14,431 50 42 14,414 7,207 50
8 32,733 1,636 05 43 8,076 4,038 50
9 47,843 19,137 40 44 13,864 11,091 80
10 71,423 12,853 60 45 10,531 4,212 40
11 34,470 13,788 40 46 8,319 4,160 50
12 34,470 17,235 50 47 6,940 3,470 50
13 15,390 7695 50 48 9411 7529 80
14 15625 9375 60 49 11309 5654 50
15 11390 6834 60 50 16259 9755 60
16 16160 6464 40 51 14353 7176 50
17 23010 13806 60 52 56760 22704 40
18 15795 9477 60 53 23766 16636 70
19 12963 9722 75 54 11997 8398 70
20 20682 14477 70 55 26431 10572 40
21 26700 10680 40 56 55355 33213 60
22 22801 11400 50 57 21223 13795 65
23 20453 12272 60 58 17350 17350 100
24 9336 7469 80 59 38424 15370 40
25 17192 12894 75 60 15336 12269 80
26 15517 12414 80 61 22026 8810 40
27 12165 9124 75 62 15336 12269 80
28 12968 9726 75 63 16539 8270 50
29 19934 15947 80 64 31104 21773 70
30 12737 8916 70 65 26335 15801 60
31 18235 10941 60 66 24444 9778 40
32 19671 11802 60 67 33509 13404 40
33 17428 12200 70 68 12656 7594 60
34 16978 10148 60 69 38920 19460 50
35 10978 7685 70 Ttl 15,42,619 8,42,874 54

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 39


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Augmentation of water production and to intermittent supply where the


expansion of supply coverage are beneficiaries throw away stored water and
therefore essential for Indore store again the fresh daily supply. In
addition there are an estimated 20,000
Some of the distribution pipeline are very illegal connections in the distribution
old and have become hydraulically system. The estimated loss of water in the
inefficient. A mapping program should be distribution system on account of leakage
undertaken to locate all the distribution and wastage is to the tune of 25% whereas
network pipelines, examine their status and taking into account of other losses like
prepare up-to-date record drawings. Based process, transmission, unauthorized
on the record ,a hydraulic analysis should connections etc.The estimated UFW by the
then be done to allow proper design of any IMC is not less than 50%.
future system expansion. This should then
be followed by water and energy audit of 7.1.6. On going project
the whole system, from production to
delivery point. There is an ongoing project for US$ 5.2
million being executed by the PHED which
An additional 400 km of distribution lines involves construction of 8 overhead service
along with additional storage reservoirs at reservoirs, about 20 km of feeder and
strategic locations would be needed to distribution mains and a 9 MLD capacity
complete the coverage of the municipal treatment plant for the Bilawali source. The
area. The shortfall in supply coverage is project is almost complete. However, since
presently made, to some extent, by ground the source has been unable to supply the
water though motorized tube wells and required water for the past few years due to
hand pumps. Due to the rapid un- poor rainfall, the newly built treatment plant
sustainable depletion of the groundwater remains under utilized.
table, the deep motorized tube wells have
become uneconomical due to their energy Tab. 7.4. Operation and Maintenance
and repairing cost vis-vis and low yield, Cost
whereas the shallow hand pumps are Cost per
subject to contamination. SI.
Cost head Annual (Rs./
No.
7.1.4. Public Stand Posts million)
Leak & other
Considering the 54% of water supply 1 180.00
coverage, the number of beneficiaries per Repairs
public stand post is about 25, which is too
2 Chemicals 8.50
low for supply management. Each stand
post should cover at least 10 houses 3 Energy 490.00
catering about 50-70 beneficiaries on
economic consideration and to reduce Staff Salary &
4 137.60
wastage. Public stand posts should only be Administration
appropriate in slums and in the areas of
economically weaker sections of Total Cost of O&M 816.10
community.
Source; Integrated Urban Development in
Madhya Pradesh for Indore, ADB
7.1.5. Unaccounted For Water (UFW)
7.1.7. Operation and Maintenance
There is substantial wastage in the public (O&M)
stand post during supply hours due to the
free flow of water. In addition there is The operation and maintenance (O&M) of
significant leakage in the pipelines of which the treatment plant and distribution system
there is no systematic management for is undertaken by the IMC by engineering
detection and repair. There is significant staff deputed from the PHED. There are
wastage in the house connections also due about 1,700 staff including 38 of

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 40


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

engineering cadre provided under the ‰ Public Health Engineering Department


municipality for O&M at the headworks and (PHED)
distribution system. The annual cost for
The interceptor Sewers were laid along
O&M is shown in Tab 7.4.
river Saraswati , river Khan, Pilliyakhal
nala, and Palasiya nala under the ODA.
7.1.8. Narmada Phase III These sewers were meant to collect the
wastewater from the slums situated along
Narmada Phase three is under
these natural drains. The interceptor
implementation and the project is expected
sewers were laid along both bank of the
to be complete by 2009. Narmada phase III
river Khan having diameter varying from
envisages increasing the Narmada Water
300mm to 1600mm. The interceptor sewers
Supply by 365 MLD. With the present
along the other nallahs finally discharge
capacity of 180MLD and 40 MLD capacity
into the interceptor sewers along the river
of Yaswant Sagar and other sources the
Khan, which conveys the sewage to the
total supply would be 585 MLD after
Sewage Treatment Plants (STP), situated
implementation of the Narmada Phase-III
at Kabit Khedi.
project planned to fulfill the requirement of
the population of 2039. Presently, two STP of 78 MLD and 12 MLD
are under operation at Kabir Khedi. The
7.2. Sewerage type of treatment is UASB. Main Sewers
laid under ODA project are not functioning
properly. Ultimately sewage is flowing
7.2.1. Present Status and through the river Khan. As a temporary
Development of Sanitation arrangement weir is constructed across the
river Khan and the sewage is diverted into
Indore city dose not have a proper sewage
the inlet chamber of 90 MLD capacities
collection and disposal system .Sewer line
STP. In the absence of Main sewer in
were laid 67 years back for a population of
Bhamori nala the sewage generated in its
about 150,000 covering 10% of the city.
catchments is discharged into the nala. By
with total network of 1710 km of roads only
constructing the weir across the nala, the
600km is provided with a sewerage system
flow will be diverted to the inlet of the 12
including the 47 Km of sewers by IDA
MLD STP close to 78MLD STP at Kabit
under ODA project but without provision of
Khedi.
any sewage treatment laid along river &
natural drains (ODA has also covered 183
Eastern part of the city is partially sewered
slums). Out of the present (2001) city
and the flow is conveyed through a Brick
population of 1,600,000 about 700,000-use
Arch sewer that finally discharges into river
septic tanks and the remainder resort to
Khan near Kabit Khedi. This Brick Arch
unhygienic practice of disposal. About
Sewer is broken at various places and the
1,000 dry pit latrines are still in use in the
sewage is by passing into Bhamori nala.
city and about 5% of the population resort
The Indore Municipal Corporation (IMC) is
to open defecation. Even the partially
taking action to repair this line and extend
treated effluent of the septic tanks is
the same up to the existing STP. Likewise,
allowed to flow to the open drains along
the sewers laid under ODA are reported to
with other untreated sewage directly from
be broken / choked at various locations due
latrines. There are about 1,465 seats of
to which the sewers are not being utilized
public toilets constructed in the city
optimally and sewage flows into the
attached to septic tanks all of which are
river/nala. To make these lines
poorly maintained.
operational, the IMC has decided to repair
these lines as per the requirement of the
Following agencies have planned and
sewer condition.
executed the system that is provided so far:

‰ Indore Municipal Corporation (IMC)


‰ Indore Development Authority (IDA)

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 41


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Existing Secondary System laid they were also designed to cater to the
then population of the city. However in
There is considerable existence of
many instances sewers are seen to
secondary system in Indore. Initially this
discharge into the rivers and nallahs. A
was thought to be in the extent of about
programme was taken up by the PHED to
50km. However, later it was found out that
provide interception and diversion units and
the system extends to about 600km out of
divert the sewarge back into nearby
which 300km is in on municipal roads,
sewers. The length of sewers laid by Indore
while remaining are on private colony and
Development Authority along the nallahs
society roads. For the understanding of the
and rivers is to the tune of 47.5km and
system, about 7000 manholes in the
diameter wise break-up is given in Tab 7.6.
sewerage system were surveyed, but
Tab. 7.6. Diameter wise Break up of
despite of this large additional survey, the Sewerage System Laid by IDA
entire system has not been covered. It is
therefore proposed that during the
execution of the project, the entire system Diameter in
be surveyed to ensure that the operation Sr. No mm Length in m
and maintenance of the system can be A I and D 154
properly undertaken. A diameter wise 1 300 2820
break-up of the surveyed existing system is 2 400 1923
shown in Tab 7.5. 3 450 3980
4 500 4320
Tab. 7.5. Diameter wise Break up of
5 600 5407
Existing Sewerage System
6 700 7633
7 800 2340
S Dia. Len. of Cen. West East 8 900 1790
N in Surveye Zone Zone Zone 9 1000 4645
mm d Ext In In In
10 1100 1862
Sewers mts. mts. mts.
In mts. 11 1200 1813
1 150 113047 66748 13072 33227 12 1500 3154
2 175 1710 319 1391 0 13 1600 5848
3 225 82384 42143 26853 13388
4 300 69620 23413 34462 11745
Total 47535
5 375 918 566 352 0
6 400 552 113 439 0 Source; Integrated Urban Development in
7 450 21276 9565 6610 5101 Madhya Pradesh for Indore, Asian
8 600 6029 1817 3996 216 Development Bank.
9 900 3823 3823 0 0
10 1000 2186 2186 0 0 To overcome the above severe disorder in
Ttl. 301545 150693 87175 63677 environmental sanitation, the PHED in
1990 prepared a sewerage master plan for
Source; Integrated Urban Development in Indore for 2028 which included the laying of
Madhya Pradesh for Indore, ADB. laying about 300 km phases. The scheme
was technically sanctioned by Central
IDA Laid Sewerage System public Health and Environmental
Engineering Organization (CPHEEO) of
The Indore Development Authority, under GOI but could not be implemented due to
the aid from ODA, UK carried out the lack of fund.
Sanitation Project with the intent of
providing sanitation in slums of Indore. Subsequently, the Indore Development
Authority with financial assistance from
The sewerage system within the slums Overseas Developing Agency (ODA) of UK
conveyed the flows to the proposed executed a sewerage system in 183 slums
sewerage system along the rivers and laying about 47 km of sewer as discussed
nallahs. Since these sewers were being earlier.

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 42


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

With information on the existing sewerage refuse. Presently the IMC only removes
network being poor, the PHED has about 70% of generated solid waste from
engaged M/s Montgomery Watson the city. The waste is crudely dumped at
Consultants (India) to undertake a Devguradia trenching ground, about 7 km
sewerage location and condition survey away from the city, which has an
and prepare a detail project report (DPR) inadequate approach road.
for improving sewerage and sewage
treatment in the city. The Consultants has As per available secondary data,
since submitted their report, which is under discussion with municipal authorities, site
examination by the authorities. visits and evaluation of the existing SWM
system, there are serious deficiencies. The
About 20-25% of the municipal area has a MSW is mixed with bio-waste, slaughter
rural character with very low population house waste etc. There are inadequate
densities. Provision of underground storage facilities; hardly 60% of the
sewerage will not be practical in these generated waste can be stored in available
areas, where on-site sanitation with septic containers. MSW heaps on open land and
tanks or low cost twin pit pour flush latrines is not removed regularly. Primary collection
will be more appropriate. of SW is by sweeping the street/ road and
public places. 70% of MSW is thrown on
Tab. 7.7. Areas other than Municipal the street / road with multi-handing.
limits Connected to the
Tab. 7.8. Ward wise Solid Waste
Sewerage System
Generation and Collection

Area Area in SOLID WASTE


Area Names
No Ha Ward Quantity Quantity Collection Freque
Palda, Limbodi Generate Collecte Efficiency ncy of
1 3,081 d In KG d in KG in % Collect
Mundlanayta
ion
Morad, Machla, Bilawali 1 10483 7483 71.4 3
2 2,438
Talav Nehru Gram 2 6310 3155 50.0 1
3 Nihalpur Mandi 1,275 3 6910 5455 78.9 2
4 Rau 1,650 4 5370 4685 87.2 2
5 Ahirkheri 1,485 5 4525 2050 45.2 2
Bangarda Chotta, Gandhi 6 7780 3890 50.0 2
6 1,625 7 9894 7947 80.3 2
Nagar
8 5240 2605 49.7 2
7 Bhangya, Kurmeri 1,125
9 5410 2705 50.0 1
8 Piplya Kumar, Nipanya 1,631 10 5820 4910 84.3 3
11 5630 4815 85.5 2
Total 14,310 12 6060 5030 83.0 3
Source; Integrated Urban Development in 13 4950 2475 50.0 1
Madhya Pradesh for Indore, Asian 14 4680 4340 92.7 2
Development Bank. 15 5150 4575 87.8 2
16 8950 7475 83.5 2
7.3. Solid Waste 17 5240 4626 88.2 2
Management 18 12860 6430 50.0 2
19 6180 3090 50.0 1
20 6610 3305 50.0 1
The quantification and characteristics data 21 7010 3505 50.0 1
of SW is not available but it is reported that
22 4800 2400 50.0 1
the city generates about 500 tones /day of
23 10220 8110 75.3 2
Municipal Solid Waste (MSW). All the
24 9330 4665 50.0 1
stages of SWM are very poor, from
collection to transportation and disposal of 25 5690 2845 50.0 1

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 43


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Quantity Quantity The primary collection doesn’t synchronize


Generate Collecte Freque with the transportation system. Loading
d In d in Collection ncy of unloading and transportation are
Metric Metric Efficiency Collect unhygienic. Total70% of generated SW is
Ward Tonnes Tonnes in % ion disposed off. The existing dumping /
26 4680 2340 50.0 1 disposal site is in poor shape with crude
27 7570 3785 50.0 1 open dumping, which results in obnoxious
28 6490 5243 80.7 2 odors, blowing of litter and breeding of
29 9570 4785 50.0 1 vectors. Burning of MSW at the site is very
30 6820 5410 79.3 2 common, which further pollutes the
31 6680 6340 94.9 2 environment. There is inability to follow the
32 7700 6850 88.9 2 Supreme Court guidelines or the SWHR
33 4770 2385 50.0 1 2000. The Identification of a suitable
34 5610 4805 85.6 3 disposal site is in progress.
35 4690 4345 92.6 2
36 5900 3940 66.7 2 There is shortage of Safai Karamcharis
37 7840 6920 88.2 2
(SK) with respect to population. There is
only one wheelbarrow among 7 sweepers.
38 5670 4835 85.2 2
There are 578 Nos, 1.0 m3 and 90 Nos 4.5
39 5320 4660 87.5 2
m3 containers, but most of them are in a
40 5550 4225 76.1 2 bad condition with a storage capacity of
41 6410 5205 81.2 2 only 400 T/D compared to generated waste
42 7370 6685 90.1 2 quantity of 500 T/D.
43 11900 10955 92.3 3
Tab. 7.9. Ward wise Biomedical Waste
44 7120 4560 64.0 2
Generation and Collection
45 11190 10595 94.6 2
46 6090 3045 50.0 1 BIO MEDICAL WASTE PER YEAR
47 5520 4765 86.3 2 Quantity
Frequency
48 10440 5220 50.0 1 Ward Generated Collected
of Collection
49 7620 6810 89.3 2 Kg/Day
50 5740 4870 84.8 2 1 1300 1300 Daily
51 8300 4150 50.0 1 2 0 0
52 5500 4800 87.2 2 3 5000 5000 Daily
53 5140 5070 98.6 2 4 10400 10400 Daily
54 5520 2760 50.0 1 5 2000 2000 Daily
55 8690 4345 50.0 1 6 2000 2000 Daily
56 6600 3300 50.0 1 7 0 0
57 8080 4040 50.0 1 8 3400 3400 Daily
58 6290 5815 92.47 2 9 10400 10400 Daily
59 4940 2470 50.0 1 10 13400 13400 Daily
60 10780 5390 50.0 2 11 4600 4600 Daily
61 12630 6315 50.0 2 12 0 0
62 8290 4145 50.0 1 13 58400 58400 Daily
63 6670 5335 79.9 2 14 26400 26400 Daily
64 4730 4365 92.2 2 15 0 0
65 5490 4745 86.4 2 16 0 0
66 4710 4355 92.4 2 17 4000 4000 Daily
67 6760 6380 94.3 2 18 0 0
68 5710 4855 85.0 2 19 0 0
69 8510 7255 85.2 3 20 0 0
Total 478702 335939 71.1 21 64000 64000 Daily
Source; Integrated Urban Development in 22 0 0
Madhya Pradesh for Indore, ADB. 23 0 0

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 44


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

24 9600 9600 Daily The Total Hospital Waste generated is


25 5600 5600 Daily about 839KG/D with 100% Collection and
26 0 0 Incineration as treatment method. The
27 53000 53000 Daily Hospital Waste is incenerated in common
28 8400 8400 Daily incenetaror (run by private entrepreneur) at
29 0 0
Sanwer Road industrial Area.
30 0 0
Hazardous Waste
31 0 0
32 0 0 About 13 Industries in the Indore City
33 2400 2400 Daily generate Hazardous Waste. The Total
34 0 0 Daily Hazardous Waste generation in the City is
35 6000 6000 Daily 46.497 MT/Year. The disposal of the
36 5000 5000 Daily Hazardous Waste is done at Ringnodia
37 68000 68000 Daily
village near Indore city.
38 4400 4400 Daily
39 2000 2000 Daily
40 10800 10800 Daily
7.4. Storm Water Drainage
41 160700 160700 Daily
42 18500 18500 Daily Present Status of Storm water
43 0 0 Drainage
44 0 0
The storm water drainage of Indore is
45 400 400 Daily
guided by the river system of Khan and
46 4400 4400 Daily
Saraswati along with their tributaries. The
47 8400 8400 Daily confluence of these two rivers is at the
48 29800 29800 Daily heart of the city. A large area around the
49 3000 3000 Daily confluence often gets flooded in monsoon
50 7400 7400 Daily and hence lying vacant. The river Khan
51 10700 10700 Daily flows from south to north of the city passing
52 12600 12600 Daily though the densely populated city area.
53 1800 1800 Daily Various primary drains like Piliakhal,
54 5400 5400 Daily Palasia nallah, Bhamori nallah, etc.
55 4400 4400 Daily discharge storm water to the rivers within
56 7800 7800 Daily the city limit. The rivers are non-perennial
57 11000 11000 Daily and dry up in summer except for the
58 0 0 wastewater discharged into them.
59 0 0
Indore has about 1,710 km of road, mostly
60 0 0
bituminous or concrete pavement. Along
61 14200 14200 Daily
the major roads there is about 350 km of
62 10800 10800 Daily secondary drains, which lead to the primary
63 8000 8000 Daily drains. The condition of these drains is
64 0 0 Daily fairly good.
65 4800 4800 Daily
66 40800 40800 Daily The annual rainfall of Indore is only about
67 90500 90500 Daily 800 mm and for a short period. There is no
68 0 0 severity of inundation of important city
69 2800 2800 Daily areas that may affect the public life and
Total 838700 838700 Daily business seriously.

Source; Integrated Urban Development in


Madhya Pradesh for Indore, ADB.

Bio Medical Waste

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 45


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Tab. 7.10 Storm Water Discharge in River developed regional road system. Important
amongst them are the Agra-Mumbai Road
River (NH-3), Ahmedabad Road (NH-51), Ujjain
Flow in MLD
Stretch Road (SH-27) Khandwa Road (SH-27) and
Dry Weather Flow Normal Flow Depalpur Road (MDR). From recent
Ma Mi Avg Ma. Mi Avg studies, both the NH's account for nearly
Khan 42% of the incoming and outgoing traffic
River
while the share for both the SH’s is around
before 24.7 10.12 18.28 35.5 14.14 25.82
Conflu 10% each. The daily total incoming and
ence outgoing traffic for the city is to the tune of
River 110,000 PCU comprising mostly of two-
Sarasw wheelers and heavy commercial vehicles.
ati
15.22 4.27 9.12 18.59 5.77 10.47
before Roads within City
Conflu
ence The city has a dense network of roads.
Old Some of the important roads that provide
Palasia 20.96 6.52 16.55 35.59 9.18 20.9 for movements in east-west direction are
Nallah Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Jawahar Marg, and
Piliakh Subhash Marg. The roads, which cater to
al
32.65 16.55 21.02 42.9 7.05 22.05
north-south direction movements, are
Nallah Sadar Bazar road, Sitala Mata Road,
a Harsiddi Main road, PNT Marg, Pathar
Kabit Godam Marg, Tilak Path and Loharpati and
88.96 51.24 65.83
Khedei Yashwant Nivas road. In addition, other
Bhamo
important roads are Maharani Road, Prince
ri
15.18 2.65 6.18 20.96 5.7 12.41 Yashwant Road and Bhandari Road.
Nallah
a
Shakka At present the IMC, IDA, and State PWD
116 51.88 91.67 126.3 54.08 95.7 bear, the responsibility of maintenance of
r Khedi
Source; Integrated Urban Development in the 1,710 km of the city roads, of which
Madhya Pradesh for Indore, ADB. IMC’s share is nearly 90%. About two-
thirds of the road length is less than 9.0 m
With implementation of the proposed
wide. Based on the functional
sewerage and solid waste management
characteristics of the road IMC has
scheme, the environmental status of the
selected 68 roads of length 143 km for
surface drains will be significantly improved
improvement (strengthening and widening)
and with effective maintenance the problem
The Indore Habitat Improvement Project
of water stagnation in the surface drains
(IHIP) of DFID has provided 360 km of
can be overcome.
tar/concrete roads in 183 slums of the city.
The pavement quality of existing roads is
In view of above, the need for investment in
generally fair with very less incidence of
storm water drainage in Indore is essential.
pavement deterioration on the major roads.
However, there is also a need to strengthen
While 80% of road length does not have
the institutional capacity with capacity
roadside drainage facility, 94% of lengths
building activities for effective O&M of the
do not have any footpath facilities.
system.

7.5. Transport System The Level of Service along most of the


major roads is quite low where the peak
hour traffic volume has far exceeded the
7.5.1 Road System existing road capacity. Some of the worst
affected roads are Dhar Road, Sanwer
Regional Roads
Road Depalpur Road, Kalyan Mill Road,
The city of Indore is connected to other Jinsy Road, Pathar Godam Road,
parts of the country through a well- Hathipala Road, Manikbagh Road,

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 46


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Sukhanivas Road, Banganga Road, 15.5% and 17.2% respectively. Illust. 7.2
Ravindra Nagar Road, Anajmandi Road show the trends in registered motor
and Bhanwarkuan Road. As part of a rapid vehicles in the city.
action plan the IMC has already taken up
16 intersections for improvement, which are
at various stages of planning or
implementation.
Illust. 7.1. Traffic Load on Various City Roads

Nam e
Traffic Load AB Road
Depalp[ur Road
4 Sanw er Road
MG Road
capacity

3.5
Jaw ahar Marg
Subash Marg
3
Jail Road
Traffic/ carrying

2.5 New Dew as Road


Load

Yashw ant Road


2
Universirt Road
Peak hour Traffic

Ranipura Road
1.5
Siyaganj Road
1 Sadar Bazar Road
Lohar Patti
0.5
Im li Bazar
Moti Tabela
0
Traffic load ( carrying capacity/ Peak Hour PCU) Gujarati Law College Road
Vir Saw arkar Road
Roads
Nasia Road

Source; Comprehensive Traffic and Transportation Study of Indore Urban Area by CES

Though to streamline the traffic chaos


some traffic circulation / management plans Tab. 7.11 Growth Trend of Registered
(in the from of banning of movement, Vehicles in Indore District
parking restrictions etc.) have been Three
enforced, much still needs to be done to Two Car /
Year Wheelers Jeeps
control the situation. wheeler Taxi
1993-94 203142 8019 19305 3643
7.5.2. Registered Vehicles 1994-95 219578 8242 21652 3644
1995-96 241780 8772 29481 3824
All major types of road based modes ply on
1996-97 266173 9122 35633 3991
the roads of the city. The number of
1997-98 296766 9319 36065 4142
registered vehicles in the city has increased
from 0.27 million in 1993 to 0.48 million in 1998-99 330586 9399 38105 4260
2000 recording an average growth rate of 1999-2000 367046 9444 41328 4310
8.8 percent per annum (Tab 7.11-7.12). Average
Annual 10.4 2.8 13.5 2.8
The average annual growth rates for two
Growth (%)
wheelers; three wheelers, car/taxi and
buses during 1993-99 were 10.4% 2.8%, Source; C TTS Report Consulting
Engineering Services (CES)

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 47


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Tab. 7.12. Growth Trend of Registered absence of proper pedestrian facilities and
Vehicles in Indore District effective enforcement mechanism, the
Buses number of road accidents in the city is quite
Year (incl. LCV HCV significant. Considering the figures from
Minibus) 1995 to 2000, it has been observed that on
1993-94 5063 3005 16364 average 2,479 accidents occurred every
1994-95 5377 3439 17072 year with 225 persons being killed and
1995-96 6264 4475 18360 2,028 persons injures.
1996-97 7818 4968 20903
1997-98 9575 5463 22289 The total number of accidents has
1998-99 10851 5852 23289 increased from 1647 in 1995 to 2019 in
1999-2000 13120 6204 24167 2000. Cumulatively 14500 accidents took
Average Annual place in the city between 1995-2000 in
17.2 12.8 6.7 which 1353 were fatalities (Tab. 7.14).
Growth (%)
Source; C TTS Report Consulting Tab. 7.14. Road Accidents Trend in
Engineering Services (CES) Indore
7.5.3. Accident Scenario
Year Total Fatal Accidents
Due to the large volume of traffic on the Accidents
roads, the absence of an efficient public 1995 1647 158
transport system, heterogeneous traffic 1996 3150 289
mix, 1997 3127 294
Tab. 7.13. Growth Trend of Registered 1998 2140 151
Vehicles in Indore District 1999 2790 288
2000 2019 173
Year Tractor Trailor Others Total Source; C TTS Report Consulting
Engineering Services (CES)
1993-94 3947 3194 1123 266805
1994-95 4870 3676 1175 288725 7.5.4. Public Transport
1995-96 6027 4491 1266 324740
The intra-city public transport system is
1996-97 6911 5052 1317 361888
essentially road based provided by an
1997-98 8252 5830 1395 399096
estimated 300 private mini-buses operated
1998-99 9410 6485 1546 439783
by Indore Nagar Sewa (private
1999-2000 10098 6937 1585 484239
organisation) and supplemented by an
Average
estimated 150 Para transit modes
Annual 16.9 13.8 5.9 10.4
Growth (%)
(tempos). The inter-city and intra-city
operations are predominantly handled by
Source; C TTS Report Consulting private agencies on contract with MPSRTC
Engineering Services (CES) supplemented by private buses along some
regional routes.
Illust. 7.2. Growth Trend of Registered
400000 Vehicles in Indore District
350000
7.6. Environment
No. of Vehicles

300000
250000
Two Wheeler
200000 Car/Jeep/Taxi
150000 Others
One of the critical and most immediate
100000
50000
problems faced by rapidly growing cities in
0 developing countries is the health impact of
1993-94 1994-95 1995-96 1996-97 1997-98 1998-99 1999- urban environmental pollution. The reasons
2000
Year being air pollution , inadequate water,
Source; C TTS Report Consulting sanitation, drainage, solid waste services
Engineering Services (CES) and urban and industrial waste
management.

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 48


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Three major issues regarding Urban Observations


Environment in Indore City – Air, Water and
Green Cover, have been addressed in the ‰ The value of suspended particulate
following sections. matter exceeds the prescribed limit of
200ug/m3 in Residential and
7.6.1. Air Commercial Areas on an annual basis.
A detailed analysis of the environmental ‰ Total suspended particulate matters
conditions of Indore and its effects on the exceed the prescribed standards at all
differentiated resident population is location.
presented here. It will help in understanding
the rationale for CDP. ‰ Concentrations during evening hours
were higher.
The deteriorating air quality is a result of
rapid urbanisation in which the increase in ‰ Particulate matter concentrations both
population density has outstripped the Respirable and Non-respirable are
available infrastructure. Vehicular and found to exceed the permissible limits
Industrial pollution is an important aspect. It at most of the locations.
is indicated by content of suspended
particulate mater in the air. The particles ‰ The values of TSPM exceed the limits
are dangerous because they carry a very set by Central Pollution Control Board.
complex mixture of toxic pollutants. Public
health scientists hold that the fine particles
from burning coal, petrol, diesel and wood
comprising a complex mixture of sulphate,
nitrate, ammonium, hydrogen ions,
elemental organic compounds, metals, poly
nuclear aromatics, lead, cadmium,
vanadium, copper zinc, nickel etc. are
harmful chemicals. They coat the surface of
the tiny particles present in the air. They
believe that even a very small increase in
concentration of these particles can cause
great harm to lungs and heart and in turn
can have effect on the life expectancy.

Air Quality
The predominant cause of air pollution in
the Indore City is Vehicular Traffic. The
Madhya Pradesh Pollution Control Board
has undertaken monitoring of various
parameters that reflect the pollution levels.

It is observed the Maximum Concentration


of suspended particulate matter in some
areas of the city of Indore far surpasses the
threshold of 200 ug/cum, by the Indian
Standard.

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 49


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Tab. 7.15. Changes in the Ambient Air Quality in Indore

S. Polo ground Kothari Market Telephone Nagar


Yr.
No SO NO SO NO SO
SPM PM10 SPM PM10 NOx SPM PM10
x x x x x
1 1991 23.2 30.0 441.15 - 19.7 29.1 453.88 - 10.5 16.37 280.20 -
2 1992 10.9 17.7 422.15 - 10.3 17.2 489.70 - 4.36 12.14 313.78 -
3 1993 11.6 18.6 399.65 - 09.7 16.0 377.99 - 2.54 10.89 267.42 -
4 1994 08.3 11.4 426.00 - 07.5 10.9 394.95 - 3.76 8.20 241.95 -
5 1995 09.0 10.9 465.01 - 06.7 11.6 409.00 - 5.97 9.20 285.54 -
6 1999 27.0 22.4 486.73 416.6 25.3 20.6 400.96 335.4 19.4 16.47 265.91 224.9
7 2000 28.3 21.8 517.64 417.2 25.7 20.5 431.69 347.8 19.1 13.06 314.96 224.9

The ambient air quality standards for commercial and residential areas, under the environment
protection act, 1986 SPM- 200ug /m3, SOx- 80 ug/m3, NOx- 80 ug/m3, PM10- 100ug/m3 and for
Industrial areas, SPM- 500ug /m3, SOx- 120 ug/m3, NOx- 120 ug/m3, PM10- 150ug/m3.

Source; Urban Environment Workbook

Tab. 7.16. SPM Respirable Dust Concentration at Indore

Time and
Duration of Total Suspended Particulate Matter
S. Location of Sampling Resp.
Sampling
No. Station Dust
Observed Equated 24 Hourly
M/N/E Min.
value Mean
1 Palasia Circle M 110 369.88 1425.88 621.50
2 Palasia Circle N 106 225.49 1281.83 608.50
3 Palasia Circle E 85 150.70 1207.04 588.78
4 Gandhi Statue M 244 709.19 4531.47 886.70
5 Palika Square M 178 193.78 962.14 605.32
6 Kothari Market E 71 1496.26 5021.08 775.20
7 Corporation Square E 51 14.72.09 7666.66 806.87
8 Rajwada E 148 3783.37 5394.75 789.07
9 Subhash Statue E 139 2476.24 3584.30 847.41
10 Dhar Bus Stand E 89 876.50 2143.10 653.14
11 Bambai Bazar E 129 569.49 1868.41 672.65
12 Gurudwara Imli Sahib M 164 389.29 1456.93 658.79
13 Siyaganj Square M 154 561.54 1589.99 665.68
14 Patel Statue M 100 824.83 2091.43 661.69

Source; Urban Environment Workbook

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 50


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Tab. 7.17. Average Particulates in Ambient air Along the Roadsides at the Respirable Zones

S.No. Location of Sampling Point PM10 NRD TSPM


1 Khajrana Chowki Khajrana Rd. 95.06 434.83 529.9
2 Vijaynagar Chowki AB Rd. 90.65 519.48 610.13
3 Palasiya Square AB Rd. 401.72 505.77 907.50
4 Chawni RNT Marg 322.34 825.25 1157.60
5 University Campus Khandwa Rd. 164.26 534025 698.51
6 Marimata Square Sanver Rd. 130.87 861.35 992.18
7 Laxmibai Nagar Kila Maidan Rd. 249.99 1120.15 1470.14
8 Kalani Nagar Aerodrum Rd. 194.28 993.51 1187.79
9 Sethi Gate Sudama Nagar Rd. 115.91 800.51 916.42
10 Chandan Nagar Dhar Rd. 649.92 842.98 1493.05
11 CAT Campus Rau Rd. 39.78 913.66 953.45
PM10- Respirable Dust, NRD Non Respirable Dust, TSPM- Total Suspended Particulate Matter.
Ambient Air Quality Standards For Commercial and Residential Areas, under Environment
Protection Act, 1986 are SPM- 200ug/m3, PM10- 100ug/m3, and for Industrial Areas 500ug/m3,
PM10- 150ug/m3. The highlighted places are in 7 Kms. Influence zone of Piplyapala.

Source; Urban Environment Workbook


7.6.2. Water
Water Pollution
B- Outdoor bathing
With the process of urbanization the C- Drinking water source with
settlements on waterfront grew as urban conventional treatment and
centers turning these water bodies into disinfections
toxic streams. River Khan, which passes D- Propagation of wild life
through the city of Indore, has virtually E- Irrigation and industrial cooling and
turned into Nallah carrying the entire water disposal
untreated domestic and industrial
wastewater of Indore City.
Observations
Tab. 7.18. Surface Water Quality in Khan
River Indore From above concerns there is a serious
S. River Grade Grade Desired
need of water management in the city of
No. Stretch (1985) (1996) Grade Indore.
Origin For this there has to be development of the
1 To C E B existing surface water bodies in the city to
Indore improve their capacity and catchments
2 Indore to area.
E E D
Ujjain Pollution in river water is potential source of
contamination in ground water aquifers.
Source; Urban Environment Workbook The sources of pollution of surface water
Classification of water bodies is as bodies have to be checked.
under Use of the rainwater harvesting techniques
is desirable in the city of Indore.
A- Drinking source without
conventional treatment but after
disinfections

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 51


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

TAB 7.19 GROUND WATER QUALITY (Month- May 2001)


S Location Appe Odou ph Colifo Nitra Nitrit Am TKN Diss Sp. BO CO TDS
N aran r rm te e mon mg/l olve Cond D D mg/l
o ce MPN mg/l mg/l ia d uctivi mg/ mg/
/100m mg/l O2 ty l l
l mg/l umho
s/cm
1 Industrial Area Clear Odour 8 8 0.7 0.14 1.4 2.2 ND 2080 3.1 40 1315
Pologround less
2 Laxmibai Clear Odour 9 7 4.4 BDL 0.9 1.6 ND 1366 1.8 20 853
Nagar less
3 Industrial Area Clear Odour 9 7 Nil Nil BDL BDL ND 850 1.2 30 517
Rau less
4 Industrial Area Clear Odour 8 7 0.58 0.002 0.8 1.2 ND 1851 2.1 30 1181
Bhagirathpura less
5 Shivaji Nagar Clear Odour 9 6 9.2 0.2 1.6 2.8 ND 1753 2.8 40 1059
(Bhindikhau) less
6 Slum Clusters Clear Odour 9 7 Nil Nil 0.3 BDL ND 532 1.2 20 345
at Bhim Nagar less
near Rajendra
Nagar
7 Slum Clusters Clear Odour 9 12 0.6 0.002 0.7 1.2 ND 1105 0.7 20 884
at Khatipura less
8 Supply boring Clear Odour 9 7 BDL Nil BDL BDL ND 840 1.2 30 510
water of less
Municipal
Corporation at
L.I.G. Colony
9 Supply boring Clear Odour 9 6 0.4 0.022 0.24 1 ND 1220 0.9 16 736
water of less
Municipal
Corporation at
Azadnagar
10 Boring water Clear Odour 9 8 0.2 0.036 Nil BDL ND 872 1 20 538
at Devguradia less
Waste
Durmping site.
11 Tube Well Clear Odour 9 7 0.18 0.024 Nil BDL ND 1252 0.9 20 762
water at less
Devguradia
Waste
Dumping site
Source; Madhya Pradesh Pollution Control Board

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 52


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

TAB 7.20 SURFACE WATER QUALITY (Month- May 2001)


Colifo Diss Sp.
S Nitr Am CO
rm Nitrit olve Condu BO
N Appea Odo ate mon TKN D TDS
Location ph MPN e d ctivity D
o rance ur mg/ ia mg/l mg/ mg/l
/100m mg/l O2 umhos mg/l
l mg/l l
l mg/l /cm
River Khan at Blackish
1 Un pl. 8 28000 4.5 0.12 6.5 12.4 Nil 1630 74 210 974
Azadnagar Turbid
River Khan at Blackish
2 Un pl. 9 24000 2.5 0.9 4 7.8 Nil 1560 76 250 928
Krishnanagar Turbid
River Khan at Blackish
3 Un pl. 9 28000 6 0.16 8 15.6 Nil 1790 96 310 1077
Bhagirathpur Turbid
River Khan at Blackish
4 Un pl. 8 35000 8.5 0.22 10.2 18.2 Nil 1804 100 290 1090
Sanwer Road Turbid
River Khan Blackish
5 Un pl. 9 50000 6.5 0.55 11.5 20.8 Nil 1650 110 340 998
Kabitkhedi Turbid
Odour
6 Bilawali Talaab Turbid 8 170 0.2 Nil 0.6 - 6.8 ND 2.8 30 262
less
Odour
7 Piplyapala Talaab Turbid 8 140 BDL Nil 0.8 - 6.8 ND 1.8 30 358
less

Sirpur Odour
8 Turbid 8 170 0.2 0 0.4 - 6.8 ND 1.8 30 326
Talaab less

Greenis
9 Sukhniwas Tank Un pl. 9 170 1.4 0.02 6 11.4 8.4 512 9 50 410
h
Nala from Sirpur
Blackish
11 Tank at Deplapur Un pl. 9 >1600 0.3 Nil 10 18.6 Nil 1780 85 240 1080
Turbid
road crossing
Piliakhal Nala
from Sirpur tank
Blackish
12 at confluence Un pl. 9 >1600 0.36 Nil 16 30.2 Nil 1886 90 280 1132
Turbid
point of river Khan
at Pologround
Narmada Water
Quality Raw Odour
13 Clear 9 12 0.14 0.02 Nil BDL 6 268 1.2 30 180
Water at Control less
Room, Bijalpur
Narmada Water
Qulaity Teated Odour
14 Clear 9 >2 0.12 BDL Nil BDL ND 318 0.6 30 191
Water at Control less
Room, Bijalpur
River Saraswati
before confluence Blackish
15 Un pl. 9 >1600 0.38 BDL 18 34.6 Nil 1355 70 180 844
to Khan, Turbid
Krishnagar
Palasia Nala
before meeting Blackish
16 Un pl. 9 >1600 0.8 0.02 8 14.8 Nil 1588 74 220 954
Khan at Turbid
Bhargirathpura
17 Bhamori Nala at Blackish
Un pl. 9 >1600 0.38 Nil 16 30.4 Nil 1625 100 260 980
Sukliya Turbid
Source; Madhya Pradesh Pollution Control Board

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 53


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

for children to ride around the park. It also


7.6.3. Green Cover has battery-operated cars.
In nature, some of the unwanted
constituents of the air, which are Meghdoot Upavan:
considered as pollutants, such as carbon
dioxide and hydrocarbons are fixed by Newest and the largest of the gardens
green plants in their system in turn situated on the outskirts of the city
releasing oxygen, the basic ingredients of developed by IDA, about four kilometers
respiration and energy in living organisms. from Palasia. It has sprawling lawns,
Trees and vegetation also capture the lighted fountains, landscaped gardens. It
suspended particles in the air on their also has an amusement park Mangal Merry
foliage and release into runoff when rain Landadjacent to it. Ice cream parlours, milk
shows wash them off. Thus atmospheric air parlours, Chaat gali are on the outside. The
gets cleaned up with the aid of trees and first Musical fountain in the State was
vegetation. established here.

Green areas such as parks playgrounds Bilawali Garden (Pt. Dindayal Upadhyay
zoo and gardens are considered as lungs Upawan)
of the city. Indore is lacking in such spaces.
Over the period of time with the growth of Recently Developed by Indore Municipal
population there is no proportionate Corporation, spread in an area of 4 acres, it
increase in the green spaces. The graph has Fountain and jogging tracks.
given below shows the shortage of green
spaces with respect to the population. Kamla Nehru Prani Sanghrayala (Indore
Zoo)
Illust. 7.3. Population Growth V/S Green
Spaces in Indore City It is developed in 17 acres of land in the
Population Growth V/S Green Spaces central part of the city. The zoo is
expanding as per Master Plan approved By
2500 25
21.14 20
Central Zoo Authority, New Delhi in an
2000
additional area of 32 acres.
Green Areas in

Population in

17.59
1500 15
Lakhs

13.17
HA.

1000 10
873 937
Apart from above gardens there are many
500 5.75 5
113 190
parks like water parks, amusement parks
0 0
1971 1994 2001 2005
constructed and maintained by Private
Years Agencies. The neighbourhood Parks have
been allocated land but have not been
Green Area Population
developed.
Source; Perspective Plan for Indore Planning
Area 2025, Department of Housing SPA New
Delhi

Major Gardens of the city

Nehru Park:

This is the oldest and most centrally


located park in Indore. Built by the Britons
as Biscow Park, it was open to only British
in the pre independence days. It was
renamed as Nehru Park after
independence. It has a variety of roses,
library, swiming pool, children's hobby
centre etc. It also operates miniature train

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 54


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

7.7. Conclusion 7.6.2 Sewerage

‰ Only 55% of the sewerage generated is


7.6.1 Water Supply connected to main sewer systems.
‰ Only 54% of the Population have ‰ 43% (60 MLD) of the Sewerage
access to piped water supply that too generated is disposed off in Septic
for a very short period in the day hence Tanks and ultimately discharged in
extension of the piped distribution Nallahs.
system is a need.
‰ Rest 2% of the population opts for open
‰ With present water sources the city defecation
manages to produce only 210 MLD of
water. With all losses and supply to ‰ Only 60MLD sewage out of 80MLD,
other Cities like Dewas and MHOW it which is generated through 55% of
manages just 192MLD of Supply for population connected to Sewer System,
Indore City. With the augmentation of is able to reach STP at Kabit Khedi.
Narmada Source by Narmada Phase III
(365MLD) the net Water available will ‰ As only 60MLD sewage is treated in
be 585 MLD, which will be sufficient for 90MLD capacity STP making it under
the projected population of 2024 with utilized.
135 LPCD supply.
‰ 80% of the Sewers laid under ODA
‰ Though the Narmada III phase will have Project are not operational due to silt
sufficient supply, bringing water from deposition, choking of lines and
narmada which is 70kms away will be a chambers as well as damage of lines.
costly affair hence the local alternative
sources such as Yashwant Sagar and ‰ The sewer carrying the waste from
Bilawali tank has to be utilized to the eastern part of the city is a old brick
fullest capacity to supplement the water arch sewer which is in poor condition
supply, which can be done by taking and ultimately the sewage is by passed
necessary steps for capacity in to Bhamori nala
augmentation. The other sources such
as wells and baudis can also 7.6.3 Solid Waste Management
supplement to water demand.
‰ Collection efficiency - only 70% of the
‰ The present per capita water supply (by solid waste generated is collected.
192MLD) is 80LPCD, which is far less Many of the wards have frequency of
than the desired 135 LPCD collection more than one day. Some of
the reasons for such inefficiency are;
‰ Water auditing is one of the major
issue, meters are neither installed at the o Due to poor primary collection
source to know the actual water
production nor at the consumer end to o Lack of Synchronization of
evaluate the consumption. Collection, storage and
transportation of Solid Waste.
‰ There is substantial loss of water due to
old and worn out pipelines leading to o Inadequate labour (Safai
leakage. The water is also wasted in Karmachari’s).
Community Stand Posts and through
the Supply Network. ‰ Storage facility can only store 60% of
the solid waste generated.

‰ Poor Primary collection of the solid


. waste generated.

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 55


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

‰ Traditional method of treatment of Company named Indore City Transport


dumping at landfill sites is used. Services Limited (ICTSL) to provide
with high capacity low floor busses
‰ There is 100% efficiency in collection
and disposal of Hospital Waste. ‰ The Goods Transport Vehicles are at
present parked on the Ring Roads in
‰ Hazardous Waste from Industries is absence of the truck terminals and
collected and disposed. freight terminals, which decreases the
efficiency of these roads.
7.6.4 Storm Water Drainage
7.6.6 Environment
‰ Rainwater Drainage of the city is
dependent mainly on the River system Air
of Khan and Saraswati.
‰ The predominant cause of air pollution
‰ There is only 350 Kms of Storm Water in the Indore City is Vehicular Traffic.
Drains (SWD) against the 1710 kms of
Road Length which discharge ‰ It is observed that the Maximum
floodwater in to river tributaries and Concentration of suspended particulate
ultimately in Khan and Saraswati river. matter in some areas of the city,
surpasses the threshold of 200 ug/cum,
7.6.5 Transport Systems in many transport corridors of the city.

‰ NH3 and NH59 constitute 42% of the in Water


coming and outgoing traffic, 10% of the
traffic travels through State Highways. ‰ Discharge of the Sewers in the flow of
Khan River has increased the pollution
‰ As per the IDP 1991 implementation of level of the city.
roads such as MR11, MR9, MR3 are
not completed which are needed to ‰ The surface water bodies in the city
service the new developed areas, which also needs capacity enhancement and
can be seen as missing links in the control of pollution that can be done in
transport network. an integrated manner with overall
conservation.
‰ The railway track virtually divides the
city into two parts acting as constraint to Green Cover
mobility of transport network in the city.
‰ The city lacks in terms of green and
‰ Most of the important roads lack in recreational areas.
Traffic Carrying Capacities, Facilities
such as signages footpaths etc. ‰ Indore doesn’t have any hierarchy of
Recreational spaces though its has the
‰ Regional transport network has their micro level neighborhood and housing
bus terminals in the densely developed area parks but very less city parks and
areas causing traffic congestion. no regional park.

‰ The increase in Vehicle ownership in


the past few years was due to
insufficient public transport

‰ The Public Transport Network till


recently was grossly inadequate. Only
recently an unique initative have been
taken by Dist. Administration and IMC
by setting up a fully Govt. owned

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 56


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Chapter been utilised up to the year 2002, which is

Housing
92.0% of the proposed area.

8 and Slums
The population of Indore has crossed the
projected population (12,50,000) for the
Indore Development Plan (1974-1991)
much before 1991 The population has
increased 2.5 times during 1974-2002, but
Housing makes significant visual impact on the housing stock could not be developed
the overall appearance of the city and its to cater the need especially for the poor
urban form. Housing configuration can sector, which has created pressure on the
make or mar the total city image and its existing housing facility causing
social and cultural life. substandard living conditions. From the
studies, it is found that more than 5.00
8.1. Housing Situation in lakhs population is living in Jhuggi-Jhopadi
Indore areas.

Traditionally, lndore has the privilege of 8.1.1. Housing Shortage


housing the best residential areas available Indore suffers from housing Shortage
in any city of the state but in higher and particularly for low and economically
upper middle-income groups only. The city weaker sections of the society. It has
has worst slums and jhuggi areas, thriving 16.25% of its population staying in Slums
within the best residential and commercial and Squatters and about 15% of the
localities of the city. population staying in the un-authorized
settlements reasons being unavailability of
The city also has the problems of vacant land near work areas, lack of land
unauthorized colonies, these colonies lack for LIG, EWS, high prices of land, lesser
in infrastructure facilities forcing the affordability and housing shortage which
inhabitants to live in un-hygienic conditions. has led to squatting. Lack of coordination &
Lack of development particularly to suit the disputes among policies of various
requirement and economic means of developments
squatters have created conditions, which
motivate unauthorized jhuggis.

Tab. 8.1. Housing Need Stock and Shortage during different Period

Source; Various Development Plans of Indore

In the Development Plan (1974-1991), Agencies and also the complexities in


5060 ha of land was proposed for developmental procedure for colonizers
residential purpose but only 4660 ha have

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 57


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

have together resulted in increase in slums/squatters the no of people staying on


squatting and unauthorized developments. available portion of land is extremely high
i.e. very large no of population is residing
Illust. 8.1. Decadal Increase in on very less proportion of land.
Housing Shortage
Illust. 8.2. Distribution of Population in
Different Subsystems

Source; Various Development Plans of Source; Perspective Plan 2025 for Indore
Indore Planning Area, Department of Housing
SPA New Delhi
8.1.2. Housing Subsystem
Illust. 8.3. Area V/s Population in
In any city all housing conditions are not Different Subsystems
same always. They differ from each other
in characteristics like income level,
residential densities, ownership status etc.
These create different typology of living,
which we can categorize as housing
subsystems.

In Indore there are following types of


subsystem exists.
‰ Traditional / Urban Village
‰ Private Plotted / Group housing
‰ Public housing schemes (IDA / MPHB) Source; Perspective Plan 2025 for Indore
‰ Co-operative housing scheme Planning Area, Department of Housing
‰ Employee housing scheme 8.1.3 House Hold ProfileSPA New Delhi
‰ Unauthorized colonies
According to the GOI official definition of
‰ Slums/ Squatters
income groups, Indore has 9.3% HIG
households, 20.8% MIG households,
From the above comparison of areas and 40.3% LIG households and 29.5% EWS
population in different subsystems it can be households; it has 17.6% BPL households.
seen that the amount of land acquired by
govt. agencies like IDA and MPHB has not In Indore, the average households size has
been utilized to the fullest extent. In other been recorded to be at 6.3 as per the
words it can be said that even been the household survey. The HIG households
prime supplier of the land for housing, the recorded the highest average households
govt. sector were not able to develop the size at 8 and the MIG households 7.4 LIG
acquired land under different schemes due 6.3 and the EWS households the lowest at
to many reasons mainly due to the legal 5. The average household size of the BPL
complications. Hence lesser population households has been 7.9, among the poor
resides in these acquired govt. lands households; the core poor had the highest
household size at 8.5 with the intermediate
On the other hand in case of unauthorized poor at 7.8 and the transitional poor at 6.6.
colonies and extreme cases in

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

The average number of adult (aged 18 and In Indore, nearly than 60% of the all
above) among all households surveyed is 4 households surveyed stated that they have
and that of children (aged less than 18) is been living in the same neighborhood for
2.2. The average number of adults in a the last 10 years. Nearly 21% reported they
household was highest at 5.9 among the have been living there for about 6 – 10
HIG households and was lowest for EWS years while 16% stated they lived there for
households 2.9. The average number of a period of 1 – 5 years. The remaining
children was found to be highest among the households 3% lived in the same
MIG households 2.3 and lowest among the neighborhood for less than a year.
HIG households (2.0). Among the poor
households, the intermediate poor had the A similar pattern has also been observed
highest number of adults (4.1) and children across the different income groups wherein
(3.6). 70% of the HIG, 62% of MIG, 60% of LIG
and 59% of EWS stated that they have not
The 2001 Census has recorded that the moved out from their present
city has relatively low literacy rate at 82% neighbourhood in the last 10 years. Nearly
including a rate of 89% literacy amongst 60% of BPL households 60% of TP and
males but only 74% amongst females. 58% of IP households reported to be
Amongst the enumerated slum population, residing in the same area for the last 10
the literacy rate is much lower at 79%, years.
including a rare of 88% amongst males and
70% amongst females. In Indore, only 13.5% of the households
surveyed stated that they had moved from
another part of the city in the last 5 years.
Tab. 8.2. Household Profile Only 4% of the households reported to
Household Profile have moved from another city and only 2%
Av HH Size 6.31 of them moved in from a rural area in the
Mean HH Income (Rs/mth) 5273 last 5 years.
BPL Pop (% HH) 17.6
Diarrhoes last year (%HH) 15.4 Of all the households surveyed in Indore
No legal Tenure (%HH) 25.4 77% stated that they owned their plot of
No in-house water (%HH) 52.5 land. Across the different income groups,
No piped water (%HH) 21.7 87% of HIG, 79% of MIG, 77% of LIG and
No private toilet (%HH) 19.4 80% of the EWS households owned their
Flooding problem (%HH) 32.7 plot of land. Nearly 87% of the BPL
No paved road (%HH) 33.0 households reported the same.
Public transport > 1 km 24.4
Of all the households surveyed 58% had a
Source; Integrated Urban Development in freehold title, 25% did not have any legal
Madhya Pradesh for Indore, ADB. right, 9.7% had received pattas from the
Illust. 8.4. Household Income Groups Government, while the rest had it on lease
in Indore or had other legal rights. It is evident that
71% of the HIG households and 62% of
Household Income Groups
MIG, 58% of LIG and 48% of EWS
9% households had a freehold title. It was
18%
observed that nearly 14% of EWS
21%
12% households had been given pattas by the
government, which was recorded to be
highest among all income groups.
Proportion of households without any legal
right was also observed to be highest
40%
among the EWS 33.6% and lowest among
the HIG households at 12%.
HIG MIG LIG EWS BPL

Source; Integrated Urban Development in


Madhya Pradesh for Indore, ADB.

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Of all the households surveyed only 20.2% households who lack safe, secure
households lived in rented accommodation. and healthy living environment with
Nearly 88% of the HIG, 79% of MIG, 77% basic infrastructure such as piped
of LIG and 81% of EWS households had water and adequate provision of
their own accommodation. Significantly, sewerage, sanitation, drainage and
nearly 87% of the BPL households owned removal of household waste.
their houses.
8.2.2. Defining Poverty Line

8.2. Urban Poverty The first concept of Poverty Line came in


1962. Poverty Line is not constant; it varies
from country to country and time to time.
In India, they who fail to reach a certain Goods and Services i.e. consumption,
minimum consumption standard are whether purchased, gifts or self-produced,
regarded as poor. To define poverty is converted in monitory terms to define the
quantitatively, it is difficult to agree on the Poverty Line. The nutritional intake
amount of income that will ensure the requirement is considered as constant i.e.
minimum consumption standard at a point 2250 calories / day (average). The average
of time. median income in squatters is considered
as Rs. 600 / capita / month.
Living costs are higher in urban areas as
compared to the rural areas. Thus the 8.2.3. Indicators of Poverty
criterion for defining poverty in urban and
rural areas varies. Besides monitory income, other aspects
related to the living conditions, are
8.2.1 Definitions of Poverty important to include in defining poverty.
There are 7 non-economic parameters to
Households are considered poor when the assess poverty:
resources that they command are
insufficient, to enable them to consume 1) Roof
sufficient goods and services for 2) Floor
reasonable minimum level of welfare.
3) Water
a.) Relative poverty: Relative poverty 4) Sanitation
is a poverty measure based on a 5) Education level
poor standard of living or a low
6) Type of employment
income relative to the rest of
society. 7) Status of children in life

b.) Absolute Poverty: Absolute Weightage & scores are assigned to each
poverty is a level of poverty at which of these parameters to assess the level of
certain minimum standards - for poverty. Higher the score more is the
example nutrition, health & shelter deprivation. Out of all these parameters 4
cannot be met. The term "Absolute are directly related to Housing.
poverty" is perhaps slightly 8.3. Slums in Indore
misleading, since there is no
"absolute" standard that defines
absolute poverty: the level of It is well known that a large percentage of
income necessary for these population in any Indian city belongs to the
minimum standards is often referred lowest economic strata i.e. economically
to as the poverty line which various weaker section. Majority of this urban poor
institutions and individuals define Population belongs to people who have
differently. migrated from the nearby rural areas in
search of work, employment. Due to the
c.) Housing Poverty: Individuals and dwindling land resources and increase in
the population the land holding of any

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

family in the rural region is no longer able Since the 1960’s, with its industrialization
to support the entire family. This and development of facilities, the city has
encourages the exodus of rural population been attracting migrants from districts of
to the nearby city. Most poor immigrants to Dhar, Ujjain, Dewas, Khargone, Jhabua,
the city can find access to shelter only by Ratlam and Mandsaur. Migrants from
squatting on public or private land. These states like U.P, Rajasthan, Maharashtra
squatters over the period of time continue and Gujarat also form sizable population in
to come and settle on this land thus Indore slums. The slum population in
creating a neighborhood, more generally Indore City during different period has been
called as a SLUM. listed in Tab 8.3. AS per the Census 2001
the slum population in Indore City
But in the format of Housing development, constitutes 16.25% only while the
the above vital factors for creating population in the slums notified by Madhya
harmonious symbiotic and self sustainable Pradesh (Slum Clearance and
communities at optimal location are Improvement) Act. is more than 3 Lakhs.
generally ignored and in fact in many cases as shown in Tab 8.4.
no provision of habitat is made for such
population in the planning of housing About 60,752 families are living in Slums
development. This deficiency in the formal Notified by Madhya Pradesh (Slum
planning leads to development of Slums Clearance and Improvement) Act. Slums in
and Squatter Settlements to assimilate the city can be classified as roadside
such population. slums, construction side slums, industrial
area slums, established slums, slums in
The concept of slums and its definition vary city periphery-and tenant groups. 52
from country to country depending upon the percent of slum population is in the age
socioeconomic conditions of each society. group of 15-20 years, the main reason for
The term slum (squatter) describes a wide which is migration of youth from rural
range of low-income settlements or poor areas. In most of the newly formed slums,
living conditions. Slum (Squatter) at its youth form’s the highest percentage of
simplest is a heavily populated area population, while in older settlements the
characterized by substandard housing and percentage of elderly persons is
squatter. comparatively higher.
Since 1951, there has been a substantial Tab. 8.3. Slum Population In Indore
increase in the population of slum dwellers. City
In 1951, the total number of slums was just Slum Population in Indore City
26, which increased to 183 in the year
Year Total Slum Decadal % of
1991. Surveys conducted by various
Populati Populati Growth slum
nongovernmental agencies have indicated
on on Rate
around 637 slums, which include
surrounding areas outside the IMC where 1951 310859 67619 21.75
construction workers and agricultural 1961 394941 83174 18.70 21.06
laborers form temporary settlements.
However, the IMC till date has recognized 1971 560936 112352 25.97 20.03
only 444 slums and notified the same in 1981 829327 126300 11.04 15.23
two phases in 1998 and in 1999. In 1997, 1991 1104000 168600 25.09 15.27
survey was conducted by IDA, in which 2001 1639000 259577 35.05 15.83
more than 270 slum areas were identified
that have come up in the last eight years. Source; Census of India
According to a study done by Oxfam in
1998, the city had a total of 1,34,418
hutments. The study also indicates a
distinct group, which could not be map~
that lives on pavements and as laborers in
temporary shelters.

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

settlements the percentage of elderly


8.4. Characteristics of persons is comparatively higher.
Slums
‰ Nearly half of the slum dwellers live on
The characteristics of Slums in Indore are
less than 350 sq. ft of land and almost
all the scheduled tribe population and
‰ Various sizes from small, medium to
most of the scheduled caste population
large often clustered together in groups
lives in slums.
but also in single, isolated locations.
‰ About 17.9 percent of the slum
‰ Mainly located on riverbanks (now
population is tenants.
converted into nallahs).
‰ Occupation of slum dwellers is largely in
‰ Have heterogeneous populations, in
the informal sector.
some places caste panchayats exist,
which play an important note in settling
‰ Percentage of workingwomen in
disputes related to property, marriage,
vulnerable sections – 45.60 percent – is
and violation of caste rules.
quite high compared to the figure for
other sections in the society.
‰ Many of these slums have saving and
credit groups, neighborhood
‰ Nearly a third of the slum population
development committee, women’s and
possesses a ration card, a majority of
youth clubs, formed under various
them fail to use it to prove their
development projects.
entitlement to various government
schemes, mainly due to non-specific
‰ Many of these are at present covered
addresses on them.
under Integrated Child Development
Scheme, Niramaya Community
‰ Half the slum population does not have
Empowerment Project, Continuous
a toilet facility and about a fourth of the
Education Program, which have a huge
population uses public toilets, most of
network of staff, volunteers and
which are in bad shape.
activities.
‰ Only a negligible proportion is able to
‰ 119 of them have community centers,
avail service of government hospitals
which were built under Indore Habitat
and the majority relies on private
Improvement Project.
doctors.
‰ Categorized mainly as encroachments
‰ Male and female literacy rates in the
on Government land, encroachment on
slums are 46.4 percent and 20.00
private land and settlements developed
percent respectively, as against 88.9
by private developers.
percent and 74.6 percent for the city.
‰ 175 of them were covered under Indore
Habitat Improvement Project, have
piped sewage, asphalt roads,
walkways, piped water supply and
other small undertakings like
community toilets, hand pumps and
road culverts.

‰ 52 percent of slum population is in the


age group of 15-50 years, the main
reason for which is migration of youth
from rural areas. In most of the newly
formed slums, youth form the highest
percentage of population, while in older

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Tab. 8.4. Slums Notified by Madhya Pradesh (Slum Clearance and Improvement) Act on
25-5-199

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MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 64


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 65


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 66


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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Source; Indore Development Plan 2011 DRAFT


8.5. Earlier Public ‰ Project by UNICEF was implemented
Interventions of Slum by the District Collectorate from 1987-
Improvements 94. The project initiated a process of
community organization and promoted
Indore has an impressive record of urban collective action
community development projects like:
‰ IHIP – this was an ODA (Overseas
Development Administration, U.K.) –
‰ The Madhya Pradesh Nagariya financed project, which was
Kshetron Ke Bhoomihin Vyakti implemented by Indore Development
(Pattadhruti Adhikaron Ka Pradan Kiya Authority. IHIP facilitated increase in
Jana) Adhiniyam, 1984, popularly capacity of the city’s sewage treatment
known as the `Patta’ Act was plant, construction of piped sewage,
introduced to grant leasehold rights to asphalt roads, cemented walkways and
the landless persons occupying urban community halls in 175 slum areas of
lands. the city. Other smaller construction
undertaken in the project included
‰ UNDP (Urban Community Development community toilets, hand pumps, road
Program) – UNICEF – funded project, culverts construction of three health
implemented from 1983-87 by Indore centers and children’s complex. Beyond
Municipal Corporation. all doubts, IHIP was a masterpiece of
architectural design and has won the
‰ UBSP (Urban Basic Services Program)
World Habitat Award (1997) for
– project was jointly funded by
innovative practices for the same.
Government of M.P., Government of
India, and ‰ Valmik Ambedkar Awas Yojna-
VAMBAY is a centrally sponsored

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

scheme which has provision of 50% ‰ To improve the physical living


grant for dwelling units for urban poor conditions of some of the poorest urban
upto 50,000 cost. IMC and IDA had families in
rehabilitated around 1000 slum dwellers ‰ Indore.
under this scheme so far. ‰ To improve standards of health literacy
and basic education.
8.5.1 The `Patta’ Act, 1984 And 1998 ‰ To develop the community organization
and institutions.
The Madhya Pradesh Nagariya Kshetron ‰ To increase the income earning
Ke Bhoomihin Vyakti (Pattadhruti potential.
Adhikaron Ka Pradan Kiya Jana) ‰ To provide security of tenure.
Adhiniyam, 1984, popularly known as the ‰ To encourage self help improvement of
`Patta’ Act was introduced to grant housing.
leasehold rights to the landless persons ‰ To strengthen local government no-
occupying urban lands. The Act was governmental organizations (NGO’s)
amended in 1998 under Rajiv Gandhi and the slum communities to ensure
Aashray Abhiyan to extend the cut off date that the assets created are properly
of eligibility to 31st May 1998. In addition, maintained and project benefits
the plot areas were revised for different sustained.
categories of cities (1000 to 600 square
feet) and lease rent per square feet per There was community halls constructed
year for 10 years was introduced at the rate under these projects, which were also
of Rs. 1.00 for Nagar Panchayats, Rs. 1.50 proposed to be utilised as Nursery Schools,
for other towns and Rs. 2.00 for Rajbhogi Local Clinics, Adult Education as well as
cities (Bhopal, Indore, Jabalpur, Gwalior other recreational and cultural activities.
and Raipur). The most important There was considerable up gradation of
amendment in the Act was to introduce the infrastructure facilities done under these
Mohalla Samitis with the intent to empower projects such as construction of roads,
the community in the planning and lying of drains, water lines, construction of
management of the development and community toilets etc. There was
social welfare. Under the `Patta’ Act, three construction of cutoff sewers was done
categories of pattas are given, category along Nallah to capture of foul water inflow
`ka’ (A) for the registration of disputed and diversion to treatment.
cases, category `kha’ (B) for permanent
lease of 30 years and category `gha’ (C) for These programs based on ideals of
temporary lease of 1 year. community participation, convergence,
cost-effectiveness, coverage, and
8.5.2. Indore Habitat Improvement continuity were primarily designed as
Project (ODA Project) process-oriented initiatives, but later due to
Indore is known for its programme for slum over ambitious implementation goals
networking (IHIP-Indore Habitat became product – oriented and failed to
Improvement Programme) in collaboration achieve expected results.
with ODA and with the idea of changing the
situation of the slum dwellers in the city. District Administration, Municipal
Indore Development Authority, as part of Corporation, and Indore Development
the well, acclaimed ODA Project, selected, Authority had opportunity to implement
and developed 175 slums out of 183 UCD, UBSP, and IHIP and to enhance their
identified during that period. expertise regarding the same. Some of the
reasons for their failure are:
The Objectives of the Project were
‰ To integrate the slums into the ‰ They implemented these projects by
economic and social network of the city. themselves, leaving other role players
disinterested about the sustenance of

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

activities. Therefore, when the funding ‰ In Indore 50% of the Housing (Informal
ceased so did the follow on activities. Housing) is been developed upon 20%
‰ They tried to achieve too much at a of the Land, which depicts their living
single time. conditions.
‰ Inter-departmental co-ordination among
partners in various areas of ‰ 25% of the household in the City
improvement was neglected and doesn’t have legal tenure, while 9% of
nothing serious was done for their the households have got Patta from
capacity building. Government of Madhya Pradesh.
‰ NGOs and NDCs had limited
opportunities to participate; therefore, ‰ 70% of the households belong to LIG
their potential and expertise remained and EWS, and BPL Catogory. (LIG
untapped, which has resulted in 40%, EWS 21% while EWS 9%)
widening the rift among various key role
players in the city’s development. 8.6.2. Slums
‰ People’s aspirations, participation, and ‰ Slums in Indore settled in the low-lying
decision were not taken into account in areas of River Banks and places close
these projects; hence, after their to work places.
withdrawal; problems in urban
communities remerged or remained the ‰ 16.25% of the population in Indore is
same. living in the slums as per census
definition of Slums, as per the slums
8.5.3. Valmik Ambedkar Awas Yojna notified under Madhya Pradesh (Slum
VAMBAY Clearance and Improvement) Act. It
Under this scheme Indore Municipal goes up to 35%
Corporation has redeveloped Arjun Pura
Slum which proposed rehabilitation of 344 ‰ 52% of the slum population in Indore
Slum Households. The work is under lies in 15-50 years age group which
progress and 50% of them are already reveals the higher percentage of
rehabilitated. In similar fashion Indore working population.
Development Authority has rehabilitated
Buddha Nagar Slum comprising 600 ‰ Only 40% of the slums, which were
dwelling units. Indore development covered under ODA Project, have piped
Authority had taken up proposals for water supply and sewage, asphalt
rehabilitation of about 6000 slum dwellers roads, walkways, community toilets,
under their currently running Town hand pumps as well as Community
Development schemes. In future Ida will be halls, but the facilities are under
developing its Town Development deteriorated conditions as there were
Schemes with 20% of the developed land no provisions for operation and
reserved for EWS and LIG and will be maintenance of facilities.
rehabilitating Slum dwellers.
‰ Low literacy levels in slums as
compared to the City (88 percent and
8.6. Conclusion 70.00 percent respectively, as against
89 percent and 74.6 percent for the
city).
8.6.1. Housing
‰ There is about 40% shortage in housing ‰ There are lots of government
supply in Indore City. The majority of interventions been implemented
housing shortage is for urban poor. towards betterment of the slum
community such as -
‰ Informal Housing such as Slums,
Squatters and the unauthorized o Patta- Tenure security.
colonies constitute about 50% of the o Slum Imoprovement Projects- ODA
housing in subsystems in Indore. (IIHP) Project

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

o UNECEF efforts in Community


development.
o Redevelopment and Rehabilitation
of Slums under Valmik Ambedkar
Awas Yojna
‰ But most of the interventions have
failed in achieving their objectives due
to

o Lack of Participation of NGO’s


CBO’s, and beneficiaries.
o Lack of coordination between
Agencies involved
o Didn’t address the Operation and
maintenance of facilities.

‰ Interventions such as VAMBAY should


be taken as a positive initiative of
integrated development of slums and
rehabilitation of slums.

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Tab. 8.5. List of Slums Developed in ODA Project, Slums Notified Under Gezzette by
Municipal Corporation and Slums Resettled by Administration
SI. Name of the Slum IMC Slum ODA Patta Resettled No. of Families

Ward No.1 - Sirpur Ward (Adjoining wards - 2, 3, 22, 52)


1 Nandan Nagar, Near Chandan IMC Slum 1500
2 Raj Nagar IMC Slum 400
3 Damodar Nagar IMC Slum 600
4 Rana Colony IMC Slum 450
5 Noorani Nagar, Dhar Naka IMC Slum 70
6 Rama Colony, Sirpur IMC Slum 240
7 Ammar Nagar IMC Slum 150
8 Nut Colony IMC Slum 250
9 Tirupati Nagar Slum IMC Slum 52
10 Geeta Colony IMC Slum 250
11 Ramanand Nagar Ext. IMC Slum 1500
12 New ColonyJAdivasi Basti) IMC Slum Patta 80
13 Bajarang Colony IMC Slum 90
14 Ram Balram Colony IMC Slum 800
15 Surajbali Nagar IMC Slum 100
16 Sanyog Nagar IMC Slum 50
17 Bajarang Nagar (Sirpur IMC Slum Patta 500
18 Ramanand Nagar ODA 200
19 Near Chandan Nagar Police ODA 200
20 Sirpur ODA
21 Laxmansingh Chauhan Nagar, IMC Slum ODA Ke-se^ffa 150 L
Sirpur (Resettled from Mhow
Ward No. 2 - Hukumchand Ward (Adjoining wards - 1,3,21,22)
22 Hukumchand Colony ODA 343
23 Chandrabhama Patta 60
Ward No. 3 - Shishak Nagar Ward (Adjoining wards - 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 21)
24 Lakshmipuri IMC Slum 150
25 Archana Nagar IMC Slum 350
26 Babu Murai Colony IMC Slum 300
27 Patel Nagar IMC Slum 35
28 Shri Krishna Nagar IMC Slum 150
29 Shakti Nagar IMC Slum 200
30 Akhand Nagar IMC Slum 200
31 Dharmarth Nagar IMC Slum 500
32 Parihar Colony IMC Slum 200
33 Rambali Nagar IMC Slum 150
34 Panchasheel Nagar, Opp. to IMC Slum ODA Patta Resettled 800
Aerodrome i (Resettled from
35 Bholenath Colony IMC Slum 250
36 Hammal Colony Shramjeevi IMC Slum 200
37 Lakshmanpuri IMC Slum, 200
38 Aradhana Nagar IMC Slum 250
39 Amrakunj nagar IMC Slum 200
40 Suvidhi Nagar IMC Slum 25
41 Lok Nayak Nagar IMC Slum 645
42 Kanyakubj Nagar IMC Slum 10
43 Vikas Nagar IMC Slum 500
44 Chaurasia Nagar IMC Slum 10

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

45 Shriram Nagar IMC Slum 100


46 Ram Nagar IMC 150
47 Anaj Mandi Lakshmibai Nagar IMC Slum 200
Factory Area
48 Aerodrome IMC Slum 100
49 Bangarh Road, Lakshmipuri IMC Slum 500
50 Panchsheel Nagar Chota IMC Slum 125
51 Shramjeevi Mammal Nagar IMC Slum 250
52 Lakshmanpuri IMC Slum 150
53 Shakti Nagar IMC Slum 7
54 Archana Nagar IMC Slum 350
55 Tigriya Badshah IMC Slum 200
56 1 Chota Bangarda Near ODA 125
Ward No. 4 - Laxmibai Ward (Adjoining wards - 3, 5, 6, 17, 18, 19)
57 Rahi Nagar IMC Slum 30
58 Bada Bangarda ODA 250
59 Gadrakhedi (Sough-North) ODA
Ward No. 5 - Maharanapratap Ward (Adjoining wards - 4, 6, 7)
60 Durga Nagar IMC Slum 6
61 Kaveri Nagar IMC Slum 150
62 Kushwah Nagar IMC Slum 750
63 New Sheetal Nagar IMC Slum 150
64 Rajaram Nagar IMC Slum 300
65 Radhakrishna Nagar IMC Slum 300
66 Rishi Nagar IMC Slum 200
67 Panchasheel Nagar (Azad IMC Slum 250
68 Jagannath Nagar IMC Slum 150
69 Jagadish Nagar MC Slum 200
70 Ganesh Bagh Colony IMC Slum 70
71 Gangaban IMC SIum 75
72 Prince Nagar IMC Slum 250
73 Shumbh Nagar IMC SIum 150
74 Govind Colony IMC Slum 200
75 Karma Nagar IMC Slum 200
76 Satyasai Bagji^Colony IMC Slum 250
77 Durga Nagar Nayi Basti IMC Slum 300
78 Govind Nagar Kharcha ODA 400
79 Panjon Nagar ODA 103
80 Valmiki Nagar ODA 240
81 Yadavnand Nagar ODA 300
82 Ekta Nagar ODA 200
Ward No. 6 - Banganga Ward (Adjoining wards - 4, 5, 7, 17)
83 Badal ka Bhatta ODA 425
84 Balai Mohalla Banganga ODA 525
85 Banganga ODA 138
86 Choti Kumhar Khedi ODA 500
87 DaK Garh Mohalla Sharda ODA 800
88 SDrvobi Mohalla Banganga ODA 500
89 Freeganj ODA 100
90 Govind Nagar ODA 240
91 Near Schoool, Banganga ODA 150
92 Banganga Saraswati ODA 80
93 Mahesh Yadav Nagar IMC Slum 400
94 Sundar Nagar IMC Slum 500

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 73


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

95 Vijayavergiya Nagar IMC Slum 200


96 Vtshal Nagar IMC Slum 100
97 Garib Nawaj Colony IMC Slum 75
Ward No. 7 - Bhagat Singh Ward (Adjoining wards - 5, 6, 8, 14, 15, 17)
98 New Bajarangapura IMC Slum 150
99 Bajarangpura IMC Slum 150
100 Shivkanth Nagar Behind IMC Slum 125
101 From Sukliya Chauraha to IMC Slum 200
102 Bhagatsingh Nagar and Total ODA 500
103 Narwal Village ODA 160
104 |Ramdutt ka Bagicha ODA Patta 200
105 Ner Sanwer Road Railway ODA 300
106 Shiv Nagar ODA 100
107| Shamaprasad Mukherjee ODA 500
108 Sewege Farm ODA 12
109, Narwal Kankad Patta 136
Ward No. 8 - Niranjanpur Ward (Adjoining wards - 7, 10, 11)
110 Pipalyakumar ODA 120
111 Bapu Gandhi Nagar AB Road IMC Slum Patta Resettled 200
(Resettled from Khatiwala
112 Gauri Nagar Behind Khatipura IMC Slum 1200
113 |Adarsh Maulik Nagar ODA 160
114 iAmarapuri ODA 56
115i Heera Nagar ODA 150
116 KabirKhedi ODA 400
117 KabitKhedi ODA 100
118 Khatipura Village ODA 160
119 Niranjanpur Village ODA 600
120; Ravidas Nagar ODA 108
121 Shakkar Khedi ODA 300
122 Shivshakti Nagar ODA 120
123 Khatipura Road ODA 160
124 Sukliya ODA
125 Niranjanpur Nayi Basti ODA Patta 709
126 Chatrapati Nagar (Resettled Resettled 150
from
Ward No. 9 - Khajrana Ward (Adjoining wards - 8, 10, 35, 36)
127 Dauiatbagh/Anarbagh IMC Slum 100
128 Habib Colony IMC Slum 60
129 All Colony IMC Slum 130
130 Ashrafi Nagar IMC Slum 200
131 Baba Farid Nagar IMC Slum 35
132 Dilip Nagar IMC Slum 100
133 Gohar Nagar IMC Slum 50
134 Harun Colony JMC Slum 50
136 Has Colony IMC Slum 35
136 Jata Cotony IMC Slum 500
137 Kjra Bagh IMC Slum 450
138 PBjlLahshmibagh IMC Slum 150
139 Khuda Baksh Colony IMC Slum 15
140 Kadar Colony IMC Slum 100
141 Majestic Nagar IMC Slum 25
142 ilominpura IMC Slum 150
14S Tanpm Nagar IMC Slum 250
144 Taj Nagar IMC Slum 13

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 74


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

145 S^anda^abad IMC Slum 60


146 Silver Colony IMC Slum 25
147 Samrat Nagar IMC Slum 150
148 Nipaniya IMC Slum 800
149 Mamta Colony IMC Slum 150
150 Roshan Nagar IMC Slum 25
151 Advocate Nagar IMC Slum 15
152 Darga Colony IMC Slum 40
153 Rehmat Colony IMC Slum 20
154 Slum near Taj Nagar IMC Slum 20
155 Shalimar Colony IMC Slum 100
156 Hina Nagar IMC Slum 50
157 Haji Colony IMC Slum 30
158 Ashraf Nagar IMC Slum 100
159 Rehbar Nagar IMC Slum 15
160 Daudi Nagar IMC Slum 60
161 Kedar Colony IMC Slum 10
162 Rajeev Nagar Jhuggi Jhopdi IMC Slum Patta 300
163 Bengali Colony IMC Slum Patta 150
164 Amar Nagar, Ganesh Mandir, IMC Slum 60
Khajrana Road
165 Khajrana Village ODA 2000
166 Anar Bagh ODA 20
167 Gandhi Gram Khajrana Patta 161
168 Vinay Nagar Patta 54
Ward No. 10 - Vijaynagar Ward (Adjoining wards - 8, 9, 11, 12, 35)
169 Ganga Devi Nagar IMC Slum 300
170 Krishnabagh IMC Slum] 170
171 New Ishwar Nagar IMC Slum 300
172 Maheshbagh Colony IMC Slum 550
173 Lakshman Mali ki Basti IMC Slum 400
174 Malviya Nagar Jhuggi Jhopdi IMC Slum Patta 400
175 Solanki Nagar IMC Slum 600
176 Ramakrishna Bagh, in the East IMC Slum Patta 170
of Ring Road
177 Krishnabagh Ext. Behind IMC Slum 245
178 Chitra Nagar, Behind Malviya IMC Slum 450
Nagar Petrol
179 Sheetal Nagar, Opp. to Police IMC Slum 700
Chauki on the
180 Sundar Nagar, Malviya Nagar IMC Slum 300
181 Suman Nagar IMC Slum 500
182 Sheetal Nagar lMC Slum 250
183 New Malviya Nagar IMC Slum 325
184 Matviya Nagar ODA
185 Lasudia (Resettled from Patta Resettled 652
Durgeshwari Nagar. Choitram
Patti, Rahul Gandhi Nagar,
tSharda Math, Bajranj Nagar,
186 Annabhau Sathe Nagar Resettled 100
(Resettled from
187 Chikitsak Nagar (Resettled Resettled 100
from
Ward No. 11 - ITI Ward (Adjoining wards - 8, 10, 12, 13, 14)
188 Anudeshik Nagar IMC Slum 75

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 75


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

189 Bhamori Dubey ka Bagicha ODA 1200


190 Ganda Nala Road Patta 114
Ward No. 12 - Bhamori Ward (Adjoining wards - 10, 11, 13, 14, 34, 35)
191 Ram Nagar, Near Bhamori IMC Slum 800
192 Mechanic Nagar IMC Slum 100
193 New Dewas Road, Dubey ka IMC Slum 350
Bagicha
194 Bajarang Nagar, Near Anup IMC Slum 200
Talkies
195 Ram Nagar IMC Slum 100
196 Bhamori ODA 273
197 Sanjay Gandhi Nagar, Near ODA 260
Anup
198 T
Newlki Bajarang Nagar ODA 120
Ward No. 14 - Subhash Nagar Ward (Adjoining wards - 7, 8, 11, 12, 13, 15, 16, 32
199 Pardeshipura Lal Gali No. 11 IMC Slum 450
200 Pardeshipura Lal Gali No. 6 IMC Slum 600
Nichli Basti
201 Back part of Pardeshipura IMC Slum 662
Road No. 2
202 Adarsh Bijasan Nagar ODA Patta 96
203 Lal Gali ODA
204 Sheelnath Camp ODA
205 Subhash Nagar ODA 140
206 Feroz Gandhi Nagar Patta 219
207 Shankar Kumar ka Bagicha Patta 56
Ward No. 15 - Pardeshipura Ward (Adjoining wards - 7, 14, 16, 17)
208 Baramatha ODA 20
209 ArjunSingh Gohar Nagar Gali Patta 91
No. 2
210 Kesaripura Patta 57
Ward No. 16 - Sheelnath Camp Ward (Adjoining wards - 14, 15, 17, 28, 30, 31, 32, 33)
211 Berwa Samaj ki Basti IMC Slum
212 Gandhi Chowk IMC Slum 100
213 Lavkush Colony IMC Slum 200
214 Kulkarni ka Bhatta IMC Slum ODA Patta 592
215 Jatav Samaj ka Kshetra IMC SIum
216 Bohare ki Chal IMC Slum
217 Mali Mohalla Bajarang Nagar IMC Slum 150
218 Nanda Mali ki Basti IMC SIum 400
219 Narayan Mali ki Basti IMC Slum 500
220 Nayi Basti Behind Kalyan Mill IMC Slum 500
Shivshakti
221 Shyamacharan Shukla Nagar IMC Slum Patta 100
Jhopad Patti
222 Shankar Kumar ka Bagicha IMC Slum 600
Near Kulkarni
223 Jhapad Patti Near Kulkarni ke 150
Bhatta
224 Nayi Basti Area 150
No. 17 - Bhagirathpura Ward (Adjoining wards - 6, 7, 15, 16, 18, 27, 28)
225 Bhagrathpura ODA 3000

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 76


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

226 Jqpendra Nagar ODA 100


227 Kumharkhedi ODA 275
Ward No 18 - Sadar Bazar Ward (Adjoining ,26, 27)
228 Bhistisi Nagar IMC Slum 275
229 Garib Nawaj Colony IMC Slum ODA 240
Ward No. 19 - Juna Risala Ward (Adjoining wards - 3, 4, 18, 20, 25)
230 Juna Risala House No. 3-177 IMC Slum 100
to Jhuggi Basti Near Nala
231 Arjunsingh Nagar ODA 140
Ward No. 20 - Dravid Ward (Adjoining wards - 3, 19, 21, 24, 25)
232 Shramik Colony Near Bada IMC Slum 600
Ganpati
233 Panchasheel Nagar IMC Slum 200
234 Sahu Nagar IMC Slum 150
235 Doosri Battalion IMC Slum 125
236 Kandelpura ODA Patta 400
237 Qanta Colony ODA 326
Ward No. 21 - Panchkuia Ward (Adjoining wards - 2, 3, 20, 23, 24)
238 Jai Bhawani Nagar IMC Slum 200
239 Indira Nagar Panchakuiya ODA
240 Nayapura ODA 100
241 Near Wear House and Jinsi Patta 93
Bada Ganpati Road
Ward No. 22 - Priyadarshini Ward (Adjoining wards -1,2, 23, 48, 50, 51, 52, 54)
242 Samajwadi Nagar Indira Nagar IMC Slum 150
Near MOG Line
243 Samajwad Nagar ODA
244 Sethi Nagar (Jansewa Nagar) ODA 75
245 Labriya Bheru ODA 500
246 Lodha Colony ODA Patta 91
247 Balda Colony ODA Patta 800
248 Mali Mohalla (Cloth Market) ODA Patta 200
249 Gadriya Mohalla ODA 140
Ward No. 23 - Devi Indira Ward (Adjoining wards - 2, 21, 22, 24, 25, 46, 47, 48)
250 Panchamurthy Nagar IMC Slum 370
251 Adarsh Indira Nagar ODA 350
252 Sulfa Khedi ODA 75
Ward No. 26 - Imli Bazar Ward (Adjoining wards - 18, 19, 25, 27, 45, 46)
253 North Kamthipura ODA 200
Ward No. 27 - Rajwada Ward (Adjoining wards - 17, 18, 26, 28, 42, 44, 45)
254 Bakshibagh ODA 500
Ward No. 28 - Devi Ahilya Ward (Adjoining wards - 16, 17, 27, 29, 30, 42)
255 Sabnees Bagh ODA 400
256 Krishnapura Shivaji Market ke Patta 84
niche
Ward No. 30 - Shivaji Ward (Adjoining wards - 16, 28, 29, 31, 40)
257 Tapu Nagar, Sarvahara Nagar IMC Slum 275
No. 2
258 Feroz Gandhi Nagar ODA
259 Shivaji Nagar ODA
260 Jeevan ki Fail ODA
Ward No. 31 - Rustam ka Bagicha (Adjoining wards - 16, 30, 32, 33, 38, 39, 40)
261 Lata ka Bagicha ODA 1000
262 Amar Tekri ODA Patta 596
263 Goto Maharaj ki Chal ODA 200

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 77


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

264 Kaf ki Chal ODA 400


265 Rustam ka Bagicha ODA 200
266 Kaji ki Chal ODA 352
Ward No. 32 Ramsingh Bhai Ward (Adjoining wards - 13, 14, 16, 31, 33)
267 Sarvahara Nagar ODA
Ward No. 33 - Patnipura Ward (Adjoining wards - 13, 31, 32, 34, 38)
268 Kanaiahlal ki Chal ODA 160
269 Kisnibai ki Chal ODA 60
270 Motilal ki Chal ODA 120
271 Narmadabai ki Chal ODA 30
Ward No. 34 - LIG Ward (Adjoining wards - 12, 13, 33, 35, 37, 38)
272 Ambedkar Nagar IMC Slum 1500
273 Ansar Colony Behind LIG IMC Slum 200
274 Nadiya Nagar ODA 200
275 Naya Basera ODA Patta 240
276 Somnath ki Purani Chal ODA 233
Ward No. 35 - Jagjeevanram Ward (Adjoining wards - 9, 10, 12, 34, 36)
277 Sanjay Nagar, Near Sanjay IMC Slum 100
278 Pagjiis ka Bagjcha Near Bhamori IMC Slum 50
279 Chandra Nagar IMC Slum 150
280 Choti Khajrani ODA 900
281 Jagjeevan Ram Nagar ODA 400
282 'Kanhu Patel ki Chal ODA 500
283 Prakash Chand Sethi Nagar ODA Patta 400
Ward No. 37 - Palasia Ward (Adjoining wards - 34 36, 38, 39, 41, 62, 63)
284 Khajrani Kankad IMC Slum 350
285 Dev Nagar ODA Patta 180
286 Harijan Colony, Palasia ODA 110
287 Pachu Kumar ki Chal ODA
288 Devi Indira Nagar Patta 128
289 Anup Nagar (Shrinagar Kankad) Patta 55
Ward No. 39 - Pancham Goma Ward (Adjoining wards - 31, 37, 40, 41)
290 Kalingabad IMC Slum 60
291 Ferodos Nagar IMC Slum 300
292 Panditji ki Chal Near Vallabh IMC Slum 200
293 Sampurna Dubey ka Bagicha, IMC Slum 100
Near
294 Pinjarapali Near Vallabh Nagar IMC Slum 150
295 Goma ki Fail ODA Patta 350
296 Pancham ki Fail ODA Patta 418
Ward No. 41 - South Tukoganj Ward (Adjoining wards - 37, 39, 40, 42, 61, 63, 64)
287 Agricultural College Patta 184
298 Residency Area, Behind MY Patta 139
Ward No. 42 - Chhoti Gwaltoli Ward (Adjoining wards - 27, 28, 29, 40, 41, 43, 44, 59, 60,
299 Choti Gwalatoli IMC Slum 130
300 Kesharbai ka Bagicha IMC Slum 200
301 Katali Mohalla ODA Patta 500
302 Unyapura ODA 340
303 Naningh Tekri ODA 200
304 North Toda ODA 750
305 Near Dudhadhari Brahmachari ODA 16
Gujarati
306 Behind Wear House ODA 40
307 Behind Gujarati College ODA 10
Ward No. 43 - Dautatganj Ward (Adjoining wards - 42, 44, 60)

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 78


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

308 Dautaeganj ODA 966


Ward No. 44 - South Toda Ward (Adjoining wards - 27, 42, 43, 45,58, 60)
309 kabutarkhana ODA 124
310 Behind Rajesh nagar ODA 160
311 South Toda ODA Patta 300
Ward No. 45 - Jawahar Marg Road (Adjoining wards - 26, 27, 44, 46, 57, 58)
312 Chandraprabhash Shekhar Nagar ODA Patta 467
313 Rajeev Gandhi Nagar ODA 40
Ward No. 46 - Bada Sarafa Ward (Adjoining wards - 25, 26, 45, 47, 48, 49)
314 Sikhwal Mohalla, Brahmanwadi IMC Slum 100
Ward No. 48 - Vaidhya Khyaliram Ward (Adjoining wards - 22, 23, 46, 47, 49, 50)
315 Ravidaspura IMC Slum
316 Kanjar Mohalla (Biyabani) ODA 150
317 Biyabani (Dhar Road) ODA 500
Ward No. 49 - Machhi Bazar Ward (Adjoining wards - 46 , 48, 50, 57)
318 Kadavghat Jhuggibasti IMC Slum 150
319 Kadavghat Basti IMC Slum 200
320 Kadavghat ODA 35
321 Macchi Bazar ODA 20
Ward No. 50 - Kailashnath Katju Ward (Adjoining wards - 22, 48, 49, 54, 56, 57)
322 Arjunsinghpura (Opp. Lalbagh) ODA Patta 200
323 Behind Jayarampur ODA 50
324 Chatribagh ODA 210
325 Joshi Mohalla ODA 10
Ward No. 51 - Laxman Singh Chauhan Ward (Adjoining wards - 22, 52, 53, 54)
326 Dravid Nagar Jhuggi Jhopdi IMC Slum 140
327 Mahawar Nagar ODA 400
328 IMOGLine ODA 60
Ward No. 52 - Dwarka Puri Ward (Adjoining wards - 1, 22, 51. 53, 69)
329 Dwarakapuri adjoining to Scheme IMC Slum
Ward No. 53 - Sudama Ward (Adjoining wards - 4, 51, 52, 54, 69)
330 Madho Nagar, Opp. Annapurna IMC Slum 100
331 Lal Bahadur Shastri Nagar, IMC Slum 800
332 Ghanshyamdas Nagar, Behind IMC Slum 900
Lalbagh Palace
333 Sudama Nagar Kankad (Resettled Patta Resettled 59
from Chandraprabhash Shekhar
334 Scheme No. 124 Patta 211
Ward No. 54 - Lalbahadur Shastri Ward (Adjoining wards - 22, 50, 51, 53, 55, 56, 69)
335 Dushhera Maidan Patta 58
336 Dushhera Maidan Tambu Patta 164
337 Kesarbagh Road Near Railway ODA 50
338 Jansewa Nagar Patta 118
Ward No. 55 - Rajmahal Ward (Adjoining wards - 54, 56, 66, 67, 68)
330 Manikbagh Line Behind Digambar IMC Slum
340 Model Village ODA 500
341 Triveni Nagar Ext. Behind Lalbagh ODA Patta 35
Ward No. 56 - Hemu Kalani Ward (Adjoining wards - 50, 54, 55, 57, 58, 66)
342 Hariya Umariya ka Bagicha OD
Ward No, 57 - Harsiddhi Ward (Adjoining wards - 45, 46, 49, 50, 56, 58)
343 ft«at Nagar ODA 300
344 North Harsiddhi ODA 28
Ward No. 58 - Marimata Bagicha Ward (Adjoining wards - 44, 45, 56, 57, 60)
345 Jabaran Colony ODA 1167
346 Radha Govind ka Bagicha ODA Patta 146
347 Ramnath ka Bagicha ODA 550
Ward No. 59 - Holkar Ward (Adjoining wards - 42, 60, 61, 64, 65, 66, 67)

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 79


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

348 Panchasheel Nagar Loha Mandi IMC Slum 125


Sapna-Sanqeeta Road
349 Bhagwandeen Nagar, IMC Slum 22
350 Dev Nagar Chadda IMC Slum 200
351 Triveni Nagar, Chitawad IMC Slum Patta 750
352 Radhaswami Nagar IMC Slum 200
353 Shayamacharan Shukla Nagar IMC Slum 100
Chitawad Kankad
354 Durga^jagar^Palda IMC Slum 225
355 Pawanpuri Colony Palda Nala IMC Slum 700
356 Sanjay Gandhi IMC Slum 500
357 Himmat Nagar IMC Slum 250
358 Pawanpuri Chitawad IMC Slum 400
359 Bhawana Nagar Palda ODA 200
360 Chitawad ODA
361 Chitawad Kankad ODA Patta 380
362 Chitawad Palda ODA 200
363 Sanjay Nagar Palda ODA 100
364 Shayamacharan Shukla Nagar ODA 400
365 Near Dal Mill ODA 30
366 Sneh Nagar Naulakha Complex Patta 71
Ward No. 60 - Katkatpura Ward (Adjoining wards 58, 59, 66)
367 Harijan Colony Shri Kalimata IMC Slum 350
Nagar, Railway Phatak, Gadi
368 Balai Mohalla ODA 150
369 Champabagh ODA Patta 476
370 Katkatpura ODA 600
371 Mominpura ODA 160
372 Prakash ka Bagicha ODA 95
373 Gadi Adda (Rauji Bazar, Juni Patta 66
Ward No. 61 - Nawlakha Ward (Adjoining wards - 41, 42, 59, 64)
374 Shankar Bagh IMC Slum 500
375 Ushaganj, Parsi Mohalla IMC Slum 150
376 Miyabhai ki Chal Naulakha road IMC slum 400
377 Gayadeen ka Bagjcha IMC Slum 125
378 Narayan Patel ka Bagicha IMC Slum 800
379 Harijan Colony Patta 58
380 Kesarbai ka Bagicha Patta 90
Ward No. 62 - Tilak Ward (Adjoining wards - 36, 37, 41 , 63)
381 Samvid Nagar ODA 2000
382 Vinoba Nagar ODA Patta 129
383 Ramabai Nagar (Resettled from Patta Resettled 127
Krishanapura Bridge and
Chandraprabhash
Ward No. 63 – Tirpati Ward (Adjoining wards - 36, 41, 62, 64)
384 Chauhan Nagar Ring Road IMC Slum Patta 241
385 pipalyahana IMC Slum ODA 350
386 Badi Gwaiatoli ODA 1609
387 Chitnis ka Purva ODA 150
388 Behind Kailash Park (Badi ODA 40
Gwalatoli)
Ward No. 64 - Residency Ward (Adjoining wards - 41, 59, 61, 63, 65)
389 Bhoopsingh ka Bagicha IMC Slum 200
390 Satam Park IMC Slum 150
391 Yadv Magar Near Moosakhedi IMC Slum 800
392 Choti Ajay Bagh Colony Near IMC Slum 200

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 80


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

393 Bhil Paltan ODA 132


394 Indira Ekta Nagar ODA Patta 340
395 Musakhedi Balai Mohalla ODA 340
396 Musakhedi Kankad ODA 200
397 Udyog Nagar ODA 900
398 Bacchibai ka Bagicha ODA 120
399 Shanti Nagar Patta 984
400 Shiv Nagar Patta 265
401 Ekta Indira Nagar (South) Patta 274
402 Ekta Indira Nagar (North) Patta 380
Ward No 65 Azad Nagar Ward ( Adjoining Wards - 59,64)
403 Tulsi nagar IMC Slum 800
404 Madina Nagar IMC Slum 1400
405 Kohinur Nagar IMC Slum 1100
406 New Panchasheel Nagar IMC Slum 150
407 Noori Nagar (Indira Complex) IMC Slum Patta Resettled 900
408 Behind Firdos Nagar Water IMC Slum 400
409 Filter Station Gopal Colony IMC Slum 450
410 Azad Nagar ODA Patta 294
411 Gopal Colony, Filter Station ODA 600
412 Nemawar Road Patta 85
Ward No. 66 - Ambedkar Ward (Adjoining wards - 55, 56, 59, 60, 67)
413 Bapu Nagar ODA 66
414 Harijan Colony, Near Devshri ODA [Patta 58
415 Sindhi Colony ODA 30
Ward No. 67 - Vishnupuri Ward (Adjoining wards - 55, 59, 66, 68)
416 Tejpur Gadbadi Kankad Nadi IMC Slum 125
417 I d ji N
T. Choitram Jhuggi Jhopdi IMC Slum 80
418 Jeet Nagar Inside Pipalyapala IMC Slum Patta 225
419 Sonia Gandhi Nagar Inside IMC Slum Patta 150
420 Rajeev Gandhi Nagar IMC Slum 150
421 Arjun Nagar ODA 60
422 Gangaur Nagar ODA Patta 200
423 Martand Nagar ODA Patta 134
424 Pipalyarao ODA 40
425 Tejpur Gadbadi ODA
426 Gadbadi Kankad ODA 73
427 Mahadev Nagar Patta 134
428 Indrajit Nagar Patta 90
429 Pawanputra Nagar Patta 56
430 Aqun Nagar Patta 51
431 Behind VI P Bar Patta 73
432 Nayi Basti Pipalyarao (Resettled Resettled 250
from
Ward No. C8 - Bijalpur Ward (Adjoining wards - 67, 69)
433 New Bijalpur ODA 100
434 Bijalpur ODA 1000
435 Mahadev Nagar Patta 134
Ward No. 69 - Dr. Rajendra Prasad Ward (Adjoining wards - 52, 53, 54, 68)
436 Kali Patel Nagar, Jhuggi Jhopdi 30
opposite to Prikanko IMC Slum
437 Prikanko Colony Anna Purna 50
Road IMC Slum
438 Suryadev Nagar (Resettled from IMC Slum Patta Resettled 300
Kabutar Khana, North Toda)

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 81


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

439 Gitti Khadan Opp. to Mishra IMC Slum Patta 100


440 Dravid Nagar Opp. to Futi Koti IMC Slum 300
441 Anand Nagar ODA 80
442 Bhim Nagar ODA Patta 90
443 Buddh Nagar (Resettled from ODA Patta Resettled 200
Krishnapura and Khatiwala
444 Ahirkhedi (Resettled from Patta Resettled 337
Bairathi Colony, Lokhande
Bridge, Malav Kanya Vidyalay,

IMC Slum - Slums notified by Indore Municipal Corporation on 25-5-1999 under Madhya
Pradesh Slum Clearance and Improvement Act, 1976

ODA - Slums developed under Indore Habitat Improvement Project (IHIP)(ODA Project)

Patta - Slums notified in the Madhya Pradesh Gazette under Madhya Pradesh Patta
Act

Resettled - Slums resettled on alternative land by administration

List is modified on 30-1-2003


Source; Indore Municipal Corporation Indore

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 82


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Chapter stable now M.T. Cloth market, and the


top khana road were first to develop.

9 Inner City British Indore


‰ Holkars got defeated by against
Britishers in 1817 they signed
9.1. Back Ground Mandsaur Treaty and Indore was again
The city of Indore is often referred as a declared capital. This started transition
modern city. The present city is about 400 in the development of Indore from
years old settlement. Till the end of the 15th mughal and Maratha style to a
century its original nucleus was a riverside composite Anglo-Indian style.
village, which occupied the bank of river Educational Institutes laid the base of
Saraswati. This area is now known as a growth of institutional Areas in the
Juni Indore. The village grew as a halting southeast part of the City.
place for the pilgrimage traveling between
from Mahakaal at Ujjain on river Shipra to
Omkareshwar on the river Narmada and 9.2. Inner City Area
onwards to Rameshwaram.
The existing core of the city that is known
as RAJWADA and its surrounding, the hub
City Of Zamindars
of all activities, is the most congested area.
‰ Indore city was on the route of the It has maximum population pressure,
Marathas of Deccan on their way to maximum intensity of building and
north India. movement of traffic and services. The old
CBD has gradually expanded its activities
‰ Their army transit camps here attracted and studies revealed that central area has
local zamindars , who were drawn by enlarged itself towards north and south
the direction.

‰ Promise of lucrative trade, settled in the ‰ The central area has uniform skyline
village on the confluence of the river and has introvert residential
khan and Saraswati Rivers. The neighbourhood.
foundation of this commercial center
was in 1715. ‰ It mainly comprises of mixed land use
i.e. commercial over residential.

Holkar Indore ‰ The central market is a vibrant area


‰ During this period development was with the road around Rajwada areas
primarily for the military and commercial carrying palette of people.
development was incidental.
‰ The central Market is the multi
‰ It got an Administrative Importance with functional market catering to the
regional population as service center,
declaration of Indore Province by
Maratha's as the capital was shifted trade and commerce
from Maheshwar to Indore and served
‰ The area is the most inefficient and
as transit camp for Marathas in their
congested part of city in terms of
route to North.
density intensity of buildings and
‰ Establishment of Holkars capital at movement of traffic because of rapid
socio-economic and physical change.
Indore provided new forces for the
development of the city. In the view of
‰ The change taken place are not
the defense needs, the three roads, one
confirming with the Building Byelaws
leading to polo ground, the other to

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 83


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

and well as the Land use allocated in have resulted in tremendous increase of
the Master Plan. vehicles in city especially in the last five
years. It is an established fact that the
Existing Land Use in the core Area is been private motor vehicles in urban areas are
put up in Tab 9.1. 54% of the Core area is found moving on the network for only
under Residential Use but those areas are twenty percent of the time and for the
being invaded by Commercial Use and remaining eighty percent time they are
presently are under Mixed Use parked either at residences or at work
places or in commercial areas. The parking
Tab. 9.1. Core Area Land Use Break Up in the old Indore commercial areas has
become critical because of heavy
CORE AREA LAND USE concentration of activities, narrow road
LANDUSE AREA IN HA widths, and encroachments on roads, non-
RESIDENTIAL 352 motorized traffic and limited space
COMMERCIAL 102 available for parking.
PUBLIC & SEMIPUBLIC 64 Inspite of the decentralization of the
RECREATIONAL 30 commercials centers to the outskirts of the
INDUSTRIAL 0 city, the old city portion is still the
TRANSPORTATION 94 commercial heart and hub of the city. In the
TOTAL 642 history of every City there comes a time
when Revitalization of City as a whole or in
Source; Perspective Plan for Indore 2025 parts becomes essential due to the growth
Dept. of Housing SPA.
pattern, rapid expansion and economic
development to keep pace with the fast
Illust. 9.1. Core Area Land Use Break changing scenario. The structures/areas
Up planned long back keeping in mind the
existing situation at that times seems out of
LANDUSE BREAK UP place in the changing city structure and are
15%
at the verge of loosing its usefulness to the
RESIDENTIAL cause for which they were planned. It
5%
COMMERCIAL therefore becomes essential to redefine
and revitalize these age-old city structures
10% PUBLIC & in terms of its usefulness in general to the
SEMIPUBLIC city as a whole and in particular to the area
RECREATIONAL
in which they are located. Most of this age
16% 54%
TRANSPORTATION old structures have served their full life term
and in absence of maintenance fund which
due to various constrains are always on
squeeze are in bad shape.
Source; Perspective Plan for Indore 2025
Dept. of Housing SPA.

9.3 Problems in Inner City


The problem of Parking of vehicles on the
crowded Roads, streets, shopping areas of
the Old Indore have become more acute in
the last five years, with liberalization of
economy resulting in larger number of
vehicles being registered every year. The
increase in the per capita income of the
Indian household, easier finance options
and the competitive and aggressive
marketing of the automobile companies

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

now used for art exhibitions and classical


Chapter music concerts. The lower three floors are
made of stone and the upper floors are

10 Urban Heritage made of wood, which made it very


vulnerable to destruction by fire. Rajwada
was burnt three times in its history, and the
last one in 1984 was the most devastating.
Indore City has rich cultural heritage
The charred rubble of the rear portion has
evolving from the 15th century. Indore was
now given way to a symmetrically laid out
developed as a halting place for the
garden featuring fountains, an artificial
pilgrimage traveling to and fro from
waterfall and some superb pieces of
Onkareshwar and Maheshwar as well as
eleventh century sculpture.
Millitary Route Connecting Maratha
Kingdom and Mughal capital. Marathas in
The present condition is not good. The
their way towards Agra for invasion used to
palace was badly damaged due to fire
stay here. Further in the British Period too
during 1982 riots. The Ganesh hall was
Indore got great Importance as a military
recently repaired and renovated keeping its
Town. The Urban heritage of Indore is
originalities. Some re-strengthening work is
greatly influenced by Holkar Kings and
on progress like front facade Re-Plaster
Maratha Culture. In the British Period the
etc.
British Officers were being settled in
Residency Kothi Area. The Heritage Lalbag Palace
Building in Holkar Period have Mixed
Mughal Maratha Architecture while the The Lalbagh Palace of the Holkars on the
buildings in British Period have Colonial banks of the Khan River is one of the
character. grandest monuments the Holkar dynasty
left to Indore city. A reflection of their taste,
10.1 Urban Heritage grandeur and life style, its construction
began in 1886 under Tukoji Rao Holkar II,
Urban image of the city is a collective visual and was carried out in three phases, the
appearance contributed by natural and man final phase completed in 1921 under Tukoji
made elements, like Rajwada, Lalbag Rao Holkar III. It is a blend of the baroque
Palace, Holkar’s Chatris, High Court and renaissance styles, and in its days was
Building, Indore Museum, Mahtma Gandhi one of the most elegant residences in India.
Hall, Pandharinaath Temple , Harsiddhi It is being developed by the Government of
Temple etc. Madhya Pradesh as a cultural center. The
main attraction is the splendidly
Rajwada Palace proportioned and furnished rooms, with
frescoed ceilings and guilded ornamental
The Holkar Palace (Rajwada) is close to mouldings. The architecture and decoration
the Chhatris, in the main square in the of this palace, inhabited by the Holkars till
heart of the city. It is a seven storied 1978 reflect the highly westernized
building (only facade remains) built over aesthetic sensibility of the later Holkars.
two centuries ago. This historic palace of Tukojirao III was the last incumbent of this
the Holkars is built in a mixture of Maratha, magnificent palace. The whole complex
Mughal and French style. The Gourmand- has a total area of 28 acres and at one time
like monumental stone and wood structure, had one of the best rose gardens of the
flanked by bastions and studded with country.
balconies and windows, is a testimony of
the past grandeur of the Holkars. Its lofty Though simple to look from outside, the
entrance archway above a huge wooden magnificent interior takes one into a
door encrusted with iron studs, leads into a dreamland of past glory. Lavishly decorated
vast courtyard enclosed by galleried rooms, in the style of Varsailles Palace, its italian
and the arcaded Ganesh Hall where state marble columns, grand chandeliers, rich
and religious functions were once held. It is Persian carpets, flying nymphs on the

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

ceiling, Belgium stained glass windows, Indore Museum:


Greek mythological relief, Italian style wall
paintings, stuffed leopards and tigers are The Indore museum houses the finest
breathtaking. The ballroom has wooden collection of Parmar sculptures from
floor on springs for extra bounce. The Hinglajgarh. The Parmar style originated
kitchen was built on the opposite bank of here and is characterized by proportionate
the river and was connected to the palace figures, carefully and ornately depicted in
by a well-lighted underground tunnel. The stone. The museum is also known for its
imposing gates of the palace are unique in collection of coins, arms and armours.
Asia. A replica of the gates of Buckingham
palace (London), about twice their size, Pandarinath Temple
were molded in cast iron and shipped from
England. They carry the Holkar state The temple of Lord Vishnu was constructed
emblem, which means "He who tries will in the center of the city during the ruling
succeed". period of Maharaja Malharrao Holkar
Second, Which is known as Pandharinath
The progress and modernization of Indore Temple.
is mainly attributed to Maharaj Tukoji Rao –
II. During his regime Holkars fought with Harsiddhi Temple
British in the famous revolt of 1857 but
were defeated by Colonel Durend. It was The temple of Durga Devi is situated on the
during his time that Krishnapura bridge, bank of River it was constructed during the
Krishna bai Chattri and roads were ruling period of Maharaja Harirao Holkar.
constructed. With the introduction of The story behind the Statue of Durga Devi
Railways in 1875 the business in Indore is that the statue was found from near by
flourished. During the regime of Maharaja tank and the same was seen in the dream
Shivaji Rao Holkar collage, Moti Bunglow of Maharaja.
were constructed. In 1903 Maharaja Shivaji
Rao Holkar left the throne in favor of his
son Maharaj Tukoji Rao –III during whose
regime also the development of city
continued. Manikbag palace, Maharani
saraya, Gandhi hall, Old High Court
Building, Yashwant Niwas, Tukoji Rao
Hospital were constructed during his
tenure.

Mahatma Gandhi Hall:

This is one of the prettiest buildings in


Indore. Built in 1904 and originally named
as King Edward Hall, was renamed as
Mahatma Gandhi Hall in 1948. This Indo-
gothic structure is made in seoni stone and
its domes and steeples are a landmark of
Indore city. It has a clock tower in front, due
to which it is also known locally as Ghanta
Ghar. The central hall has a capacity for
2000 people and is frequently the venue of
book / painting exhibitions, sales, and fairs
throughout the year.

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Chapter City Governance • The Madhya Pradesh


Corporation Act, 1956
Municipal

& Institutional
11 Setup
The Constitutional amendment Act, 1992,
gives local bodies a constitutional status,
assigns them a large number of functions
11.1.1 Introduction (Annexure -1), ensures them stability,
In order to enable the urban local bodies “to provides a suitable framework to function
perform effectively as vibrant democratic with greater freedom and also makes
units of self government”, the 74th institutional arrangements for devolution of
Constitutional Amendment was introduced larger financial resources. To meet the
in the Parliament and it became an Act in constitutional requirements and aspirations,
December 1992. This Act is a great reform the Madhya Pradesh government made
act in the political context as well as in the necessary amendments in the existing
administrative and financial aspects legislations relating to local bodies in the
concerning the urban local bodies in India. state.

The 1992 amendments aim at 11.1.2 Institutions and Organisation


empowerment of local bodies by requiring Urban management in India is facing new
the state governments to; challenges in the form of large
concentrations of population in urban
• Establish an adequately represented areas, opening of the economy and the
electoral base at local levels with a resultant demand for quality services,
fixed tenure of five years, and a growing number of urban poor, inadequate
provision for holding elections within financial resources and complexities of
six months in the event of premature urban situations, given to which urban
dissolution of local councils; management has also extended beyond
• Set up mechanisms for consolidating the sole responsibility of the municipal
and coordinating planning and corporations. There are other organizations
development initiatives and actions of that are responsible for urban management
municipalities; and like urban development authorities, special
• Consider expanding the role of purpose boards and corporations, and the
municipalities, and correspondingly State Government department controlling
strengthen their fiscal jurisdiction and the affairs of urban development. As a
power and authority. result of these agencies and the definite
roles assigned to them in overall urban
Madhya Pradesh has been the leader in
terms of progress on the front of management, the municipal corporation is
required to closely work with and share the
decentralisation. Since the Amendment in
responsibility of urban management with
1992, the State passed the conformity
them.
legislation in 1993, conducted three rounds
of elections to local governments and has
Besides Indore Municipal Corporation other
been one of the first states to constitute
agencies involved in urban management
and implement the recommendations of the
and development in Madhya Pradesh (and
SFCs (1996 and 200).
in Indore) are:
In July, 1957, the State Government
enacted the following legislation, replacing Indore Development Authority
the diverse legislations1 in operation in Until 1973, the city had a 'City Improvement
different parts of the state: Trust', to assist the Indore municipal body
in its developmental activities. In 1973, the
• The Madhya Pradesh Municipalities Improvement Trust was converted to Indore
Act, 1961 Development Authority (IDA) under the
Madhya Pradesh Town and Country
Planning Act, 1973. Primarily, IDA develops

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

new residential areas. During the early Public Health Engineering Department
stages of development of such areas, IDA Government of Madhya Pradesh
is responsible for developing basic
infrastructure. Once a sizable number of The Public Health Engineering Department
plots are sold, the area is formally (PHED), a State Government body, is
transferred to IMC, which is then charged with a number of responsibilities in
responsible for the maintenance of the water supply and sanitation. It is a state
infrastructure in the area. So far, four level body; presently the staff is deputed to
residential colonies developed by IDA has Indore to oversee the Narmada water
been handed over to IMC with all the legal project.
formalities.
Madhya Pradesh Housing Board
Apart from developing residential areas,
IDA has taken up a number of MPHB functions as per the MP housing
development schemes like construction of development act of 1972. It has
some major roads, traffic squares, constructed about 20000 units in Indore city
Krishnapura Lake, Meghdoot Garden, etc. of HIG, LIG, MIG, EWS, Shops, Offices and
The Commissioner of IMC is the ex-officio Halls and about 4000 developed plots. The
member on the board of IDA. MPHB have been constructing and
developed in 21 colonies in the city. MPHB
After publication and adoption of the lndore works in collaboration with IMC for
Development Plan 1991 u/s 18,19 of Nagar maintenance of services.
Tatha Gram Nivesh Adhiniyam 1973, the
main implementing agency IDA has played Indore Development Fund Ltd.
an important role. lndore Development
Authority has taken so far 80 schemes on A limited company, Indore Development
an area of about 4500 ha. Out of which Fund Ltd, has been formed to mobilize
development in 33 schemes covering an funds for repair and construction of Roads
area of about 1900 ha has been in the city. The company id fully owned by
completed. Twenty-eight schemes (area IMC.
about 1000 ha) have been dropped due to
various reasons. In 19 schemes (area of District Urban Development Authority
about 1600 ha) the process of land
It function under the administration of the
acquisitions is in progress.
Indore District Collector’s office and finally
Madhya Pradesh Public Works reports to the Urban Development
Department department of the state government.

Public Works Department (PWD) deals with Madhya Pradesh Town and Country
the construction and maintenance of Planning (MPTNCP)
buildings, roads, and bridges. Irrigation,
T&CP department in Indore was
flood control works.
established under MPTNCP act of 1973.
Madhya Pradesh Pollution Control The main function of T&CP is to prepare
Board master plans and give permission for
development of schemes in accordance
MPPCB monitors air quality, water quality with master plan.
and noise levels at various sampling points
distributed throughout the city. It is also Krishi Upaj Mandi samiti, Indore
mandated to monitor industries and
Mandi samiti’s main function is to provide a
enforce pollution control measures.
set up for the farmers of the regional area
MPPCB is the nodal agency appointed to
to sell their commodities. Presently there
implement the 'National River Conservation
are three main mandis functioning under
Plan.
Krish Upaj mandi samiti, Indore. Out of the

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

three the Grain mandi at Chavvani is ill MC and UDA/ TCPD/ HB


placed in highly congested area.
The MC-UDA relationship is such that the
Indore City Transport Services Ltd. MC often remains ignorant or casually
informed of new area development till such
This is an unique imitative that have been time when construction has started, and the
taken by Dist. Administration and IMC by time comes for obtaining various
setting up a fully Govt. owned Company clearances like water supply, SWM,
named Indore City Transport Services drainage linkages access roads, etc. Often,
Limited (ICTSL) to provide with an the MCs are denied the benefit of raising
efficient transport system in the city. property taxes since the new properties are
in the peri-urban area, even though
11.1.3. Area of Fragmentation extended services are provided by the MCs
for which service charges are being
The major reform to local administration in received. More importantly, the T&CP
India resulted with the 74th Constitutional make many planning decisions and
Amendment Act in 1992, restoring local recommendations, which are not
self-governments in the form of mandatory acceptable to the MC, or which the MC
elections, and delegation of functions and feels is inimical to the future growth /
finances articulated by SFC. But, functional development of the city. A similar
decentralisation will remain on paper, if a relationship exists between MC and HB.
corresponding and commensurate financial Handing over-taking over of assets
devolution is not made to different territorial between the MC and the UDA or HB
governments. remains a problem. The obvious remedy
lies in making the MC the sole planning
Beyond the creation of the democratically authority, as envisaged under the 74th CAA,
elected bodies at the level of municipalities, through which the MC will grant all planning
the progress on decentralization needs to permissions with a charge only after it has
increase the pace further. satisfied itself about its current and future
responsibilities. This is a major governance
‰ No worthwhile decentralization of issue.
powers and responsibilities had
occurred or is in sight. There exists no At present, together with the city
evidence that powers and corporations, there are state agencies also
responsibilities of local governments operating in the same urban space,
have, in de-facto terms, been expanded independently of the ULB. These are the
in accordance with Schedule XII. Far Urban Development Authority State
more disconcerting fact is the absence Housing Board, the Town and Country
of clarity in respect of the functions of Planning Department, etc. Similarly there
local governments. are central government agencies. The
activities of all these agencies impact on
‰ Although the state governments have the same or the peripheral urban space,
enacted the conformity legislations which affect the spatial pattern and future
incorporating the provisions of the growth direction. The corporations only
Constitutional amendments, the have an operational relationship with these
formulation of rules and byelaws to put agencies with no control or influence over
those provisions into effect has lagged the outcomes of their activities. The
behind. eventual responsibility for civic services
ultimately devolves to the city authority.
‰ It is not clear if the recommendations of
the finance commission of states have The functional jurisdictions of these
been acted upon, and if these have led agencies vis-à-vis the Municipal
to any improvement in the finances of Corporations in respect of the main civic
local governments. services are shown in Tab 11.1.

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Tab 11-1: Agency responsibilities for City the MC complains of lack of resources, and
Services in Indore lack of details etc. and the PHED staff
Operation complain of the continuing responsibility of
S
Planning Constru and forced maintenance out of their limited
Sector
and Design ction maintenan
N resources. In a few cases, the optimum
ce
capacity and the quality of delivery of the
PHED /
1 Water PHED PHED services have decreased due to inadequate
MC
PHED maintenance.
Sanitation PHED / Clearly, the current arrangement between
PHED MC MC/
& MC the MC and PHED is not working and it is
2 / UDA/ UDA/
Sewerage Househol
HB/NGOs HB/ unlikely to improve in the coming years. At
On – Site ds
NGO’s state level, both the UADD and PHED are
Solid aware of the situation, but neither is willing
3 MC MC MC
Waste to grapple with the issue.
GoI/Go
MP Overview: Indore Municipal
Roads/ GoI/
Bridges GoI/GoMP
(PWD)/
GoMP Corporation
GoMP
4 National (PWD)/MC (PWD)
(PWD)/ Illust 11.1 Indore Municipal Corporation
State / UDA/ HB MC/ UDA/
MC/
Local HB
UDA/
HB
PHED/
PHED/ PHED/
5 Drainage MC/
MC/ UDA MC/ UDA
UDA
Slum
MC/ MC/
6 Improvem MC/ DUDA
DUDA DUDA
ent
City UDA/ MC (UDA/
7 T & CP
Planning HB HB)
Environm MPPCB/ MPPCB MPPCB/
8
ent EPCO / EPCO MC
Public
9 MC MC MC
health
Before 1818, when the capital of Holkars
was shifted from Maheshwar, Indore was a
There are two dimensions of the real
small town. Later, the city prospered and
situation. In Table 1-1, it should be noted
became a major center for opium trade.
that MC-PHED and MC-UDA relationships
Despite it's prosperity till 1870, Indore
are the most intractable.
lacked planned development in regards to
MC and PHED facilities like water supply, drainage,
PHED has been given the responsibility of sanitation, and waste disposal. In 1870, the
planning, design and construction of the first municipality was constituted in Indore
water supply, sewerage and drainage and Bakshi Khajan Singh was appointed
projects of the municipal corporations (MC) Chairman. With the formation of the
since 1995. Under this arrangement, the Municipality, the then rulers of the Indore
financial and administrative sanction for a State, the Holkars, initiated some bold
project comes from the PHED. The assets, initiatives. Trade and Commerce were
however, have to be transferred to the MC given leverage to strengthen the city
on completion for operation and economy to ensure a positive growth.
maintenance. Though, the PHED staff’s Piped water supply system was established
works under tile functional control of the at the turn of the century to cope with the
MC, their administrative control remains demand of the city. In 1906; the city started
with the PHED. There is therefore duality its own powerhouse and established a new
here and accountability is blurred. water supply system from the Bilaoli water
Secondly, in many cases, taking over of the body. The municipality was also given
assets created has not been completed; enough authority to initiate scientific

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 90


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

planning and management. In 1910, 11.1.4a Organisation Structure


extensive landuse mapping was initiated
and the city was mapped in 100 sheets. A The functioning of Municipal Corporation of
city sanitation project was initiated in 1912 Indore (IMC) is governed by the Madhya
under the expert supervision of Mr. Pradesh Municipal Corporation Act, 1956
Lancaster. During this period, the city and amendments thereto. The
shifted from its traditional opium and organisational set up of IMC comprises of a
agricultural trade and commerce to modern Political Wing (Deliberative) and Executive
industries, predominantly textiles. Realising Wing. The Deliberative Wing is an elected
the potential of new industries, the Holkars body of Councilors from different wards in
invited Mr. Patrick Geddes, who prepared the city and is headed by the Mayor. The
the first authentic "master-plan' for the city. Executive Wing is headed by the
Geddes plan was not restricted to land use, Commissioner and looks after the day-to-
but is one of the most comprehensive day functioning of the Corporation and
documents in urban planning and assists the Deliberative Wing in the
incorporated many of the aspects that are decision making process.
currently considered desirable, like peoples
participation and need for future growth. Deliberative Wing
Soon the municipality became the first city
to have an elected municipal government The Deliberative Wing of IMC is headed by
responsible for the welfare and growth of the Mayor and overall functioning of the
the city. A city improvement trust was Corporation is governed by the Mayor-in-
created and sanitation and waste disposal Council and the Departmental Advisory
was undertaken in a scientific and planned Committees constituted by the Speaker
manner. The Indore method of composting from amongst the Councilors other than the
city wastes was a successful model members of the Mayor-in-Council.
followed in several other towns. Regular
The provisions contained in the Madhya
cleaning of the city and sprinkling of water
Pradesh Municipal Corporation Act 1956
along the roads was initiated and made
regarding the constitution of Mayor-in-
mandatory.
Council, election of a Speaker and
After independence, Indore city was formation of Advisory Committees are
included into Madhya Bharat and declared given under section 9. Under Section 18 of
as the first category of municipality by the the Act, the Mayor and elected Councilors
local government department of Madhya of the Corporation shall elect a Speaker
Bharat. In the year 1956, during the from the elected Councilors. Under Section
reorganisation of states, Indore was 37 of the Act, the Mayor-in-Council shall be
included in Madhya Pradesh and in the constituted by the Mayor from amongst the
same year it was declared a municipal elected Councilors within 7 days from the
corporation. date of election of the Speaker.

Despite such a long lead time in planned Committees set up by IMC under Mayor-
development, Indore unfortunately is in-Council
reeling under the set of problems that most As per Section 403 of the Madhya Pradesh
modem cities are facing, air pollution, water Municipal Corporation Act 1956, IMC has
scarcity and problems in maintaining a appointed an Appeal Committee to look
quality environment, problems of solid into the appeals against an order passed
waste collection and disposal, lack of by the Commissioner or an officer
adequate revenues and the vagaries of the subordinate to the Commissioner.
current democratic and bureaucratic
institutions. The Appeals Committee consists of the
Mayor and four elected Councilors. Any
aggrieved person may appeal against any
order passed by the Commissioner or any
Officer within 30 days from the date of such

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

order. The Appeal Committee may for ‰ Law and General Administration
sufficient cause extend the period Department
prescribed for appeal.
The member of the Mayor-in-Council have
been made Member-in-Charge of each of
When an appeal is made against an order,
the above departments and he is expected
all proceedings to enforce such order and
to convene the meeting of the Advisory
all prosecutions for breach thereof are
Committee of the department concerned at
suspended pending the decision on the
least once in every two months and preside
appeal.
over such meetings.
Ward Committees It is expected that the departmental
According to Section 48-A of the Madhya proposals regarding the expenditure and
Pradesh Municipal Corporation Act, the developmental works shall be first
Ward Committees shall be constituted discussed in the Advisory Committee and if
within 30 days from the date of election of approved, subsequently put to Mayor-in-
the Speaker. Council or to other sanctioning authorities
for sanction.
Every elected Councilor representing a
ward within the territorial area of a Wards The organisation structure of the
Committee and two persons residing within Deliberative Wing of IMC is presented in
the territorial area of such Committee shall the enclosed Tab 11.2
be nominated as members by the Mayor.
The persons shall be nominated on the
recommendation of the Chairman of the
Wards Committee and such persons shall
not have voting rights in the meetings.

The State Government has prescribed the


duties, powers and the procedure for
conducting the business of Wards
Committees. These rules are summarised
in the Annexure-4.

Functional Review of MiC and General


Body
After civic elections, the Mayor-in-Council
was constituted by the Mayor in June 2005
as per Section 37 of the Act. Similarly, the
Speaker has constituted the following
Advisory Committees to advise in the
affairs of the department concerned.

‰ Housing, Environment and Public


Works Department
‰ Water works Department
‰ Health and Medical Department
‰ Market Department
‰ Education department
‰ Women and Child Welfare Department
‰ Food and Civil Supplies Department
‰ Rehabilitation and Employment
Department
‰ Revenue Department

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Illust.11.2 The organisation structure of the Deliberative Wing of IMC

Illust.11.3 The organisation structure of the Executive Wing of IMC

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

11.1.4b Executive Wing report. The functions of the Central Office


are as under;
The Municipal Commissioner is the
administrative head of the executive wing. ‰ Policy formulation
According to Section 69 of the Madhya ‰ Planning
Pradesh Municipal Corporation Act, the ‰ Direction, control and co-ordination of
entire executive power for the purpose of activities of the zones and other
carrying out the provisions of the Act vests departments
in Commissioner and he shall also: The departments of IMC and their functions
are detailed in Annexure- 6:
‰ Perform all the duties imposed or
conferred upon him by the Act
11.1.4c Zonal Offices
‰ Prescribe the duties and exercise
supervision and control over the acts For the purpose of better administration
and proceedings of all municipal and delivery of services to the public, the
officers and servants and subject to the area within the IMC is divided in to 14
rules or bye laws for the time being in zones. The Zonal Officer, who reports
force, dispose of all questions relating directly to the Municipal Commissioner,
to the services of the said officers and heads the Zonal Office. The officers that
servants and their pay, privileges and assist the Zonal Officer in the day-to-day
allowances. operations are;
‰ Take immediate action on occurrence
of any accident or unforeseen event ‰ Officiating Engineer – Public Works
and report it to the Deliberative Wing of ‰ Officiating Engineer – Water Supply
the Corporation and the costs if any, of ‰ Chief Health Inspector
such action and not covered by the ‰ Senior Tax Collector
current budget provision. ‰ Office Superintendent / Accounts Clerk
The various Departments under Municipal For effective functioning of Zonal Offices,
Commissioner have been divided amongst the functions and the powers of the
2 Additional Municipal Commissioners. This Commissioner are to the Zonal Officers in
deputation of power has been done under three stages (See Annexure-5).
Sec 45 of the M.P.M Co Act. There are
three Deputy Municipal Commissioners The decentralisation process is introduced
who are in charge of the central city in December 2001 and it is in transitory
functions of Finance, Engineering and the phase. It will require some time to
city planner deputed from the town streamline the functioning of the Zonal
planning department holds the central Offices and for providing adequate
position as a coordinator to the front line infrastructure, staff etc.
administrative staff.
Functions of the Zonal Offices
The implementation of the decentralisation
process is in progress and there is no The Zonal Offices will perform the following
clarity regarding the role of the Central and functions:
Divisional offices and the functions and
powers. The organisation structure of the ‰ Health and Sanitation
executive wing is presented in the enclosed ‰ Water Supply
‰ Property Tax assessments and
Functions of the Central Office Collection of taxes
‰ Lighting (Only Supervision)
The operations of the IMC are organised on ‰ General Administration
functional basis headed by the
Commissioner to whom the departmental
heads at Central Office and Zonal Officers

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11.1.4d Municipal Financial irrespective amount of expenses likely


Powers to be incurred therein, the prior
approval of the council shall have to be
According to G.O.No. 24-F-1-65-05-XVIII-3 obtained.
dated 14th July, 2005; the powers and ‰ The prior approval of the Corporation or
functions of the Mayor-in-Council are as the Council, as the case may be, shall
under: have to be obtained for giving any grant
or reward to any institution or person
Tab 11-2 Financial Powers (excepting the employees).
‰ In the proposal for construction work in
S Authority Cities with Cities any ward, the
N more than with less recommendation/concurrence of the
o 3 lakh than 3 concerned ward councillor (if the office
Population lakh of the ward councillor in the concerned
Populati is not vacant),
on Mayor/Commissioner/Local member of
Legislative Assembly/Local Member of
1 Municipal Up to Rs. Up to Parliament, shall be necessary.
Commissioner 10 lakh Rs.2 lakh ‰ The tender shall be invited for
construction work or purchase in
accordance with the provisions of
2 Mayor Exceeding Exceedin
Works Manual and the recommendation
Rs.10 lakh g Rs.2
but not lakh but of the Tender Committee prescribed in
above not above these rules shall be obtained thereon.
Rs.25 lakh Rs 10 ‰ Where the amount of expenditure
lakh. exceed rupees one thousand and does
not exceed rupees ten thousand, it shall
be necessary to call at least three
4 Mayor-in- Exceeding Exceedin
Council Rs.25 lakh g Rs.10 quotations and it shall be necessary for
but not lakh but the sanctioning authority to ensure that
above not above the rate which is being sanctioned is not
Rs.1Crore Rs 25 more than the prevailing market rate.
lakh. ‰ Provided that, prior to giving sanction, it
shall be necessary for that sanctioning
3 Corporation Exceeding Exceedin authority to ensure that the provision for
Rs.1 Crore g Rs.25 the concerned expenditure exists in the
lakh budget.
‰ Provided further that the rate so
sanctioned as per the quotation so
Source: G.O.No. 24-F-1-65-05-XVIII-3 dated
called, shall be limited to the concerned
14th July, 2005
work and shall not be used for any
The financial powers described above shall other work.
be exercised only subject to the following ‰ Each authority shall give information to
conditions: the authority senior to him within 15
days of the expenditure, exceeding fifty
‰ There should be budget provisions in percent or more, of the maximum
the sanctioned budget and the amount financial power vested in him.
available in the relevant budget head ‰ In case of exercise of the financial
for the work concerned. powers by the Mayor-in-Council or the
‰ In the technical cases, there should be President-in-Council, as the case may
the technical obtained in the manner be, information in all relevant cases
prescribed in these rules. shall be submitted in the next meeting
‰ Such works which are of the policy of the council.
nature or relevant to the whole city, ‰ A proper communication system is
necessary between the functional head

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at Central Office and the staff looking the effective project identification and
after the relevant function in the Zonal budget preparation.
Office.
Issues of Executive Wing
‰ It is necessary to establish a proper
Management Information System (MIS) This section discusses key issues
between Central Office and Zonal regarding the overall structure of the
Offices. executive wing and it’s functioning. A
11.1.5 Key Observations and Issues detailed assessment of issues with regard
to the organization, systems and
Key observations regarding municipal procedures and associated issues and
structure and functions are based upon program design elements for key functions
discussions with a wide range of municipal of the Corporation are presented in the
authorities and elected councilors and following section.
secondary information available in the
Corporation in the form of registers. The key issues regarding the structure and
functioning of the executive wing are:
The observations with regard to structure
and functioning of the deliberative wing and ‰ Several senior level posts lying vacant,
overall organization of the executive wing many resulting from retirements, yet to
of the corporation are discussed under this be filled with appropriately
section. The issues and program design qualified/experienced personnel;
elements with regard to functional ‰ Very large span of control of the
departments of the executive wing are Municipal Commissioner – almost all
elaborated in the next section, based on a departmental and sectional heads
review of organization, systems and report directly to the Commissioner,
procedures of key functional departments. thereby hampering effective supervision
and control over overall functioning of
Issues of Deliberative Wing the Corporation;
‰ Ad hoc arrangements made to address
Key issues identified with regard to vacancies in key posts, resulting in
structure and functioning of the deliberative loading individuals with additional
wing are: functions of varied nature;
‰ Piecemeal efforts towards
‰ Inadequate co-ordination between decentralization process due to lack of
Mayor-in-Council, Advisory appropriate quality and quantity of
Committees/General Body and Wards manpower and inadequate financial
Committees; resources for establishing the Zonal
‰ Inappropriate representation in the MIC offices – decentralization not based on
constituted by the Mayor – includes a clear reorganization plan;
members from the political party that ‰ Designation of Zonal heads and HODs
have majority representation from of town planning, traffic management,
opposition party in the General Body. accounts and audits, etc needs strict
This has resulted in occasions where regulations regarding the cadre
there has been no consensus among qualification.
the General Body and MIC regarding ‰ Inadequate co-ordination between
city-wide development projects aimed various departments – especially the
at improving delivery of civic services; assessment section to revenue section,
and town planning section to assessment
‰ No adequate administrative and section, water supply department to
financial power given to the Wards revenue section; etc
Committees. Besides which there is ‰ Absence of a feedback and monitoring
also inadequate deployment of staff to system with regard to capital
the zonal offices making it difficult for expenditure proposals sanctioned by
the competent authorities;

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‰ Inadequate staff and infrastructure at raised locally is restricted by narrow


Zonal office to execute decentralized economic base of local areas.
functions; and ‰ Although the reluctance of local bodies
‰ Absence of an effective system/plan for to tax people and poor administrative
communication of day-to-day capacity at the local level also account
transactions, between Zonal offices and for the poor financial position of local
central office. bodies.
‰ SFC has examined that local bodies still
have own resources, which can be
Observations Regarding Creation of facilitated by policy level changes.
Zonal Offices ‰ In a federal set-up some restrictions are
inevitable.
‰ The Executive Engineers and Assistant ‰ A highly decentralised tax system may
Engineers belonging to Water Supply or distort the allocation of mobile
Public Works Department have been resources or factors of production and
posted at the Zonal Offices and are stand in the way of creation of a
functioning as Zonal Officers. domestic common market.
‰ The Zonal Offices do not possess the ‰ Since self-effort to raise resources may
adequate authority, neither are they be one of the criteria for determining
equipped with required infrastructural devolution of resources from the state
and skill-set support. In the absence of government to local bodies, the SFC
adequate power and manpower with has made efforts to collect such data
requisite skills and experience, the from local bodies and also ascertain
decentralisation of activities may not reasons for poor performance on this
yield the expected results. front.
‰ Officers at Zonal level are mere 11.1.6 Strategic Elements for
dispenser of higher-level authority Program Design
orders. They don’t possess adequate
financial and execution powers. Some of the specific programs that IMC
Key Financial Autonomy Issues may have to undertake to address the
issues identified above are:
The limitations of Municipal Corporation is
coming more and more to light against the Strategies for Deliberative Wing
background of inadequacy of finances for
serving the needs of growing urban ‰ The role of the Information Cell should
communities, though finance is not the only be strengthened under the Right to
factor accounting for their unsatisfactory Information clause in the Municipal Act
performance. With the present level of to the extent that no other platform for
revenue and expenditure, even obligatory the information dissemination is
functions are being inadequately required. This cell should be the hub of
performed. Municipal services and all the latest and chronological
amenities are chronically short of basic information. This cell should be
requirements. With the present level of designed to hoard sufficient data in the
funds at their disposal, IMC is incapable of relevant formats. The initiative has
meeting, leaving alone expanding, and already been taken by the Corporation
existing facilities in their charge. Ugliness is to put the information on their website;
the dominant external characteristic of the and
city. ‰ Establishing an appropriate and
effective organizational set-up at the
‰ Fiscal autonomy largely depends upon zonal office level, to support the Wards
the extent to which own resources are Committees in planning, decision-
raised by the local bodies. It is a fact making and implementation of
that level of resources that can be developmental works.

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Strategies for Executive Wing local bodies, gone are the days of armchair
professionals. Their insulation from the
‰ Regrouping of activities on functional general masses and the political system
basis in order to reduce the number of may be catastrophic in the changing
persons directly reporting to the environment, where participatory decision-
Commissioner and establishing making is becoming institutionalised.
reportability through Deputy Municipal Among the professionals, who require
Commissioners and other departmental expertise exercised with integrity, skills are
heads; necessary to strike a balance between the
‰ Filling vacancies, especially at senior political process and service delivery.
levels, with appropriately qualified
personnel through fresh recruitment or Indore Municipal governance is bound with
by promoting experienced internal staff the objective of better functioning, efficient
with appropriate training; and effective service delivery to the
‰ Establishing a comprehensive inhabitants of Indore City, especially to the
municipal management information disadvantage sections of the society as
system (MMIS) that facilitates envisages in the recent policies and Good
communication between Zonal offices governance global agenda.
and the central office, the MMIS needs
to facilitate maintenance and 11.2.1 Indore Municipal Governance
management of functions related to all Status
departments of the Corporation;
‰ Establishing full-fledged, well-equipped Objectives of good governance are to
Head and Zonal offices and ensuring ensure that “political, social and economic
right sizing of staff at these offices priorities are based on broad consensus in
based on a plan for executing the society and that the poorest and the most
functions delegated to them. vulnerable are heard in decision making
‰ To appoint officials of the cadre of over the allocation of development
Deputy or Assistant Municipal resources. The section in particular review
Commissioners as Zonal Officers in the the status of Indore Municipal Governance
Zonal offices. on the basis of certain parameters and
indicators.3
11.2 Indore Municipal
Corporation Governance Effectiveness
Overview
The functioning of the city depends to a
In order to translate new policies and large extent on the effectiveness of the
paradigm into practice, a framework of the local government and the quality and cost
objectives is to be prepared.2 It should
clearly spell out economic, environmental, 3
Effectiveness: Major source of Income,
financial, social, constitutional and political Predictability of transfers in local govt. Budget,
objectives. With the ongoing economic Published performance delivery standards,
liberalisation and devolution of power to Consumer satisfaction Survey, Existence of
vision statement.
Equity: Citizen’s Charter: Right of access
2
In the past, the solution to urban ills was often to basic services, % of Women Councilors, Pro-
seen to lie in preventing further urban expansion. poor pricing policies for water, Incentives for
Now, the answer is thought to be greater informal businesses.
investment in cities. The problem is not Participation: Elected Council, Elected
urbanisation itself but more the inability of some Mayor, Voter turnout and voter participation by
cities to afford the necessary infrastructure to Sex, Public forum, Civic Associations per 10,000
keep pace with the rate of population change and population.
increase in construction as income rise. Many Accountability: Formal Publication (of
now argue that with adequate public and private contracts/tenders, budgets & accounts), Control
investment and improved urban management, by higher levels of Government, Codes of
most cities should be able to improve their local conduct, Facility for citizen complaints, Anti-
environment and reduce their contribution to corruption Commission, Disclosure of income/
global environment degradation. assets, Independent audit

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of services it provides. Rs 54 crore during informal vending and provide security of


1997-98 to Rs. 186 crore during 2003-04. At employment to a large section of society.
the same time, revenue from the city's own
sources (property tax, water tax, trade and Participation
licenses etc.) increased from Rs. 18 crore
to Rs 75 crore. Consequently, the IMC has Elected Council4 indicates that the local
been able to double its expenditure on population has had a role in identifying the
service provision., showing a better financial personnel most suitable for governing the
performance. city as part of the council and therefore
signified civil society participation.
The recent collection and balance between
the sources of income provides an Elected Mayor indicates
indication on the viability, independence involvement/participation of the local
and control over resources of the local population in decision-making.
government, and thus its effectiveness.
‰ Effectiveness: The decisions of an
Equity Elected Mayor are more likely to be
representative of the wishes of the local
Mandated number of women councilors in population, and hence the government
IMC council indicates the gender equity in is likely to be more effective
representation of women involved in ‰ Accountability: An elected Mayor is
municipal government decision-making more likely to accountable to the
processes as fundamental to promoting population that he/she represents, than
more equitable policies, plans and projects. a nominated Mayor.
It also indicates: The lower voter turnout and voter
participation by sex in the Municipal
‰ Participation: Equal participation of the
corporation election (2004) indicates lack of
women is a fundamental human right.
interest and involvement of the public in
‰ Accountability: Representation of
local government. Low participation in
women in the local government to
representative democracy may, however,
improve the responsiveness of
be balanced by higher levels of
decision-making processes on specific
participatory democracy. It may also
women issues.
indicate:
‰ Effectiveness: Policies, plans and
projects to be more effective if the ‰ Equity: women’s inability to participate
priorities of both men and women are equally in formal elections. If
equally and equitably addressed. disaggregated by income levels, it may
Recent reforms and interventions of Pro- also indicate the meaningfulness of
poor pricing policies (Under process) for voting to the urban poor.
Urban Infrastructure services signifies ‰ Effectiveness: strength of local
commitment and measures undertaken by government’s development mandate;
IMC for equitable distribution of basic perceived relevance of elections results
services (water as the key service) to its for affecting the quality of life in cities
entire people commensurate with their ‰ Accountability: at the extreme, indicator
economical conditions, especially the may suggest that elected officials are
poorer sections. not accountable to the population.
The existence of People’s forum indicates
Hawker zones in the various city locations
the availability of informal or formal
for informal businesses shows the efforts of
mechanisms for the public to express their
government in providing equal
views and share their issues with peers.
opportunities for informal businesses for
the economic welfare of society. It may also
work towards reducing corrupt practices in 4
An elected council is more likely to make
the government benefiting from such decisions that are more representative of the
wishes of the local population

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The vibrancy of associational life in a city, ‰ Less effectiveness: possibly because


with larger numbers indicates greater the local authority does not have
vibrancy. Organized groups are vital for sufficient autonomy and resources to
effective participation. It may also indicate: act, but also possibly because the local
authority has not proved capable of
‰ Equity: larger numbers indicate the carrying out its responsibilities
existence of organizations representing ‰ Less Participation: if accountability is
the urban poor, women, minorities or oriented upwards, a local authority may
other normally excluded groups. not feel it necessary or worthwhile to
‰ Accountability: civic organizations help promote local participation in decision-
ensure the accountability of local making;
government, through the mobilization of
IMC’s published code of conduct signifies
people behind the issues that affect
the government’s commitment towards
them;
integrity of its officials. It may also motivate
‰ Effectiveness: the existence of many
and enhance the behavior of its official and
civic associations also facilitate the
help reduce corruption.
formation of partnerships for the
delivery and/or maintenance of services
Facility for citizen complaints in public
‰ Security: civic associations can foster a
grievances cell indicates Indore Municipal
sense of community that can reduce the
Government’s responsiveness towards
individual member’s vulnerability to
integrity of officials and shows the
crime and corruption and act as a social
willingness of the government to be
safety net
responsive for the welfare of its citizens.
Accountability
Disclosure of income/ assets by the official
The open flow of information is vital for and elected represented of the Municipal
good urban governance. Indore Municipal corporation is made as a provision in the
Corporation has made provisions for formal rule of law, but for the unforeseen reasons
publication of information regarding never been practiced. Which imparts the
contracts and budgets indicate the accountability of the decision-makers in the
willingness of the local authority to be government and their genuine interest in
transparent in its activities and accountable the welfare of the local people as
for its decisions. It also indicates a greater questionable?
confidence of people in the local
government and integrity of auditing and A regular independent audit made in the
monitoring. It may also indicate: corporation after the adoption of double
accounting system indicates the
‰ Participation: willingness to involve the accountability of the local government
public in setting/debating budget towards its taxpayers and transparency in
priorities and in the evaluation of its providing resources for development
procurement processes projects.
‰ Equity and Effectiveness: publication of
financial information to encourage
participation in decision-making can not
only help eliminate opportunities for 11.3 Urban Governance Issues
corruption, but helps to ensure that and Strategies
scarce development resources are
used most equitably and effectively. Having the overview of the Municipal
Governance, Structure, Procedures and
Control by higher levels of Government to
Practices involved certain major issues are
close local authorities or remove councilors
identified and respective Strategies can be
at its discretion, councilors are likely to be
formulated to design and implement
more accountable upwards rather than
programme and projects under JNNURM
downwards to their citizens. It may also
indicate:

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Table 11-3 Urban Governance and Institutional Strengthening Strategies

Issues Strategies Programme/ Responsible Implementing


Projects Agency Agency
Though preparation of Policy interventions GoMP GoMP/IMC
development plans especially at state
has been included in level to include
the functions of MC, planning powers to
adequate policy the Corporations.
reforms and
operational support at MCs need to have a
state and local level technical arm
has not been realized strengthened to
prepare and
implement
development plans
which requires
cadre revisions
Coordination and Clear demarcation GoMP GoMP
rationalisation of inter- of roles and
institutional functions between
relationship has to be IMC and Parastatal
effected for better Bodies so that there
result between the is no overlapping of
municipal authorities the executive
and Parastatal Bodies powers.
Planning capacity, MC’s may be Review of GoMP/IMC IMC
human resource facilitated with the managerial,
development, financial formulating of Technical gaps
management are not Planning Cell, in IMC and
developed, which Cadre revisions to strengthening
results in operating improve human project
inefficies; resources which development
should be a part of and
comprehensive management
capacity building mechanisms.
plan of MC

Formulating E- GoI/GoMP IMC


Governance
Programme
Incentives to IMC IMC
promote private
participation and
NGO in service
delivery
Awareness IMC IMC
programme for
private
entrepreneurs
regarding city
administration
and urban basic
services.

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Awareness GoMP/IMC NGO’s/ Planning


programme for and
Indore municipal management
officials institutions.
regarding
efficient working
hours and
responsiveness.
Adoption of modern GIS Survey and Training and GoMP/IMC IMC /Planning
technologies and detailed Structural capacity building Institutions
procedures will help plans for city basic programme for
MC to take up physical services and asset employees of
development in an inventory. IMC to adopt
integrated manner; modern tools
and techniques.
Poverty alleviation not A dedicated Project inputs GoMP/IMC Social Planning
being an obligatory department for slum from social Institutes
function of upgradation with planning
Corporations, MC is adequate staff and agencies with
not adequately financial support is proactive
equipped to contribute required. involvement of
effectively in the NGO’s and
various central/state Need assessment CBO’s
programmes for the of personnel at
poor. Stumbling blocks different levels
being lack of data, arising from new
convergence with investment, method
other agencies and of recruitment and
community placement;
participation; subsequent
restructuring if
necessary.
The city is more used Formulating a city Formulation of a IMC IMC
to design and Vision as shared city
implement location- perception of all Development
specific repair, stake holders of the strategies plan
maintenance and city in order to get for Indore with
improvement works, timely support from detailed CIP and
rather than city-wide all quarters. FOP
integrated systems
development planning
and execution;
Absence of a relevant Functional Restructuring of GoMP/IMC IMC
HRD programme. reorganization/ existing
restructuring and organisational
delegation of setup.
powers to the
departments is
necessary to enable
them to perform
better.

Summing up, all the salutary to share in the development decisions as


recommendations as well as the their own doing. While it is all very well to
constitutional amendment clearly favours delineate the elements of good
an unbundling of administration through governance, there appears to be a looming
decentralisation and is the very essence of chasm between the percept and the
good governance which enables the people practice.

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The present changes in the political and


administrative reforms have helped IMC in
strengthening of the Functions, Finances
for the Functions and Functionaries to a
greater extent. This is reflected in the
impact of institutional development,
services and finances of IMC. Although
examined with an increasing trends the
activities under institutional development
still has not achieved the satisfactory
levels. The recent Financial and other
reforms of restructuring and reorganizing
suggest an overall shift in the traditional
mind set of the Government and the
Governed.
The decentralization initiatives envisaged in
the CAA in context to IMC can be
concluded as, though local self government
in Indore has deep regards to the
objectives laid under the agenda and few
reforms are taken in the direction they shall
be rated as average, though the state may
have higher index in comparison to the
others. There is a wide scope an
unmistakable opportunity for IMC to
fundamentally rethink on how they function
and how they intend to develop their
localities. The Document intends to
formulate Short term, Middle term and Long
term strategies in institutionalizing better
functioning and services to city residents
especially urban poor.

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Chapter ‰ Improvement and Repair of Existing


Problems network to increase its efficiency

12 and Issues
while curbing the losses incurred as
the present water supply Network is
highly inefficient due to Leakages
and Dilapidated Network.
12.1. Water Supply
‰ There is no accountability of water
produced at source and Treatment
12.1.1 Problems and Issues Plants as well as the water
consumed at consumer
‰ The Present water supply is only connections.
192 MLD achieving per capita per
day supply of 80 Liters, which is not 12.2. Sewerage
adequate. With the completion of
Narmada Phase III, currently under 12.2.1 Problems and Issues
execution the supply available will
be 585 MLD, which is sufficient for ‰ The Sewerage network in the city
the population envisaged in 2024 at lacks in the coverage of entire city.
135 LPCD. Other areas have septic tanks,
which dispose its effluent in open
‰ Though the Narmada III phase will drains ending in polluting the
have sufficient supply, bringing environment.
water from Narmada which is 70kms
away will be a costly affair hence the ‰ The efficiency of the existing
local alternative sources such as sewerage network is very poor .Out
Yashwant Sagar and Bilawali tank of 80 MLD sewage generated by
has to be utilized to the fullest population currently connected to
capacity to supplement the water the main sewerage network only
supply, which can be done by taking 60MLD is able to reach the STP at
necessary steps for capacity Kabit Khedi.
augmentation. The other sources
‰ The low efficiency of the network is
such as wells and baudis can also
due to Leakages, Choking and Silt
supplement to the water demand.
deposition. Both the Old Sewerage
‰ Though the Water Source will be Network and the recently
augmented to the required demand constructed network under ODA
with just 54% Network Coverage of project by IDA are in bad condition
Piped Water Supply the Water Crisis for want of regular maintenance.
in Indore will still prevail.
‰ Due to inefficiency of the discharge
‰ The sources have the capacity to trunk network the total capacity of
reach the demand but the water the STP (90 MLD) is not utilized.
supply network is inadequate to
cover the whole city. The Water 12.3. Solid Waste Management
Supply network needs to be
extended to cover maximum
Population. 12.3.1 Problems and Issues

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‰ The efficiency of the Solid Waste carry major Traffic load and have
collection mechanism is low, where insufficient carriageway width in
only 70% of the Solid Waste respect to the traffic volume they
generated is being collected and carry. Important road facilities such
disposed. as medians, footpaths etc. are also
non-existent on most of the roads.
‰ The Solid Waste Management
Mechanism lacks in Primary ‰ The Road network of Indore lacks in
collection (70%) as well as the mobility towards connecting the
inadequate Labour (Safai newly developed areas and
Karmachari’s SK’s) outgrowths. There are several such
missing links.
‰ The mechanism also lacks in the
synchronisation between the ‰ The railway track virtually divides
collection storage and transportation the city in to two parts acting as
of Solid Waste Management constraint to the mobility of transport
network in the city. Such roads need
‰ The Waste is not segregated as over bridges and the existing over
Organic and Other Wastes. bridges are narrow leading to
bottlenecks in the traffic flow.
‰ The Municipal Corporation doesn’t
have Biomedical waste Disposal ‰ The mobility of the traffic is also
System. retarded due to the numerous
junctions with high traffic intensity,
12.4. Storm Water Drainage Heavy vehicle turning movements
and lack of channelisation of the
12.4.1 Problems and Issues traffic.
‰ Only 350kms of the 1710kms of the ‰ Many areas in the city seriously face
roads have Storm water drains. parking problem, with the carriage
Most of the roads in the city doesn’t way being utilised as parking
have drainage. reducing the capacity and ultimately
increasing traffic congestion.
‰ The nallahs and river tributaries
have lost their discharge capacity, of ‰ The Bus terminals are located in the
storm water discharge. There is an densely developed areas causing
urgent need of this nallahs and river traffic congestion. The transport
to be chanelised, increase and terminals drastically lacks in
protection of their cross section by facilities.
constructing embankment and
retaining walls to improve their water ‰ The Public Transport Network till
carrying capacity. recently was grossly inadequate.
Only recently an unique initative
12.5. Transportation have been taken by Dist.
Administration and IMC by setting
12.5.1 Problems and Issues
up a fully Govt. owned Company
‰ The NH’s and SH’s constitute more named Indore City Transport
than 50% of the incoming and out Services Limited (ICTSL) to provide
going traffic in the city. These Roads high capacity low floor busses on
about 18 routes in the city. The

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

setup presently lacks in ‰ The urban environment with


infrastructure facilities such as inadequate green spaces increases
depots and terminals. the threats from environmental
pollution. Some new Parks and
‰ East west Green Transport corridors Gardens have to be developed to
have a heavy flow, which can be address to the environmental
seen as need for Mass Rapid pollution situation.
Tranport System.5
12.7. Inner City
‰ There is no organized truck terminus
facility in the IMC Area. Generally 12.7.1 Problems and Issues
trucks are parked in an unorganized
manner in Lasudia , Palda, ‰ Inspite of the decentralization of the
Khandwa Road, Chandan Nagar commercials centers to the outskirts
and Sanwer Road Industrial Area . of the city, the old city portion is still
the commercial heart and hub of the
‰ city.
12.6. Environment
‰ The inner city areas have very
narrow streets, which are being
12.6.1 Problems and Issues encroached by various street
activities and the parking facilities.
‰ It is observed that the Maximum
Concentration of suspended ‰ The inner city lacks drastically in
particulate matter in some areas of terms of organised parking areas.
Indore and in many transport
corridors of the city surpasses the 12.8. Urban Heritage
threshold limit of 200 ug/cum,. There
is a need for taking appropriate 12.8.1 Problems and Issues
measures for constant monitoring of
emission from vehicles and penal ‰ Urban image of the city is a
action against polluting vehicles to collective visual appearance
reduce automobile pollution in the contributed by natural and man
city. made elements, like Rajwada,
Lalbag Palace, Holkar’s Chatris,
‰ The surface water bodies in the city High Court Building,Indore Museum,
too need the capacity enhancement Gandhi Hall, Pandarinath Temple,
and control of pollution that can be Harsiddhi Temple etc.
done in an integrated manner with
overall conservation. ‰ Need for Conservation and
improvement of the structures for
‰ There is huge scarcity in terms of adaptive reuse as exhibition halls
green and recreational areas in the and recreational spaces to facilitate
city. Indore doesn’t have Large their regular maintenance.
scale green areas.
12.9. Slums

5
As per the Comprehensive Traffic and
Transportation Study for Indore Urban Area 12.9.1 Problems and Issues
by CES Consultants

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

‰ There is about 40% shortage in which strengthen the economic base


housing supply in Indore City. The of the city.
majority of housing shortage is for
urban poor. Informal Housing such ‰ The strategic Location of the city in
as Slums, Squatters and the the central India with excellent
unauthorized colonies constitute connection by Road to other parts of
about 50% of the housing in Indore. country is best suited as
intermediate growth center and
‰ 25% of the household in the City distribution hub.
doesn’t have legal occupational ‰ Proximity to cotton belt, strong
right, while 9% of the households presence in textiles and ready-made
have got Patta from Government of garments.
Madhya Pradesh.
‰ Indore is also developing as an
‰ 70% of the households belong to institutional hub mainly due to
LIG and EWS, and BPL Category. presence of the Institute of National
(LIG 40%, EWS 21% BPL 9%). repute like Indian Institute of
Management (IIM Indore) and many
‰ 35% of the population and about other professional Institutes
118000 households live in slums
notified by Madhya Pradesh Slum ‰ With such professional institutes
indore has a potential to grow in
(Improvement and Clearance) Act.
1956. Information Technology and
management sector.
‰ Only 40% of the slum population 12.11. Constraints of the
has Water Supply, Public Toilets
Community Hall etc. Many of the City
public toilets are not maintained
properly leading to non-use of this ‰ Indore though well connected by
already created facility. Road network has limited
connectivity to Railway Network. It
‰ There have been number of does not lie on the major railway
Government interventions towards network.
implementation of various scheme ‰ Lack of water sources in near
meant for betterment of the slum proximity is one of the major
community but they have been constrain of the city implying in
lacking an integrated approach in getting water from Narmada river 70
solving the problem.
Km away.
12.10. Strengths of the ‰ Indore lacks in high quality urban
City infrastructure such as roads, water
supply sewerage etc.
‰ Indore serves as a commercial ‰ Indore faces severe power and
capital of the city. It is the hub of water crises, which is a deterrent to
Trade and commerce activities as setting up new Industries.
well as Industrial activities like ‰ 50% of the population lives in
automobile, pharmaceuticals, textile, informal housing in the absence of
garments and other industries, basic services and unhygienic
conditions.

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

strength of the city, which is not utilized to


Chapter
Vision the fullest due to inadequate infrastructure.

13 and Goals
Inadequate infrastructure and
condition of the Urban poor in the city has
living

always been a constraint to the


13.1. Vision of the City
development of Indore.

The long term vision conceived by the


Indore Municipal Corporation for Indore
City -

“Indore shall enter an era of

Prosperity with Spatially

restructured environment, improved


Indore has transformed from a small Jagir
urban infrastructure to achieve
in Maratha kingdom to a vibrant
commercial center of Madhya Pradesh. better lifestyle, minimum basic
Indore today due to its rich economic base services to the underprivileged with
is often called as Mini Bombay. The vision
functionally sustainable
of Indore is scripted reviewing the strengths
and weakness of the city. development and dynamism of

growth which will pave the way of

it becoming a world class

commercial city.”
JNNURM has provided the opportunity to
the citizens of Indore to decide the future of
their city. Indore Municipal Corporation
being the representative of the citizens had
Indore presents a complementary mix of taken this opportunity to formulate the City
history and pragmatic urban futurism. Development Plan to achieve the Vision for
the city.
Indore shall be developed for future by
curbing the weakness, which in process
would add to the strengths of the city. The
rich economic base of the city is the

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

The Long term vision of Indore can be


achieved by considering following elements Heritage Conservation
towards the development of Indore City. ‰ Improvement of Old City
‰ Healthy Community Life
‰ Conservation of Cultural and
‰ Improved Mobility
Built Heritage.
‰ Housing for All
‰ Sustainable City
Vision of ‘Slum less’ Indore
‰ Heritage and Inner city area
It is also well known fact that majority of the
Conservation
above urban poor population provides the
The elements of achieving the vision can
essential goods and services at affordable
be elaborated as;
cost to the other segments of the
population (i.e. LIG MIG and HIG
Healthy Community Life
household) including providing labour
‰ Ensuring Sufficient Water Supply
equity for the industrial and economic base
‰ Complete Connectivity and
of the city to sustain the wholesome life of
treatment of Sewage the entire city. Thus the urban poor and the
‰ Proper Disposal of Solid Waste urban rich/middle income households are in
symbiotic relationship to sustain the
Improved Mobility wholesome life cycle in a city.
‰ Proper Road Network
‰ Bridges and Flyovers 35% of the population in Indore lives in
slums. The number of slum households is
‰ Access to Public Transport
about 1,18,000; of which around 86000
‰ Mass Rapid Transport System
households require rehabilitation, relocation
‰ Road Safety
or infrastructure development. The vision
for slums in the Indore is to make Slum less
Housing for All Indore by 2015. The CDP envisages
‰ Shelter for Urban Poor making provision of about 15,000 dwelling
‰ Minimum basic Services to units for the Slum dwellers either to be
Urban poor relocated or rehabilitated at the same
place, development of 25,000 plots for
Sustainable City Urban poor and about 40,000 slums house

‰ Control of Air and Water hold will be provided with an improved


infrastructure services to provide almost all
Pollution
the slum population of Indore a better and
‰ Green Indore

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

sustainable living environment. This will growth of slums IDA will be constructing
benefit around 80,000 households. Around dwelling units for EWS and LIG Category
1000 households have already been on 20% of Land in its Town Development
rehabilitated; in different projects executed Schemes in future too.
by IMC and IDA and rehabilitation of 6000
slum households is in process under
VAMBAY scheme. To control the future.

13.2. Goals
The Goals envisaged to be achieved in the CDP of Indore are briefly discussed below –

13.2.1 Water Supply


The Goal

The year 2011 sees a water demand of about 394 MLD for about 30.0 lakh persons at 135
LPCD. For the year 2021, an ultimate capacity of 585 MLD and storage capacity of 250
million liters for about 48.0 lakh persons at 135 LPCD. For the year 2039

S.N DESCRIPTION 2005 2010 2015 2020

Water supply liters per capita per day


1 80 120 135 135
Average – net supply - LPCD

2 Transmission and distribution losses 40 20 20 20

3 % Population Covered 54 100 100 100

4 % Area covered 70 100 100 100

5 Total supply / storage capacity 180/86 340/180 400/250 470/250


45min
6 No. of hours of supply alternate 24 hr. 24 hr. 24 hr.
day

Total water supply from surface


7 168/227 394/560 394/560 465/560
sources / Treatment capacity

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

13.2.2 Sewerage
The Goal

The year 2021 sees a wastewater generation of nearly 450 MLD by about. 30.0Lakh
persons. 100% population and area coverage for the year 2012. The distribution network
will extend to a length of about 849.4km.

S.N DESCRIPTION 2005 2010 2015 2020

1 % Population Covered 50 70 90 100

2 % Area covered 55 90 100 100

3 % of sewage treated 20 80 90 90

13.2.3 Storm Water Drainage

The Goal

Total storm water drain network of about 85 % of the road network in that year by the
end of horizon year 2011.

S.N DESCRIPTION 2005 2010 2015 2020

1 % of Roads having storm water drain 20 60 85 90

2 % Area covered 30 80 90 95

13.2.4 Solid Waste Management

The Goal
The year 2021 envisages a comprehensive and sustained solid waste management
system with modern and scientific answers to collection, transportation and disposal of
about 1100 MT of solid waste and bio-medical waste.

S.N DESCRIPTION 2005 2010 2015 2020

1 Total Waste generated per day 500 780 940 1080

2 % waste collected to generated 70 100 100 100

3 % of waste processed 70 100 100 100

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Total Vehicle Capacity / total waste


4 0.7 1.0 1.0 1.0
generated

5 Trips / vehicle 2 3 4 4

13.2.5 Roads And Transports

The Goal
The year 2021 envisages 60 % "all weather roads and a total road length of 2000 km is
expected to cover the entire area and population of the Corporation by 2011

The year 2021 envisages full section road development and intersections developments
of about 60% road length with an effective traffic management and efficient public
transport systems and introduction of metro, elevated roads and fly-overs as also on
the major corridors of the city by 2021

S.N DESCRIPTION 2005 2010 2015 2020

1 Road density 13.43 16.00 18.00 20.00

2 Per capita road length 0.9m 1.1m 1.2m 1.2m

3 Paved road to Total road length 60% 80% 90% 99%

4 % Area under roads 12 15 15 15

5 % of roads having street lighting 70 80 90 100

13.2.6 Slum Rehabilitation and Basic Services to Urban poor


The Goal
The year 2012 envisages Indore as a a "zero slum city” with rehabilitation and relocation
of as many as 15,000 slum dwelling units in a phased manner

No. of Household / Colonies


S.N DESCRIPTION
2005 2010 2015 2020
No. Of Households Requiring
1 Infrastructure Development 40000 30000 10000 00
No. Of Households Requiring New
2 15000 11200 3400 00
Houses
No. Of Households Requiring Plotted
3 25000 17000 8000 00
Development
No Of Illegal Colonies Requiring
4 444 320 124 00
Infrastructure Up gradation

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

13.2.7 Environment

The Goal
The year 2021 envisages a "Clean and Environment Friendly Indore" with environment
status reports being prepared each year to check the levels of pollution in the city.

13.2.8 Heritage Structures

The Goal
The year 2012 sees a well maintained Heritage Structures in the city.

13.2. Existing State of Infrastructure


State of the Infrastructure
Water
Installed Capacity (mgd) 216
Water availability
Released / daily (mgd) 168
With city limits
Source of water supply 10 – 50 sq.km 44
> 100 k.m 172
Per Capita supply (lpcd) 80
Water coverage Supply duration (hrs.) 45 Minutes every second
day
Wastewater Disposal
Wastewater generated daily (mld) 150.00
Disposal (underground sewerage) 60.0
capacity (mld)
Present operating capacity (mld) 90.00
Households connected to 55%
underground sewerage %
Solid Waste Waste generated daily 500
(tonnes/day)
Collection daily (tonnes/day) 400
Storm water Drainage
Annual Rainfall 890MM
Length of storm water drains 350
(kms)
Roads and road
Transport
Municipal roads (kms) 1710
State – level roads (kms) 170
Public transport Buses (numbers)
Bus capacity/ passengers 30/50
Private registered vehicles
Street Lighting Number 24574 (Tube Lights)
19274 Sodium lamp
Area coverage % 70%

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Chapter City Investment acting as buffer zones. This is also to


create an efficient urban form and for
decongestion of the CBD, wherein many
Plan; Strategies and
14 Action Plan
confirming activities are to be shifted to an
alternate location.

14.2.3 Decentralized planning


14.1 City Investment Plan and increased citizens'
involvement in the
The existing situation analysis on the state development planning
of infrastructure under the sub mission for process.
urban infrastructure and governance and
the existing housing condition of the urban Public participation and consultation at
poor under the sub mission for basic neighborhood level regarding land use and
services for urban poor has provided growth patterns shall create social benefits
broader perspective towards formulating and avoid non- conforming land uses.
the sectoral goals based on vision Increased citizens' involvement in the
perceived for the city development. development planning process shall be
pursued actively to achieve the above-
The gap between the existing condition and mentioned social benefits.
the conceived sectoral goals has been
identified which was the basis for project 14.2.4 Improved co-ordination
identification under the Jawaharlal Nehru between various sanctioning
National Urban Renewal Mission. Thus the
and implementing agencies.
sectoral deficiencies are to be rectified
phase wise for the period of 7 years from Non-conforming land uses and major non-
2005-06 to 2011-2012. aligned sections towards the periphery of
the corporation shall be corrected with
improved co-ordination between the
14.2 Urban Planning and implementing agencies like IMC IDA and
Growth Management - TCP and necessary changes shall be
Strategies and Action Plan incorporated in the development plan.

14.2.5 Optimum use of municipal


14.2.1 Rapid and rational land and inviting private
implementation of sector to work with the public
development plan. sector.
Implementation of the development plan The land and real estate owned by the
lies in the finalization of the Town Planning corporation in the city shall be utilized for
Schemes covering the corporation area as commercial development either by itself or
well as the Planning area. In these, through leasing out to private users. This
regularization drives for illegal non- shall help to mobilize financial resources for
conflicting changes in land use and implementation of the IMC's City
demolition drive for illegal non-confirming Investment Plan as proposed in CDP.
land uses shall be taken up.
The Indore Development plan which is in
14.2.2 Development restrictions in stage of draft publication is expected to be
specific areas. in force in another three month’s time.

Restriction of development in specific areas


shall be taken up by finalizing TP schemes
with provisions for open/ green spaces

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

agencies of the development plan.


Action Plan/ Tasks
‰ Optimum use of municipal land and
inviting private sector to act coherently
‰ Implementation of development plan to in the development work with the public
cover the entire city with town planning sector.
schemes by the year 2006.

‰ Discouraging excessive urban sprawl


by establishing appropriate building and 14.3 Urban Renewal Strategies
density regulations for selected areas.
& Action Plan
‰ Establish green belts and buffer zones The strategies are in accordance with the
conclusions drawn in the Inner city and
present infrastructure analysis carried out
‰ Development of geographical earlier in the report and as per the
information systems suggestions of the citizens, elected
representatives and the other stakeholders
‰ Implementation of major road alignment involved in the preparation of City
Development Plan.
Institutions
14.3.1 Strategy
‰ Indore Municipal Corporation
Revitalization of inner City as a whole or in
‰ Indore Development Authority parts becomes essential due to the growth
pattern, rapid expansion, economic
‰ Town planning department development, Congestion and over
crowding. Presently the population density
‰ Voluntary organizations and NGOs of the CBD area is …….. higher than the
overall city population density. This also
‰ Citizens' groups affecting the infrastructura services laid at
the time of initial development and
upgraded time to time in unplanned
manner. Thus this area required a
revitalization plan to develop this area in
Operating Plan (Urban accordance to the total city development
Growth Management/ plan.
Development Planning) ‰ Planned infrastructural
Development.
Strategies Capacity augmentation of existing water &
sewer lines and laying of new sewer &
‰ Rapid and rational implementation of
storm water lines.
development plan.
‰ Strengthening of road surface and
‰ Development restrictions in specific
traffic management.
areas.
‰ Redefine and revitalize age-old city
‰ Decentralized planning and increased
structures
citizens' involvement in development
planning process. Most of the age old structures have served
their full life term and in absence of
‰ Improved co-ordination between
maintenance fund which due to various
various sanctioning and implementing
constrains are always on squeeze are in

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

bad shape and also the spaces are Heritage Street


presently underutilized. GRAND TOTAL 130.00

14.3.2 Identification of Project


for JNNURM 14.3.5 Operation Plan/ Tasks
Indore Municipal Corporation has already ‰ Development of all internal Roads width
started execution of some of the project Less than 6.0 mts of the city area such
with Private Public Participation like as Juna Risala, Bombay Bazar etc.
Multistoried parking building at Subash including storm water and sewer line.
Chowk etc. However the projects identified
under JNNURM are meant to provide ‰ Development of junctions of Rajwada
improved better living condition in the Inner area like P.Y road junction, Narsingh
city area by the end of horizon year 2011. bazaar junction etc.

14.3.4 Executing Institution ‰ Construction of Collectorate building


situated in densely populated area near
‰ Indore Municipal Corporation Rajwada in old city at the same location
but with improved Infrastructure
Tab 14.1 SUB MISSION FOR URBAN services especially parking etc by
utilizing the land available optimally.
INFRASTRUCTURE AND
GOVERNANCE ‰ Construction of Administrative Block of
URBAN RENEWAL Indore Municipal Corporation presently
AMOUNT situated in densely populated area near
S.N WORKS IN Rajwada in old city at the same location
CRORES but with improved Infrastructure
ROADS, services especially parking etc by
TRANSPORT AND utilizing the land available optimally.
DRAIN WORK.
All internal Roads ‰ Relocation Of Grain Mandi
width Less than 6.0
1 mts, total area of road 30.00 The Grain Mandi is located in the CBD
400000 sq.mt.@ Rs. area creating lot of traffic conjunction at
750 per sq.mt the same time the present land can be
Traffic junctions, use in better form and the Mandi can be
Parking area shifted to the space en-marked in the
2 development at CBD 4.00 Indore Development Plan at Bye Pass
ared and transport in an area of 150 acres.
area.
Construction of
4 20.00
Colloctorate Building
Construction of Indore
5 municipal Corporation 20.00
admin Building
Anaj Mandi at Nayata
Mundla on Nemaver
6 road Near by Pass on 50.0 14.4 Water Supply – Strategies
approx 150 acres of
land and Action Plan
Develoment of Itavari 14.4.1 Strategy
7 6.00
Bazar Street to

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

The strategies are in accordance with the implementation, monitoring and evaluation.
conclusions drawn in the present The significance of people's participation in
infrastructure analysis carried out earlier in water conservation shall also be realized.
the report (7.6.1) and as per the
suggestions of the citizens, elected The Goal
representatives and the other stakeholders
involved in the preparation of City The year 2011 sees a water demand of
Development Plan. about 394 MLD for about 30.0 lakh persons
at 135 LPCD. For the year 2021, an
‰ Water Supply Planning ultimate capacity of 585 MLD and storage
capacity of 250 million liters for about 48.0
While the current works shall focus on the lakh persons at 135 LPCD. For the year
network strengthening, source 2039
augmentation and increase in the yield for
future requirements of the city on cheaper 14.3.2 Institutions
cost basis by alternate sources near to city
like Yeshwant Sagar, Bilawali and different ‰ Indore Municipal Corporation
wells and Bawadies. The entire system
shall be augmented and structured in a 14.3.3 Sustainability Indicators
planned and sustainable way to serve the
city in long term. ‰ Present Gross supply

‰ Water Auditing ‰ Gross supply after execution of


Narmada Phase – III project
Water auditing is the best practice to
reduce the system losses and make the ‰ T&D losses and unaccounted for water
entire supply of water accountable. This
involves leak detection studies apart from ‰ Treatment capacity to total supply
studies on the quality and quantity of water
drawl at the consumer end and explores ‰ Storage capacity to total supply
ways and means for effective water supply
systems. ‰ Distribution network to total road length

‰ Water Supply Operation and ‰ Number of house service connections


Maintenance to total property tax assessments

At present, the IMC PHED wing is ‰ % of water availability from alternate


managing the O & M of water supply sources (Present)
system. To improve the O & M facilities
steps would be taken to involve 14.4.2 Identification of Project for
experienced private companies, which will JNNURM
be solely responsible for the O & M of the
system, based on an agreed annual fee. Indore Municipal Corporation have started
These contracts shall be continued added execution on the Narmada Phase – III
with inbuilt incentives for improved project with ADB assistance, which is
performance. planned to fulfill the water demand for the
projected population growth for the horizon
year 2039. However the projects identified
under JNNURM are meant to provide
‰ Institutional Strengthening and increased capacity through alternative and
Capacity Building cheaper water sources and harness them
to the fullest advantage.
The members of the hydraulic department
shall undergo training in project planning, Tab 14.2 WATER SUPPLY

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

S. Work Cost ‰ Procurement of quality meters and


N in Cr conversion of un-metered connections
1 Water Supply - Improvement to metered ones.
in Present System
Leak detection rectification 20.00 ‰ To improve the water supply distribution
& Replacement of old pipe network, 100 mm diameter PVC/ DI
lines and laying of new lines pipe with lining will be laid to
for area where there are no supplement the existing distribution
pipe lines at present. system in the old parts of the city where
leakage is the main source of water
2 Construction of RCC loss.
Barriage at Yeshwant sagar
35.00 ‰ During summer water is supplied
Tank including trunk line of
through tankers filled at Narmada
720mm dia of 8500 mts
hydrants at 4 locations, to avoid this
length.
construction of sumpwell and boring of
tube well in outskirt areas, connecting
3 Construction of sump well,
them in a group and establishing
boring of tube wells &
hydrant centers to fill the tankers.
interconnecting them to
1.30
establish hydrant points for ‰ To develop a secondary supplementary
tanker filling at 8 locations source of water supply by cleaning of
during summer season. existing wells and bawadies,
construction of bund walls, covering
4 Fixing of pumps in the from top and other required works to
existing tube wells of IMC 2.50 enable efficient extraction of portable
1000 nos@25000 water from it.
5 Cleaning of old Well and ‰ Extension, augmentation and
Baudi’s, covering the top, rehabilitation of existing systems in an
reconstruction of bund wall efficient manner to supply the water @
1.00
for developing an additional of 135 lpd per capita and desired
source of water supply. targets by 2009. in order to achieve this
supply rate in the planning of Phase –
GRAND TOTAL 59.80 III of Narmada water the 40mld of water
is to be supplied from other available
14.4.3 Action Plan/Tasks sources out of which Yeshwant Sagar is
one main source. The Yashwant Sagar
‰ Extension, augmentation and
had an initial storage of 19.963MCM,
rehabilitation of existing systems in an
which has been reduced to about
efficient manner to match the
14.65MCM due to silt deposits, as per
community needs and desired targets
1994 capacity survey conducted by
by 2009
CWPRS-Pune. At present, only 4.5
MGD of water is possible to be drawn
‰ An inventory of possible leaks and
from the Yashwant Sagar reservoir. In
sources of unaccounted for water
order to meet the water supply demand
followed by water auditing every three
for growing population of Indore city.
years.
Municipal Corporation of Indore have
‰ Procurement of quality meters and proposed to augment the storage
conversion of un-metered connections capacity of Yashwant Sagar.
to metered ones and revision of tariff
The following activity was decided.
14.4.4 Operating Plan (Water Supply) ‰ Full reservoir level will be kept at

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

EL.524m but in future it is likely to be plants along with the sewerage network
raised at EL.525m. becomes necessary to cater to the needs
of 2011 and 2021. This shall also involve
‰ Spillway should be designed in such a revitalization of sewerage network in the
way that it should pass the peak flood old city area.
with minimum rise in water table above
the fun reservoir level i.e. 525m. ‰ Regularization

‰ Spillway should be designed for fun The large number of illegal outfalls/ outlets
reservoir level EL.525m. into the drains of the city. A regularisation
drive to connect them into the main sewer
‰ Embankment etc. should be designed network by adding / renewal of lines. This
for FRL 524m. will also improve the effective operation
and maintenance of the system.
‰ Existing spillway should be plugged and
abandoned. ‰ Effective Operation & Maintenance

‰ Lying of Sub main trunk of 720mm dia The sewerage treatment plant of total
of total Length 8.5 km. capacity 90mld is already in operation,
which is maintained by IMC. At present
only 60mld of sewer is reaching to the plant
for treatment, thus it required connections
14.4.5 Executing Institutions
of sub mains line to the main sewer
‰ Indore Municipal Corporation network lines.

‰ System Maintenance Plan


14.5 Sewerage –Strategies and A system maintenance plan involving the
Action Plan components of routine, corrective and
preventive maintenance shall be prepared
14.5.1 Strategy apart from an inventory of the entire system
to aid the preparation of a Geographical
The strategies are in accordance with the
Information System of the city.
conclusions drawn in the present
infrastructure analysis carried out earlier in ‰ Awareness Campaign on Recycling/
the report (7.6.2) and as per the Reuse
suggestions of the citizens, elected
representatives and the other stakeholders An awareness campaign regarding the
involved in the entire City Development importance of recycling and reuse of
Plan. Presently since only 55% household wastewater for various household purposes
are connected to the sewer system the shall be taken up to tackle any unforeseen
strategies would focus upon planning for situation in the future. A plan shall also be
connecting the remaining percentage of drawn to set up recycling plants in the near
household to the sewer system and also future along with treatment plants.
catering for the future needs till 2021, as
per the detailed project prepared by The Goal
Montgomery Watson Harza (MWH).
The year 2021 sees a wastewater
‰ Augmentation and Rehabilitation of generation of nearly 450 MLD by about.
the System 30.0Lakh persons. 100% population and
area coverage for the year 2012. The
The present sewerage system being put
distribution network will extend to a length
into operation caters only half of the
of about 849.4km.
present population needs. Extension of the
capacity of the existing sewerage treatment

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

14.5.2 Institutions population

‰ Indore Municipal Corporation ‰ Sewer network length to total road


length.
14.5.3 Sustainability Indicators:
‰ Treatment capacity to total sewerage
‰ Total sewerage generation generated

‰ Total area served to total area ‰ Number of sewer connections to total


water connections
‰ Total population served to total
14.5.4 Identification of Project for
JNNURM Construction of 245 Mld
61.25
The projects identified under JNNURM are STP.
meant to cover total population for the
horizon year 2021 and 100% area of the Physical & Price
city, providing connectivity to the main 64.84
Contingencies
sewer system. Indore Municipal GRAND TOTAL 346.87
Corporation has already completed the
DPR for the sewerage project. Strategies
Tab 14.3 SEWEARAGE ‰ Augmentation and rehabilitation of the
system
S. Cost
WORK
N in Cr ‰ Regularization
Improvement in Present
1
System ‰ Effective operation and maintenance
Replacement of Old
under size sewer lines & ‰ System maintenance plan
Laying New Sewer Line
2.00
including chamber ‰ Awareness campaign on recycle/ reuse
construction and
Miscellaneous Works. 14.5.5 Operating Plan (Sewerage
Systems)
Laying of new sewer line
and construction of ‰ Extension, augmentation and
chambers in the newly rehabilitation of existing systems in an
under taken efficient manner by replacing old
20.00
colonies.(below 300 mm blocked lines (mainly in slum areas),
dia. total length of line to the under size line (mainly in old city
be laid during the project area) and new lines to be connected to
period 2000mts) the main trunk sewer line , which
presently are discharging sewerage to
2 New Sewrage Scheme open nallaha / spaces . The proposal
also includes laying of new line to the
Length of Primary
areas presently which are not having
System in KM for pipes
any network including construction of
which are greater than or 157.93
brick chambers. This will enable 100%
equal to 300mm (165.304
of the generated sewerage to reach up
KM)
to the STP, where presently only 60mld
of sewerage is reaching up to STP
Length of the Secondary through the present sewer line network.
System (260 KM) 40.85 The project of sewerage is proposed to
(300 mm. dia and below) be completed by 2009.

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 120


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

‰ In the DPR prepared by Montgomery The secondary sewers includes existing


Watson Harza (MWH) The overall sewers, which are given due credit while
catchments is divided into 3 parts all of computing the cost of secondary sewer
which are conveying sewage from the network, essentially an area development
upstream stretches to the Sewage activity. In case of fully sewered areas, only
treatment plant (STP) site through the cost required for connecting these to
gravity-based systems. The areas are the primary network and related works is
broadly divided as follows: considered. In case of partially sewered
areas new sewer lines are included and in
‰ Central Khan river catchments case of un sewered areas, full sewer
development costs in the area are
‰ Left Interceptor Sewer catchments considered. The scheme is a full
development scheme targeted for the year
‰ Right Interceptor Sewer catchments 2035. In the phase I only 20 percent
provision i.e. 260km of the total
‰ The above bifurcation has enabled requirement of 1300km has been made for
following key benefits: the secondary system.

‰ Large diameter main sewers are not ‰ An inventory of locations of spills, leaks
required to negotiate congested central and mixing areas of storm water with
areas in the city, thereby facilitating solid waste.
convenient and speedy construction
‰ Mapping and creation of geographical
‰ The central catchments covers most of information system (CIS) detailing out
the core area defined by PHED in their system location, characteristics, age
master plan, which is fast achieving and location to enable a constant check
saturation as regards to area and on malfunctions
population, and hence can be taken up
as an immediate Phase 1 activity ‰ Operation and maintenance plan for all
the factors involved
‰ Pumping stations are avoided in the
intermediate stretches as the entire
system runs by gravity, thus enabling
operational reliability and substantial 14.5.6 Executing Institutions
cost savings in operation and
maintenance. ‰ Indore Municipal Corporation

The primary sewer network at the


conceptual stage includes diameters from
300 mm. to 1800 mm. The secondary
system consists of sewers, which are below
300mm.

Cost of primary sewers is computed from


the lengths obtained after detailed design,
whereas cost of secondary sewers is
obtained from the area-basis computations
as a part of developing the various areas
classified under above 3 categories:

‰ Fully sewered areas,

‰ Partially sewered areas and

‰ Un sewered areas.

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 121


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

‰ Indore Municipal Corporation

14.6 Storm Water Drainage - 14.6.3 Identification of Project


Strategies for JNNURM
14.6.1 Strategy The projects identified under JNNURM are
The strategies are in accordance with the meant to cover 85% of the existing roads
conclusions drawn in the present including the spinal road like palasia and
infrastructure analysis carried out earlier in M.G road for the horizon year 2001
the report (7.6.4) and as per the
suggestions of the citizens, elected
representatives and the other stakeholders Tab 14.4 SUB MISSION FOR
involved in the entire City Development URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE AND
Plan and on the fact that road side storm GOVERNANCE
water drains are as important as the flood STORM WATER
protection scheme for natural drains. This S.
is in the best interest of reducing operation WORK Cost in Cr
N
and maintenance costs as well as
Improvement in
preserving the condition of the road
Present System
surface. Presently only 20% roads are
having storm water drains. Laying of New
Storm water line on
‰ Construction of Roadside Drains both side of the
existing roads and
Adequate attention has to be given to the 1 other major roads 50.00
construction of roadside storm water drains (Total length of line
(both open and closed) to facilitate proper on both side of
draining of storm water into natural drains about 50 kms of
and also to maintain proper road surface. It road length)
is expected that around 100 km of storm
water drains would be necessary by 2009. Construction of
Nallahs
‰ Drainage Rehabilitation. embankment and
2 canalization work 20.00
Strengthening of the existing open main including
and small drains / nallahs by construction construction of RCC
of RCC wall, desalting etc. retaining wall etc.
GRAND TOTAL 70.00
‰ Effective Operation and Maintenance

Once the flood protection scheme is in 14.6.4 Action Plan/ Tasks


place, an operation and maintenance plan ‰ Extension, Augmentation and
for the entire system involving the roadside rehabilitation of the existing network to
drains, storm water drains natural drains is match the community needs and
necessary. desired targets by 2010.

The Goal ‰ De-silting of the open roadside drains


Total storm water drain network of and nallahha.
about 85 % of the road network in that
year by the end of horizon year 2011. ‰ An inventory of areas of mixing areas
with sewer lines.

‰ An operation and maintenance plan for


the embankments, sluice regulators etc
14.6.2 Institutions

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 122


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

of the flood protection system and the Proper planned internal road network to be
storm water drain network. developed and maintained at Devguradia
landfill site.
Strategies
‰ Development of New Land Fill Site.
‰ Drainage rehabilitation programme
Proper planned approach and internal road
‰ Construction of roadside drains
network to be developed year wise as
required to be developed and maintained at
‰ Effective operation and maintenance
new landfill site.
14.6.5 Operating Plan (Sewerage ‰ Developing and Maintaining a
Systems) Transfer Station.
‰ Lying of new storm water line on both
side of the existing city main roads Intermediate transfer stations have to be
including development of footpath and developed and maintained. There will be a
sides of the roads to ensure proper need for one or two such stations in the
collection of storm water in the city, wherein facilities of a refuse
collecting chambers compactor; waste segregators, recycling
units and disposal facilities shall be
‰ Construction of RCC wall to provided.
strengthened the side embankment of
the nallahs to stream line the storm ‰ Effective Positioning of Solid Waste
water flow. Collection Facilities

14.6.6 Executing Institutions A Geographical Information System shall


be developed regarding the existing
‰ Indore Municipal Corporation locations of collection facilities, the
characteristics of the neighborhoods being
served by each container, the total amount
14.7 Solid Waste Management and types of waste being generated,
–Strategies and Action effective walking distance from each
neighborhood to the container spot etc. The
Plan idea is to come out with the Geographical
Positioning System for the containers. This,
14.7.1 Strategies apart from an effective location will help in
optimum usage of containers and upkeep
The strategies are in accordance with the of surroundings.
conclusions drawn in the present
infrastructure analysis carried out earlier in ‰ Increased Private Sector and
the report (7.6.3) and as per the Community Participation.
suggestions of the citizens, elected
For the private sector involved in solid
representatives and the other stakeholders
waste management, incentives shall be
involved in the entire City Development.
introduced for improved performance.
Presently only 70% of the total generated
Awareness campaigns shall be taken up in
solid waste is collected and dumped at
all slums and through the media about
dumping yard regularly on daily basis. The
waste minimisation, source segregation,
strategies would focus upon identifying
healthy ways of storage at source and
suitable collection and disposal methods.
reuse. This is aimed at increasing level of
‰ Developing and Maintaining Existing community participation.
Land Fill Site.

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 123


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

‰ Waste Segregation and Reuse. ‰ Scientific disposal methods to be


introduced
Source segregation of solid waste is
presently practiced in a very small area of ‰ Introduce private sector participation in
the city and shall be effectively increased operation and maintenance of waste
and materials of value shall be segregated transfer centers and disposal sites.
for recycling and income generation. Waste
material from demolition sites such as 14.7.4 Identification of Projects for
timber, masonry and other process-able JNNURM
wastes shall be diverted to the transfer
stations and reused. In consultation with Indore Municipal Corporation is developing
Community development groups, creation a new site for scientific land filling for the
of rag pickers' societies shall be initiated in disposal of solid waste collected as per the
slums. Based on a survey of process-able standards and specifications for the
and recyclable wastes being generated and collection of solid waste within the frame
the various reuses they can be put to, such work of MS W Rules - 2000.
societies shall be facilitated in contacting all
such units and industries that can reuse Tab 14.5 SOLID WASTE
them, thereby creating a corporation MANAGEMENT
assisted rehabilitation and employment
S.N Particular Cost in Cr
generation program.
Up-gradation of
The Goal existing land fill
site at Devguria
The year 2021 envisages a including
comprehensive and sustained solid 1
development of 15.00
waste management system with modern Infrastructure
and scientific answers to collection, like approch
transportation and disposal of about road and other
1100 MT of solid waste and bio-medical works etc.
waste. Land fill
2
management
14.7.2 Institutions Land
requirement for
‰ Indore Municipal Corporation Next 30 years
a
waste
14.7.3 Action Plan/Tasks generation is
about 250 acrs.
‰ Maintain and manage the existing
Site selection
system through improved methods of Base line data,
waste collection.
Geotechnical,
topgraphical,
‰ Preventive maintenance of refuse
Hydrological
collection vehicles
investigation
studies (EIA),
‰ Increase the door-to-door waste b 1.00
Cost of
collection performance and make the
infrastructure
staff accountable and responsible for
development
the same as well as cleanliness and
and other
effective use of public spaces.
arrangements
‰ Create waste transfer centers at as per MSW
appropriate locations with refuse rules.
compactor systems, waste segregator
systems and reuse or recycle facilities.

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 124


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Yearly agency with three wheeler cycle


development rickshaw and make the staff
cost of the new accountable and responsible for the
trenching same as well as cleanliness
c ground for
Next 5 years ‰ Development and construction of waste
(Rs. In Cr. 3.5 + transfer centers at appropriate locations
18.00 with refuse compactor systems, waste
3.75 + 3.5 + 3.5
+ 3.75) segregator systems and reuse/ recycle
Development of facilities.
3 2.00
Transfer station
Total 36.00 ‰ Introduce private sector participation in
operation and maintenance of waste
transfer centers and disposal sites
Strategies
‰ Developing and maintaining the existing 14.7.6 Executing Institutions
and new land fill site.

‰ Developing and maintaining a transfer ‰ Indore Municipal Corporation


station network

‰ Effective positioning of solid waste 14.8 Transport System (Roads,


collection facilities Bridges, Traffic Management,
‰ Waste segregation and reuse
Parking Lots, Goods And Mass
Transport) - Strategies And
‰ Increased private sector and community Action
participation
14.8.1 Strategy
The strategies are in accordance with the
conclusions drawn in the present
infrastructure analysis carried out earlier in
14.7.5 Operating Plan (Solid Waste
the report (7.6.5) and as per the
Management) suggestions of the citizens, elected
representatives and the other stakeholders
‰ Construction of Internal roads and involved in the entire City Development
approach road from Byepass to the site.
The strategies aim at covering the entire
‰ Developing a new site for scientific land area and population of the city with an
filling for the disposal of solid waste effective road network by 2011, as well as
collected as per the standards and improving the surface condition of the
specifications for the collection of solid roads by 2021.
waste within the frame work of MS W
Rules - 2000. ‰ Augmentation and Asset
Rehabilitation.
‰ Maintain and manage existing system
through improved methods of waste Up gradation of the existing roads shall be
collection taken up to extend strengthened and
enhance the road to its ultimate sections as
‰ Preventive maintenance of refuse per the ROW proposed in the Indore
collection vehicles Development Plan to cater the increasing
traffic and reducing the dust and air
‰ Increase door-to-door waste collection pollution. The roads would be upgraded to
performance with the help of Private Cement concrete road due to the pre

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 125


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

dominantly Black cotton soil structure of the ‰ Increase degree of connectivity to 100
area. The plan shall be taken up in phased percent.
manner so as to optimize the cost and
serve the different area as per the needs ‰ Extension of all the missing master plan
envisaged. road in phasing.

‰ Widening and Strengthening of Road ‰ Up-gradation and rehabilitation of


Structures and Removal of existing road surface.
Encroachments.

With due consideration to the growing The Goal


traffic intensity, major roads, corridors and The year 2021 envisages 60 % "all weather
state highways running through the city are roads and a total road length of 2000 km is
to be extended and expanded. This shall expected to cover the entire area and
involve construction of fly-over, bridges population of the Corporation by 2011
etc., the works on some of which are
already in progress. This shall also involve
14.8.3 Institutions
removal of encroachments on road
margins, shifting of electrical poles, trees ‰ Indore Municipal Corporation
etc. and strengthening of road structures
with pavements, footpaths and surfaced ‰ Indore development authority
margins with a provision for storm water
lines. ‰ M.P.Public Works Department

‰ Planning for Extension of Existing 14.8.4 Sustainability Indicators


Master Roads and Construction of ‰ Road density
New Radial Roads Which are the
Missing Links in the Transport ‰ Per capita road length
Network.
‰ Concrete road length/ total road length
To connect the existing city area to the
newly developing outskirts area criss 14.8.5 Identification of Projects for
crossing the existing ring road and bye
JNNURM
pass, radial road as proposed in the Indore
Development plan are being proposed. Presently the total length of existing major
Construction of these linkages would be and other roads is 1020 km in IMC area.
taken up by IDA an agency, which has
been constituted for the execution of Indore Road network inventory reveals that nearly
development plan. This will provide for the 40% of the network has two lane
planned connectivity and proper road carriageways. On an average, 100000
alignment to facilitate growth of peripheral vehicles move in and out, daily, At the inner
areas. cordon, slow vehicles account for a share
of 15 percent. While percentage of peak
14.8.2 Action Plan/Tasks hour traffic ranged between 7.3 and 14.6
percent on these roads.
‰ All major roads to be expanded to 4/6- Some of these inner roads were developed
lanes, with full road section and in full road section under BOND project.
converted to cement concrete / black
top roads including construction of
flyovers.

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Tab 14.6 ROADS AND BRIDGES (IMC )

ROADS AND BRIDGES (IMC )


Existing Features Proposed Features
Unit Cost
Len. ROW CW
S.N Description Cost (Rs. In
(km) Classifi (m) (m) Classific Measures ROW CW
cation ation (m) (lane) /Km. Crore)

V.I.P. Route
No.1
(Ramchandranag Full
1 ar Tiraha to 4.5 Arterial 30 7.5 Arterial Section 30 6 4.00 18.00
Ahilyapath to Dev.
Bhandari Mill
Tiraha
Bhandari Mill to
Shram Shivir to
Full
Shastri Statue
2 2.5 Arterial 30 10.5 Arterial Section 30 6 4.00 10.00
(M.T.H.
Dev.
Compound) Via
Patthar Godam
A.B. Road Arterial
(Industry House) Full
3 to Rajkumar Over 2.2 30 10 Arterial Section 30 6 4.00 8.80
Bridge Via Bal Dev.
Vinay Mandir
Rajkumar Mill to Arterial Full
4 Sarvate bus 3.0 30 15 Arterial Section 30 6 4.00 12.00
stand Nasiya Dev.
Subhash Marg Arterial Full
5 (Bada Ganpati to 2.5 24 12 Arterial Section 24 6 3.5 8.75
Chimanbag) Dev.
Arterial Full
Patnipura to
6 1 30 7 Arterial Section 30 6 4.0 4.00
Malwa Mill
Dev.
Indra Circle to Arterial
Agrasen Square Full
7 to Tower 3 24 12 Arterial Section 24 6 3.5 10.50
Choraha to Dev.
Manikbag R.O.B
Manikbag R.O.B.
Full
to A.B. Road (Via
8 2 Arterial 30 7 Arterial Section 30 6 4.0 8.00
Chohitrram
Dev.
Hospital)
Viyas Pul to
Full
Bada Ganpati to
9 1.5 Arterial 18-30 12 Arterial Section 30 6 4.0 6.00
Gangwal Bus
Dev.
stand
Subhash Nagar Full
Sub Sub
10 to Chimanbag 2 18 7 Section 30 6 4.0 8.00
Arterial Arterial
Via Bhandari mill Dev.
Siyaganj to Juni Full
Sub Sub Section
11 Indore 1 18 12 18 4 3.0 3.00
Arterial Arterial Dev.
Muktidham

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 127


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

M.T.H. to Full
12 Siyaganj Via 1 Arterial 30 12 Arterial Section 30 6 4.0 4.00
Railway Station Dev.
Front Road of Full
Inner city Inner city Section
13 Kaanch Mandir 0.5 24 18 24 6 3.5 1.75
Road Road Dev.
(Itwaria Bazar)
G.P.O. (Nasiya) Full
to Juni Indore Section
Sub Sub
14 under Bridge 2.5 18 12 Dev. 18 4 3.0 7.50
Arterial Arterial
Sarvate Bus
Stand
Nehru Statue to Full
Sub Sub Section
15 Bus stand 1 18 12 18 4 3.0 3.00
Arterial Arterial Dev.
(Madhumilan )
Maharana Pratap Full
Statue To Phooti- Section
16 4 Arterial 30 14 Arterial 30 6 4.0 16.00
Kothi to Dev.
Ahirkhedi/ CAT
Annapurna Full
Mandir to Section
17 Rajendra Nagar 2 Arterial 30 14 Arterial Dev. 30 6 4.0 8.00
Crossing
A.B.Road
Mahesh Guard Full
Tiraha to Sanwer Section
Road (Vrandavan Sub Sub Dev.
18 2 18 6 18 4 3.0 6.00
Colony and Arterial Arterial
Baneshwari
Mandir)
Sanwer Road Full
Naka to Sangam Section
Sub Sub
19 Nagar (Kushwah 1.5 18 3 Dev. 18 4 3.0 4.50
Arterial Arterial
Nagar Main
Road)
Narayan Kothi to Full
Malwa Mill Section
20 2.5 Arterial 30 7 Arterial 30 6 4.0 10.00
square to Kalyan Dev.
Mill Tiraha
Rajwada (State Full
Bank of Indore) Section
Sub Sub
21 to Hemu Kalani 2 18 12 Dev. 18 4 3.0 6.00
Arterial Arterial
Square Via
Harsidhi
Bada Ganpati to Full
Rajwada to Sub Sub Section
22 3 18 12 18 4 3.0 9.00
Krishnapura Arterial Arterial Dev.
bridge
Kailash Marg Full
lohar patti to Section
Hukumchand Inner city Inner city Dev.
23 2 18 7 18 4 3.0 6.00
Colony via. Antim Road Road
chouraha ,
Panchkuhiya
Kalani Nagar ( Full
Aerodrum Road) Sub Sub Section
24 2 18 5 18 4 3.0 6.00
to Chandhan Arterial Arterial Dev.
nagar

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 128


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Rajwada to Full
Marimatha Sub Sub Section
25 2.5 18 7 18 4 3.0 7.50
(Sadar bazar Arterial Arterial Dev.
Road)
Greater Kailash Full
junction to Saket Section
26 2.5 Arterial 12.-30 12 Arterial 18-30 4 to 6 3.5 8.75
Nagar junction to Dev.
Ring Road
Palasiya square Full
to Patrakar Section
Square to Dev.
27 3 Arterial 24 12 Arterial 24 4 to 6 3.5 10.50
Tilaknagar Jain
Mandir to Ring
road
Suyash Hospital Full
28 to Badi Gwaltoli 2 Arterial 18 12 Arterial Section 18 4 3.0 6.00
to Tilaknagar Dev.
Patel Statue to
Full
Bhagatsingh Sub Sub
29 3 18 12 Section 18 4 3.0 9.00
Statue (Jawahar Arterial Arterial
Dev.
Marg)
Nehru Statue to Full
Ambedkar Statue Sub Sub Section
30 2 24 14 24 6 3.5 7.00
(Dhakkanwala Arterial Arterial Dev.
Kuwa Road)
Patel Statue to Full
Shivaji statue Section
Sub Sub
31 chourha (M.Y. 3 18-30 12 Dev. 18-30 4 to 6 3.5 10.50
Arterial Arterial
Road ) Via Nehru
Statue
Nehru Statue to Full
Sub Sub Section
32 Agrasen Statue 2 18 12 24 4 3.0 6.00
Arterial Arterial Dev.
(Chhawani)
Railway Station Full
to Patel Statue to Sub Sub Section
33 1.5 18 12 18 4 3.0 4.50
Shradhanand Arterial Arterial Dev.
Marg
R.N.T. Marg Full
(Jahaj Mahal) to Section
Noble Hospital to Sub Sub Dev.
34 2 18 12 18 4 3.0 6.00
Ambedkar Statue Arterial Arterial
and Pandey
Compound
M.G. Road Full
(Bansi Plaza) to Section
Sub Sub
35 Narayan Kothi 3.5 18-30 12 Dev. 18-30 4to 6 3.5 12.25
Arterial Arterial
Square to M.I.G.
Thana.
Pratap Statue to Full
R.T.O. to Section
Rajendra nagar Dev.
Railway
36 Crossing, Shiv 5 Arterial 30 7 Arterial 30 6 4.0 20.00
Mandir to A.B.
Road (Babu
Labhchand
Chajlani Marg)

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 129


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Maharana Pratap Full


Statue to Section
37 3 Arterial 24 7 Arterial 24 4 3.5 10.50
Chatribag to Tori Dev.
Corner
Chatripura Thana Full
to Kagdipura to Inner city Inner city Section
38 2 18 7 18 4 3.0 6.00
Narsih Bazar road road Dev.
square
Shivaji Statue to Full
39 Musakhedi to 4 Arterial 30 7 Arterial Section 30 6 4.0 16.00
Ring Road Dev.
Saint Paul To
Full
Agriculture Sub Sub
40 3 18 7 Section 18 6 3.0 9.00
College to Daily Arterial Arterial
Dev.
College to Zoo.
Full
Palsikar to Inner city Inner city Section
41 1 18 7 18 4 3.0 3.00
Pagnispaga road road Dev.
Palsikar colony to Full
Gadi Adda Section
Inner city Inner city
42 Rialway crossing 1.5 18 7 Dev. 18 4 3.0 4.50
road road
Via Kalal Kui
masjid
Patrakar colony Full
to anand Bazar Section
Sub Sub
43 to Ring road 3 18 7 Dev. 18 4 3.0 9.00
Arterial Arterial
Khajarana
square
Depalpur Road to Full
Sub Sub Section
44 Phul Kalaria 2.0 18 7 18 4 3.00 6.00
Arterial Arterial Dev.
Pumping station
Bhawar kuan to Full
45 Manikbag 1.5 Arterial 30 7 Arterial Section 30 6 4.00 6.00
(transport Nagar) Dev.
Manik bag Bridge Full
46 to devshri Talkij 2.0 Arterial 30 7 Arterial Section 30 6 4.00 8.00
to Rly Line Dev.
Narsing Bazaar Full
Inner city Inner city Section
47 to Gorhakund 0.8 18 9 24 6 3.50 2.80
road road Dev.
Chaurah
R.T.O. to Full
48 Rupram Nagar 2.0 Arterial 24 9 Arterial Section 24 6 3.50 7.00
Chouraha Dev.
Marimata Full
49 Chouraha to 3.0 Arterial 30 9 Arterial Section 30 6 4.00 12.00
Banganga thana Dev.
Ring Road Full
Sub Sub Section
50 Chouraha to 3.0 18 7 18 3 3.00 9.00
Arterial Arterial Dev.
Khajarana
M.R. 9 ITI to Full
Ahiliyaashrum Section
Sub Sub
51 Ujjain Road Via 3.0 18 7 Dev. 18 4 3.00 9.00
Arterial Arterial
Pardeshpura ,
Bhagirathpura

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 130


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Hathipala Full
Chouraha to Section
52 0.8 Arterial 24 11 Arterial 24 4 3.50 2.80
Juni Indore under Dev.
Bridge
Krishanpura to Full
Harshdhi bridge Inner Inner City Section
53 1.5 18 10 18 4 3.00 4.50
Via Nandlalpura, City road road Dev.
Gothampura
Pandrinath to Full
Inner Inner City Section
54 Gautampura to 1 18 6 18 4 3.00 3.00
City road road Dev.
Chandrabhaga
Full
Chandrabhaga to Inner Inner City Section
55 0.5 18 10 18 4 3.00 1.50
Kalalkui Masjid City road road Dev.
Kagadhipura to Full
Jairampur Inner Inner City Section
56 1.5 18 7 18 4 3.00 4.50
(collectorate City road road Dev.
Road )
Full
Medical hostel to Section
57 2 Arterial 30 7 Arterial 30 6 4.00 8.00
samwad nagar Dev.
Gitabhawan to Full
58 Tilaknagar main 2 Arterial 18 8 Arterial Section 18 4 3.00 6.00
road Dev.
MR - 9 ITI to Full
Kabit khedi Sub Sub Section
59 3 18 7 18 4 3.00 9.00
(Ganda Talab Arterial Arterial Dev.
oad)
Krishna pura Full
Bridge to DRP Sub Sub Section
60 2.5 30 14 30 6 4.00 10.00
line Ujjain road ( Arterial Arterial Dev.
Shanti Path)
Satyasai School Full
61 Chouraha to 2 Arterial 30 9 Arterial Section 30 6 4.00 8.00
Nyaynagar Dev.
Jabaran Colony Full
Chouraha to Section
Raoji Bazaar Inner Inner City Dev.
62 1.5 18 10 18 4 3.00 4.50
thana to City road road
Kumrawat pura
to Hatipala
Gadi Adda Full
Railway Crossing Inner Inner City Section
63 1 30 6 30 6 4.00 4.00
to juni Indore City road road Dev.
Muktidham
Vidhyadham to Full
Sub Sub Section
64 pallar nagar to 3 18 4 18 4 3.00 9.00
Arterial Arterial Dev.
SF line
Virsavarkar marg Full
65 juni Indore to 1 Arterial 30 10 Arterial Section 30 6 4.00 4.00
Manikbag ROB Dev.
Pardeshipura bus Full
stand Chouraha Sub Sub Section
66 3 18 8 18 4 3.00 9.00
to Bhgirathpura Arterial Arterial Dev.
Laximbhai nagar

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Gangawal Bus Full


67 stand to Sirpur 2 Arterial 30 10 Arterial Section 30 6 4.00 8.00
(Dhar road ) Dev.
146 TOTAL 506.40
This list represents the overall development of complete section of Rs. 296.4. Cr.
almost 143 km of roads by 2021. In the present mission under
JNNURM of seven years it is proposed to construct roads as per the
priority decided by the IMC costing

Tab 14.7 WIDENING OF EXISTING BRIDGES, CONSTRUCTION OF NEW RIVER


BRIDGES, CONSTRUCTION OF ROB, FLYOVERS AND GRADE SEPERATORS (IMC)

WIDENING OF EXISTING BRIDGES & CONSTRUCTION OF NEW RIVER BRIDGES,


Name Cost
1 Karbala Bridge 1.00

2 Rupram Nagar Bridge 1.00

3 T.Choitram Hospital bridge 1.06

4 Aerodrome Road Vyas bridge 0.40


5 Marimata Bridge 0.50
6 Sawand Nagar bridge 0.90
7 Kulkarni Bhatta bridge 2.00
8 Other small Culverts 1.00
9 Hatipala Bridge 0.80
10 Chandra Bhaga Bridge 0.80
11 Suklia Bridge 2.00
TOTAL 11.46

CONSTRUCTION OF ROB , FLYOVERS AND GRADE SEPERATORS (IMC)


1 Grade Seprator at Palasia Square 20.00
2 At Jawhar marg From Veshnav school to Patel bridge 30.00
3 ROB at Bhandri Mill Railway crossing 10.00
4 ROB at Ujjain Road Railway Crossing 10.00
5 ROB At Kesar bag 9.00
6 ROB At Navlakhha Square 20.00
99.00
GRAND TOTAL 406.9

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SUB MISSION FOR URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE AND GOVERNANCE


ROADS AND BRIDGES (PWD )
Proposed Features Cost
S.N Description Classificat ROW CW (Rs. In
Measures
ion (m) (lane) Lakh)
1 Between Mangliya and Rao Arterial Full Section Dev. 30 6 84.62
Bangali square to bye pass
2 (Bicholi Hapsi) Arterial Full Section Dev. 30 6 7.17
Bangali square to to kanidia
3 Arterial Full Section Dev. 30 6 8.38
roadbye pass
Ring Road to By Pass
4 Arterial Full Section Dev. 30 6 22.46
Nemawar road
Bada Ganapati square to
5 Gommatgiry Arterial Full Section Dev. 30 6 27.06

149.69

Tab 14.8 SUB MISSION FOR URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE AND GOVERNANCE


ROADS AND BRIDGES (IDA )
Proposed Features
Cost (Rs. In
S.N Description Classificat
Measures ROW (m) CW (lane) Lakh)
ion
Jawhar marg to Full Section
1 Arterial 30 6 1.73
Pagnispaga Dev.
Dhar road to Airport Full Section
2 Arterial 30 6 6.59
Dev.
MR-9 By pas to
Full Section
3 Electronic complex Arterial 30 6 23.52
Dev.
link Road
Piplya pala to Full Section
4 Arterial 30 6 14.4
Byepass MR-3 Dev.
MR-11 Ujaain Road to Full Section
5 Arterial 30 6 36.09
Byepass Dev.
White Church to Ring Full Section
6 Arterial 30 4 12
road square Dev.
7 ROB at Juni indore 18
TOTAL 112.33

top roads. Including construction of


14.8.6 Operating Plan (Roads, flyovers, footpath, storm water drains
Bridges & Fly-Overs) service road, central verge and other
services.
‰ All major roads to be expanded to 4/6-
lanes, with full road section and ‰ Extension of the entire master plan road
converted to cement concrete / black in phasing in full planned section with

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

cement concrete top including footpath, undertaken works are also in line with this
storm water drains, service road, plan.
central verge and other services. The
extension of MR-3, MR-9, MR-10 and The plan is a comprehensive effort in
MR-11 road, to connect the developing identifying all the roads, all such junctions
areas surrounding the Proposed master and road-rail crossings that are facing or
planned road and the existing city road will face traffic congestion problems. It had
network also identified spatially, the inadequacy of
public parking facilities, pedestrian facilities,
‰ Up-gradation and rehabilitation of road dividers and traffic segregation
existing road surface from black top to measures etc.
Cement Concrete including footpath
and storm water drains, street lighting. The plan also pointed outh the inefficient
functioning of the public transport system
14.8.7 Executing Institutions and had explored measures and options for
improving the system to cater to the needs
‰ Indore Municipal Corporation of the population in 2011 and 2021.
‰ Indore Development Authority ‰ Improvement of parking and
pedestrian facilities.
‰ Madhya Pradesh Public Works
Department It shall be seen that all new commercial
developments adhere to the minimum
provision of parking facilities. Apart from
Traffic Management providing public parking spaces on
important roads steps shall be initiated to
avoid parking at junctions. Footpaths of
14.8.8 Strategy
requisite width, pedestrian crosswalks and
The strategies are in accordance with the subways will be introduced. Vehicular traffic
conclusions drawn in the present will be banned or limited to only access
infrastructure analysis carried out earlier in lanes in certain stretches of the CBD near
the report (7.6.5) and as per the the Rajwada area, Sarvate bus stand and
suggestions of the citizens, elected railway station areas.
representatives and the other stakeholders
involved in the entire City Development ‰ Traffic streamlining at intersections.
Plan, the city had a registered vehicle Channelisers, traffic islands, traffic signals,
population increasing at an average annual dividers, lane separators and traffic police
rate of 8.8 percent. The intra-city public control shall be introduced at all important
transport system is essentially road based junctions based on necessity and design. A
with an estimated 300 private minibuses separate study shall be carried out to
operated by Indore Nagar Seva and 150 suggest improvements in the design and
tempos. layout of junctions in the city.
The strategies address the issues of traffic ‰ Decongestion of the CBD.
management and public transport. Since it
is the need of an efficient system rather Proposals have been drawn up to
than any up-gradation or extension, the decongest the CBD area, in which a mix of
strategies shall focus upon system re- commercial and public activities invites a lot
structuring mechanisms. of traffic. Options of an alternate site
location for the ST bus stand shall be
‰ Preparation of traffic and explored. The existing terminal can be
transportation master plan. utilized as an alighting point. Also,
possibilities of shifting certain wholesale
A comprehensive traffic and transportation
activities to new locations are being
master plan prepared by CES is already
proposed.
under existence and the presently

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

The Goal Strategies


‰ Implementation of traffic &
The year 2021 envisages full section
transportation master plan.
road development and intersections
developments of about 60% road length
‰ Improvement of parking and pedestrian
with an effective traffic management and
facilities
efficient public transport systems and
introduction of metro, elevated roads ‰ Traffic streamlining at intersections
and fly-overs as also on the major
corridors of the city by 2021 ‰ Decongestion of the CBD

14.8.9 Institutions 14.8.11 Operating Plan (Traffic


Management)
‰ Indore Municipal Corporation
‰ Traffic and transportation master plan
for 2011
‰ Indore development authority
‰ Construction of Parking lots and
‰ M. P. Public Works Department
multistoried parking building at the inner
city areas and other Identification of
14.8.10 Action Plan/Tasks
locations for parking facilities
‰ Implementation of the medium
measures suggested in the Traffic and ‰ Development of new Inter state Bus
transportation master plan for 2021. Terminal at MR - 3 with all the required
amenities. To decongested the Sarwete
‰ Identification of locations for provision bus stand area.
of parking facilities.
‰ Development of new goods terminal
‰ Alternate site location for the “Transport Nagar” at MR-3 with all the
central Sarwate bus Stand. required infrastructure.

‰ Traffic signs to be converted by ‰ Development of new freight terminal on


all the all major city connecting state
and National highways.
‰ Modern elements such as thermo
plastic paint, retro-reflective boards, ‰ Traffic signs to be converted into
gantry signage, countdown clocks etc. modern elements such as Thermo
plastic paint, Retro-reflective Boards,
‰ Lane separators on major roads to Gantry Signage, Count-down clocks
segregate traffic and improvised etc.
junctions to streamline traffic flow.
‰ Construction of Intercity Bus terminal
‰ Provision of adequate footpaths and and depot with all amenities.
pedestrian ways.
‰ Metro Rail project in the CBD area.
‰ Awareness programme on
implementation of TP schemes, traffic ‰ Lane separators on major roads to
regulations and civic sense. segregate traffic and improvised
junctions to streamline traffic flow
‰ Regular maintenance and energy Provision of adequate foot paths and
management so as to cut down on the pedestrian ways
O & M expenses on street lighting.
‰ Awareness programme on
implementation of TP Schemes, traffic

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

regulations and civic sense Preparation of existing detail inventory of


the level of various services availability in
‰ Traffic signs to be converted into the slums, on the basis of which various
modern elements such as Thermo rehabilitation program’s shall be taken up to
plastic paint, Retro-reflective Boards, achieve the goal of Slumless Indore.
Gantry Signage, Count-down clocks
etc. ‰ Rehabilitation of Slums
Construction of housing units in the
‰ Regular maintenance and energy
identified slums either in situ or relocated to
management so as to cut down on the
the identified new locations with all
O&M expenses on street lighting
Infrastructure services are proposed.
14.8.12 Institutions ‰ Infrastructural Development works
‰ Indore Municipal Corporation
Development of the deficient portion of the
Physical Infrastructures in all those slums,
‰ Traffic Police, Indore
which are identified in the study.
‰ NGOs

‰ Citizen's
‰ Community development and social
infrastructure.
Development of educational and health
14.9 Housing for Urban Poor– center and training program’s to maintain
Strategies & Action Plan the created infrastructure and services

‰ Regularization of illegal
14.9.1 Strategy colonies and unauthorized layouts.
The strategies are in accordance with the The various unauthorized and Illegal
conclusions drawn in the present settlements that have come up in different
infrastructure analysis carried out earlier in part of the city particularly in the fringe
the report (8.6) and as per the suggestions areas due to various reasons such as
of the citizens, elected representatives and complexity in Govt. norms and regulations,
the other stakeholders involved in the entire tendency of land owners to dispose off
City Development Plan. It has been there land coming in the various schemes,
observed that maximum slums in the city etc. The corporation intends to regularize
are either along major transport corridors or only those settlements / illegal colonies
water bodies or on govt. land. where violations are in the limits prescribed
by the Govt. by levying of an impact fee
The strategies for slum improvement are after which the land use for the specified
focused on making Indore a ‘SLUMLESS areas shall be made legal and adequate
CITY’ by 2012. This is proposed to be infrastructure shall be provided.
achieved by providing a sustainable and
economical housing options to the slum The Goal
dwellers under various relocation and
rehabilitation program’s. The housing The year 2012 envisages Indore as a a
strategies for the Urban poor are focused "zero slum city” with rehabilitation and
on facilitating the proper land use ,providing relocation of as many as 15,000 slum
a marketable and legal title to the land dwelling units in a phased manner
owner and providing all infrastructural
services for a environmentally sustainable 14.9.2 Institutions
living place . ‰ Indore Municipal Corporation
‰ Slum Existing condition survey ‰ Indore Development Authority

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‰ M.P.Housing Board and transport corridors/ total number of


slums.
14.9.3 Sustainability Indicators
‰ Number of slum dwelling units
‰ Occupancy rate relocated/ rehabilitated
‰ Vacancy rate ‰ Monthly household income of
rehabilitated slum dwelling units/
‰ Number of slums along water bodies
income before rehabilitation

14.8.4 Identification of Projects for JNNURM


Tab 14.9 Slum Rehabilitation/Relocation And Slum Area Improvement
S. Name Of The Proposed Rehabilitation Site No. of dewelling Cost In
N Location Of Slum units Crores
HOUSES FOR SLUM DEWELLERS & URBAN 15000 Nos @ Rs.
1 POORS 100000.0 per unit 150.00
TOTAL 150.00
INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT OF PLOTS 25000 Nos @ Rs.
FOR SLUM DEWELLERS AND URBAN POOR 20000.0 per hutments
2 50.00
in various part of the
city
TOTAL 50.00
SLUM IMPROVEMENT AND REHILIBATATION 40000 Nos @ Rs.
PROJECTS 15000.0 per hutments
60.00
in various part of the
3 city
TOTAL 60.00
DEVELOPMENT OF INFRASTRUCTURE IN
4 100
ILLEGAL COLONIES
TOTAL 100.00
DEVELOPMENT OF HAWKERS ZONE AND
5 HAT BAZAR AT VARIOUS PLACES IN THE 10
CITY
TOTAL 10.00
GRAND TOTAL 370.00
water network, solid waste disposal,
electrification, community center,
14.9.5 Operating Plan (Housing & primary health center etc. in all those
Slums) slums which are identified in the study.
‰ Ground + 2 structure EWS housing ‰ Development Infrastructures like
schemes to be introduced on the Drinking water supply, sewer and storm
identified land for relocating the slum water network, solid waste disposal,
with all required basic infrastructure like electrification, community center,
Drinking water supply, sewer and storm
water network, solid waste disposal, primary health center etc. for plotted
electrification, community center, development to rehabilitate the Urban poor
primary health center etc. and illegal colonies.

‰ Development of the deficient portion of


the Physical Infrastructures like
Drinking water supply, sewer and storm

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on a regular basis. This forms an important


aspect of monitoring the quality of water
14.10 Environment - bodies.
Strategies & Action Plan ‰ Integrated transportation planning.
14.10.1 Strategy Since a high concentration of pollutants is
observed at junctions and in the form of
The strategies are in accordance with the SPM along roads, it is imperative to
conclusions drawn in the present integrate air pollution mitigation measures
infrastructure analysis carried out earlier in with those of traffic improvement.
the report and as per the suggestions of the
citizens, elected representatives and the ‰ Regulatory framework.
other stakeholders involved in the entire
City Development Plan. Since there is no In line with the powers vested by the 74th
effective monitoring of the pollution levels Constitutional Amendment Act on ULBs to
of the city, the strategies shall address the maintain the environment of the city,
same and help the corporation in bylaws shall be drafted in coordination with
maintaining an effective database of the MPPCB to control air and water pollution in
environmental conditions of the city. the city.

‰ Analysis of pollution level. The Goal

Preparation of existing detail inventory of The year 2021 envisages a "Clean and
the level of air & water pollution of the city Environment Friendly Indore" with
at various locations. environment status reports being
prepared each year to check the levels
‰ Action plan for cleaning and of pollution in the city.
desilting of important water bodies
in the city. 14.10.2 Institutions
On the basis of analysis, the action plan will ‰ Indore Municipal Corporation
be formulated for all the water bodies in the
city to check the pollution levels and ‰ Indore Development Authority
measures towards the maintenance and
revitalization shall be suggested. The plan
shall also explore various options of 14.10.3 Action Plan/ Tasks
maintenance; like developing recreational ‰ Preparation of action plans for control of
activities etc. based on the plan. water and air pollution in the city

‰ Improving condition of existing ‰ Small scale polluting industrial units


parks and development of Regional to be moved out of the city
p& city park in the city.
The execution plan will be formulated for ‰ Effective transportation planning to
developing all the city level parks and avoid congestion on roads and road
regional parks. margins to be properly paved.

‰ Effective monitoring of water bodies ‰ Conservation of water bodies.


and quality control.
‰ Mixed land use to be accepted to
The corporation shall initiate a dialogue reduce unnecessary movement of
between various agencies including vehicles
MPPCB, to collect and maintain data on
important parameters of water bodies like ‰ Development and regeneration of city
BOD, COD, species present, extent of silt, parks and Regional parks.
sewerage outfalls, industrial discharges etc.

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‰ Green belt provision and plantation of 14.10.4 Identification of Projects


trees for JNNURM

Tab 14.10 ENVIROINMENTAL UPGRADATION, CITY BEAUTIFICATION AND


URBAN FORESTRY
S. AREA COST IN
N CRORES
1 River front development

Site clearance, Rehabilitation of slums, Earth management, 103.00


Construction of path ways, road linkages, parking places,
Plantation, Landscape / Gardens, Rehabilitation of existing stop
dam. The cost for development of river front project. @ Rs.
2.00crore per Km for total length of Rivers 51.5 Km

2 Redevelopment of Nehru Park, Ghantaghar, Megdoot garden, and 13.00


Construction of Vishram Bag and Lalbag park etc.

3 Development of colony parks in the different colonies of the city 40.00


including construction of boundary wall, soil filling and construction
of paved walking track.400@100000

4 Development of Piplya Pala regional park including , Development 20.00


of bio-diversity & flowleral park, boating facilities, water park, and
development of food zone & shoping areas.

5 Conservation of Piplya pala tank including Bund strengthening, 15.00


Desilting of tank.

6 Development of Sirpur Tank area including development of park, 5.00


boating facilities, water park, and development of food zone &
shoping areas.

7 Conservation of Sirpur tank including Bund strengthening, Desilting 12.00


of tank, plantation etc.

6 Plantation at Institutional Lands belonging to Educational 10.00


institutions, Industrial premises, Central and State Govt. premises
and other Public lands.Community Wastelands, Road side margins
– state/National Highway, roads, Degraded hillock and reserve
forest near city..
GRAND TOTAL 202.00

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

‰ Heritage Group of Buildings


‰ Heritage Site
14.11 Heritage Structure- ‰ Heritage Precincts
‰ Heritage
Strategies & Action Plan ‰ Monument/Building

14.11.1 Strategies & Action Plan Formulation of Specific Projects for the
Conservation, Restoration, Preservation,
The strategies are in accordance with the Reconstruction of the identified Areas,
conclusions drawn in the present Heritage Zones etc. with the idea of revitalizing the
analysis carried out earlier in the report City centers. Demolition of
(7.6.6) and as per the suggestions of the historical/heritage building or buildings
citizens, elected representatives and the should be done only under special
other stakeholders involved in the entire conditions and law. Encroachments should
City Development Plan. be dealt with firmly. This should be done
with extensive and intensive consultation
An integrated approach is necessary since
with the people and peoples groups
Historic towns have greater Sustainability
including technical, political personnel etc.
than a new development because their
giving space for people to participate in
development is based on evolutionary
more ways than one.
processes and is in tune with the micro-
environment of the region of its location. The care and maintenance of heritage must
be entrusted to the local community, for
Study and Documentation of the
which Public Awareness programs,
Historical/Heritage resulting in an inventory
Heritage Walks, Workshops, Educational
that should be published and marked in
programs must find place in the Heritage
map of the area, complete with its location,
Management Plan.
ward No., ownership, status, photographs,
description, historical and heritage Signage, public notices, road furniture,
significance, age etc. display boards, billboards, etc. should be
designed to supplement the ambience of
‰ Buildings of heritage/historic value
the historic/heritage area.
‰ Drainage and Water systems such as
fountains, tanks, well etc. Promotion of traditional cultural
expressions and art should be given
‰ Streetscapes and culturally importance and special spaces, programs
homogenous areas and facilities should be provided for the
growth of such activities.
‰ Crafts, skills and craftsmen of traditional
crafts The Goal
‰ Open spaces and gardens including The year 2012 sees a well maintained
type of existing trees and plants Heritage Structures in the city.

14.11.2 Institutions
Dividing the identified buildings, areas etc. ‰ State Archeology department
and to Provide Legal back-up with
Regulations and Bye-laws to the identified ‰ Indore Municipal Corporation
buildings after dividing them into
‰ Indore Development Authority
‰ Heritage Zone
‰ Heritage Areas

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14.3.11 Identification of Projects 14.12 SPECIAL PROJECTS


for JNNURM - STRATEGIES & ACTION
PLAN
Tab 14.11 Heritage Structures
14.12.1 Strategies & Action Plan
11 Conservation of 20.00
LalBag palace include The strategies are in accordance with the
conservation, conclusions drawn from the suggestions of
restoration, signage, the citizens, elected representatives and
regulations, the other stakeholders involved in the entire
interpretation, City Development Plan.
electrification and
awareness program of 14.12.2 Identification Of
the buildings, open Projects For Nurm
spaces, water system
(including fountains, Working Women Hostel
tanks, wells etc.
Due to the rapid industrialization and fast
increase in trade and commerce etc. there
is growing trend of migrated population
12 Conservation of 5.00 coming from the nearby cities and also
Rajwada palace from far of cities for jobs etc. The male
include conservation, population and highly placed females also
restoration, normally does not face the accommodation
electrification, problem, but the middle level and below
fountains, level, single female staff working in this
reconstruction of Companies / Industries faces acute
damaged area, problem for want of a secure and good
replastering, repairing premises for residential purpose. Many of
of front portion etc these female employees are forced to
travel daily from near by areas due to lack
13 Conservation of other 5.0 of such accommodation thereby creating
atructures like financial burden and hardship on them. To
Chatteries, Boliea cater to the problem of providing a secure
chatteries, Ghandhi and good accommodation to the single
hall etc women working in the city working women
GRAND TOTAL 30.00 Hostel in different parts of city are being
proposed.

Old Age Home


14.11.4 Operating Plan
Homes for the aged may be said to meet
Reconstruction of damage part of the the needs of the elderly from the stage
structure, restoration of damaged parts, where they are retired, but still do not
waterproofing, re-plastering, and repairing contain themselves entirely within the walls
and replacement of doors and windows, of their own dwellings. To cater for such
redevelopment of gardens and lawns, senior citizen Old age homes in form of self
repainting, fencing the boundaries of the contained dwellings are being proposed in
structure etc. different parts of the city where maximum
care and attention in sheltered
accommodation is being provided. These
activities are proposed to be carried out in
partnership with NGO’s or self help groups
for better sustainability.

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

to develop National and International


Night Shelter Standard Sports Infra structural Facilities in
the city so that the migration of sports
Indore being the commercial capital city a
persons to other cities can be stopped.
large number of Rural population floats in
Also creation of any Sports infrastructure
for short duration of stay. In order to
greatly helps in diverting the minds of
facilitate their stay, Economical stay options
growing youngsters to more creative fields
are employed in the form of night shelters.
of sports thus enabling them to grow with a
The facilities provided in such shelter
healthy mind and body.
houses are in this manner that the user get
a secure staying in the city.
Convention Center & Exhibition Ground
Indore being the commercial capital of the
State, lot of multinational companies are
Marriage Hall/ Community Halls
setting up there business in Indore and in
The spread of Indore both in terms of area nearby areas like Pithampur and Dewas
and population and the increasing land but having the base in Indore. Software
prices have led to a situation where low Industry have started targeting Indore as a
cost Marriage Halls/community halls for the second level hub for talent search and
under privilege are almost non existent. It is many such companies have already started
therefore proposed to provide for well their operations in Indore. AKVN is
placed Marriage halls/community halls constructing a world calls Software
especially for the under privilege coupled Technology park which would be
with all infrastructure facilities. operational very soon. Indore already
enjoys a significant position on the
readymade garment map of the country. At
Sports Complex present there is no auditorium hall to host
The development of Infra structural any International or National level
facilities, services and amenities like meet/conference of capacity 2000 or more,
Health, Education, SPORTS etc so far Hence a world class convention center is
have not been developed as per the proposed in the CDP which will be a self
growing needs of the city. Indore have sustainable venture in regards to its O& M
applied for hosting the National Game 2011 by way of levying charges on the user.
in coordination with the other important
cities of state. At present there is only one
Stadium and ground ‘Nehru Stadium’ which
fulfills the criteria laid down by sports
ministry for different sports. The City boast
of many National and International Players
in all categories of sports but the growth of
new talent is seriously hampered by the
lack of Sports Infrastructure. Some
individual Sports associations have tried to
create some facilities for the particular
sports but it is drastically inadequate to
fulfill the growing needs of the city. In the
absence of Sports Facilities in the City the
up coming talent generally migrate to the
bigger cities like Delhi and Bombay thereby
straining the already merge Infrastructure
available there.

Indore is almost centrally located and the


whole of central India lacks Sports Infra
Structural Facilities . So it is very important

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

SUMMARY OF PROJECTS IDENTIFIED FOR JNNURM


S.N ACTIVITIES COST IN CRORES
IMC IDA PWD ICTS/ KUMS MPHB TOTAL
ARCH.
A SUB MISSION FOR URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE AND GOVERNANCE
1 URBAN RENEWAL 80.00 50.00 130.00

2 WATER SUPPLY 59.80 59.80

3 SEWERAGE 346.87 346.87

4 SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT 36.00 36.00

DRAINS / STORM WATER


5 70.00 70.00
DRAINS

6 URBAN TRANSPORT
a ROADS AND BRIDGES 406.86 112.33 149.7 668.88
TRUCK TERMINALS /
b 20.00 30.20 50.20
TRANSPORT NAGAR
c BUS TERMINALS 12.00 20.00 32.00
d MASS TRANSPORT SYSTEM 312.50 307.50 620.00
e PARKING LOTS 20.00 20.00

ENVIROINMENTAL
UPGRADATION, CITY
7
BEAUTIFICATION AND URBAN
FORESTRY
PRESERVATION OF WATER
a 13.00 5.00 18.00
BODIES
DEVELOPMENT OF REGIONAL
b 15.00 15.00
PARK
c COLONY PARKS 40.00 40.00
UPGRADATION AND
d CONSTRUCTION OF CITY 16.00 16.00
PARKS
e URBAN FORESTRY 10.00 10.00
f RIVER FRONT DEVELOPMENT 50.00 53.00 103.00

7 SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE
a WORKING WOMEN HOSTEL 7.00 7.00
b MARRIAGE HALL 3.00 3.00
c NIGHT SHELTER 2.00 2.00
d COMMUNITY HALL 4.00 4.00
e OLD AGE HOME 4.00 4.00
SPORTS COMPLEX & PLAY
f 18.00 18.00
GROUND
g HERITAGE STRUCTURES 5.00 5.00 20.00 30.00
h CREMATION GROUND 4.00 4.00

8 SPECIAL PROJECTS
1 Convention center near lal bag
palace for 3000 capacity 13.00 13.00

S.N ACTIVITIES COST IN CRORES

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IMC IDA PWD ICTS/ KUMS MPHB TOTAL


ARCH.
2 Exhibition Ground Phase - I
development comprising of
Exihibition Pavelions, ancillary
10.0 10.0
facilites like resturants, Admin.
Offices, utilities, amphitheaters
etc. on approx 50 acers of land.
3 Slaughter House at Aazad Nagar 5.0 5.00
Stadium Complex at Master Road
4 40.00 40.00
–3
SUB TOTAL OF SUB MISSION ON SUB MISSION FOR
URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE AND GOVERN. 2375.75

B SUB MISSION ON BASIC SERVICES TO THE URBAN POOR


HOUSES FOR SLUM
1 DEWELLERS & URBAN POORS 50.00 100.00 150.00

INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT
OF PLOTS FOR SLUM
2 20.00 30.00 50.00
DEWELLERS AND URBAN
POOR
SLUM IMPROVEMENT AND
3 REHILIBATATION PROJECTS 50.00 10.00 60.00
DEVELOPMENT OF
4 INFRASTRUCTURE IN ILLEGAL 100.00 100.00
COLONIES
DEVELOPMENT OF HAWKERS
5 ZONE AND HAT BAZAR AT 10.00 10.00
VARIOUS PLACES IN THE CITY
SUB TOTAL OF SUB MISSION ON BASIC SERVICES
TO URBAN POOR 370.00

GRAND TOTAL 1755.03 433.53 149.69 327.5 50.00 30.00 2745.75

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Chapter
Reforms &
15 Capacity Building

15.1 Agenda
The thrust of the JNNURM is to ensure improvement in Urban Governance and service
delivery so that ULBs becomes financially sound and sustainable for undertaking new
programs. The agenda of reforms specified in JNNURM is given in the following section . A
Memorandum of Agreement (MoA) between States /ULBs /Parastatal agencies and the
Government of India which is a prerequisite for accessing the Central assistance would spell
out specific milestones to be achieved for each item of reform.
It is envisaged in the JNNURM that all mandatory and optional reforms shall be completed
within the Mission period.

Initiatives taken by IMC

Indore with a population of 1.64 million in 2001 is the largest city of Madhya Pradesh ( M P )
state. Realizing that Indore's growing size required significantly greater expenditure on services
and amenities in 1999 the IMC began its initiative to strengthen its revenue base. In 1995-96 IMC
earned an income of only Rs. 44 crore. In response to the pressure on its finances and with a aim
to increase investment in infrastructure. IMC has undertaken sustained measures to strengthen
its revenue-base. The property tax, shop rent charge, trade licensing, budgeting, and accounting
systems were computerized and improved. The IMC also prepared an inventory of its existing
assets and designed strategies for their optimal use. The FMC introduced self-assessment of
property tax by citizens. To strengthen its revenue collection, the IMC reorganized the revenue
department separating Survey and Assessment. Billing and Collection, and vigilance functions,
introduced cash collection counters and decentralized many revenue operations to zonal offices.
The municipal corporation set up a master data bank and compared information available from
voters lists, the state electricity board, the shops and establishment department, and title
registration to identify assets non-assessed for property tax. illegal water connections, under-
assessment of property tax. and non-payment of rents for municipal assets.

As a result of these measures, total revenue increased from Rs 54 crore during 1997-98 to Rs.
186 crore during 2003-04. At the same time, revenue from the city's own sources (property tax,
water tax, trade and licenses etc.) increased from Rs. 18 crore to Rs 75 crore. Consequently,
the IMC has been able to double its expenditure on service provision.

Reforms undertaken by IMC till to date

15.2 GIS Application

The modern accrual-based double entry systems of accounting have already been
partially introduced in IMC and the system will be fully operational in the next financial
year.

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15.2.1 E-Governance Applications in IMC

Aim

Development of transparent public services using Information technology with an timate aim of
paper less governance.
Objective

1. Development of relevant software’s for various services provided by the Indore


Municipal Corporation.
2. Development of GIS based services for Indore Municipal corporation
3. Integration of the Various services through the GIS and MIS
4. Training and Capacity Building for employees of Indore Municipal Corporation
5. Providing transparent, effective implementation of the policies and project of Indore
Municipal Corporation
Tab 15.1 Present status of various E-governance applications are following

S.N. Services using E- Details


governance
applications
a. Property Tax Demand Register/ Billing/ Payment Collection
b. Water Tax ---------same as above--------
c. Licenses Rent ---------same as above--------
d. Birth and Death Issuance Birth and Death Certificate
e. Accrual Based Budget Management and Implementation of Double Entry Accounting
Accounting System
System
f. Building Issuance of Certificate
Permission
1. Inward and outward of application
2. fee calculation / refusal letter
3. registration of Engineers / architect
g Scanning and 1. section maps of building
indexing of
documents
2. Colony layouts
3. lease land documents
4. Colonizer / builder. registration documents
5. employee records
h Social securities To beneficiaries destitution of poison timely and regularly application in
pension schemes working
I Connectivity To develop the wireless connective between head quarter and zonal
offices work under progress by CMC limited.
j Call centre For public complaint and suggestion call centre at IMC in working from
last 8 months
k GIS One pilot project for ward 56 has been completed and according to
result obtained IMC will decided to implement the whole GIS project for
all wards.

The work of GIS application for Indore city have already been awarded to M/S Nagarjun
Infotec Ltd, a Hyderabad based company which will be devicing the complete GIS related
operation for IMC. A piolet project have already been completed in this regard.
Salient features of Pilot Project of GIS

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(a) Objectives
ƒ Estimation of Property Tax
ƒ Land Use/land Cover of each property

(b) Study Area


ƒ 1 ward.
ƒ 1 sq. K.M.
ƒ 24 linear K.M.
ƒ 17 residential colonies.
ƒ Total 2500 properties

(c) Method
ƒ ETS Survey
ƒ Data Collection
ƒ Linking of data with map

( d) Application Software
ƒ Arc view
ƒ AutoCAD
ƒ Map object
ƒ Customize application is developed using visual basic & map object
ƒ Oracle

( e ) Application Of The Digital Map


ƒ Water
ƒ Electricity
ƒ Basic Facility
ƒ Tracking
ƒ Garbage Dumping
ƒ Setting up hospital, School, Police Stations, and Fire Stations etc.
ƒ Shortest Path
ƒ Socio- Economic Analysis
ƒ Town & Country Planning

( f ) Municipal GIS Software


ƒ User Friendly
ƒ Buffer Analysis
ƒ Property Assessment
ƒ Road Widening
ƒ Print Map
ƒ Selection By Attribute
Details of proposed GIS project

Aim

To develop a digital city map, which will have geo-referenced information and processes
required for efficient working of Municipal Corporation
Objectives

• Creation of GIS data base on minimum 1:1000 scale

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• Data collection and survey


• Area wise individual property survey
• Development of customized GIS application
• Implementation and training
• Installation of necessary Hardware
• Interconnectivity of services and data transaction between Zonal offices and various
departments of the IMC
Coverage

• Property Tax
• Road network
• Water connection and Billing
• Building permission and connection to property tax
• Land information system
• Ward wise information
• Waste management
• Business licensing
• Sewerage Network
• General Public services
Proof of Concept

• Pilot project initiated


• Ward No. 56 was selected as sample ward
• Project completed in 2 months

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Process

• Tenders were invited


• Minimum qualification of CMM level 3
• 10 Companies submitted there offer
• 7 companies were Qualified
• Extensive evaluation of technical offer
• 5 companies short listed on the basis of technical proposal
• 3 companies short listed on the basis of highest marks obtained
• NCC Softech, Haderabad is selected for GIS project
• Cost of GIS project 1.28 cr.
• Time period of project 1 year

Method
• Procurement of Satellite image
• ETS survey I
• Internal individual property survey
• Data collection
• Linking of data with of map
• Development of customized GIS software
• Training and implementation
Technology Solution

• ESRI technology
• Oracle 9i Spatial
• Map object
• Application and Database server of Dell
• Linux and windows environment
Application of Digital Map

• Property identification
• Property tax calculation and verification
• Water tax calculation
• Electricity consumption
• Basic facility
• Socio - economic analysis
• Town and country planning

2. Further improvement and integration with GIS is proposed.


3. MIS for remaining services is planned with GIS
4. Training is started with the collaboration of M.P. Khadi Gram Udyog Nigam (Govt. of
M.P. undertaking)
5. Network between the HO and Zonal Offices is being implemented by CMC with 7 year
maintenance.
6. LAN at HO and Zonal Offices is being planned.
7. Scanning and Indexing of Building Permission document and Colony cell layouts
already completed. The integration of same with GIS is being planned.

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8. Services of IIPS – DAVV being taken for providing Consultancy in IT related matters.
This is to be formally started by signing a MoU.
Methodology

1. Appointment of formal Consultant.


2. Implementation of LAN at HO and Zonal Office.
3. Systematic implementation of different software already developed with required
hardware
4. Start of GIS project.
5. Integration of various software (MIS) with GIS.
6. Appointment / Engagement of IT professionals for IMC
7. Training to IMC employees for various services.
8. Maintenance activity under the guidance of Consultant.

Cost of Project

1. Hardware Cost

A. One time cost

S.No. Item Numbers Rates Amount in lakh


1 Server 14 1.5 21
2. Desktop 96+127 0.36 80.28
3 Laser Printer 25+24 0.12 5.88
4 DMP 72+101 .08 13.84
5 LAN at HO 7
6 LAN at Zone 12 0.25 3
7 Training 300 0.01 3
Total 134

B. Recurring Cost Per year

S.No. Item Numbers Rates Amount in lakh


1 Hardware Maintenance Lump Sum - 12
2 Stationary -do- - 25
3 IT Professional 05 1.2 06
Total 43

2. Software Cost:

A. One Time Cost

S .No. Item Numbers Rates Amount in lakh


1 MIS Development Lump Sum - 15
2 Integration of GIS and MIS -do- - 05
Total 20

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B. Recurring Cost for One year

S. No. Item Numbers Rates Amount in lakh


1 Software maintenance Lump Sum - 2
Total 2

C. Consultant Services

S. No. Item Numbers Rates Amount in lakh


1 Initial Cost Lump Sum - 07
2. Recurring cost (for Five Per year 2.5 12.5
years)
Total 19.5

Implantation Period - Three years

As specified in JNNURM User charges will be levied in consultation with the various
stakeholders to achieve the objective of collecting full cost of operation and maintenance. After
completion of Narmada Phase-III project for water supply it is proposed to install meters at
every outlet.

There is already provision kept in the budget of IMC for basic services to Urban poor which
now will be supplemented to meet the requirement of JNNURM.

Some of the scheme for Slum rehabilitation is already underway in Indore under the VAMBAY
scheme of GoI wherein the security of tenure are being provided to the Slum dwellers and site
and services developed. The other reforms spelled out in JNNURM will also be taken up on
priority basis as they already are in the agenda of IMC in pursuit of its aim to provide the Slum
dwellers and urban poor, a sustainable and environmentally hygienic living conditions.

Timeline for Implementing the Urban Reform Agenda As per Annexure

15.3 Capacity Building


15.3.1 Direction to Planning

A city needs to start with a basic vision of itself, about the direction in which it would like to go.
What is it that the city would like to be known for? What are its strengths? How should it attract
quality people to its fold? These questions may yield different answers from the different places
for each place has its own culture, its own behavioral pattern and it is keeping that in mind any
strategy should be devised. Some places may find their potential in trade and commerce or
financial services and some may find it in education, health, science, technology and research,
others in tourism or cultural activities, a salubrious climate and natural beauty and yet some in
heavy industry. Cities need to align themselves along those strengths. And these strengths are
retained and advocated through appropriate Capacity Building programme.

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15.3.2 Indore Municipal Corporation

IMC, as entrusted body to carry out the National Urban Renewal Mission, needs to build on its
organizational capacity. Training and Capacity Building are functions along with the other
initiatives taken by the GoMP.

Indore Municipal Corporation has a range of functions related to the provision of the public
services under obligatory and discretionary functions as incorporated in the Madhya Pradesh
Municipal Corporation Act, 1956 (Refer chapter of Governance.). Like functioning and the
problems identified for any other ULB, IMC also has its functional hazards as following:

15.3.3 The Stumbling Blocks

To identify the prevalent trends and the scope of reforms, multi levels of authority at IMC were
interviewed. It was observed after the dialogue that not only the intervention was required in
the training and capacity building field but there also was a need to restructure and reengineer
the hierarchies and job responsibilities. Following were the encumbrances identified by the
various officials at IMC. There was unanimous view that Madhya Pradesh far ahead in
incorporating the reforms which off-shot from the 73rd and 74th Constitutional Amendment Act.
But there still is need of further strengthen the efforts that have been initiated.

Hindrances in smooth functioning of the department

Urban governance and functioning at IMC today is characterized by


• Fragmentation of responsibility,
• Incomplete devolution of functions and Funds to the elected bodies and ULBs,
• Multi-locality offices and no proper infrastructural provision for the IMC staff.
• Unwillingness to progress towards municipal autonomy,
• Adherence to outmoded methods
• Lack of appropriate HR Department and policy.
• Absence of suitable training policy and technical Upgradation programs.
• No knowledge imparting of the rules and regulation or refreshers.
• No structured induction or orientation program.

The concerns are further listed as following as per the feedback given by IMC employees,
Tab 15.2

Tab 15.2: Departmental Concerns

There is no holistic frame in which the activities of all the functional bodies are
converged for a common ultimate goal. The activities of the local bodies and the
various associate and special bodies overlap, which result in dissipation of scarce
resources and contradiction of action.
Large number of meetings, low participation, minimally effective decisions.

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Lack of formal training policy.


Lack of Personnel with appropriate background and aptitude
Inadequate skill sets of personnel already deployed
Lack of appropriate institutional framework to handle the programme
Coordination and rationalization of inter-institutional relationship has to be effected
for better result between the municipal authorities and Parastatal Bodies.

There are inconsistencies and inadequacies in the urban legal frame work e.g.
municipal laws, town and country planning law, district planning law, etc.

The powers, functions and authority given to the Mayors, Mayor-in-Council and the
local bodies as a whole are not adequately defined.

Planning capacity, human resource development, financial management are not


developed, as a result of which these are operating inefficient.
There is no rigid implementation mechanism to execute the devised programmes.
The city is not fully equipped in terms of human and physical resources to take up
Planning Actions in an integrated manner.
The city is more used to design and implement location-specific repair, maintenance
and improvement works, rather than city-wide integrated systems development
planning and execution.
Modernization and upgrading of systems and procedures in city management through
equipment, skill-enhancement and application, and updating of manuals and codes
(e.g. GIS and MIS) have not been carried out to meet the current and emerging
challenges Functional reorganization of and delegation of powers to the departments
in the city is necessary to enable them to perform better (e.g. a relevant HRD
programme).
Basic elements of improved financial management (e.g. asset register. Double -Entry
system in accounting, billing and collection, etc.) have to be initiated.

The annoyance and resistance is much stronger at the places where nominees were
not informed about the programs and their utility.

IMC lack in-house capacity to handle urban issues. Suitable training programs are
required to combat this.
No forum available to support professional development of urban managers in the
state.
There is no systematic approach to chalk out departmental reforms.

Experience shows that functional autonomy becomes a reality only when it is accompanied by
financial independence. State governments, therefore, need to strengthen the autonomous
functioning of the IMC like any other ULB through positive measures, and in particular, ensure
their financial self-reliance.

In a country that ranks among the highest in terms of scientific and technological talent, where
Information Technology and Business Management schools mushroom around every corner of
even the smallest towns and where even a librarian must have some specialized training of his

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field, there is no systematic education for Governance and Administration. The average
administrator is selected from a variety specialization and left to learn the complexities of public
Administration.

15.4 The Training Perspective


After years of neglect, the development of human resource at the ULB level has suddenly
become a matter of concern, not just for senior administrators but for policy-makers,
international donors and development agencies as well. Local governments need capacity-
building to be effective. Unless local governments are given unambiguous administrative, fiscal
and political devolution, no organization would be able to perform to expectations.

In the contemporary rapidly changing socio-political environment, the importance of training


needs no reiteration. The importance is gaining momentum due to rapidly changing economic,
political and developmental scenario. Training as a process enables individuals to cope with
the pace and magnitude of changes, take initiatives and provide leadership to developmental
activities and helps them to adapt themselves to the changing needs of the society. Training,
therefore, constitutes an integral part of all Human Resource Development efforts. Timely and
need based training with emphasis on ‘doing’ rather than ‘knowing’, increases productivity and
organizational effectiveness.

In the present scenario, training probably requires more serious attention than ever before
because functionaries working at the cutting edge level (elected members and functionaries)
are the ultimate provider of goods and services to the people. Thus, enhancing performance at
this level is of critical importance to ensure optimum utilization of scarce financial and material
resources. Since there is cost associated with training, any ill-directed training may be futile
and may lead to wastage of time and resources.

15.4.1 Training Effectiveness

The training as a concept has a hoary past. It is as old as Plato's Republic. But during last
decades due to changed environment of society and state, the concept and understanding of
training has undergone a tremendous change. Now the ULBs have changed their
characteristics and functions to a large extent. Therefore trainers and training institutions
catering to them must aim to train, keeping the changed priorities and perspectives in mind.
Besides this the secondary function or the obligatory duty is also to be carried out viz: to
influence the government departments / organizations to value the spirit and essence of the
same.

15.4.2 Training Problems and Present Situation

Following is the comprehensive update on the training problems and present situation:

Tab 15.3 Action Plan With Verifiable Indicators

Problems Present Situation


Horizontal and vertical information flow lacking;
Organizational structure and
Pyramidal structure of Authority;
Internal coordination
True management interaction Lacking;

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Manuals and procedures not updated regularly;


Refresher trainings are often taken lightly;
Procedures and internal
Municipal Information system not developed;
management
Old permanent staff are least bothered of the changes and the
new staff capable is not recruited regularly;

Knowledge, Skills and application not present in the new


changing context.
Staff capacities
Employee’s are less adaptable to the changes in the
procedures;

Better Understanding and knowledge of other relevant


External – inter Agency institutions is untouched;
coordination Dimensions of interrelationship not fully understood;
Areas of cooperation and concerns not identified adequately;

Lack of records, facts and asset registers update;


Non – realization of Revenue
Continuation of leakage, Under-assessment, Under billing and
Potential
oversight;

No experience (except one or two instances);


Civil society Interface
Efficiently discouraged many a times;
Have no history of such activity;
Lack of Experience, Interest or Need felt but approach and action not taken and if taken it is
Pro-activity in Local economic too slow in the name of culpability to other Departmental
development Procedures;

15.4.3 Training for Civil Servants.

In the light of above, the emphasis of training is now placed in enabling civil servants to play a
role of catalytic agent for sustainable development. Their role has to be a “facilitator” rather
than a “provider". Therefore inclusion of methods and approach, which can tailor the attitude,
and behavior of civil servants in training activities is demand of the day.

The training-function will be created and fully integrated with organizations with responsibility
encompassing all activities aimed at improving performance and effectiveness. The training-
function would advice managements in formulation of on training priorities. The training-
managers of training function will be involved in the identification of training and development
needs, necessitated by the administrative reforms. They will also be involved in establishing
forward and backward linkages in the training process i.e. Pre and post-training issues. A
conducive training climate where self-development is encouraged needs to be thought of while
framing a training policy.

Training in the Indian context has been looked upon more as a cosmetic exercise. It is only
very recently that human resource development is beginning to be given its rightful place. The
promotion of systematic training in every government department is a mammoth task requiring
the total commitment of all those involved in the training function. We have to recognize that
training is not a mundane activity, which can carry on with utter disregard to the organizational
environment around it.

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Illust. 15.1 Simple Model of Training Process

With the exception of Tamil Nadu, Maharashtra and Madhya Pradesh, no other state has
formulated its own Reform and Training Policy. Consequently, the imperatives of these
changes have yet to percolate down among the multitude of departments and agencies at the
state level and much less to the regional or district levels. In almost all the states not even one
half of the departments/agencies have any continuing arrangements for administrative
improvements or provisions for training their employees.

Illust. 15.2 Elaborate Model of Training Process

15.4.4 Role of Voluntary Agencies in Training


The voluntary agencies and the other organizations of civic society are vigorously coming
forward to address some of the critical and important elements in administrative reform and
capacity building. However, it is recognized by the government that there is a need to create
an enabling environment so that their participation in the development process is further
enhanced.

The National Training Policy (Annexture: 1) provides the framework for the development of
the human resources of the government. The policy, inter-alias, emphasizes the need for

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training to be given to all employees so as to increase the professionalization of the civil


services at all levels.

High priority is attached by the government to the training and management development of
higher civil services by providing opportunities for the development of professional skills and
general management abilities across the departmental/organizational boundaries. The aim is
to create an adequate pool from which to draw personnel for the senior management levels of
Government.

Capacity building in urban institutions is one area which is much talked about but has been
relatively neglected in terms of action. The restructuring of the roles of the elected ULBs has to
initially come about in the form of partnerships with the parastatals which have been handling a
variety of services. The public service element needs to be made more professional and
accountable to the people. Adoption of modern accounting systems, improved practices of
budgeting and planning, effective use of wards committees and other means of peoples’
participation, and programme assistance should be put to use for improving urban governance
Capacity building is required for developing communication and inter-personal skills among the
people responsible for providing for the needs of the urban poor, for improving the level of
services and satisfaction of the beneficiaries, and for providing coordinated services from a
number of line agencies.

Good urban management without adequate capacity is a misconception


Training and development efforts are no longer viewed as peripheral to departmental goals.
The human resources are treated as assets rather than as costs and training is seen in the
government as an investment in future organizational capabilities. A two-pronged approach is
suggested for the same, Firstly, to build capacity for making the administration and the public
institutions more responsive and, secondly to empower the citizens to create sustained
pressure for change.

The capacity building is not seen in isolation. The capacity building efforts are to be
accompanied with administrative reforms. Administrative reforms efforts aim at:

(a) Improvement of delivery system; and

(b) Image building/correction of the public systems.

The overall goal of the Capacity Building in Public Administration Programme will contribute
significantly to the above objectives.

Capacity Building needs to focus on the entire stakeholder department to cover areas of policy
facilitation, system of restructuring, organization development, and training and knowledge
management. It is required for good government which will bring efficiency and effectiveness of
services and for “good governance” to deal with the empowering of more and more
stakeholders and bringing in transparency and accountability in the various systems of delivery
for city services.

15.5 Recommendation & Implementation Strategy


Before taking action on any recommended strategies there are certain issues that need to be
resolved. Unless the department has answers to these no programme undertaken to build the
capacities would be effective in principle.

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There is a need to conduct an extensive research programme to analyze the present setup.
The authority at the highest level needs to ask and review the following issues:

‰ Is the present organizational structure ready to implement any development or training


strategy?

‰ Are the roles and responsibilities made clear at all the levels of hierarchy, are the
deliverables clear to employees in order to carry out their functions effectively?

‰ Is there any relevant pre-requisite for technical post or any provision of acquiring the skill if
need be?

‰ Are Manuals and technical instruction guidelines in place and made available to relevant
people?

‰ Is there any vision, a long term plan for the department apart from the short term plan
made for the fiscal purpose?

‰ In the absence of a long term plan, how do the officials plan to achieve a holistic
implementation of the already floated developmental exercises?

‰ Are the Discretionary and Obligatory Duties of the Corporation clearly formulated and
defined?

‰ Has the Act been amended to suit the present setup and requirement?

‰ Can the department make provisions for a fixed tenure of the key officials so that the
initiatives taken at the particular level does not suffer?

Unless there are answers to these issues it is in principal not possible to deliver an effective
training and capacity building programme.

It is very strongly recommended to undertake an in-depth organizational research to study the


various vertical and horizontal levels of hierarchy. To chalk and design the roles and
responsibilities at each level to enable the smooth transition of power when need comes. It
would enable each employee to understand his/her role in clearer terms and carry out the
responsibilities efficiently.

It would be the second phase which would address the issue of training and capacity building.
For smooth functioning and efficient execution of the assigned tasks any department would like
to undertake training programmes in the following areas:

1. Technical Skills

2. Upgradation of existing skills

3. Knowledge of Reforms and Innovations

4. Behavioral Skills

5. Employee Development

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6. Success Stories and Best Practices

7. Miscellaneous

In past there has been an assortment of training programmes that has taken place for the
municipal personnel as follows:

Tab 15.4 List of Training Programs for Municipal Personnel

Training Module on ‘Land Management’.


Training Module on ‘Water Supply Management’.
Training Module on ‘Public health’.
Training Module on ‘Vital Statistics including Registration of Birth and Death’.
Training Module on ‘Environment Management’.
Training Module on ‘Solid Waste Management’.
Training Module on ‘Urban Planning and Development’.
Training Module on ‘Roads & Bridges Construction’.
Training Module on ‘Fire Services’.
Training Module on ‘Urban Poverty Alleviation’.
Training Module on ‘Urban Transportation’.
Training Module on ‘Community Participation’.

Training Module on ‘Provision of Urban Amenities and facilities such as Parks, Gardens, and
playgrounds’.

Training Module on ‘Slum Improvement and Upgradation’.


Training Module on ‘Municipal Finance and Resource Mobilization’.

These programmes can also be broadly classified into the above mentioned categories. But it
is apparent from this list that sufficient efforts have not been made and there is a need to make
more concerted efforts in the field of training and development to arrive at more sustainable
gains from it.

The training evaluation report of these programs further sums up to the fact that these training
have not achieved the desired results and require efforts to obtain significant and sustained
knowledge gain. As identified by most of the Corporation Employees, there are no clear
guidelines available for carrying out such programmes and there is no mechanism available to
nominate the employees for the same. These factors reiterate that fundamental need at IMC is
in-depth study of the Organizational Structure and ‘Capacity Mapping’ at all the levels.

15.6 Action Plan


Following are the steps that should be taken extensively at the department:

15.6.1 HR Initiatives

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• Prepare an organization chart based on personnel functions and assign appropriately


qualified personnel to identified posts.
• Establish an HR Department/agency
• Formulate an HR policy incorporating key HR elements (rewards, incentives, training
and career planning)
• Determine the areas of capacity building and training for the staff.

15.6.2 Formation of a FOCUS Group

A team of selected personnel would be constituted that will facilitate the process of training and
capacity building. As it is not possible for the department to implement the training strategy
without the professional help in the area and at the same time any outside agency would not
be able to do justice unless the programme is developed jointly by a professional along with an
internal department resource who has a detailed insight to the department.

15.6.3 Review of Training Needs

A comprehensive exercise with the selected personnel would be undertaken to assess the
training needs of the persons directly connected with the planning process. This stocktaking
will develop a training strategy in consultation with other states carrying the similar range of
activities hence facilitating the knowledge sharing and management.

The training strategy will develop profile of participants, training design and training modules.

15.6.4 Training Manual

A Training Manual is a set of guide lines, and instructions elaborating systems, procedures,
processes, and techniques required to be applied in planning, formulating, implementing, and
reviewing departmental training and development interventions by the organization. In
government departments also there is a need to develop training manual to provide direction
for formulating departmental training policy, implementation strategies, and programmes of
action.

15.6.5 Training plan

The need for a training plan is to meet the short-term/long-term requirements of an


organization for improving the performance of valuable human resources at all levels. To be
successful, training programmes should not be created in isolation, but structured in line with
goals and the development plans of the individual/ organization. The training and development
plan must be an integrated system of the HR development process and must be monitored
periodically to measure progress.

15.6.6 Workshop with Resource Persons

A team of resource persons will be constituted to develop resource and learning material for
the training modules

15.6.7 Training of Trainers

A critical mass of trainer will be developed at multi-levels. This group will in turn take care of
the training down the line.

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15.6.8 Conducting Training

Depending on the number of trainers a series of training of trainers programme will be


conducted. The time frame of the same can be mutually decided by concerned personnel.

15.6.9 Periodic Review

A team of experts and selected beneficiaries will conduct a mid-term review.

15.6.10 Training Reinforcement & Continuity

Ideally, training should have reference to earlier programmes and build on them. Trainees
learn more when training is encapsulated and repeated with well-defined objectives concise
and yet comprehensive.

The other training and capacity building activities can be undertaken as per the Training
process flow given in the chart and the action plan as listed:

Tab 15.5 Broad Training Process Flow


Assessment of Assumption
Action Plan Indicators of Achievement
Indicators (Risk)
I. BROAD OBJECTIVES
Capacity development through training.
II. IMMEDIATE 9 Systematic approach introduced 9 Formation of • The Project
OBJECTIVES in identifying training needs by Steering understand
2.1 To identify trainers while designing and Group at the impact of
training needs implementing training. Project level TOT will be
To introduce 9 Recommendation/suggestion 9 Field trip slow.
systematic made by the participants and feed organized to • The field
training to in to the development of training assess the level
identify training strategy. training need functionaries
needs of 9 Steering are able to
identified target Group articulate their
group approves of actual needs
To develop the training to make the
training strategy strategy project
as per the need Knowledge and successful
skills are
reflected in
the course
organized by
the trainer.
• Priority given
III. MODULE 9 Development of modules on 9 Assessment of by the Project.
DEVELOPMENT identified needs for capacity quality of • Effective
To develop building modules on networking
training modules the basis of amongst
on identified and contents and Project
agreed processes by partners.
competence Project • Project
requirement at, partners partners take
Block and training as a
District level serious

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business.

IV. PILOT TESTING 9 Course conducted for testing 9 Incorporation • Timely


To test the training training modules of Feedback release of the
module and its from fund for
effectiveness participants module
for improved development
quality Availability of
professionals

V. TRAINING OF 9 Selection of Trainers 9 Identified • Willingness


TRAINERS 9 Collaborative development of trainers to learn
To develop critical training and resources amongst undergoes • Selection of
mass of trainer at Trainers. training trainer
block/sector level • Trained
Trainers
remained in
post.
• Trainers get
opportunity to
demonstrate
their learned
behavior

VI. TRAINING 9 Trainers conduct courses for 9 Number of • Availability of


To conduct and identified client at various levels courses trainees
facilitate training at conducted • Project able
various levels and number to sustain the
of people focus and
trained momentum of
training

Illust. 15.3 Training Detail

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1.7 USION.

The development of human resource at the local level has seldom gone beyond nominating a
few officers for programmes being conducted by various training institutes and understandably
as it has not produced any tangible changes in the working of ULBs anywhere. This is because
although the trainers there may have the expertise and training material required, they lack in
insider’s perspective and seldom have a stake in the development of the organization as a
whole.

Training may help to upgrade skills and knowledge and sensitize people but it cannot build
capacities among organizational chaos. True change flows from true empowerment of the
worker and that comes from arming him with the information to take the right decisions.

A fundamental change is needed in finding solution as every level and to device the holistic
policies and strategies with a very clear emphasis on all-round Human Development.
Identifying the impediments, and devising the relevant strategies to combat them through
identifying the individual capacities and training & building upon them is the key answer in
place of delivering off the shelf ready made programs. As the person is empowered to his/her
full capacity the difference between the mere policy maker and the person who can deliver.

There is an acute need at IMC to focus on strategic capacity building initiatives that would
require an emphasis on assessing the skills and knowledge necessary to determine needs,
seek solutions, process information and change priorities, the emphasis of human resource
development should be much wider than individual training courses. This document seeks to
present the road map to achieve the all-round development, realistic and sustainable optimal
use of the resources to fulfill the State and Society expectations by executing their entrusted
jobs effectively. To achieve the sustained implementation of a programme to recruit, train,
motivate and develop a local work force to become more efficient, dedicated and effective
members of the public service.

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Chapter Financial ‰ Demand from State Govt. for a stipulated


Share from the Road tax collected by RTO
in Indore .
Operation plan
16 ‰ Underlying the major assumptions, basic
assumptions for growth in property tax
16.1. Strategy assessment, growth in other taxes and
miscellaneous income, as well as changes
in the main expenditure heads have been
The City Investment Plan is the multi- year
made, including general administration,
scheduling of investments and public
establishment, O & M, debt servicing, etc.
improvements. The scheduling or phasing
of the plan is based on studies of the fiscal
‰ The phasing/ scheduling of investments
resources availability (for new investments
have been carried out through an
and O & M), technical capacity for
interactive process and the principles of
construction and O & M and the choice of
phasing have been taken into account.
specific improvements to be constructed for
a period of seven years into the future.

In determining a long-term financial Principles of Phasing


strategy, IMC plans to raise resources
‰ Priority needs, with developed areas
through:
receiving priority over future
‰ Accessing the grants available under the development area
JNNURM Framework (as % of identified
‰ “Inter and intra-service linkages-
investment in Urban Governance and
Investments in one sector shall
infrastructure sectors - 50% Central Govt.
be complemented by corresponding
Grants and 20% State Govt. Grants).
improvements in other sectors.
‰ Revision of the Annual Property tax and ‰ Size and duration of the requirements,
other taxes at certain levels including preparation and
implementation period
‰ Revision of water charges and imposition
‰ Project linked revenue implications,
of sewerage charges at specific intervals
such as installing house connections
and transfer of water and sewerage tax to
where supply and distribution
the respective account heads.
capacities have been increased
‰ Maintaining the collection performance of
taxes and charges at certain minimum
levels for current and for arrears.

‰ Levying user charges on the facilities


created.

‰ From the various remunerative projects


identified by IMC, mainly through PPP
module.

‰ Increase in Octroi Compensation provided


by State govt. and other various grants.

‰ Demand from State Govt. for a stipulated


share from the commercial tax surcharge
collected from Indore.

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16.2 Financial Operating Plan


‰ Grants, Contribution and Subsidies
The Financial operating Plan (FOP) is 2. Revenue Account Expenditure;
essentially a multi-year forecast of finances ‰ Establishment
of the local body for medium term of 5 to 10
‰ Operation and Maintenance
years (Plan Period). It needs mention that ‰ Debt Servicing Existing and New
the identified investment is phased from
Loans
2005-06 to 2011-12 and the FOP has also ‰ Phasing of non debt liabilities, and
been generated for the same plan period. A
salient feature of the FOP is that all
3. Capital Income; and
outstanding dues including debt and non-
4. Capital Expenditure
debt liabilities have been taken into account
and the repayment has been scheduled 16.2.1 Forecast of Revenue Income
accordingly.
Property Tax/ consolidate tax has been the
The FOP is basically generated to assess single largest source of revenue for the
the investment sustaining capacity of the IMC contributing to more than 25 percent.
corporation adopting a project funding The assumption adopted in forecasting
structure comprising, 30% in the form of property tax, water tax, water charges,
internal generation (in case of surplus water inspection fee and other revenue
revenue account) and the rest by way of items are presented in Table
grant. The major criterion for ascertaining
the investment sustaining capacity of IMC 16.2.2 Other taxes
is that, they should have year-to-year
positive Opening Balance during the plan Other tax items including fees, etc. have
period. been assumed to grow at the past growth
trends, subject to minimum of 10% and
The financial data for the Financial Years maximum of 25% per annum.
2001-02 to 2005-06 procured from the IMC
has been used as the base to prepare the Non-Tax Income
FOP. A spreadsheet FOP model has been
customized so as to work out the ultimate 16.2.3 Own Income Sources
investment sustaining capacity of the
corporation, based on the FOP Non tax income from the corporations and
assumptions. assets, like income from municipal
properties, collection from public places,
As mentioned in financial section, the IMC realization under special acts, and public
maintains its account on a accrual basis service charges and fees, etc. are assumed
accounting system. The main item of to grow at the past trends, subject to a
income and expenditure have been minimum of 5% and maximum of 10% per
classified into two accounts for assessing annum, over the average income during the
the financial position of the corporation last five years.
namely revenue account and capital
account. The same has been adopted for 16.2.4 Other Income Source
the FOP and further revenue account
receipts and expenditure were projected Other sources mainly include interest
under following categories earned from deposits and dues, sale
proceeds (scrap sale, farm product,
1. Revenue Account Receipts; publication, tender from, etc.), and
‰ Taxes miscellaneous income. These are assumed
‰ Non Tax Sources, and

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to grow at minimum of 5% and a maximum 16.3 Forecast of Revenue


of 10% per annum.
Expenditure
16.2.5 Revenue Grants
The assumption made in forecasting the
items of revenue expenditure are presented
The revenue grants announced from time-
in Table
to time are assumed to grow at past trends,
subject to a nominal growth of 8 percent.
Tab. 16.2 Assumption adopted for
These grants mainly include grant for
forecasting items of Revenue
various purposes viz. UBSP, grants for
expenditure
educational and medical services and other
grants announced from time to time.
Item Assumptions
Tab.16.1 Assumption adopted for Adopted for
forecasting realization under various Forecast
heads I Establishment Forecast adopting
Item Assumpt Basis expenditure 1. Nominal annual
ion growth rate 5%
adopted 1. Annual growth Past trend, subject
for rate to a minimum of
forecast 5%and maximum
I General Forecast adopting an of 8.% p.a.
tax average growth rate of II Repair & Water Supply -@
10% maintenance Rs. 0.17 Lakhs
II Other taxes on existing per MLD per
1 Water Forecast adopting services annum at 2006-05
charges, current average growth prices, and
water rate, subject to increasing at 5%
inspection minimum of 20% and p.a.
fee, vehicle maximum 175%. Other Services-
tax, theatre Forecast adopting
tax, and current average
other taxes growth rate,
III Non-tax income subject to
minimum of 5.%
1. Income Forecast adopting
and maximum of
from current average growth
7.%.
municipal rate, subject to
properties, minimum of 5% and NRCP
realization maximum 10.%. III Debt servicing ADB Lone:
under sp. To be repaid in as
Acts, Inst, per the repayment
Rent & provided by IMC.
other Loans (to fund
IV Revenue grants CIP)-
Bonds:
1. State Subject to a standard
Governmen growth rate of 8% IV Outstanding NIL
t and Other non-debt
Grants liabilities
(Salaries, P.F,
MPEB, Edu.
Cess,ect.)

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16.4 Forecast of Capital Income The project is being planned under PPP
scheme. As such IMC will develop the
and Expenditure required amenities and construct
Capital Income commercial spaces by reutilising the total
space available. The total cost of the
16.4.1 Own Sources development work will be Rs. 12 crores.
The scheme will generate Rs. 5.00 crores
The amount realized under own sources of income from 2007-2008 and 2010-2011.
contribute mainly from capital grants,
municipal bonds, (floated for water and 3. Construction of Admin Building of
sewerage projects), non-refundable IMC:
registration/ permit fee, sale of capital
assets, etc. A standard nominal growth rate The Corporation proposes, to construct the
of 8 percent per annum over the average new Admin block for its own Adm, office
realization during the last five years has purpose, which will create ample of parking
been assumed. and office space. Along with this some part
would be exploited commercially which will
16.4.2 Regular- Scheme-based Capital generate Rs.10 crores in year 2007-2008.
Grants
4. Parking lots at various identified
The Indore Municipal Corporation receives locations in the city:
capital grants from the State Government
under various state and Central The corporation has identified various sites
Government sponsored schemes for and old structures in Inner city area, to be
specific capital works. The income under developed as multistoried parking
such grants does not show specific trends structures under PPP. The total cost
during the last five years. Thus a standard involved is estimated at Rs.20.0 crores.
nominal growth rate of 8 percent per The schemes would be implemented in the
annum over the average realization during year 2006-07 to 2008-09. The corporation
the five years has been assumed. Table would get approx. Rs.1.00 crores per year
below presents the assumptions adopted after 2006-07.
for forecasting the items of capital income
and expenditure. 5. Parking lots and Recreational areas
along Khan river :
16.5 Income Expected From
On similar line as above parking lots and
Projects Identified Under recreation areas are to be developed on
JNNURM the land reclaimed after river embankment
1. Freight Terminals at 5 locations:- development, which is expected to
generate Rs. 1 crore per year from 2008-
2009.
The project will start in 06-07 and will be
completed in phased manner by 2011-12. 6. Slum Rehabilitation – Commercial
The total project cost is Rs.20 crores, which exploitation by relocation.
excludes the cost of land, the land cost will
be borne by IMC. The net returns The corporation under its drive to relocate
generated from the sale of developed the slums for the betterment has identified
commercial plots/spaces are estimated at Slum situated at Mhow Naka near Pratap
Rs.10 corers in 5 years. statue( Mhow naka) and some other
locations in different part of the city. These
2. Re development of Regional Bus pockets of slums situated in main
stands:- commercial area will be either relocated to
some other place or will be rehabilitated at

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

the same location in a planned manner except for MLA/MP


leaving some of the space for commercial grant, for which a
development to harness the commercial standard growth rate
value of that particular location. One such of 8% is adopted
project opp. Lalbagh palace for Arjunpura II Loans New Capital works to
slum has already been successfully be funded from
implemented. The land will be developed • Bonds floated for
under PPP. The scheme is expected to road project,
generate approx Rs.25 crores from the • Grants-based on
year 2007-08 and onwards in the phased Govt. rules,
manner. • Required to be
funded from
Apart from it approx. 15% of the total cost revenue surplus,
of Slum rehabilitation will be recovered • Borrowings-AD
from the beneficiaries. Bank lone of Rs
7. Development of Illegal Colonies : 314.Crore
• Balance
The corporation has identified around 442 borrowings from
illegal colonies covering approx. 550 Acers other institutions.
of land. As per state Govt. policy It has B Capital expenditure
been decided to regularise and develop Sector-wise • Based on the
this colonies. Total expenditure of Rs.100 capital investment
crores has been estimated on these under expenditure sustainable by
the NURM scheme. The corporation will be the IMC, phased
charging Rs.15/- per sq. feet, which will over the plan
generate Rs.25.63 crores over a period of period. (See
5 years from 2006-07 to 2011-12. phasing of capital
investment and
Capital Expenditure sizing of capital
investment). The
Regular Scheme-based Capital Works investment needs
identified by IMC
The IMC is required to utilize the scheme- has been adopted
based capital income for specific works for the plan
alone. It is assumed that the entire amount period
of capital income received for such works
from state/ central Government will be
expended on specific schemes for which
they are meant for.

Tab. 16.3 Assumption adopted for


forecasting items of Capital Income and
Expenditure
Item Assumptions
Adopted for
Forecast
A Capital Existing capital
Income income to grow
(Grant and based on current
Contribution) average growth rate,
subject to standard
growth rate of 8%

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16.6 Projects Identification annexed herewith and will be separately


contributing the 30% share for the different
under JNNURM projects identified by them in this scheme.
The projects identification has been done
based on the strategies listed out under each The total estimated capital investment
of the service sector as identified by IMC and required for providing efficient services and
other parastatal bodies. The total projects cost different facilities to the population residing in
derived based on the estimates are aimed at city planning area by the year 2012 is about
ensuring optimal and efficient utilisation of Rs. 2745.75 Crores as identified by the IMC
existing infrastructure systems. and other agencies involved.

The table annexed herewith presents the


summary of sector-wise investment
A very important feature of this City requirements for the urban infrastructure and
Development Plan and City urban services to poor.
investment strategy is the
involvement of other The capital Investment required by different
agencies are summarized as follows –
development agencies apart
from IMC in formulation and Indore Municipal Corporation– 1755.03 Cr
executing projects under
different sectors as per their Indore Development Authority–. 433.53 Cr
work chart, thus ensuring a
collective effort by all the MPPWD – 149.69 Cr
agencies towards an
Indore City T.S. Ltd. – 307.50 Cr
integrated and sustainable
City Development strategy. Archeology – 20.0 Cr
The agencies involved in the CDP apart from Krishi Upaj Mandi Samiti – 50.0 Cr
IMC and their sphere of activities are:
M.P. Housing Board - 30.00 Cr
Indore Development Authority –
Roads, Environment, Special projects and Total - 2745.75 Cr.
Urban services to poor.
MPPWD –
16.7 Financial Operating Plan
For IMC (Fop) – Results
Roads
The FOP is generated from the sustainable
Indore City transport services Ltd. – investment point of view and other options,
Mass transport which were considered as discussed
earlier. The seven-year FOP of IMC is
State Archeology department –
presented in appendix, which may be
Heritage structures extended to 10 years.
Krishi Upaj Mandi Samiti – Under the assumptions made and the full
Urban renewal identified investment loaded , the
investment sustainability criteria are
M.P. Housing Board - Urban services to
satisfied during all years of planning
Poor.
horizon. IMC would have operating surpluses
along with prompt repayment of all outstanding
This different agencies will be executing the
loans and non-debt liabilities. This is mainly due
projects as per the Summary of the projects
to the consideration of about 70% of the total

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

identified investment being funded in the form of For the Investment identified by Krishi Upaj
grants under the JNNURM framework. mandi samiti for shifting the existing Grain
Mandi in the Old city area to the outskirts
The results of the FOP in terms of the total on bye pass , it possesses sufficient funds
investment required, investment sustainable of to cater for the required 30% investment in
for the IMC is presented in Annexure -V I . the component.

16.8 Fund requirement by IMC Similarly for the Investment identified by


MPHB for providing Plots to urban poor in
and other agencies-
its various scheme it possesses sufficient
The funding for the identified investment for the funds to cater for the required 30%
complete CDP as worked out would be by way investment in the component.
of –

Total financial outlay - 2745.75 Cr

Grant under JNNURM


by GoI - 1370.0 Cr (49.89%)

Grant under JNNURM


by M.P Govt. - 549.0 Cr (19.99%)

Own contribution of IMC


other agencies and
loans - 826.75 Cr.(30.11%)

Regarding the works carried out by other


agencies the FOP of IDA also is annexed
with. IDA has a strong capital base and a
reserve fund of around 40.0 Cr. and can
easily meet its share of 30% in the
identified projects in different years of plan
period.

For the Investment identified by MPPWD,


which is a Govt. organization, the state
govt. will provide for the 30% share.

The investment identified by the ICTS Ltd.


mainly for establishing the Mass Rapid
Transport system will be required in the last
two years i.e. 2011 and 2012. ICTS will try
to generate the required resources in the
first five years of plan since it have already
started its operation by providing city bus
services on about 18 routes in the city.

For the Investment identified by


Archeology, which is a Govt. organization,
the state govt. will provide for the 30%
share.

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FINANCIAL OPERATING PLAN FOR INDORE MUNICIPAL CORPORATION
(Rupees in lakhs)
2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
Consolodated
Tax/Property Tax 3216.41 3811.56 4163.03 4068.14 4434.27 4966.39 5711.34 7139.18 8067.27 8793.33 9584.73
Water Tax 741.10 871.08 955.57 759.48 911.38 2734.13 3280.95 3937.14 6724.57 8069.49 9683.39
Water Meter Charges (narmada) 386.27 426.00 448.45 478.71 574.45 689.34 827.21 992.65 1191.18 1429.42 1715.30
Other Taxes 71.07 60.04 75.11 129.22 143.43 159.21 176.73 196.17 217.74 241.69 268.28
Rental Income from
Muni.Properties 188.97 201.37 199.80 179.13 197.04 216.75 238.42 262.26 288.49 317.34 349.07
Collection From Public
Place 41.68 54.22 65.00 75.87 83.46 91.80 100.98 111.08 122.19 134.41 147.85
Other Income 1030.97 1196.09 2212.05 1257.92 1383.71 1822.08 2004.29 2204.72 2425.19 2667.71 2934.48

Revenue Grants 7119.98 9792.68 7436.69 9052.17 10862.60 11731.61 12670.14 13683.75 14778.45 15960.73 17237.59
Proposed Income
(i) Solid Waste Management 168.00 183.04 200.26 216.36 231.70 240.16
(ii) Compounding of illegal construction 600.00 800.00 800.00 100.00 50.00 50.00
(iii) Parking Lot Developments 200.00 300.00 50.00 25.00 25.00 25.00
(iv) illegal colony regularisation 300.00 700.00 500.00 200.00 100.00 100.00
(v) Truck Terminal 0.00 100.00 200.00 200.00
(vi) remunerative space available due to Slum Shifting 400.00 400.00 400.00
Total Revenue income 12796.45 16413.0 15555.70 16000.64 18590.35 24079.31 27493.11 30677.22 34556.46 38020.82 42335.85
2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12

Establishment Expenditure 4588.56 4614.36 4952.38 5363.13 5631.29 5912.85 6208.49 6518.92 6844.86 7187.11 7546.46
Administration &
General Expenses 301.40 824.47 458.00 657.09 722.80 795.08 874.59 962.05 1058.25 1164.08 1280.48
Repairs & Maintenance 1343.28 1847.62 1891.90 2042.50 2144.63 2251.86 2364.45 2482.67 2606.81 2737.15 2874.00
Service & Programme Related Dire 1.97 8.37 40.73 44.28 48.71 53.58 58.94 64.83 71.31 78.44 82.37
Other Expenses 6068.54 6697.76 5635.47 4848.72 5333.59 5866.95 6453.65 7099.01 7808.91 8589.80 9019.29
Appropriation

Debt Servicing 293.16 492.36 829.52 871.95 1602.28 1875.23 2211.04 3536.92 4963.12 4878.56 4722.66
Total Revenue Exp. 12596.91 14484.9 13808.00 13827.67 15483.29 16755.55 18171.15 20664.40 23353.26 24635.14 25525.27

REVENUE SUR/DEF 199.54 1928.10 1747.70 2172.97 3107.06 7323.77 9321.96 10012.82 11203.19 13385.68 16810.58
CAPITAL ACCOUNT
2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
Capital Income (Specify Sources)

1.Specific Schemes 0.00 0.00 82.89 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
2. Loan Receipts 458.00 2827.00 2315.40 3700.00 8027.00 9315.00 9315.00 6330.00 0.00 0.00
3. (i) NURM Central grant 1950.00 11275.00 9263.00 10387.00 13472.00 15971.00 25432.00
(ii) NURM State grant 780.00 4510.00 3705.00 4155.00 5389.00 6389.00 10173.00

4. Capital Grant 4985.00 7481.00 7481.00 4987.00


Total Capital
Receipts 0.00 458.00 2909.89 2315.40 6430.00 28797.00 29764.00 31338.00 30178.00 22360.00 35605.00

Capital Expense
1. NURM Schemes 0.00 3900.00 22550.00 18525.00 20775.00 26945.00 31945.00 50863.00
2. Capital exp.(specify) 0.00 3700.00 13695.00 20552.00 20552.00 13701.00
Total 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 7600.00 36245.00 39077.00 41327.00 40646.00 31945.00 50863.00

total capital sur/def -1170.00 -7448.00 -9313.00 -9989.00 -10468.00 -9585.00 -15258.00
net sur/def 1937.06 -124.23 8.96 23.82 735.19 3800.68 1552.58
FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE OF INDORE MUNICIPAL CORPORATION (Rupees in lakhs)
HEAD OF ACCOUNT 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 AVERAGE
I Revenue Account
REVENUE INCOME
A Own Sources
1 Consolodated Tax/Property Tax 3216.41 3811.56 4163.03 4068.14 3814.79
2 Water Tax 741.10 871.08 955.57 759.48 831.81
3 Water Meter Charges (narmada) 386.27 426.00 448.45 478.71 434.86
4 Other Taxes 71.07 60.04 75.11 129.22 83.86

5 Rental Income from Muni.Properties 188.97 201.37 199.80 179.13 192.32

6 Collection From Public Place 41.68 54.22 65.00 75.87 59.19


8 Other Income 1030.97 1196.09 2212.05 1257.92 1424.26
B Grants & Subsidies 0.00
1 Revenue Grants 7119.98 9792.68 7436.69 9052.17 8350.38
2 Subsidy/Donation 0.00
Grand Total Revenue Income (A+B+C) 12796.45 16413.04 15555.70 16000.64 15191.46
Per Capita Own income
Revenue Expenditure 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 AVERAGE
A Extablishment Expenditure
1 Establishment Expenditure 4588.56 4614.36 4952.38 5363.13 4879.61

2 Administration & General Expenses 301.40 824.47 458.00 657.09 560.24


3 Repairs & Maintenance 1343.28 1847.62 1891.90 2042.50 1781.33
4 Service & Programme Related Direct E 1.97 8.37 40.73 44.28 23.84
5 Other Expenses 6068.54 6697.76 5635.47 4848.72 5812.62
6 Appropriation 0.00
B Debt Servicing 0.00
1 293.16 492.36 829.52 871.95 621.75
2 Finance Charges 0.00
3 Due on Proposed Investment 0.00
4 Finance Charges on Proposed Investment 0.00
C Additional Expenditure 0.00
1 Phasing of Non Debt Liability 0.00
2 Additional 0 & M for 0.00
a 0.00
b 0.00
c 0.00
D Transfers To Capital Account 0.00
Grand Total Revenue Expenditure (A+B+C+D) 12596.91 14484.94 13808.00 13827.67 13679.38
II Capital Account 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 AVERAGE
Capital Income
A Own Sources
B Capital Grants 0.00 0.00 82.89 0.00 20.72
C Loans 458.00 2827.00 2315.40 1400.10
D Other Capital Income/Additional Grant 0.00
Total Capital Income (A+B+C+D) 0.00 458.00 2909.89 2315.40 1420.82
CAPITAL EXPENDITURE 0.00
A Land 7.40 27.50 95.68 367.68 124.57
B Buildings 36.06 201.86 592.90 520.02 337.71
C Public Places 86.15 109.45 178.72 207.43 145.44
D Roads/Bridges/Street lights 718.07 786.59 2003.89 4846.46 2088.75
E Sewerage & Drainage Lines 98.40 199.99 190.98 186.39 168.94
F Water Supply 1044.25 688.60 426.32 1164.57 830.94
G Solid Waste Management 6.16 25.01 2.85 2.30 9.08
H Storm Water Drains 20.43 5.11
I Traffic 0.00
J Plants, Machinery & Equipment 1.35 35.64 23.90 69.66 32.64
K Vehicles & Transp. Equipments 4.37 1.09
L Office Equipments 1.50 0.72 5.28 2.12 2.41
M Furniture, Fixtures and Fittings 1.49 2.78 3.81 3.14 2.81
N Slums 119.56 119.64 59.80
O Environment 0.00
P System Modemisation 0.64 1.77 0.88 1.37 1.17
Q River Embankment/Conservation Plan 0.00
R Miscellaneous Fixed Assets 141.72 1113.74 3297.83 144.31 1174.40
Total Capital Expenditure (A to I) 2143.19 3193.65 6942.60 7659.89 4984.83
III Summary of Municipal Account 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 AVERAGE
1 Revenue Account Status 199.54 1928.10 1747.70 2172.97 1512.08
3 Capital Account Status -2143.19 -2735.65 -4032.71 -5344.49 -3564.01
4 Overall Municipal Accounts Status -1943.65 -807.55 -2285.01 -3171.52 -2051.93
5 Closing Balance 0.00
6 Outstanding Loan 0.00
III Key Financial Indicators
1 Operating Ratio 1.56 11.75 11.24 13.58
Debt Servicing Ratio (% of Revenue
2 Income) 1.68 4.92 3.11 3.49
3 Establishment Cost (Estab. Exp. To Re 35.86 28.11 31.84 33.52
4 Capital Utilisation Ratio 697.3 238.59 330.82
5 Outstanding Debt Liability (Rs.Lakhs)
6 O/S Loan to Property Tax Demand
7 O/S Loan to Income thro' Own Revenu 0 6.92 34.82 33.32
FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE OF INDORE MUNICIPAL CORPORATION Sectrol Contribution-% Share
HEAD OF ACCOUNT 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 AVERAGE
I Revenue Account
REVENUE INCOME
A Own Sources
1 Consolodated Tax/Property Tax 25.14 23.22 26.76 25.42 25.14
2 Water Tax 5.79 5.31 6.14 4.75 5.50
3 Water Meter Charges (narmada) 3.02 2.60 2.80 2.99 2.85
4 Other Taxes 0.56 0.37 0.48 0.81 0.55

5 Rental Income from Muni.Properties 1.48 1.23 1.28 1.12 1.28


6 Collection From Public Place 0.33 0.33 0.42 0.47 0.39
8 Other Income 8.06 7.29 14.22 7.86 9.36
B Grants & Subsidies 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
1 Revenue Grants 55.64 59.66 47.81 56.57 54.92
Grand Total Revenue Income (A+B+C) 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00
Revenue Expenditure 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 AVERAGE
A Extablishment Expenditure
1 Establishment Expenditure 36.43 31.86 35.87 38.79 35.73

2 Administration & General Expenses 2.39 5.69 3.32 4.75 4.04


3 Repairs & Maintenance 10.66 12.76 13.70 14.77 12.97
4 Service & Programme Related Direct E 0.02 0.06 0.29 0.32 0.17
5 Other Expenses 48.17 46.24 40.81 35.07 42.57
Grand Total Revenue Expenditure (A+B+C+D) 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00
II Capital Account 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 AVERAGE
Capital Income
A Own Sources
B Capital Grants 0.00 0.00 2.85 0.00 0.95
C Loans 0.00 100.00 97.15 100.00 99.05
D Other Capital Income/Additional Grant 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Total Capital Income (A+B+C+D) 0.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00
CAPITAL EXPENDITURE
A Land 0.35 0.86 1.38 4.80 1.85
B Buildings 1.68 6.32 8.54 6.79 5.83
C Public Places 4.02 3.43 2.57 2.71 3.18
D Roads/Bridges/Street lights 33.50 24.63 28.86 63.27 37.57
E Sewerage & Drainage Lines 4.59 6.26 2.75 2.43 4.01
F Water Supply 48.72 21.56 6.14 15.20 22.91
G Solid Waste Management 0.29 0.78 0.04 0.03 0.29
H Storm Water Drains 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.27 0.07
I Traffic 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
J Plants, Machinery & Equipment 0.06 1.12 0.34 0.91 0.61
K Vehicles & Transp. Equipments 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.06 0.01
L Office Equipments 0.07 0.02 0.08 0.03 0.05
M Furniture, Fixtures and Fittings 0.07 0.09 0.05 0.04 0.06
N Slums 0.00 0.00 1.72 1.56 0.82
O Environment 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
P System Modemisation 0.03 0.06 0.01 0.02 0.03
Q River Embankment/Conservation Plan 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
R Miscellaneous Fixed Assets 6.61 34.87 47.50 1.88 22.72
Total Capital Expenditure (A to I) 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00
FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE OF INDORE MUNICIPAL CORPORATION Growth Rate % per annum
HEAD OF ACCOUNT 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 CAGR
I Revenue Account
REVENUE INCOME
A Own Sources
1 Consolodated Tax/Property Tax 18.50 9.22 -2.28 8.48
2 Water Tax 17.54 9.70 -20.52 2.24
3 Water Meter Charges (narmada) 10.29 5.27 6.75 7.43
4 Other Taxes -15.52 25.10 72.04 27.21

5 Rental Income from Muni.Properties 6.56 -0.78 -10.35 -1.52


6 Collection From Public Place 30.09 19.88 16.72 22.23
8 Other Income 16.02 84.94 -43.13 19.27
B Grants & Subsidies 0.00
1 Revenue Grants 37.54 -24.06 21.72 11.73
Grand Total Revenue Income (A+B+C) 28.26 -5.22 2.86 8.63
Revenue Expenditure 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 AVERAGE
A Extablishment Expenditure
1 Establishment Expenditure 0.56 7.33 8.29 5.39

2 Administration & General Expenses 173.55 -44.45 43.47 57.52


3 Repairs & Maintenance 37.55 2.40 7.96 15.97
4 Service & Programme Related Direct E 324.87 386.62 8.72 240.07
5 Other Expenses 10.37 -15.86 -13.96 -6.48
6 Appropriation 0.00
B Debt Servicing 0.00
0 Existing 67.95 68.48 5.12 47.18
2 Finance Charges 0.00
3 Due on Proposed Investment 0.00
4 Finance Charges on Proposed Investment 0.00
C Additional Expenditure 0.00
1 Phasing of Non Debt Liability 0.00
2 Additional 0 & M for 0.00
a 0.00
b 0.00
c 0.00
D Transfers To Capital Account 0.00
Grand Total Revenue Expenditure (A+B+C+D) 14.99 -4.67 0.14 3.49
II Capital Account 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 AVERAGE
Capital Income
A Own Sources
B Capital Grants
C Loans 517.25 -18.10
D Other Capital Income/Additional Grant
Total Capital Income (A+B+C+D)
CAPITAL EXPENDITURE
A Land 271.62 247.93 284.28 267.94
B Buildings 459.79 193.72 -12.29 213.74
C Public Places 27.05 63.29 16.06 35.47
D Roads/Bridges/Street lights 9.54 154.76 141.85 102.05
E Sewerage & Drainage Lines 103.24 -4.51 -2.40 32.11
F Water Supply -34.06 -38.09 173.17 33.67
G Solid Waste Management 306.01 -88.60 -19.30 66.03
H Storm Water Drains 0.00
I Traffic 0.00
J Plants, Machinery & Equipment 2540.00 -32.94 191.46 899.51
K Vehicles & Transp. Equipments 0.00
L Office Equipments -52.00 633.33 -59.85 173.83
M Furniture, Fixtures and Fittings 86.58 37.05 -17.59 35.35
N Slums 0.07 0.02
O Environment 0.00
P System Modemisation 176.56 -50.28 55.68 60.65
Q River Embankment/Conservation Plan 0.00
R Miscellaneous Fixed Assets 685.87 196.10 -95.62 262.12
Total Capital Expenditure (A to I) 49.01 117.39 10.33 58.91
1 Resource Mobilisation
1 Per Capita Income 835.31
2 Sources of Funds
Share of Own Sources in Total Revenue Income 46.51
Share of Octroi in Total Revenue Income
Share of Property Tax in Total Revenue Income 25.93
Share of Revenue Grants & Subsidies in Total Revenue Income 56.77
3 Growth in Revenue Income 8.64
4 Growth in Own Sources of Revenue Income 8.28
5 Per Capita Own Income 366.39
II Expenditure Management
1 Per Capita Expenditure 768.86
2 Uses of Funds
Share of Establishment Expenditure in Total Revenue Expenditure 35.67
Share of O & M Expenditure in Total Revenue Expenditure 13.03
Share of Establishment Expenditure to Total Revenue Income 33.17
3 Growth in Establishment Expenditure 5.41
4 Growth in O & M Expenditure 15.97
5 Growth in Total Revenue Expenditure 3.48
III Liability Management
1 Per Capita Liability (2001 population estimated)
Outstanding Debt per Capita 85.53
Outstanding Non-Debt Liability per Capita 1.27
Total Outstanding Liability per Capita 86.79
2 As % pf Property Tax Current Demand (2004-05)
Outstanding Debt as % of P.T. Demand 34.42
Outstanding Non-Debt Liability as % of P.T. Demand 0.51
total outstanding Liabilityas % of p. t demand 34.93
3 As % pf Property tax Own revenue Income (2004-05)
Outstanding Debt as % of Own Revenue Sources 20.15
O/s Non-Debt Liability as % of Own Revenue Sources 0.3
Total O/s Liability as % of Own Revenue Sources 20.45
4 Non-Debt Liability as % of Total Liability 1.46
5 Debt Servicing Ratio (D.S/Revenue Income) 4.09
IV Performance Indicators
1 Operating Ratio 9.95
2 Growth in Per Capita Own Income 11.32
3 Growth in per Capita Grant 15.62
4 Growth in Per Capita Total Income 13.72
5 Growth in Per Capita Establishment Expenditure 6.3
6 Growth in Per Capita O & M Expenditure 38.98
7 Growth in Per Capita Revenue Expenditure (-).17
8 Capital Utilisation Ratio 350.84
V Efficiency Indicators
1 Tax Collection Performance
Property Tax 4.03
Water Tax 8.94
2 No. of P.T. Assessments per Tax Collection Staff 3383 p y
3 Property Tax Demand per Assessment 1802 rs
4 Population per P.T. Assessment 4 person
SUMMARY OF PROJECTS IDENTIFIED FOR JNNURM & ITS PHASING
ESTIMATED EXPENDITURE IN 2005-2006 ESTIMATED EXPENDITURE IN 2006-2007 ESTIMATED EXPENDITURE IN 2007-2008 ESTIMATED ESTIMATED ESTIMATED ESTIMATED COMP.S
S.N ACTIVITIES COST IN CRORES EXPENDITURE IN EXPENDITURE IN 2009- EXPENDITURE IN 2010- EXPENDITURE IN 2011- HARE IN
2008-2009 2010 2011 2012 TOTAL
IMC IDA PWD ICTS/ KUMS MPHB TOTAL IMC IDA PWD ICTS/ KUMS MPHB IMC IDA PWD ICTS/ KUMS MPHB IMC IDA PWD ICTS/ KUMS MPHB IMC IDA ICTS/ IMC IDA ICTS/ IMC IDA ICTS IMC IDA ICTS OUTLAY
ARCH. ARCH. ARCH. ARCH. ARCH. ARCH.

A SUB MISSION FOR URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE AND GOVERNANCE (IN %)


1 URBAN RENEWAL 80.00 50.00 130.00 5.00 5 10.00 25.00 10.00 20.00 12.00 15.00 15.00 13.00 4.73

2 WATER SUPPLY 59.80 59.80 5.00 10.00 8.00 8.00 10.00 10.00 8.80 2.18

3 SEWERAGE 346.87 346.87 2.00 50.00 50.00 55.00 65.00 65.00 59.87 12.63

4 SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT 36.00 36.00 2.00 4.00 4.50 5.00 7.00 7.00 6.50 1.31

5 DRAINS / STORM WATER DRAINS 70.00 70.00 1.00 7.00 9.00 10.00 15.00 15.00 13.00 2.55

6 URBAN TRANSPORT
a ROADS AND BRIDGES 406.86 112.33 149.7 668.88 10.00 2.00 2.00 50.00 20 75.00 50.00 20 72.69 60.00 20 80.00 20 80.00 20 76.86 10.33 24.36
TRUCK TERMINALS / TRANSPORT
b 20.00 30.20 50.20 5.00 5.00 2.50 5.00 3.00 5.00 3.50 5.00 3.50 5.00 2.50 5.20 1.83
NAGAR
c BUS TERMINALS 12.00 20.00 32.00 3.00 1.50 4.00 1.75 6.00 2.00 6.00 2.00 4.00 1.75 1.17
d MASS TRANSPORT SYSTEM 312.50 307.50 620.00 2 1 1 1 50.00 50 262.50 252.50 22.58
e PARKING LOTS 20.00 20.00 2.00 5.00 2.00 2.25 3.00 3.00 2.75 0.73

ENVIROINMENTAL UPGRADATION, CITY


7 BEAUTIFICATION AND URBAN
FORESTRY
a PRESERVATION OF WATER BODIES 13.00 5.00 18.00 2.00 3.00 3 1.50 1.50 2.50 2.50 2.00 0.66
b DEVELOPMENT OF REGIONAL PARK 15.00 15.00 3.00 10 2
c COLONY PARKS 40.00 40.00 2.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 6.50 6.50 5.00 1.46
UPGRADATION AND CONSTRUCTION
d 16.00 16.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 2.75 2.75 2.50 0.58
OF CITY PARKS
e URBAN FORESTRY 10.00 10.00 2.00 1.25 1.25 2.00 2.00 1.50 0.36
f RIVER FRONT DEVELOPMENT 50.00 53.00 103.00 10.00 10 6.50 9.5 7.50 7.5 9.00 9 9.00 9 8.00 8 3.75

7 SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE
a WORKING WOMEN HOSTEL 7.00 7.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.50 1.50 1.00 0.25
b MARRIAGE HALL 3.00 3.00 1.00 0.30 0.30 0.50 0.50 0.40 0.11
c NIGHT SHELTER 2.00 2.00 0.50 0.25 0.25 0.35 0.35 0.30 0.07
d COMMUNITY HALL 4.00 4.00 1.00 0.50 0.50 0.70 0.70 0.60 0.15
e OLD AGE HOME 4.00 4.00 1.00 0.50 0.50 0.70 0.70 0.60 0.15
f SPORTS COMPLEX & PLAY GROUND 18.00 18.00 2.00 4.00 1.75 1.75 3.00 3.00 2.50 0.66
g HERITAGE STRUCTURES 5.00 5.00 20.00 30.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 0.60 1.00 4.00 0.60 1.00 4.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 1.00 0.50 2.00 0.80 0.50 2.00 1.09
h CREMATION GROUND 4.00 4.00 1.00 0.50 0.50 0.70 0.70 0.60 0.15

8 SPECIAL PROJECTS
1 Convention center near lal bag palace for
13.00 13.00 3 3 3 3 1 0.47
3000 capacity
2 Exhibition Ground Phase - I development
10.00 10.00 2 3 2 3 0.36
on 50 acers of land.
3 Slaughter House at Aazad Nagar 5.0 5.00 1.00 0.60 0.60 1.00 1.00 0.80 0.18
4 Stadium Complex at Master Road – 3 40.00 40.00 5 10.00 15 10 1.46
SUB TOTAL OF SUB MISSION ON SUB MISSION
FOR URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE AND GOVERN.
2375.75 32.00 12.00 2.00 5.00 193.50 54.00 79.00 2.00 25.00 159.75 62.50 76.69 1.00 20.00 180.25 54.50 5.00 232.70 47.00 5.00 282.70 10.50 81.00 474.13 24.03 254.50 86.52
B SUB MISSION ON BASIC SERVICES TO THE URBAN POOR
HOUSES FOR SLUM DEWELLERS &
1 URBAN POORS 50.00 100.00 150.00 2.00 3.00 10.00 20.00 6.00 20.00 7.00 30.00 7.00 10.00 7.00 10.00 8.00 10.00 5.46

INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT OF
2 PLOTS FOR SLUM DEWELLERS AND 20.00 30.00 50.00 1.00 5.00 15 6.00 15 4.00 4.00 1.82
URBAN POOR
SLUM IMPROVEMENT AND
3 50.00 10.00 60.00 2.00 10.00 2.00 6.00 4.00 7.00 3.00 7.50 2.00 7.50 1.00 8.00 2.19
REHILIBATATION PROJECTS
DEVELOPMENT OF INFRASTRUCTURE
4 100.00 100.00 2.00 20.00 12.50 12.50 18.00 18.00 17.00 3.64
IN ILLEGAL COLONIES
DEVELOPMENT OF HAWKERS ZONE
5 AND HAT BAZAR AT VARIOUS PLACES 10.00 10.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.75 1.75 1.50 0.36
IN THE CITY
SUB TOTAL OF SUB MISSION ON BASIC
SERVICES TO URBAN POOR
370.00 7.00 4.00 42.00 27.00 15.00 25.50 30.00 15.00 27.50 37.00 34.25 16.00 34.25 11.00 34.50 10.00 13.48
GRAND TOTAL 1755.03 433.53 149.69 327.5 50.00 30.00 2745.75 39.00 16.00 2.00 5.00 235.50 81.00 79.00 2.00 25.00 15.00 185.25 92.50 76.69 1.00 20.00 15.00 207.75 91.50 5.00 266.95 63.00 5.00 316.95 21.50 81.00 508.63 34.03 254.50 100.0
INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Annexure – II

JAWAHARLAL NEHRU NATIONAL


URBAN RENEWAL MISSION

Timeline for Implementing the


Urban Reform Agenda

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 172


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Annexure – II

I. Reform Agenda at the Level of the


Urban Local Body (ULB)
Accounting Reform

What system of accounting does the ULB follow?


Cash-based, single entry

Modified accrual

Accrual, double entry


`
If it is accrual, double entry- based, since when has this system been followed? Year
2001

If cash-based or modified accrual, give a time schedule for change over to


accrual, double entry system.

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

E-Governance Applications (using IT, GIS and MIS)

Has there been any initiative towards the use of E-governance


applications or setting up of an E-governance cell within the ULB?

Yes ` 9 No

If yes, for what services is the ULB using these applications and in what way?

REFORM TIMELINE FOR INDORE


2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
6 1 6 2 6 3 6 4 6 5 6 6 6 7
Type of reform mns year mns year mns year mns year mns year mns year mns year
e-Goverance
Assess existing IT initiatives

Develop options to introduce e-


Gov
Develop service delivery
strategy
Assessment of functional
requirement
Develop technical options

Project mgm. Framework---

implementation framework

Explore PPP options

Initiate City website

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 173


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

S.N. Services using E-governance Details


applications
a. Property Tax Demand Register/ Billing/
Payment Collection
b. Water Tax ---------same as above--------
c. Licenses Rent ---------same as above--------
d. Birth and Death Issuance Birth and Death
Certificate
e. Accrual Based Accounting System Budget Management and
Implementation of Double Entry
Accounting System
f. Building Permission Issuance of Certificate
1. Inward and outward of
application
2. fee calculation / refusal letter
3. registration of Engineers /
architect
4. Information about legal
Colonies as well as legal Building
5. Information about Valid
Engineers / architect

g Scanning and indexing of documents 1. section maps of building


2. Colony layouts
3. lease land documents
4. Colonizer / builder. registration
documents
5. employee records
h Social securities pension schemes To beneficiaries distribution of
pension timely and regularly
application in working
I Connectivity To develop the wireless
connective between head quarter
and zonal offices work under
progress by CMC limited.
j Call centre For public complaint and
suggestion call centre at IMC in
working from last 8 months
k GIS One pilot project for ward 56 has
been completed and according to
result obtained IMC will decided
to implement the whole GIS
project for all wards.

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 174


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Property Tax Reform, 2004/05


What are the total numbers of properties in the city? 450000

What are the number of properties assessed for purpose of taxation?


331845
What are the number of properties which paid taxes in the fiscal year 2003/04?
127166
What is the basis of taxation?

• Annual rateable value (ARV)

• Unit area values to determine ARV 9


• Unit area values to directly determine property values or property tax

• Capital valuation

What is the amount of tax demanded?

2003/04 2004/05
Rs 52.13 Crore. Rs. 58.30 Cr

What is the amount of tax collected?


2003/04 2004/05

Rs. 21.92 Cr Rs. 23.68 Cr

Achieving the target of 85%tax collection to tax demanded

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

9 9 9

REFORM TIMELINE FOR INDORE

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012


Type of reform 6 1 6 2 6 3 6 4 6 5 6 6 6 7
mns year mns year mns year mns year mns year mns year mns year
Use of IT

Survey of 100% property

Tax
assessment(insuring full
coverage)
Develop GIS

Improve Tax recovery

Achieve full taxation and


recovery

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 175


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Levy of User Charges

Water Supply

Percentage of households covered by municipal/ parastatal water supply


70%
Per capital domestic water supply
80lpcd
Average number of hours of water supply 3/4
Percentage of non-revenue water to total water released 40%
Percentage of water supplied free 20%
Percentage of water lost due to leakages and thefts 20%
Total cost (Operation & Maintenance and debt repayment) incurred in delivering water.

2003/04 2004/05

Rs. 17.00 Cr Rs. 18.65 Cr

Total recoveries from the sale of water

2003/04 2004/05

Rs. 14.04 Cr Rs. 12.38 Cr

Achieving cost recovery target (full O & M recovery)

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

9 9 9 9
REFORM TIMELINE FOR INDORE

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012


Type of reform 6 1 6 2 6 3 6 4 6 5 6 6 6 7
mns year mns year mns year mns year mns year mns year mns year
Assess O& M cost for water
supply / sanitation / street
lighting
Reviewing existing tax rates
and
structure
Working out strategy for full
Recovery of O &M Cost
Reducing number of public
taps

Enrolling / regularizing
unaccounted
water connections
Water demand management
and
energy audit
a.Leakage detection and
minimizing the wasage of
water
b.Repairing and replacing of
old
pipelines and pumps

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 176


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

c.Repaire / replacement of
machinery
Achieving full O and M cost

Other services

Service User charge


a. Street Lighting 10-15%
b. %
c.
%
d.
%
Achieving cost recovery target (full O & M recovery)

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7


9 9 9 9
Services to the Urban Poor

Percentage of households living in unauthorized tenements/


temporary structures 20%

Percentage of households living in unauthorized tenements/


temporary structures without access to %

Municipal water supply 30%


Sanitation 30%
Primary education 30%
Primary health 30%

Reaching the services to the urban poor

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

9 9 9 9 `

Internal earmarking of budgets for the urban poor

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7


`9 9 9 9 9 9 9
REFORM TIMELINE FOR INDORE

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012


Type of reform 6 1 6 2 6 3 6 4 6 5 6 6 6 7
mns year mns year mns year mns year mns year mns year mns year
Year marking budget share for
urban poor

MEHTA & ASSOCIATES INDORE 177


INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Preparing MAPP

Implementation of MAPP

Involvement of community

Involving public private


partnership

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INDORE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Under JNNURM

Reform Agenda at the Level of the


State Government

Implementation of the Constitution (Seventy-Fourth) Amendment


Act, 1992

What is the status of implementation of the following as per the Act? Specify.

Yes No Remarks

(a) Constitution of municipalities Yes

(b) Composition of municipal councils Yes

(c) Reservation of seats for women, SCs, and STs Yes

(d) Constitution of District Planning Committees (DPCs) Yes

(e) Constitution of Metropolitan Planning Committees (MPCs) No

(f ) Incorporation of Schedule 12 into the State Municipal Act Yes

If Schedule 12 has been incorporated into the State Municipal Act, has it been incorporated fully
or partially?

Fully Partially
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Which of the functions of Schedule 12 have been incorporated into the State Municipal Act and
transferred to ULBs?
Functions listed in 12th Function Transfer to
schedule incorporated ( defacte)

1. Urban planning including town planning No No


2. Regulation of land-use and construction of
Buildings Yes Yes
3. Planning for economic and social development Yes Yes
4. Roads and bridges Yes Yes
5. Water supply for domestic, industrial and
commercial purposes Yes Yes
6. Public health, sanitation, conservancy and solid
waste management Yes Yes
7. Fire services Yes Yes
8. Urban forestry, protection of the environment
and promotion of ecological aspects Yes Yes
9. Safeguarding the interests of weaker sections
society including the handicapped and mentally
retarded Yes Yes
10. Slum improvement and upgradation Yes Yes

Functions listed in 12th Function Transfer to (


schedule incorporate defacte) ULB

11. Urban poverty alleviation. Yes Yes

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12. Provision of urban amenities and facilities parks


gardens, and playgrounds Yes Yes
13. Promotion of cultural, educational, and aesthetic
Aspects Yes Yes
14. Burials and burial grounds, cremations, cremation
grounds and electric crematoriums Yes Yes
15. Cattle pounds, prevention of cruelty to animals Yes Yes
16. Vital statistics including registration of births and
Deaths Yes Yes
17. Public amenities including street lighting, parking
lots, bus stops and public conveniences Yes Yes
18. Regulation of slaughter houses and tanneries Yes Yes

Has the transfer of functions been accompanied by transfer of staff?

Yes ` 9 No

If no, has the ULB been given the powers to recruit staff for managing the transferred
functions?

Yes No

Give a time-schedule for transferring the Schedule 12 functions to the ULB

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

` ` `

* Specific timeline / action plan to achieve this reform is shown in the enclosed statement

If the DPC/MPC has been constituted, attach a copy of the Act. Yes copy Attached

If the DPC/MPC has not been constituted, has the legislative process for their constitution been
initiated?

Yes No ` 9
There is no metropolitan area as yet in M.P.

If no, give a time- schedule for constituting DPC/MPC – Not Required

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

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State Achievements

1. MP is the 2nd state in the country to introduce Mayor in council/President in council system in
ULBs in the year 1998.
2. Direct election of Mayor and President has also been introduced
3. MIC/PIC have been given wide financial powers
4. Mayor has also been given independent financial power in the year 2005
5. DPCs have been formed in all the 48 districts and are fully functional

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6. Unification of Corporation and Municipalities acts is under progress. Draft of new Municipal
act is ready and being scrutinized by the steering committee headed by the Principal Secretary,
7. Preparation of Municipal Accounts Manual on the lines of National Model Municipal Accounts
Manual is under progress.

Repealment of Urban Land (Ceiling and Regulation) Act, 1976 *


Current status of the Act in the State Repealed
9
Not Repealed

If not repealed, give a time schedule for its repealment

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

Rent Control Reforms, 2004/05 *


(a) Number of properties under rent control %

(b) Percentage to total number of properties


%
Current rental ceiling below which properties qualify
to be under rent control
Rs
State the provision in the existing laws, which allow property owners to seek vacation of
housing units, upon conclusion of the tenancy period.

State the provision in the existence laws, which allow tenancy to be transferred.

Time schedule for undertaking reform of rent control laws

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

9 9 9 9
Outline the nature of proposed reform of rent control laws.

Stamp Duty Rationalisation, 2005

Current stamp duty rates as applicable to property-related transactions (sale, purchase, transfer
etc.)

> 10% 8-10% 6-8% 5 % & less

Any surcharge on the base rate

> 2% 1-2 % <1%


* Specific timeline / action plan to achieve this reform is shown in the enclosed statement

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Time-line for reducing stamp duty rates to 5 per cent or less than 5 per cent

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7


` ` ` ` `

Public Disclosure Law

Is there any provision in respect of public disclosure (public screening or review of municipal
budget proposals) in the existing State Municipal Act.

Yes No
9
If yes, state the provision and comment on its adequacy.

Provision for arranging social audit by the urban local bodies has been made in the municipal
act in the year 2003. This provision shall be enlarged to meet the requirements of JNNURM in
respect of public disclosure

Give the timeline for enactment of a Public Disclosure Law or incorporation of


relevant provision in the existing state-level municipal statute.

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

9 9
* Specific timeline / action plan to achieve this reform is shown in the enclosed statement

Community Participation Law


Is there any provision in the State Municipal Acts regarding the involvement of civil society,
industry, and business in municipal affairs – e.g., in setting priorities, budgeting provisions, etc?

Yes No
9
1.State Achievements
i. Municipal acts provide for constitution of Mohalla committees
ii.Rules for constitution , powers and functions of Mohalla committees have also been framed.
iii.The rules will be further examined to meet the GoI target for community participation

Time schedule for enactment of a Community Participation Law or incorporation of


relevant provision in the existing state-level municipal statute

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

9 9 9
* Specific timeline / action plan to achieve this reform is shown in the enclosed statement

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City Planning Function

Who is responsible for city (urban) planning function for the city?

Urban local body (ULB)

City-based special-purpose agency


9
State-level town & country planning organisation `
Time schedule for formal association of ULB with the City Planning Functions

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

` ` `9

* Specific timeline / action plan to achieve this reform is shown in the enclosed statement

Who, which agency is responsible for provision of the following services?

Water supply and sewerage

Urban local City- level special State- level PHED Any other
body ` purpose agencies special purpose (specify)
agencies

Schedule for transferring to municipality this function, where it is not a municipal


function

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

Public transport

Urban local City- level special State- level special PHED Any other
body ` purpose agencies purpose agencies (specify)

Schedule for transferring this function to the municipality where it is not a municipal
function

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

`9

* Specific timeline / action plan to achieve this reform is shown in the enclosed statement

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Optional Reform Agenda


( ULB Level)

Revision of bye-laws to streamline the approval process for


construction of buildings, development of sites etc.

Time schedule
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

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1.State Achievements

i. The process of approval for building construction and development of sites is regulated by the
Madhya Pradesh Bhumi Vikas Niyam ,1984.
ii.The process of approval of building construction has already been simplified under the rules
and the municipal acts to a great extent.
iii.Single window system has been introduced for the approval of building plans.
iv. Specific time limit has been prescribed for the ULBs in the citizen charter for the approval of
building plans.

Simplification of legal and procedural frameworks for conversion of


agricultural land for non-agricultural purposes.

Time schedule

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

9 ` `

Introduction of Property Title Certification System in ULBs.

Time schedule

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

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Earmarking at least 20-25 per cent of developed land in all housing


projects (both public and private agencies) for EWS/LIG category
with a system of cross subsidization.

Time schedule
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

` 9

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2.State Achievements
i.The Madhya Pradesh Municipality (Registration of colonizers and terms and conditions)rules
1998 provide for earmarking 15% of developed plots for the persons of informal sector in every
colony.
ii. The provision shall be extended to meet out the GoI target.
Introduction of computerised process of registration of land and
property.

Time schedule

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

`9 `

3.State Achievements
i.The process of computerization is under progress.

Revision of bye-laws to make rain- water harvesting mandatory in all


buildings to come up in future and for adoption of water
conservation measures.

Time schedule

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

`9

4.State Achievements
i.The Madhya Pradesh Bhumi Vikas Niyam, 1984 makes it mandatory for the owners of the
building to develop rainwater harvesting device on a plot size of 250 sq.m. and above.
ii. This provision was made in the rules in the year 2001.
iii.Proposed building and all action plan for effective implementation of the provision is as
under :
a. Special public awareness campaign in the form of 'Jalabhishek Karyakram' has been
launched
b.It has been decided to undertake developing rainwater harvesting device in the
Government buildings in every city / town as under :
• Bhopal , Indore , Jabalpur , Gwalior and Ujjain 5 buildings
• Other Municipal Corporation, towns 3 buildings
• All Municipalities 2 buildings
• All Town Panchayats 1 building
c. As above it has been targeted to develop rain water harvesting devices in total 441
existing Governemnt buildings .

Bye-laws on reuse of reclaimed water.

Time schedule

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

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5.State Achievements
State Government intends to require the Municipal Corporations to frame bye-laws on reuse of
reclaimed water for the large buildings and all non-residential buildings.

Administrative reforms i.e. reduction in establishment by introducing


voluntary retirement schemes, non-filling up of posts falling vacant
due to retirement etc., and achieving specified milestones in this
regard.

Time schedule

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

` ` `9 ` `
6.State Achievements
i. Administrative reforms in view of reducing the establishment cost has been given due
priority by the State Government.
ii. The policy of non-filling up of the post has been implemented for more than last 5 years
iii.ULBs are permitted to fill up only the post lying vacant under the Back-log of Reservation
quota for SCs/STs
iv. Service conditions and recruitment rules for officers and staff of Municipal Corporations
have been framed in the year 2000, rationalizing the Municipal Corporation Cadre.
v.The State Government is emphasizing on training and orientation of officers and staff of
ULBs.'
vi.Training need analysis has been conducted by the RCVP Naronha, MP Acedamy of
Management. The recommendations of the report are being implemented.

Structural reforms

Time schedule

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

` ` `9 ` `

Encouraging Public-Private Partnership

Time schedule
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7

9 ` ` ` ` `