Sie sind auf Seite 1von 22

Small vs.

Large: how assortment size influences consumer loyalty*


Pequeños y grandes: tamaño del surtido de cómo influye en la
lealtad del consumidor

José Luis Ruiz-Real (corresponding author)


Professor of Marketing
School of Economics and Business, Agrifood Campus of International Excellence
ceiA3, University of Almería
jlruizreal@ual.es

Juan Carlos Gázquez-Abad


Assistant Professor of Marketing
School of Economics and Business, Agrifood Campus of International Excellence
ceiA3, University of Almería
jcgazque@ual.es

Irene Esteban-Millat
Assistant Professor of Marketing
School of Economics and Business, Open University of Catalonia
iestebanm@uoc.edu

Francisco J. Martínez-López
Assistant Professor of Marketing
School of Economics and Business, University of Granada
fjmlopez@ugr.es

This work analyses the influence of the assortment size in consumer behaviour.
Specifically we analysed how consumers react to two different assortment sizes (small
and large), all of them mixed (private label-PL and national brands-NB) in relation to
the store switching intentions. For this purpose we analysed the relationship between four
variables (store image, value consciousness, perceived variety of assortment and private
label purchase intention) and consumer´s store switching intentions. To test the
hypotheses formulated we have developed an online experiment with a sample of 1,120
individuals. The experiment was carried out in four product categories: yogurt, bread,
detergent and toilet paper. To carry out the analysis we use the methodology of structural
equations. Results obtained show that the assortment size influences consumer behaviour
in an obvious way. In mixed assortments we have found significant differences between
small and large assortments. Store switching intentions is diminished by store image, a
higher value consciousness and the perceived variety of the retailer’s assortment. In large
assortments, store switching intention is lower when store image is positive, consumer´s
value consciousness is high, consumer’s perceived variety of the retailer’s assortment is
high. In the same way, store switching intentions are positively affected by PL purchase
intention. Our results do not support PL ability for generating a genuine consumer loyalty
towards the store.

* Acknowledgments: This work has been funded by Ramón Areces Foundation


Keywords: retailer, assortment, store switching intentions, private label, national brand
Introduction and objectives

Retail distribution is a sector of obvious relevance in economic activity in Spain. In 2014,


the estimated retail turnover was 206,776,441 euros, reaching the highest increase in
recent years, according to the report "Global Powers of Retailing" (Deloitte, 2016). The
supermarket chain Mercadona is leader in Spain with 22.3% share of retail food in 2015,
according to the consulting firm Kantar Worldpanel (2016), followed by Carrefour
(8.6%), DIA (8.2%), Grupo Eroski (5.8%) and Lidl and Auchan (3.8%).

Changes that have occurred in Spain in retailing have been very significant since the
seventies to the present, heightened by the economic recession of recent years, which has
caused a change in priorities and consumer behaviour. One of the most important changes
that have taken place has been the consolidation of private label (PL), which has led to
profound changes in the composition of assortments of retailers. The market share of the
PL in Spain reached 42% in value and 49.7% in volume during 2014 (IRI, 2015). Large
supermarkets increased their share to 48%, with Mercadona leading the market, followed
by Carrefour and Eroski. The expansion of PL has generated structural changes, affecting
the sector as a whole. Retailers have begun a clear strategy of market segmentation
through its PL, attending to price, product category, or the benefits sought by consumers
(Castelló, 2012), resulting in various scenarios in which to apply the great variety of PL.

In this environment, many retailers have opted for strategies to reduce their assortments,
primarily by withdrawing a large number of national brands (NB), giving greater
prominence to its own brands (Ailawadi and Harlan, 2004). A specific form of reduction
is by removing assortment of brands; while reductions of assortment usually consist of
removing multiple products from different brands, brand delisting strategy chooses to
completely remove all products of a brand within a category assortment (Sloot and
Verhoef, 2008). Attending to the compilation by Gázquez-Abad et al. (2015) of retailers
who carried out dereferencing strategies in their assortments, we can mention the case of
Wal-Mart (which reduced its overall assortment about 30% in the UK and 7.6% in the
US), Edah, Asda, Edeka or Metro, among others. Carrefour Group introduced a program
of optimization of product categories, reducing the size of the assortment by 15% (Berg
and Queck, 2010). In Spain, it is known the case of Mercadona, which in 2008 withdrew
from its shelves almost 800 brands from different manufacturers, some of which are
leaders in their product category (e.g., Nestle, Calvo o Pascual).

However, later, many of these retailers (including Mercadona) were forced to reintroduce
some of the NB previously removed to prevent consumer boycotts and the damage that
this decision was causing in its own image (Sloot and Verhoef, 2011). Therefore, the
decision is not as simple as removing brands from the assortments. Remove certain NB
can damage the image of the store, because consumers may consider that this assortment
is incomplete, either by not including most brands available (Pepe et al., 2012), or for not
including renowned brands (Sloot and Verhoef, 2008).

At present retail management cannot simply rely on offering very large assortments or
design a marketing strategy based on small assortments and very aggressive prices.
Retailers must offer their customers an assortment that, regardless of its size and
composition, provide real value to consumers and offers them an appropriate response to
their expectations (Miranda and Joshi, 2003). The main function of retailers should be to
contribute to a significant improvement in efficiency in the consumer buying process,
which will help them to achieve a competitive advantage and a particular commercial
differentiation (Berne, 2006).

So, what should a retailer do to achieve customer satisfaction and loyalty to their stores?
Are the largest assortments better that smallest ones to establish customer loyalty
strategies? Clearly the decision taken by the retailer in this regard is essential, not only
from the perspective of the cost structure and profit margins, but also from the perspective
of the image that consumers will develop about the company itself. The answer to the
above questions is therefore key to the success of the retailer, as it will allow it to know
what brands need to compose its assortment and which brand may be removed without
detrimental to its image and loyalty of their customers. Analysing consumer behaviour in
different sizes of assortment composition is essential to success in retail management. In
this work we bring value to analysing consumer behaviour facing assortments of different
size (small and large). For this purpose we conducted an online survey to 1,120
individuals, considering four product categories and including real brands. Consumer
response has been analysed through the estimation of a structural equation model.

Conceptual Framework / Literature Review

The concept of store image is introduced by Martineau (1958), who describes it as the
definition that makes a consumer in relation to a store according to its attributes which
work both functional and psychological level. Thus, the image of the store denotes the
feeling of customers towards it and each store has a different positioning for each client.
North et al. (2003) describe the store image as the identity of the store, being an influential
factor in the initial process of purchasing decision of consumers.

The image of the store is considered a critical determinant of the competitive position of
the retailer, to the extent that determines among other issues store loyalty and therefore
reduces the store switching intentions (Sirgy and Coskun, 1985). Consumers who have a
better image about a particular store develop a better perception of quality, value,
satisfaction and loyalty (Johnson et al., 2001). Considering the direct relationship found
in most studies, we propose the following hypothesis:

H1 A positive store image has a direct and negative effect on store switching intentions
Value-conscious consumers are characterized by being concerned about the price-quality
ratio received; i.e. they are customers who pay special attention to the quality they receive
for a certain price when making a purchase (Zeithaml, 1988; Lichtenstein et al, 1990).
The perceived value is a concept of subjective nature (Woodruff, 1997), resulting from
the comparison by consumers of perceived benefits and efforts to be performed (Zeithaml,
1988; McDougall and Levesque, 2000).
The perceived value can influence customer attitude (Swait and Sweeney, 2000).
Numerous studies support the positive influence of perceived value on loyalty to the
establishment, in the context of retailing (Chen and Quester, 2006). Loyalty has been
defended from two perspectives: attitudinal and behavioral (Dick and Basu, 1994; Oliver,
1999). According to the above the following hypothesis is formulated:
H2 Value consciousness has a direct and negative effect on store switching intentions
Academic research argues that the perceived level of variety of an assortment affect the
decision process and store selection by the consumer even more than the actual level of
variety. Several authors (e.g. Arnold et al., 1978; Brown, 1978; Finn and Louviere, 1996)
found a positive effect of the variety of assortment on the choice of the store and the
intention to be loyal to the store (e.g. Baker et al., 2002; Verhoef et al, 2007).
Consumers themselves say assortments decisions affect their choice of store (Arnold and
Tigert, 1982; Arnold et al., 1983). In fact according to the work of Briesch et al. (2009),
decisions of choice store present a greater sensitivity to changes in the variety of
assortment that to changes in prices. Large assortments tend to be attractive by providing
consumers with higher perception of variety (Chernev, 2003), more alternatives to choose
from (White and Hoffrage, 2009), and more likely to find what you want (Berger et al.,
2007). Many authors find a positive effect between the perception of a wide assortment
and the intention of loyalty to this store by consumers (e.g, Sirohi et al., 1998; Hoch et
al., 1999; Baker et al. 2002; Verhoef et al, 2007). According to the evidence found in the
literature, we formulate the following hypothesis:
H3 The perception of a wide assortment affects directly and negatively the store
switching intentions
PL are usually ownership, control and exclusive sales of retailers. The products under this
brand are used to highlight the image of the distributor, attract customers and increase
bargaining power with suppliers (Gomez and Okazaki, 2007). PL they have a range of
values that represent the company. A positive image of the PL not only helps companies
become more competitive, but also helps to encourage consumers to buy back the same
PL and therefore to buy back in the same store (Porter and Claycomb, 1997).
Most of the literature shows the existence of a positive relationship between the PL image
and store loyalty (e.g. Allen and Rao, 2000; Corstjens and Lal, 2000). San Martin (2006)
argues that there is a process of transfer of consumer confidence among the PL, the store
staff and retailer. Thus when a client trusts products with PL and local staff, will also trust
the store, which will decrease the intention of changing shop. Paiva et al. (2012) presented
an explanatory model of loyalty to supermarkets, based on the proposals of Flavián et al.
(2001), Collins-Dodd and Lindley (2002), Martenson (2007), and Martinez and Montaner
(2008). This model proposes that loyalty to a retailer is composed of an affective and
cognitive loyalty. From the proposals of different authors, the following hypothesis is
proposed:
H4 PL purchase intention affects directly and negatively on store switching intentions
So we propose a relationship model which includes these four hypotheses regarding store
switching intentions (figure 1).

Figure 1. Relationship model proposed


Methodology

To test the hypotheses formulated above, we have developed an online experiment with
a sample of 1,120 individuals belonging to a large panel of consumers in Spain, owned
by IRI. At the time of the study (March 2013) IRI had a consumer panel consisting of
322,883 individuals, aged between 24 and 65, responsible for buying for their homes for
food products, cleaning and personal care products in supermarkets and hypermarkets.
IRI panel is statistically representative of the Spanish population, both in terms of socio-
demographic variables (gender, age, income level, education level, family size), and
geographical distribution. To measure the different variables of the theoretical model
proposed we used composite scales, as they allow assess psychological variables that are
not directly observable (Churchill, 2003). Have been used Likert scales, widely used in
the literature on assortment and brands.

In the experiment we considered two different sizes of assortment: small (four brands)
and large (ten brands). The definitions of small and large assortments are based on
previous experiments (e.g. Chernev, 2003, 2006), in which the "big" assortments were
typically four, five or even six times the size of "small" assortments. In this investigation
a lower ratio was used, specifically three. As to the composition of the assortment, this
includes mixed assortments (PL and NB).
The experiment was carried out in four product categories (not included in this work):
yogurt, bread, detergent and toilet paper. We had chosen these four categories attending
to the classification made by Dhar et al. (2001), which responds to the
penetration/frequency relationship and establishes four categories of product: (1) staples
(high penetration/high frequency); (2) niches (low penetration/high frequency; (3) variety
enhancers (high penetration/low frequency), and (4) fill-ins (low penetration/low
frequency).

Individuals were randomized to different scenarios, according to number of brands (4 or


10) and proportion of high equity of PL and NB (a third and two-third high equity). The
final number of individuals for each type of variety was 35. Considering that the
experiment was carried out in four categories of product, the total number of individuals
for each type of assortment combination was 140. So we have a total sample of 1,120
individuals.
To carry out the analysis firstly it is carried out a confirmatory analysis of all measurement
scales by using the methodology of structural equations offering satisfactory results in
both scenarios. SEM statistical technique is considered the most appropriate for analysing
the relationships identified in the model proposed. Results confirm that the different
indicators show a good fit to the data, with right values for R2 of store switching intentions
and all estimates are significant in all or some of the scenarios analysed.

Findings and discussion

Results obtained show that the assortment size influences consumer behaviour in an
obvious way talking about store switching intentions (table 1). We have found significant
differences between small and large assortments. According to the findings, in small
assortments store switching intentions is diminished by store image, a higher value
consciousness and the perceived variety of the retailer’s assortment. We found no
significant relationship between PL purchase intentions and store switching intentions. In
large assortments, store switching intention is lower when store image is positive,
consumer´s value consciousness is high, consumer’s perceived variety of the retailer’s
assortment is high. In the same way, store switching intentions are negatively affected by
PL purchase intention (figure 2).

Table 1. Significant results for 4 and 10 brands assortments


Hypothesis 4 brands 10 brands
(H1) STORE CH INT <---STORE IMG -0,393 (p=0,000) -0,29 (p=0,000)
(H2) STORE CH INT <---VAL CONC -0,107 (p=0,048) -0,107 (p=0,003)
(H3) STORE CH INT <---VAR PERC -0,207 (p=0,000) -0,213 (p=0,000)
(H4) STORE CH INT <---PL PURCH INT n.s. -0,067 (p=0,009)
n.s.- No significant

Figure 2. Relationship model


Store image and store switching intentions

The results allow the acceptance of the hypothesis H1, which established a direct
relationship, with a negative sign, between positive store image and store switching
intentions. So the more positive is the store image, the lower the intention of the consumer
to switch stores. This relationship is confirmed for both, small assortments (-0.393; p =
0.000) and large (-0.29; p = 0.000). The intensity of this relationship is higher in small
assortments.

The store image indicates the feeling of customers towards a store, being different
positioning for each client. The literature supports the existence of the relationship
between store image and store switching intentions. Thus, Wu et al. (2011) state that the
corporate image is considered an important antecedent of store loyalty and brand loyalty,
as it encourages repeat purchase and decrease store switching intentions. In this same
vein, other studies show that store image is a determining factor in the competitive
position of the retailer, to determine, among other things, store loyalty and reduce store
switching intentions (e.g. Bellenger et al., 1976; Sirgy and Coskun, 1985). Customers
have a certain image of a store, which may lead them to further visits and repurchase
decisions (Kunkel and Berry, 1968). Consumers who have a better image of a store
develop a better perception of the value, satisfaction and loyalty (Johnson et al., 2001).

Store image thus acts, similar to brand value in relation to the repeat purchase by
consumers. If consumers perceive a brand with a positive and strong image, that may
have a positive influence on the probability that they choose that brand over other
competing brands (Vogel et al., 2008). In the same way, differentiation of the store is a
key element for the retailer. When consumers perceive a positive store image, higher than
its competitors, it is likely they to increase their satisfaction when purchasing products
there (Gomez et al., 2004), and is also likely they to remain loyal to the establishment.

Therefore, retailers try to develop strategies that enable them to obtain a positive image
and differentiated from other competitors, which is what will allow consumers to
distinguish from other stores (Ganesh et al., 2007). We can mention, as an example, the
case of the German chain Lidl, which went from being seen on his arrival in Spain as a
Hard Discount with a very limited assortment, to considerably improve its image among
Spanish consumers, adding new brands, expanding its assortment and with a strong
investment in television campaigns, to have been able to generate a positive store image,
and not only among the "pure" PL finders, but even among the upper middle class.

Value consciousness and store switching intentions

Results allow to accept the H2 hypothesis, which proposed a direct relationship, with a
negative sign, between value consciousness and store switching intentions. In both
assortments, small and large, the value of parameter is the same, -0.107 (p = 0.005, for
small; p = 0.003, for large).

The literature contains numerous works that argue that value-conscious consumers are
characterized by providing a special concern for the quality they receive, within a certain
price, when making a purchase (e.g. Thaler 1985; Zeithaml, 1988; Lichtenstein et al.,
1990). In this context, the literature suggests that there is a positive influence of perceived
value on store loyalty (e.g. Chen and Quester, 2006). In this sense, Gomez et al., (2011)
confirm that the value consciousness plays a key role in the formation of loyalty,
especially in the case of large buyers.

Value-conscious consumers are especially concerned about optimizing the value in their
purchases. They seek alternatives until they find what they think gives them the most
value for money. This tendency to seek variety is something inherent to the individual
(Berné et al., 2005) and may be motivated by satiety, desire for novelty or curiosity.
Because of this, these consumers seek diversity in their purchases as a way to meet these
needs, while also serves to reduce the level of uncertainty. However, these consumers are
also aware that the search for information and comparison, as well as diversity in
shopping at a general level, involve an investment in time and opportunity costs
(Marmorstein et al., 1992).

Perceived variety and store switching intentions

The results obtained allow accepting the hypothesis H3, which established a direct and
inverse relationship between the perceived variety of assortment and store switching
intentions. The relationship is slightly higher in large assortments (-0.207; p = 0.000
and -0.213; p = 0.000, for small and large assortments, respectively).

Academic research provides numerous empirical studies which show that consumer
perception of variety with respect to assortment of a store affects the selection process, in
addition to finding a positive impact between the perceived variety of assortment in a
store and the store switching intentions (e.g. Hoch et al., 1999; Baker et al., 2002; Verhoef
et al., 2007).

The range of assortment is a strategic element for shaping the store image, at the same
time that allows it meet different needs and preferences of its customers (Dhar et al.,
2001). This is considered as an important advantage for consumers, as it enables them to
be more efficient in their purchases and to avoid travelling to complete their shopping
basket, having to go to different stores. Considering Berné et al. (2001), consumers seek
to minimize, for each movement in the purchase, the sum of the variable costs associated
with buying a certain size of the shopping basket in different stores. Thus, with larger
assortments consumers reduce the perceived costs related to the effort that represents each
act of purchasing, seeing increase their convenience and satisfaction, which affects their
intention to remain in the store.

PL purchase intentions and store switching intentions

The results obtained allow partially accept the hypothesis H4, which established a direct
and inverse relationship between PL purchase intentions and store switching intentions.
This relationship is confirmed only in large assortments (-0.067; p = 0.009).

We find numerous studies that indicate a positive relationship between PL and store
loyalty. Thus, Porter and Claycomb (1997) conclude that a positive image of the PL helps
companies become more competitive and also motivates consumers to repurchase the
same PL, therefore to buy back in the same establishment. Allen and Rao (2000) argue
that customer retention is caused by multiple factors, among which would be the
perceived image of the brand. Corstjens and Lal (2000) state that the quality of the PL
can be useful to generate differentiation between retailers and increase store loyalty. San
San Martin (2006) states that when a client trusts the PL and the staff of a store, also will
rely on the store itself, which will diminish store switching intentions. Martinez and
Montaner (2008) suggest that Spanish consumers prone to PL are characterized by being
loyal to the establishment. Paiva et al. (2012) argue that store loyalty is composed of
affective and cognitive loyalty. Cognitive loyalty is an effect, among other factors, of PL
loyalty.

After years improving the quality, variety and image through a strong advertising
investment, PL have managed to shorten the distance with NB, not only objectively
speaking, but also in the assessment of consumers. If before PL were perceived as "the
choice of those who cannot afford to buy something else," they are currently associated
with a smart shopping option. This strong commitment of retailers towards PL, coupled
with an environment of economic recession that favoured changes in consumer habits and
the fact that many consumers bought these brands for the first time, significantly
increasing its presence in the shopping basket, it has allowed a learning process based on
personal experience and facilitated a better understanding and familiarity with these
brands. Once consumers experience PL, many of them continue purchasing those later
(Labeaga et al., 2007).

This change has not occurred only in perception of consumers, but also affects their
buying behaviour and the decision-making process. Consumers no longer purchase PL as
an option positioned exclusively on price, but they do aware of its value and, therefore,
as a preferential option that provides balance price/quality, in addition to guarantees
which are strengthened by the learning process and the self-image of the retailer. Many
PL are already so deeply rooted in society that are perceived as if they were NB, with a
different positioning and addressed to different consumer segments. PL as Aliada,
SeleQtia or Hacendado (brands of Hipercor, Eroski and Mercadona, respectively), have
their own image among consumers, many of whom visit their stores specifically looking
for these brands.

That is, PL serve currently to differentiate and position the store image, which is
consistent with investigations such as Bigné et al. (2013), whose results demonstrate the
importance of strengthening a positive and favourable image of PL, as a means of building
a strong store image, which, in turn, also affects value creation for the store. Therefore,
PL become an instrument of store loyalty for retailers who promote them in order to
increase loyalty to their establishments, since that can only be acquired in these. In this
sense, we argue that PL may help to increase traffic on the store and to improve consumer
loyalty by offering exclusive ranges that are not found in other establishments.

Consumers who intend to buy PL in retail stores with a wide assortment (e.g. Hipercor),
have a high level of commitment and loyalty to this retailer PL (it is usually because it is
PL with a higher level of reputation, given the good image of the retailer that markets
them). These customers have a higher level of loyalty to these brands that consumers who
buy PL in chains with small assortments (e.g. supermarkets), since they are not faithful
to a certain PL, but to the PL in general, so they can find other stores with PL that best fit
their demands, which favours their store switching intentions.

Conclusions and managerial implications


Results show the existence of a relationship between the four variables analysed value–

consciousness, PL purchase intentions, perceived variety of assortment and store image-


in large assortments, and the same results in small assortments with the exception of PL
purchase intentions, which is no significant (table 2). The most important variables in
relation to store switching intentions are perceived variety of assortment and store image.

Table 2. Intensity of the relationship of the variables regarding the store switching
intentions in different sizes of assortment

Size of assortment

Small Large
Value consciousness Moderate Moderate

PL purchase intentions n.s. Moderate

Perceived variety of assortment Moderate High


Store image High High
n.s.- No significant

From the results obtained in this research can draw different managerial implications,
especially for food based retailers.

Regarding store switching intentions we can state that value consciousness has a moderate
role in all sizes of assortment. The results indicate that consumers concerned about
achieving a good balance price-quality are not loyal to the store simply by offering a
larger assortment. That is, as from a certain size of assortment, in which consumers feel
they can make enough comparisons and evaluate alternatives, the fact of including more
brands does not result in lower levels of store switching intentions.

Since the PL has significantly improved its image, providing assurance and confidence
to customers, it is reasonable to think that when consumers have a wide assortment in the
store, where they can find their favourite brands, its intention to change establishment
will be less, also favouring this circumstance the need to spend less time searching for
information. Moreover, comparison of actual savings resulting from the fact of selecting
one or another brand is a simpler process when the consumer is in its usual store, even
more so considering that may only be acquire in the stores of this retailer. Therefore, we
believe that value consciousness of consumers decreases their store switching intentions,
as long as the store provides wide assortments and the buyers perceive that adds value to
them, particularly as long as the consumer finds assortments composed of brands with
different prices and qualities.

In relation to PL purchase intentions, our results do not support PLs ability for
generating a genuine consumer loyalty towards them, nor towards the store itself.
Although it is true that PL has significantly improved its image in recent years, we believe
that it has not yet reached the level of emotional attachment that certain NB have developed.
While many consumers buy PL, it does not necessarily mean they are loyal customers.
Therefore, retailers must find a balance in the assortment sought by its customers,
strengthen relationships with them and improve their image to attract customers, rather
than basing their strategy in developing loyalty through its PL. From the results, our
recommendation for retailers is seeking a balance between PL and NB, so that consumers
perceive enough variety to know that they can choose between different products to
meet their needs,
without changing establishment. It is important to further improve both the quality of the
PL as its image through promotional campaigns, expansion into new product categories
and segmentation strategies based on prices and the benefits sought, that can reach to
different types of consumers, and the excellent opportunity of interaction with customers
at the point of sale. However, retailers who bet on PL should continue providing value
through them, but without disregarding the price is still a determining factor.

The two most important elements to build customer loyalty are the perceived variety of
assortment and a positive store image. The perceived variety is especially relevant in the
case of large assortments, as this factor is one of its hallmarks and one of the main reasons
why consumers go to these stores, in addition to its good image. El Corte Inglés, to take
one example, brings together two concepts, variety of assortment and a good store image
among consumers. Its strategy to cover large needs and to create a memorable consumer
experience among its customers by offering a wide range of services, have generated a
sense of pride among its customers, improving their level of store loyalty.

It is noteworthy that the relationship between store image and store switching intentions
is greater (in absolute value) when it comes to small assortments that when they are large.
This could be caused by that stores offering assorted small generally correspond to retail
formats like supermarkets, closer to consumers and towards whom these often develop
more intense loyalty or, at least, in terms of repetition purchase (even in cases where this
could occur for convenience or routine, and we were talking about spurious loyalty or
inertia). In any case, it seems reasonable that consumers who are familiar with a particular
store and have a positive image of this, intend to keep going to it for their purchases.

Limitations and further research

This research is not exempt from some limitations. First, research has been limited to
Spanish context. Thus, it would be interesting to conduct this study in geographical
contexts different from Spanish, greatly influenced by the intensity of the economic crisis
in recent years and the high market share of the PL. Secondly, the methodology based on
an online experiment, with its advantages and disadvantages. Third, we do not
differentiate between high and low value PL. It would be interesting to know the influence
of brand equity in consumer behaviour. Finally we do not include only-PL assortment
which may be interesting according to the strategy followed by some retailers in relation
to assortment size and composition.
En este trabajo se analiza la influencia del tamaño del surtido en el comportamiento de los
consumidores. Concretamente, analizamos cómo los consumidores reaccionan a dos
diferentes tamaños de surtido (pequeños y grandes), todos ellos mezclados (private label-PL
y marcas nacionales-NB) en relación a la tienda cambiando las intenciones. Para ello se
analizó la relación entre cuatro variables (guardar la imagen, el valor de la conciencia, la
percepción de la variedad de surtido y de etiqueta privada de intención de compra) y la
tienda del consumidor intenciones de conmutación. Para probar las hipótesis formuladas,
hemos desarrollado un experimento online con una muestra de 1.120 individuos. El
experimento fue realizado en cuatro categorías de productos: yogur, pan, detergente y papel
higiénico. Para llevar a cabo el análisis, se utiliza la metodología de ecuaciones estructurales.
Los resultados obtenidos muestran que el surtido tamaño influye en el comportamiento de
los consumidores de una manera obvia. En surtidos mixtos hemos encontrado diferencias
significativas entre los pequeños y grandes surtidos. Almacenar las intenciones de
conmutación se ve disminuida por almacenar la imagen, cuanto mayor sea el valor de la
conciencia y la percepción de la variedad del surtido del minorista. En gran surtidos,
almacenar intención de conmutación es inferior al almacenar la imagen es positiva, la
consciencia del valor de consumo es alta, el consumidor percibe la variedad del surtido del
minorista es alto. De la misma manera, almacenar las intenciones de conmutación son
afectados positivamente por PL la intención de compra. Nuestros resultados no apoyan PL
capacidad para generar una verdadera fidelidad del consumidor hacia la tienda.

Introducción y objetivos

La distribución minorista es un sector de una importancia obvia en la actividad económica en


España. En 2014, el volumen de negocios estimado fue de 206,776,441 de euros, alcanzando
el mayor aumento en los últimos años, según el informe "Potencias mundiales del comercio
al por menor" (Deloitte, 2016). La cadena de supermercados mercadona es líder en España
con el 22,3% de la cuota de venta de alimentos al por menor en 2015, según la consultora
Kantar Worldpanel (2016), seguida por Carrefour (8,6%), DIA (8,2%), Grupo Eroski (5,8%) y
Lidl y Auchan (3,8%).
Los cambios que se han producido en España en la venta al por menor han sido muy
significativos desde los años setenta hasta la actualidad, acentuado por la recesión
económica de los últimos años, lo que ha provocado un cambio en las prioridades y el
comportamiento de los consumidores. Uno de los cambios más importantes que han tenido
lugar ha sido la consolidación de la etiqueta privada (PL), que ha dado lugar a profundos
cambios en la composición de surtidos de minoristas. La cuota de mercado de los PL en
España alcanzó el 42% en valor y 49,7% en volumen durante 2014 (IRI, 2015). Los grandes
supermercados aumentaron su participación a 48%, con Mercadona liderando el mercado,
seguida por Carrefour y Eroski. La expansión de la PL ha generado cambios estructurales, que
afectan al conjunto del sector. Los minoristas han comenzado una clara estrategia de
segmentación de mercado a través de su PL, atendiendo al precio, categoría del producto, o
los beneficios buscados por los consumidores (Castelló, 2012), resultando en varios
escenarios en los que se aplican a la gran variedad de PL.
En este entorno, muchos comerciantes han optado por estrategias para reducir sus
variedades, principalmente por la retirada de un gran número de marcas nacionales (NB),
dando mayor importancia a sus propias marcas (Ailawadi y Harlan, 2004). Una forma
específica de reducción es quitando el surtido de marcas; mientras que las reducciones de
surtido generalmente consisten de extracción de varios productos de diferentes marcas,
marcas elige la estrategia de exclusión para eliminar completamente todos los productos de
una marca dentro de una categoría (surtido y Sloot Verhoef, 2008). Asistir a la compilación
por Gázquez-Abad et al. (2015), de los minoristas que lleva a cabo la anulación de las
referencias de estrategias en sus variedades, podemos mencionar el caso de Wal-Mart (que
redujo su surtido general alrededor del 30% en el Reino Unido y 7,6% en los EE.UU.), la Edah,
Asda, Edeka o Metro, entre otros. Grupo Carrefour presentó un programa de optimización
de las categorías de productos, reduciendo el tamaño del surtido en un 15% (Berg y Queck,
2010). En España, es conocido el caso de Mercadona, que en 2008 se retiraron de sus
estanterías casi 800 marcas de fabricantes diferentes, algunos de los cuales son líderes en su
categoría de producto (por ejemplo, Nestle, Calvo o Pascual).
Sin embargo, posteriormente, muchos de estos minoristas (incluyendo el Mercadona) se
vieron obligados a reintroducir algunos de los NB previamente retirados para evitar los
boicots de los consumidores y el daño que esta decisión estaba causando en su propia
imagen (y Sloot Verhoef, 2011). Por lo tanto, la decisión no es tan sencillo como eliminar las
marcas de los surtidos. Extraer ciertas NB puede dañar la imagen de la tienda, ya que los
consumidores pueden considerar que esta selección es incompleta, ya sea por no incluir la
mayoría de las marcas disponibles (Pepe et al., 2012), o por no incluir marcas de renombre
(Sloot y Verhoef, 2008).
En la actualidad Retail Management no puede basarse simplemente en ofrecer gran surtido
o diseñar una estrategia de comercialización basada en pequeños surtidos y precios muy
agresivos. Los minoristas deben ofrecer a sus clientes un surtido que, independientemente
de su tamaño y composición, aportar un valor real a los consumidores y les ofrece una
respuesta adecuada a sus expectativas y Miranda (Joshi, 2003). La principal función de los
minoristas deben contribuir a una mejora significativa en la eficiencia del proceso de compra
del consumidor, que les ayudará a lograr una ventaja competitiva y una diferenciación
comercial en particular (Berna, 2006).
Entonces, ¿qué debe hacer un minorista para lograr la satisfacción del cliente y la lealtad a
sus tiendas? Son el mayor surtido mejor que pequeños para establecer estrategias de
fidelización de clientes? Claramente la decisión tomada por el minorista en este sentido es
esencial, no sólo desde la perspectiva de la estructura de costos y márgenes de ganancia,
sino también desde la perspectiva de la imagen que los consumidores se desarrollan
alrededor de la propia empresa. La respuesta a las preguntas anteriores, por lo tanto, es
clave para el éxito de la tienda, ya que le permitirá saber qué marcas necesitan para
componer su surtido de productos y marcas que pueden ser removidos sin perjudicar su
imagen y la lealtad de sus clientes. Analizar el comportamiento de los consumidores en
diferentes tamaños de surtido composición es esencial para tener éxito en la administración
de tiendas minoristas. En este trabajo aportamos valor a analizar el comportamiento de los
consumidores frente a los surtidos de diferente tamaño (pequeños y grandes). Para ello
hemos realizado una encuesta online a 1.120 personas, considerando cuatro categorías de
productos y marcas reales incluidos. Respuesta del consumidor ha sido analizado a través de
la estimación de un modelo de ecuaciones estructurales.

Marco Conceptual / revisión de literatura


el concepto de almacenar la imagen es introducida por Martineau (1958), quien lo describe
como la definición que hace que un consumidor en relación a un almacén según sus
atributos que trabajan tanto a nivel psicológico y funcional. Por lo tanto, la imagen de la
tienda denota el sentimiento de los clientes hacia ella y cada tienda tiene una posición
diferente para cada cliente. Norte et al. (2003) describen el guardar la imagen como la
identidad de la tienda, siendo un factor influyente en el proceso inicial de la decisión de
compra de los consumidores.
La imagen de la tienda está considerada como un factor determinante de la posición
competitiva de la empresa minorista, en la medida en que determina, entre otras
cuestiones, por lo tanto, reduce la lealtad y el almacén de la tienda de conmutación (Sirgy
intenciones y Coskun, 1985). Los consumidores que tengan una mejor imagen acerca de un
almacén determinado a desarrollar una mejor percepción de calidad, valor, satisfacción y
lealtad (Johnson et al., 2001). Considerando la relación directa encontrada en la mayoría de
los estudios, proponemos la siguiente hipótesis:
H1 almacena la imagen positiva tiene un efecto directo y negativo en la tienda intenciones
de conmutación de
los consumidores conscientes del valor, se caracterizan por estar preocupados por la relación
calidad-precio recibido; es decir, que son clientes que presten especial atención a la calidad
que reciben para un precio determinado al hacer una compra (Zeithaml, 1988; Lichtenstein
et al., 1990). El valor percibido es un concepto de naturaleza subjetiva (Woodruff, 1997),
resultantes de la comparación por parte de los consumidores de los beneficios percibidos y
los esfuerzos a realizar (Zeithaml, 1988; McDougall y Levesque, 2000).
El valor percibido puede influir en la actitud del cliente (Sweeney y Swait, 2000). Numerosos
estudios avalan la influencia positiva del valor percibido en la lealtad a la creación, en el
contexto de la reventa y Quester (Chen, 2006). Lealtad ha sido defendido desde dos
perspectivas: actitudinales y conductuales (Dick y Basu, 1994; Oliver, 1999). De acuerdo con
lo anterior se formula la siguiente hipótesis:
H2 Valor de la conciencia tiene un efecto directo y negativo en la tienda intenciones de
conmutación
la investigación académica sostiene que el nivel percibido de variedad de un surtido afectan
el proceso de decisión y selección de almacenamiento por el consumidor, incluso más que el
nivel real de la variedad. Varios autores (ej. Arnold et al., 1978; Brown, 1978; Finn y Louviere,
1996) hallaron un efecto positivo de la variedad de surtido en la elección de la tienda y la
intención de ser leales a la tienda (ej. Baker et al., 2002; Verhoef et al., 2007).
Los propios consumidores dicen surtidos decisiones influyen en su elección de store (Arnold
y Tigert, 1982; Arnold et al., 1983). De hecho, según el trabajo de Briesch et al. (2009), las
decisiones de elección store presente una mayor sensibilidad a los cambios en la variedad de
surtido que a cambios en los precios. Surtidos grandes tienden a ser atractivo,
proporcionando a los consumidores con una mayor percepción de la variedad (Chernev,
2003), más alternativas para elegir (Blanco y Hoffrage, 2009), y es más probable que
encuentre lo que usted desee (Berger et al., 2007). Muchos autores encuentran un efecto
positivo entre la percepción de un amplio surtido y la intención de lealtad a este almacén por
parte de los consumidores (e.g, Sirohi et al., 1998; Hoch et al., 1999; Baker et al. 2002;
Verhoef et al., 2007). Según la evidencia encontrada en la literatura, se formulan las
siguientes hipótesis:
H3 la percepción de una amplia variedad afecta directa y negativamente la tienda cambiar
intenciones
PL son generalmente la propiedad, el control y la venta exclusiva de los minoristas. Los
productos de esta marca se utilizan para resaltar la imagen del distribuidor, atraer clientes y
aumentar el poder de negociación con proveedores (Gómez y Okazaki, 2007). PL tienen una
gama de valores que representan la empresa. Una imagen positiva de la PL no sólo ayuda a
las empresas a ser más competitivas, pero también ayuda a estimular a los consumidores a
comprar de nuevo la misma PL y, por lo tanto, volver a comprar en la misma tienda y
Claycomb (Porter, 1997).
La mayoría de la literatura muestra la existencia de una relación positiva entre la PL Imagen y
guardar fidelidad (ej. Allen y Rao, 2000; Corstjens y Lal, 2000). San Martin (2006) sostiene
que existe un proceso de transferencia de la confianza del consumidor, entre la PL, el
almacén personal y detallista. Así, cuando un cliente confía en productos con PL y personal
local, también confía en el almacén, lo que disminuirá la intención de cambiar de tienda.
Paiva et al. (2012) presentaron un modelo explicativo de la lealtad a los supermercados,
basado en las propuestas de Flavián et al. (2001), y Collins-Dodd Lindley (2002), Martenson
(2007), y Martínez y Montaner (2008). Este modelo propone que la lealtad a un minorista
está compuesto por una lealtad afectivas y cognitivas. A partir de las propuestas de
diferentes autores, se propone la siguiente hipótesis:
H4 PL intención de compra afecta directa y negativamente sobre las intenciones de
conmutación tienda
entonces, proponemos un modelo de relación que incluye estas cuatro hipótesis sobre las
intenciones de conmutación store (figura 1).
Figura 1. Relación modelo propuesto

Metodología

para probar las hipótesis formuladas anteriormente, hemos desarrollado un experimento


online con una muestra de 1.120 individuos pertenecientes a un amplio grupo de
consumidores en España, propiedad de IRI. En el momento del estudio (marzo de 2013) El IRI
tuvo un panel de consumidores formado por 322,883 personas, de edades comprendidas
entre los 24 y 65, responsable de la compra de sus casas para alimentos, productos de
limpieza y productos de cuidado personal en los supermercados e hipermercados. Panel de
IRI es estadísticamente representativa de la población española, tanto en términos de
variables sociodemográficas (sexo, edad, nivel de ingresos, nivel de educación, el tamaño de
la familia), y su distribución geográfica. Para medir las distintas variables del modelo teórico
propuesto se utilizaron escalas compuesto, ya que permiten evaluar las variables
psicológicas que no son directamente observables (Churchill, 2003). Se han utilizado las
escalas Likert, ampliamente utilizado en la literatura sobre el surtido de productos y marcas.
En el experimento se consideraron dos tamaños diferentes de surtido: pequeño (cuatro
marcas) y grande (10 marcas). Las definiciones de los surtidos de pequeños y grandes se
basan en experimentos anteriores (p. ej. Chernev, 2003, 2006), en la que los "grandes" los
surtidos eran normalmente de cuatro, cinco o incluso seis veces el tamaño de la "pequeña"
surtidos. En esta investigación se utilizó una proporción inferior, concretamente tres. En
cuanto a la composición del surtido, esto incluye surtidos mixtos (PL y NB).
El experimento fue realizado en cuatro categorías de productos (no incluido en este trabajo):
yogur, pan, detergente y papel higiénico. Habíamos elegido estas cuatro categorías
atendiendo a la clasificación hecha por el Dhar et al. (2001), que responde a la
penetración/frecuencia de relación y establece cuatro categorías de producto: (1) grapas
(alta penetración/alta frecuencia); (2) la penetración de nichos (baja/alta frecuencia; (3)
variedad potenciadores de la penetración (alta/baja frecuencia), y (4) Fill-ins (baja
penetración/baja frecuencia).
Los individuos fueron asignados aleatoriamente a distintos escenarios, según el número de
marcas (4 ó 10) y la proporción de alta equidad de PL y NB (un tercio y dos tercios de alta
equidad). El número final de los individuos para cada tipo de variedad era de 35.
Considerando que el experimento fue realizado en cuatro categorías de producto, el número
total de individuos de cada tipo de combinación de surtido fue de 140. Así que tenemos una
muestra total de 1.120 individuos.

Para llevar a cabo el análisis en primer lugar se realiza un análisis de confirmación de todas
las escalas de medición utilizando la metodología de ecuaciones estructurales que ofrecen
resultados satisfactorios en ambos escenarios. SEM técnica estadística es considerado el más
apropiado para analizar las relaciones identificadas en el modelo propuesto. Los resultados
confirman que los distintos indicadores muestran un buen ajuste a los datos, con valores de
R2 de conmutación store intenciones y todas las estimaciones son significativos en todos o
algunos de los escenarios analizados.

Resultados y discusión

los resultados obtenidos muestran que el surtido tamaño influye en el comportamiento de


los consumidores de una manera obvia hablando de almacenar las intenciones de
conmutación (tabla 1). Hemos encontrado diferencias significativas entre los pequeños y
grandes surtidos. Según las conclusiones, en la pequeña tienda de surtidos de intenciones de
conmutación se ve disminuida por almacenar la imagen, cuanto mayor sea el valor de la
conciencia y la percepción de la variedad del surtido del minorista. No encontramos relación
significativa entre las intenciones de compra PL y almacenar las intenciones de conmutación.
En gran surtidos, almacenar intención de conmutación es inferior al almacenar la imagen es
positiva, la consciencia del valor de consumo es alta, el consumidor percibe la variedad del
surtido del minorista es alto. De la misma manera, almacenar las intenciones de
conmutación son afectados negativamente por PL intención de compra (figura 2).

Tabla 1. Resultados significativos para 4 y 10 marcas surtidos a la


figura 2. Modelo relacional

almacena la imagen y almacenar


los resultados de las intenciones de conmutación permiten la aceptación de la hipótesis H1,
que establece una relación directa con un signo negativo, entre almacenar la imagen positiva
y almacenar las intenciones de conmutación. Lo más positivo es el almacenar la imagen,
menor será la intención del consumidor al switch almacena. Esta relación se confirma por
tanto, surtidos de pequeño (-0.393; p = 0.000) y grande (-0,29; p = 0,000). La intensidad de
esta relación es mayor en pequeñas surtidos.
La tienda imagen indica el sentimiento de los clientes hacia una tienda, posicionamiento,
siendo diferente para cada cliente. La literatura apoya la existencia de la relación entre la
imagen del almacén y tienda las intenciones de conmutación. Así, Wu et al. (2011) afirman
que la imagen corporativa es considerado un antecedente importante de la tienda de lealtad
y fidelidad a la marca, porque fomenta la repetición de compra y disminuir tienda
intenciones de conmutación. En este mismo sentido, otros estudios muestran que almacena
la imagen es un factor determinante en la posición competitiva de la empresa minorista,
para determinar, entre otras cosas, almacenar la lealtad y reducir la conmutación store
intenciones (p.ej. Bellenger et al., 1976; Sirgy y Coskun, 1985). Los clientes tienen una cierta
imagen de una tienda, lo cual puede conducir a nuevas visitas y decisiones de recompra
(Kunkel y Berry, 1968). Los consumidores que tengan una mejor imagen de la tienda,
desarrollar una mejor percepción del valor, la satisfacción y la lealtad (Johnson et al., 2001).
Almacenar la imagen así actúa, similar al valor de la marca en relación con la repetición de
compra de los consumidores. Si los consumidores perciben una marca con una imagen
fuerte y positiva, que pueden tener una influencia positiva sobre la probabilidad de que se
elija esa marca por encima de otras marcas competidoras (Vogel et al., 2008). De la misma
manera, la diferenciación de la tienda es un elemento clave para el minorista. Cuando los
consumidores perciben una tienda positiva imagen, superior al de sus competidores, es
probable que aumente su satisfacción a la hora de adquirir productos allí (Gómez et al.,
2004), y también es probable que se mantengan fieles a la creación.
Por lo tanto, los minoristas intentan desarrollar estrategias que les permitan obtener una
imagen positiva y diferenciada de los otros competidores, que es lo que va a permitir a los
consumidores distinguir de otras tiendas (Ganesh et al., 2007). Podemos citar como ejemplo
el caso de la cadena alemana Lidl, que pasó de ser visto en su llegada a España como un
disco de descuento con un surtido muy limitado, para mejorar considerablemente su imagen
entre los consumidores españoles, añadiendo nuevas marcas, ampliando su surtido y con
una fuerte inversión en campañas de televisión, que han sido capaces de generar una
imagen positiva de tienda, y no sólo entre los "puros" PL finders, pero incluso entre la clase
media alta.
El valor de la conciencia y almacenar
los resultados de las intenciones de conmutación permiten aceptar la hipótesis H2, que
propone una relación directa, con un signo negativo, entre el valor de la conciencia y
almacenar las intenciones de conmutación. En ambas variedades, grandes y pequeñas, el
valor del parámetro es el mismo, -0.107 (p = 0,005, para pequeños; p = 0,003, para los
grandes).
La literatura contiene numerosas obras que argumentan que los consumidores conscientes
del valor, se caracterizan por ofrecer una especial preocupación por la calidad que reciba,
dentro de un determinado precio, al realizar una compra (ej. Thaler 1985; Zeithaml, 1988;
Lichtenstein et al., 1990). En este contexto, la literatura sugiere que existe una influencia
positiva del valor percibido en el almacén la lealtad (p. ej. Quester y Chen, 2006). En este
sentido, Gomez et al., (2011), confirman que el valor de la conciencia juega un papel clave en
la formación de la lealtad, especialmente en el caso de grandes compradores.

Los consumidores conscientes del valor, están especialmente preocupados acerca de cómo
optimizar el valor de sus compras. Buscan alternativas hasta que encuentran lo que ellos
piensan que les da más valor por su dinero. Esta tendencia a buscar la variedad es algo
inherente al individuo (Berné et al., 2005) y puede ser motivada por la saciedad, el deseo de
novedad o curiosidad. Por esta razón, los consumidores buscan la diversidad en sus compras
como una manera de satisfacer esas necesidades, mientras que también sirve para reducir el
nivel de incertidumbre. Sin embargo, estos consumidores son también conscientes de que la
búsqueda de información y de comparación, así como diversidad de compras en un nivel
general, implican una inversión de tiempo y costes de oportunidad (Marmorstein et al.,
1992).
Variedad percibida y almacenar las intenciones de conmutación
los resultados obtenidos permiten aceptar la hipótesis H3, que establece una relación directa
e inversa entre la percepción de la variedad de surtido y almacenar las intenciones de
conmutación. La relación es ligeramente superior en grandes surtidos (-0.207; p = 0,000 y p =
0,000; -0.213, para pequeños y grandes surtidos, respectivamente).
La investigación académica proporciona numerosos estudios empíricos que demuestran que
la percepción del consumidor de la variedad con respecto a la selección de una tienda afecta
el proceso de selección, además de encontrar un impacto positivo entre la percepción de la
variedad de surtido en una tienda y la tienda cambiar intenciones (p.ej. Hoch et al., 1999;
Baker et al., 2002; Verhoef et al., 2007).
La gama de surtido es un elemento estratégico para la conformación de la imagen de la
tienda, al mismo tiempo que le permite satisfacer las diferentes necesidades y preferencias
de sus clientes (Dhar et al., 2001). Se considera que esta es una ventaja importante para los
consumidores, ya que les permite ser más eficientes en sus compras y evitar viajar a
completar su cesta de la compra, tener que ir a diferentes tiendas. Considerando Berné et al.
(2001), los consumidores buscan minimizar, para cada movimiento en la compra, la suma de
los costes variables asociados con la compra de un determinado tamaño de la cesta de
compras en diferentes tiendas. Por lo tanto, con mayor surtido los consumidores reducen los
costos relacionados con el esfuerzo que representa cada acto de compra, viendo aumentar
su comodidad y satisfacción, lo cual afecta su intención de permanecer en el almacén.
PL intenciones de compra y almacenar las intenciones de conmutación
los resultados obtenidos permiten aceptar parcialmente la hipótesis H4, que establece una
relación directa e inversa entre PL intenciones de compra y almacenar las intenciones de
conmutación. Esta relación sólo está confirmada en gran surtido (-0.067; p = 0.009).

Encontramos numerosos estudios que indican una relación positiva entre la PL y almacenar
la lealtad. Así, Porter y Claycomb (1997) concluyen que una imagen positiva de la PL ayuda a
las empresas a ser más competitivas y también motiva a los consumidores a comprar el
mismo PL, por lo tanto volver a comprar en el mismo establecimiento. Allen y Rao (2000)
argumentan que la retención de clientes es causada por múltiples factores, entre los cuales
sería la percepción de la imagen de la marca. Corstjens y Lal (2000) afirman que la calidad de
la PL puede ser útil para generar diferenciación entre minoristas y aumentar la lealtad de
tienda. San

San Martin (2006) establece que cuando un cliente confía en el PL y el personal de la tienda,
también va a depender de la propia tienda, lo cual disminuirá la conmutación store
intenciones. Martinez y Montaner (2008) sugieren que los consumidores españoles
propenso a PL se caracterizan por ser leales a la constitución. Paiva et al. (2012) argumentan
que la tienda se compone de lealtad afectivas y cognitivas de lealtad. Es un efecto de lealtad
cognitiva, entre otros factores, de la PL de lealtad.
Después de años en la mejora de la calidad, la variedad y la imagen a través de una fuerte
inversión en publicidad, PL han logrado acortar la distancia con NB, no sólo objetivamente,
sino también en la evaluación de los consumidores. Si antes de pl fueron percibidos como "la
elección de aquellos que no pueden permitirse el lujo de comprar otra cosa", que
actualmente están asociados con una opción de compras inteligentes. Este fuerte
compromiso de minoristas hacia PL, junto con un entorno de recesión económica que
favorecía a los cambios en los hábitos de consumo y el hecho de que muchos consumidores
compraron estas marcas por primera vez, aumentando significativamente su presencia en la
cesta de la compra, que ha permitido un proceso de aprendizaje basado en la experiencia
personal y ha facilitado una mejor comprensión y familiaridad con estas marcas. Una vez que
los consumidores experimenten PL, muchos de ellos siguen comprando los posteriores
(Labeaga et al., 2007).
Este cambio no se ha producido sólo en la percepción de los consumidores, sino que
también afecta a su comportamiento de compra y el proceso de toma de decisiones. Los
consumidores ya no compra PL como opción colocado exclusivamente en el precio, pero lo
hacen conscientes de su valor y, por tanto, como una opción preferencial que proporciona
equilibrio precio/calidad, además de las garantías que son reforzados por el proceso de
aprendizaje y la auto-imagen de la tienda. Muchos PL ya están tan profundamente
arraigados en la sociedad que se perciben como si fueran NB, con una posición diferente y
dirigida a diferentes segmentos de consumidores. PL como aliada, o hacendado SeleQtia
(marcas de Hipercor, Eroski y Mercadona, respectivamente), tienen su propia imagen entre
los consumidores, muchos de los cuales visitan sus tiendas buscando específicamente estas
marcas.
Es decir, PL actualmente sirven para diferenciar y posicionar la imagen de la tienda, que es
consistente con las investigaciones como Bigné et al. (2013), cuyos resultados demuestran la
importancia del fortalecimiento de una imagen positiva y favorable de la PL, como un medio
de construir una fuerte imagen de tienda, que, a su vez, afecta también a la creación de valor
para el almacén. Por lo tanto, convertirse en un instrumento de PL guardar lealtad para los
minoristas que promocionarlos para aumentar la lealtad a sus establecimientos, ya que sólo
pueden ser adquiridos en estos. En este sentido, sostenemos que la PL puede ayudar a
aumentar el tráfico en la tienda y mejorar la lealtad del consumidor ofreciendo rangos
exclusivos que no se encuentran en otros establecimientos.
Los consumidores que deseen adquirir PL en tiendas con un amplio surtido (p. ej. Hipercor),
tienen un alto nivel de compromiso y lealtad a este minorista PL (normalmente es porque es
PL con un alto nivel de reputación, dada la buena imagen de la tienda que comercializa).
Estos clientes tienen un mayor nivel de lealtad a estas marcas que los consumidores que
compran en las cadenas PL con surtidos de pequeño (por ejemplo, supermercados), puesto
que no son fieles a una determinada PL, sino a la PL en general, para que puedan encontrar
otras tiendas con PL que mejor se adapten a sus exigencias, lo que favorece sus intenciones
de conmutación del almacén.

Conclusiones e implicaciones gerenciales


resultados muestran la existencia de una relación entre las cuatro variables analizadas: valor
de la conciencia, PL intenciones de compra, la percepción de la variedad de surtido y
almacenar la imagen- en grandes variedades, y los mismos resultados en pequeños surtidos
con excepción de PL de intenciones de compra, lo cual no es significativa (Tabla 2). Las
variables más importantes en relación con la tienda de intenciones de conmutación son
percibidos variedad de surtido y guardar la imagen.
Tabla 2. La intensidad de la relación de las variables con respecto a las
intenciones de conmutación store en diferentes tamaños de surtido a
partir de los resultados obtenidos en esta investigación pueden dibujar diferentes
implicaciones gerenciales, especialmente para los alimentos basándose minoristas.
Con respecto a las intenciones de conmutación store podemos afirmar que el valor de la
conciencia tiene un papel moderado en todos los tamaños de surtido. Los resultados indican
que los consumidores preocupados por el logro de un buen equilibrio precio-calidad no son
leales a la tienda simplemente por ofrecer un surtido más grande. Es decir, a partir de un
cierto tamaño de surtido, en el que los consumidores sienten que pueden hacer
comparaciones y evaluar alternativas suficientes, el hecho de incluir más marcas no resultan
en bajos niveles de conmutación store intenciones.
Desde el PL ha mejorado considerablemente su imagen, proporcionando seguridad y
confianza a los clientes, es razonable pensar que cuando los consumidores tienen un amplio
surtido en la tienda, donde se pueden encontrar sus marcas favoritas, su intención de
cambiar de establecimiento será menor, también favorecer esta circunstancia la necesidad
de gastar menos tiempo buscando información. Además, la comparación de ahorros reales
resultantes del hecho de seleccionar una u otra marca es un proceso más sencillo cuando el
consumidor está en su tienda habitual, más aún teniendo en cuenta que sólo se puede
adquirir en las tiendas de este minorista. Por lo tanto, creemos que el valor de la conciencia
de los consumidores disminuye sus intenciones de conmutación de almacén, mientras que la
tienda ofrece un amplio surtido y los compradores perciben que añade valor a ellos, en
particular, mientras que el consumidor considera surtido compuesto de marcas con
diferentes precios y calidades.
En relación a las intenciones de compra PL, nuestros resultados no apoyan PLs capacidad
para generar una verdadera fidelidad del consumidor hacia ellos, ni hacia la propia tienda. Si
bien es cierto que el PL ha mejorado considerablemente su imagen en los últimos años,
creemos que todavía no ha alcanzado el nivel de apego emocional que ciertos NB han
desarrollado. Aunque muchos consumidores comprar PL, no significa necesariamente que
sean clientes leales. Por lo tanto, los minoristas deben encontrar un equilibrio en el surtido
solicitados por sus clientes, estrechar las relaciones con ellos y mejorar su imagen para atraer
a los clientes, en lugar de basar su estrategia en el desarrollo de su lealtad a través de PL. A
partir de los resultados, nuestra recomendación para los minoristas es la búsqueda de un
equilibrio entre la PL y NB, con el fin de que los consumidores perciben una variedad
suficiente para saber que pueden elegir entre diferentes productos para satisfacer sus
necesidades, sin cambiar de establecimiento. Es importante para mejorar tanto la calidad de
la PL como su imagen a través de campañas promocionales, la expansión a nuevas categorías
de productos y estrategias de segmentación basada en los precios y los beneficios previstos,
que puede llegar a distintos tipos de consumidores, y la excelente oportunidad de
interacción con los clientes en el punto de venta. Sin embargo, los minoristas que apuesta
sobre PL debe continuar aportando valor a través de ellos, pero sin descuidar el precio sigue
siendo un factor determinante.

Los dos elementos más importantes para construir la lealtad del cliente son la percepción de
la variedad de surtido y almacenar la imagen positiva. La percepción de la variedad es
especialmente relevante en el caso de grandes surtidos, ya que este factor es una de sus
señas de identidad y una de las principales razones por las que los consumidores van a estas
tiendas, además de su buena imagen. El Corte Inglés, por poner un ejemplo, reúne a dos
conceptos, la variedad del surtido y una tienda de buena imagen entre los consumidores. Su
estrategia para cubrir grandes necesidades y para crear una memorable experiencia de
consumo entre sus clientes, ofreciendo una amplia gama de servicios, que han generado un
sentimiento de orgullo entre sus clientes, mejorando su nivel de lealtad de tienda.
Es de notar que la relación entre almacenar la imagen y almacenar las intenciones de
conmutación es mayor (en valor absoluto) cuando se trata de pequeñas surtidos que cuando
son grandes. Esto podría deberse a que las tiendas que ofrece diversas pequeñas
generalmente corresponden a formatos comerciales como supermercados, más cerca de los
consumidores y hacia quien estas suelen desarrollar más intensa lealtad, o, al menos, en
términos de repetición de compra (incluso en los casos en que ello podría ocurrir, por
comodidad o rutina, y estábamos hablando de fidelidad espuria o inercia). En cualquier caso,
parece razonable que los consumidores que están familiarizados con un almacén
determinado y tener una imagen positiva de este, va a seguir yendo a ella por sus compras.

Limitaciones y nuevas investigaciones


esta investigación no está exenta de algunas limitaciones. En primer lugar, la investigación ha
sido limitada al contexto español. Por lo tanto, sería interesante realizar este estudio en
contextos geográficos diferentes de Español, muy influenciado por la intensidad de la crisis
económica en los últimos años y la elevada cuota de mercado de la Pl. En segundo lugar, la
metodología basada en un experimento online, con sus ventajas y desventajas. En tercer
lugar, no podemos diferenciar entre alto y bajo valor PL. Sería interesante conocer la
influencia de la marca en el comportamiento de los consumidores. Por último no podemos
incluir sólo-PL surtido que puede ser interesante de acuerdo a la estrategia seguida por
algunos minoristas en relación a surtido tamaño y composición.