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Critical facilities and lifelines are usually affected by a high magnitude hazard.

A: true

People in disaster affected areas do not suffer from psychological trauma after experiencing a
devastating calamitous event.
A: false

Disasters can cause death, diseases, destruction and displacement.


A: true

A disaster has occurred because a hazard hit an area without people and their assets.
A: false

Elements at risk can also be categorized into tangible and intangible. The intangibles include social
cohesion, community structure, and cultural losses.
A: true

Physical risk factors can either lessen or aggravate one's vulnerability to hazards, for example the
level of strength of a building and the presence or absence of fire exits in the case of an earthquake.
A: true

Disasters can set back years of development efforts of a country.


A: true

Disaster risk reduction aims to reduce the damages and loss caused by hazards. One of the key risk
reduction measures is to reduce exposure to hazards.
A: true

Hazards have different adverse impacts on the elements at risk in an urban and rural setting.
A: true

The elements at risk are hazard-specific. Who and what can be damaged depends on the hazards
as well as the characteristics of the area.
A: true

Hazards and disasters are one and the same.


A: false

Exposure is one of the key determinants of disaster risk.


A: true

The Philippines and its cities are not among countries and cities with significant population and
economic exposure to typhoons, earthquakes, tsunamis, storm surges, volcanoes, and landslides,
according to recent studies by risk analysis firm Verisk Maplecroft.
A: false

People living in poor developing countries have more vulnerabilities than those living in developed
countries.
A: true

Philippines is one of top three countries with regards to being at-risk to hit by hazards.
A: true

Gender and age are risk factors that make recovery more difficult.
A: true

Disaster cause problems and hardships to population and communities.


A: true

The Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act of 2010 defines exposure as "the
degree to which the elements at risk are likely to experience hazard events of different magnitudes".
A: true

Aside from physical exposure, livelihoods and economic assets can be considered in measuring
exposure of the elements at risk.
A: true

The focus of the .... science perspective in analyzing disaster is what damage and loss it could
cause to physical aspects such as people and their properties and assets; public and private
buildings and infrastructures.
A: physical/natural

People l iving in .... are constantly endangered to tsunami, storm surges and sea level rise.
A:coastline/coastal areas

The following should be done after an earthquake except


A: Don't use matches, candles, or any flame. Broken gas lines and fire don't mix.

All submarine earthquakes can cause tsunamis.


A: false

If you experience the signs of impending tsunami, the best action to take is
A: immediately leave the low-lying coastal areas and move to higher ground

A process where particles of loosely consolidated and water-saturated deposits of sand are
rearranged into more compact state, squeezing water and sediments towards the surface in the form
of sand fountain and creating a condition resembling to a "quick sand" is called
A: liquefaction

Landslides and liquefaction due to ground shaking brought about by an earthquake are considered
A: secondary effects

In interpreting earthquake hazard maps, the color code for high risk areas is
A: red

Ground rupture which is the surface expression of an earthquake choices magnitude 5.5-6.0 is
known as
A: primary effect of earthquakes

Fires, spills of hazardous chemicals and flooding are considered as


A: collateral effects

The deformation on the ground that marks the intersection of the fault plane with the earth's surface
is known as
A: ground rupture

The color code for no risk areas is


A: white

A phenomenon which produce giant sea waves generated mostly by vertical displacement of the
ocean floor associated with a strong and shallow submarine earthquake is called
A: tsunami

The intense vibration of the ground is known as


A: ground shaking

There is impending tsunami if


A: all of the choices

After an earthquake, always be prepared for aftershocks.


A: true

The Dock, Cover and Hold is a "must do" after an earthquake.


A: false

The color code for medium risk areas is


A: orange

The color code for low risk areas is


A: yellow

Armed conflicts and wars are natural hazards.


A: false

Water supplies, electricity and transportation can be severely affected by strong typhoons with
strong winds.
A: true

_____________is a phenomenon, which produce giant sea waves generated mostly by vertical
displacement of the ocean floor associated with a strong and shallow submarine earthquake.
A: tsunami

Psychological trauma is not good for overall well-being of a person.


A: true

Displacement and living in an evacuation center cause problems and hardships to population and
communities.
A: true

Understanding of vulnerability and capacity can be best done through


_________________________________.
A: vulnerability and capacity assessment

Susceptibility, ___________, fragility are other terms for vulnerability


A: weakness

Elements at risk include people, properties, livelihood, location, etc. .


A: true

Disaster risk and hazards are not the same.


A: true

Exposure elements, exposed elements, or vulnerable elements are other terms used to refer to the
elements at risk.
A: true

_______________ is a process where particles of loosely consolidated and water-saturated deposits


of sand are rearranged into more compact state, squeezing water and sediments towards the
surface in the form of sand fountain and creating a condition resembling to a "quick sand".
A: liquefaction

Savings: good governance: and, life-saving skills are examples of __________


A: capacity

Environmental pollution is purely a human made hazard.


A: false

Examples of measures to increase capacity and reduce vulnerability.


A: a, b and c

Hazards have different adverse impacts on the elements at risk in an urban and rural setting.
A: true

____________refers to the intense vibration of the ground.


A: earthquake
Women: poor people: and, people with disability are usually included in marginalized and most
___________groups.
A: vulnerable

Complex web of interlinked conditions which include physical, social, economic, environmental
factors.
A: vulnerability

Hazard is not a dangerous event or substance.


A: false

Critical facilities and lifelines are more likely to be affected by a high magnitude hazard.
A: true

Death, destruction, diseases and displacement are associated to disasters.


A: true

Develop a family ______ consisting of where to meet your family after an earthquake.
A: plan

After an earthquake check yourself and others for injuries: provide first aid for anyone who needs it:
and, turn on the _________ and listen for news.
A: radio

Categorization of factors for capacities and vulnerabilities.


A: all of the choices

Hazard and risk are interrelated but not the same.


A: true

Houses that are built according to good design and construction principles have a better chance to
withstand the onslaught of a strong earthquake than those that are poorly constructed.
A: true

Examples of measures to increase ____________and reduce vulnerability include training and


education: sustainable livelihood: and, adequate food supply.
A: capacity

Who and what elements at risk can be damaged depends on the hazards and the characteristics of
the area or location.
A: true

__________condition is a factor, which make people and their property more vulnerable.
A: unsafe
The development efforts of a country is affected by a disaster because the money intended for
development may be diverted to more pressing relief efforts.
A: true

When a hazard strikes a vulnerable people, with very low capacity, living in an unsafe location,
disaster may occur and recovery may take more time.
A: true

Some ______________tools for capacity and vulnerability assessment include resources mapping:
community watching: transect walk: livelihood and coping analysis.
A: Participatory

_____________________refers to the deformation on the ground that marks the intersection of the
fault plane with the earth's surface.
A: ground rupture

While other elements at risk can be affected by hazards, people are not because they can escape.
A: false

Philippines is in the top three most disaster-prone countries of the world.


A: true

Don't use __________ during an earthquake, as they'll probably get stuck anyway.
A: elevators

The concept which explains why given a level of exposure to the hazard, some people or sectors in
the community or society are more at risk or less at risk.
A: vulnerability

Some participatory tools for capacity and vulnerability assessment include.


A: a, b and c

Earthquake is natural hazards resulting from geological processes.


A: true

Exposure is the degree to which the elements at risk are likely to experience hazard events of
different magnitudes.
A: true

Gender and very young and very old age are considered risk factors.
A: true

A good attitude and mental health are factors in good decision making, particularly during
emergencies.
A: true
Fire is an example of a natural hazard.
A: false

Usually included in marginalized and most vulnerable groups.


A: a, b and c

Social cohesion, community structure, and cultural losses are some kinds of intangibles elements at
risk.
A: true

Examples of capacities.
A: a, b and d

Understanding of vulnerability and capacity can be best done through ... and ... .
A: vulnerability and capacity assessment

There is impending _________if there is severe ground shaking: if seawater recedes from the coast:
and, if there is a loud "roaring" sound similar to that of a train or jet aircraft.
A: tsunami

Some factors which make people and their property vulnerable.


A: a, b and c

Typhoon Haiyan is an example of a hazard that became a disaster because of the extent of
damages it wrought in the Visayas Islands.
A: true

Other terms for vulnerability.


A: Susceptibility, weakness, fragility

Ash fall rarely endangers human lives, but it can have devastating effects on the things that people
rely upon from day to day living.
A: false

The two indicators for an impending tsunami.


A: there is severe ground shaking; if seawater recedes from the coast Or, if there is a loud "roaring"
sound similar to that of a train or jet aircraft.

Hazards can be classified according to origin, which could be from nature, from man's activity or a
combination of both.
A: true

Lava flows are streams of molten rock that pour or ooze from an erupting vent.
A: true

During volcanic eruption, check for injured and trapped persons near the slide, without entering the
direct slide area. Direct rescuers to their locations.
A: false

People living near volcanoes may not detect premonitory events before and eruption.
A: false

Fire is an example of a human-sourced hazard.


A: true

People, properties and location are examples of elements at risk.


A: true

Increase in the frequency of volcanic quakes with rumbling sounds and occurrence of volcanic
tremors are signs of impending volcanic eruption.
A: true

Knowing the ways of protecting the school from ash fall, landslides and debris ?ows by consulting
your local disaster coordinating council must be done before a volcano erupts.
A: true

There is impending tsunami if


A: all of the choices

Provinces that are at risk to tsunami.


A: Sulu/Tawi-tawi/Basilan/Batanes

Hazard of high magnitude should always be welcome by children because there will be no class.
A: false

The legend in the map tells you what different colors and signs mean in the map. It works as a
decoder of the data presented in the map.
A: true

The three things that should be done after an earthquake.


A: Check yourself and others for injuries; Provide first aid for anyone who needs it; Turn on the radio
and listen for news/Use the phone to connect to family.

Both ash fall and pyroclastic flows can destroy agricultural lands.
A: true

During volcanic eruption, less priority if given for evacuation outside the area of ash shower to
pupils/students with breathing problems. They should be advised to cover their nose, preferably with
a wet piece of cloth.
A: false

The GPS coordinates are a unique identifier of a precise geographic location on the earth, usually
expressed in alphanumeric characters.
A: true

The earthquake that hit Bohol some years back cannot be an example of a disaster because the
extent of damages it wrought in the Bohol island is negligible.
A: false

Most volcanoes provide various type of warnings before eruptions begin.


A: true

During a volcanic eruption, follow the instructions that go with the warning. If there is a directive to
evacuate, do so immediately.
A: true

Closing windows and doors to reduce entry of ash if heavy ash fall is expected to hit the community
must be done during a volcanic eruption.
A: false

The Marawi armed political conflict is an example of a natural hazard.


A: false

Ballistic projectiles are rocks that an erupting volcano may hurl into the air.
A: true

Do not "Dock, Cover and Hold " during an earthquake, just stand and wait for news.
A: false

In assessing disaster risk, the formula used is DR=HEV, where DR stand for Development
Research, H for Hazard, E for Exposure and V for Vulnerability.
A: false

Do not panic and be sensitive to the possibility of aftershocks, after an earthquake.


A: true

The following should be done during an earthquake except


A: Anchor heavy furniture, cupboards, and appliances to the walls or floor

Environmental pollution is detrimental to health.


A: true

The following should be done before an earthquake except


A: Don't use matches, candles, or any flame. Broken gas lines and fire don't mi

Volcano hazard maps illustrate potential for ground-based volcanic impacts-lava flows, pyroclastic
flows, ash fall, volcanic gases, and more far-reaching hazards (such as lahars) in valleys that drain
the volcano.
A: true

Example of geological hazard. EARTHQUAKE

Example of combination of human made and natural hazards. FLOODING

Example of human made hazard . FIRE

Shows the dangerous areas. HAZARD MAPS

Very high risk. RED COLOR SIGNIFIES

No risk. WHITE COLOR SIGNIFIES

Big sea waves. TSUNAMI

High risk province. SULU

During an earthquake. “Dock, cover and hold”

agency that deals with volcanoes. PHIVOLCS

Hazard maps are used to help understand the areas that may be affected by specific volcanic
eruption phenomena.
A: true

During and after an emergency, you should not think only of yourself, you should provide first aid for
anyone who needs it, if you are capable.
A: true

In interpreting a hazard map, look for the title, which is located at the bottom portion of the geological
map. It is important because it tells you right away what kind of hazard map it represents or the area
where the map is based.
A: false

Earthquake is a human sourced hazard resulting from geological processes.


A: false

Elements at risk, particularly people can be affected by hazards, but they can manage even without
disaster preparedness.
A: false

Volcanic ash does not consist of fragments of pulverized rock, minerals, and volcanic glass created
during volcanic eruptions and measuring less than 2 mm in diameter.
A: false
The three things that should be done before an earthquake.
A: Learn first aid; Learn how to turn off the gas, water, and electricity in your home; Make up a plan
of where to meet your family after an earthquake

Pyroclastic flows contain a high-density mix of hot lava blocks, pumice, ash and volcanic gas.
A: true

The three things that should be done during an earthquake.


A: Do not panic; Fix heavy furniture, cupboards, and appliances to the walls or floor; If you're in a
car, stop driving until the earthquake stops/Don't use elevators

Water supplies, electricity and transportation are not always protected and therefore can be affected
by strong typhoons with strong winds.
A: true

Hazard Maps show the places in the country which are at risk to the following:
A: earthquake;tsunami Or, landslides

In assessing disaster risk, the framework used is DR=HEV, where DR stand for disaster risk, H for
Hazard, E for Exposure and V for Vulnerability.
A:

In assessing risk, the framework used is R=HEV, where R stand for risk, H for Health, E for
Evacuation and V for Vulnerability.
A: Vulnerability and Capacity Assessment

Typhoon Haiyan cannot be an example of a disaster because the extent of damages it wrought in
the Visayas Islands is negligible.
A: false

In interpreting earthquake hazard maps, the color code for no risk areas is:
A: white

Understanding of vulnerability and capacity can be best done through.


A: vulnerability and capacity assessment

On November 8, 2013, Super Typhoon ______ cut a devastating path across the Central Philippines
(Visayas).
A: Haiyan(or Yolanda)

Some participatory tools for capacity and vulnerability assessment include.


A: all of the choices

_____is a very important tool. It shows what places in the country, which are at risk to earthquakes.
A: map
If you experience the signs of impending tsunami, the best action to take is:
A: immediately leave the low-lying coastal areas and move to higher ground

Exposure is not one among the key determinants of disaster risk.


A: false

Be careful around broken glass and debris. Wear boots or sturdy shoes to keep from cutting your
feet.
A: true

A disaster will surely not occur when a hazard hit an area with vulnerable people and assets.
A: false

Communities with many vulnerabilities and low capacities are susceptible to experience
__________.
A: disasters

People living in rich developed countries have more vulnerabilities than those living in poor
developing countries.
A: false

Developmental perspective considers disasters as a challenge to ___________ as they negate


years of hard earned advances in education, health, social and economic areas.
A: development

For locally-generated tsunamis, where you might feel the ground shake, you may only have a few
minutes to move to higher ground.
A: true

In assessing disaster risk, the framework used is DR=HEV, where DR stand for disaster risk, H for
Hazard, E for Exposure and V for Vulnerability.
A: true

_____shows the places in the country which are at risk to tsunamis


A: map

Categorization of factors for capacities and vulnerabilities could include:


A: all of the choices

Elements at risk, particularly people can be affected by hazards, thus disaster preparedness is
important.
A: true

When water lines are broken, so there is no _____ to extinguish the fire.
A: water

Examples of capacities.
A: all of the choices

Physical risk factors can either lessen or aggravate one's vulnerability to hazards, for example the
level of strength of an office and the presence or absence of emergency exits in the case of an
earthquake.|
A: true

People live within or close to volcano danger zones, are to be affected by _____ flow and ash fall.
A: (lava)

Livelihoods and economic assets can be considered in measuring exposure of the elements at risk.
A: true

Hazard and risk are not interrelated at all.


A: false

Hazards always have similar adverse impacts on the elements at risk in an urban and rural setting.
A: false

The intangibles elements at risk include social cohesion, community structure, and cultural losses.
A: true

Earthquake is human sourced hazards resulting from political processes.


A:false

Landslide and is a potential __________ hazard.


A: earthquake

Landslides and liquefaction due to ground shaking brought about by an earthquake are considered:
A: secondary effects;

Tsunami is a potential ________ hazard.


A: earthquake

The province/s that are at risk to tsunamis include.


A: all of the choices

Elements at risk do not include people, properties and location.


A: false

Disasters do not cause death, diseases, destruction and displacement.


A: false

An earthquake may be classified as either tectonic or volcanic.


A: true
________as it is, is not a disaster, but can cause massive and complex disasters.
A: hazard

Disaster do not cause problems and hardships to population and communities.


A: false

Other potential earthquake hazards include:


A: all of the choices

Some factors which make people and their property vulnerable.


A: all of the choices

In interpreting earthquake hazard maps,


A: red

In interpreting earthquake hazard maps.


A: red - wrong

Hazard Maps show the places in the country which are at risk to
A: all of the choices

___________ refers to the intense vibration of the ground.


A: ground shaking

__________ earthquakes are those induced by rising lava or magma beneath an active volcano.
A: volcanic

Usually included in marginalized and most vulnerable groups.


A: all of the choices

People living in the __________ slopes are defenseless in the face of landslides.
A: mountain

A phenomenon which produce giant sea waves generated mostly by vertical displacement of the
ocean floor associated with a strong and shallow submarine earthquake is called:
A: tsunami

Responsible people should check water, gas, and electric lines for damage.
A: true

The focus of the natural science perspective in analyzing disaster is what _______and loss it could
cause to physical aspects such as people and their properties and assets: public and private
buildings and infrastructures.
A: damage

Typhoon Haiyan cannot be an example of a disaster because the extent of damages it wrought in
the Visayas Islands is negligible.
A: false

Understanding of vulnerability and capacity can be done through.


A: vulnerability and capacity assessment

The following should be done after an earthquake except:


A: Use the phone to connect to face book

During an earthquake, the following should NOT be done except:


A: If you're in a car, continue to drive until the earthquake stops,

During and after an emergency, if you're at school or work, _______ the emergency plan or the
instructions of the person in charge.
A: follow

Lahars are a specific kind of mudflow made up of volcanic debris.


A: true