Sie sind auf Seite 1von 10

~v Gl~O o(Jc VA oAo TAO LONG AN

TRlfONG THPT CHUYEN LONG AN KY T~I HQC SINH-GIOIOLYMPIC -


TR~I HE PHU'ONG NAM LAN THU' VI

Mon thi : Tl~NG ANH


Ngay thi : 18 thang 7 nam 2019
Tho•i gian lam bai : 1ao phut
ID§ CHiNH TJ-tU'-9 (Khong k/J th&i gian phat ae)
(De thi c6 11 trang)

- Thi sinh kh6ng auvc s& dt,mg tai li~u, ke ca tfr cJien .

- Can b(> coi thi kh6ng giai thich gi them.


Ma phach

I. LISTENING (40 points)

HlfCYNG DAN PHAN THI NGHE HIEU


• Bai nghe g6m 3 phfm, m6i phf:Jn c1U'Q'c nghe 2 lfln, m6i lfln each nhau 15 giay, m& aau va kJt thuc
<leu c6 tin hi~u.
• Thi sinh c6 3 phut cJe hoan chfnh bai nghe.
• MQi hwng dan cho thi sinh (bflng tieng Anh) cJa c6 trong bai nghe.

Part 1: Listen to a man who runs a recruitment agency talking a young woman. For questions 1-5,
complete the Employee Record using NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS and/or A NUMBER for each
blank. Write your answers in the spaces provided.

PRIME RECUITMENT
EMPLOYEE RECORD
' Example Answer
Surname Riley
I
Position applied
1.
I

I Email
edwinari@worldnet.com
I I

Nationality
2. I
Reference Name: John Keen
(professional) Job: manager of a play cente~ _ _
- -- I
Reference Name: Eileen Dorsini I
(personal) Job: 3.
-
ceri ifica te
Special qualifications Current 4.
Certificate of competence in 5 I
- -
I
Part 2 : Ll5 ran to pnrt of a radio disc ussion a bout graphology, th o study of handwriting. For que5 ilona
~-tO. choose rh o answor (A. B, C or D) wh ich fits bas t :1ccorcf/11 g to what you hoar. Write your answers
lf1 th e corrospondlng rwmborod boxos p ro vldod.
6 Accon.1in~1 In Ri clmrd , comments 0 11 n client' s porso 11nl1t:y trrnts sho uld only be made if the g rapho logist

A is sure: tl1at til e S3 m ple of handwri ting is genuine


B is su r'e his res ults Are supported by th e rest of hi s team.
C. ca n bach. up his in itial findin gs with further evid ence .
D ca n confi rm his fi ndi ngs in differe nt handwriting sa mples .
7. Wl1at is Maria 's vi ew of tl1e co nclu sio ns whi ch grapholog ists arrive at?
A The connections hove not bee n proved. B. The rules of interpretatio n are not clear.
C . More detailed interp retation is needed. D. Research is needed into th e w ay writin g is ta ught.
S. What, in Richa rd's view , is th e key to an understanding of a client' s personality?
A th e way in w hich th e c lie nt lea rnt to write
B. th e vari ati o ns in th e c lie nt's individu al letters
C . the way th e client's ha ndwriting has developed
D. the influence of current trends on the cl ient's handwriting
9. A ccord ing to Richard , some businesses with North Am erican links
---
A. use graphol ogy re luctantly in recruitm ent.
B. a re unwilling to disclose th at th ey use graphology.
C . are sce ptica l about the valu e of graphology.
D . are trading more successfully because of graphology.
10. What does Maria conclude about the use of graphology?
A. It has become a source of discontent. 8 . It is not appropriate for use as a recruitment tool.
C . It is used by few serious psychologists . D. Its educational value has not been proved.
Your answers:
, 6. I 7, 1 s. I 9, 110.

Part 3 : Listen to a piece of news from the CNN about hosting the FIFA World Cup. For questions 11-
20, supply the blanks with the missing information using NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS AND/OR A
NUMBER taken from the recording for each answer in the spaces provided.

The focus of the news bulletin is the (11) _ _ __ __ _ __ _ _ in the world of international soccer.
According to U .S . prosecutors , some officials of FIFA have accepted more than $150 mill ion in (12)
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ over the past 24 years .
They were expected to uphold the rules that keep soccer honest and to protect the integrity of the game.
However, they corrupted the business of soccer to (13) _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ and to
enrich th emselves.
The Depa rtment of Justice is determined to end these practices , to root out corruption and to bring (14)
_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ to justice.
FIFA has bee n investigated for corruption for years . However, it's rep eatedly denied that its top officials are
(15) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
The repo rte r says whichever nation hosts the W orld Cup potentially receives a (1 6)
economic boost.
-The- decision
--------------
to select Qata r to host the W orld Cup in 2022 has become a (1 7) _ _ _ _ _ _ __ __
one.
· · ls l1ave bee n un der (18) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ a m·d
Officia 1 allegation of corruption in th e
selection process fo r both the 2022 Cup and th e 2018 WorId Cup in Russ ia. .
FIFA's (19) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ hired 8 11 i,i dc pendent investig ator later announcing
no evidence of corrup ti on and no r~aso n lo reope n the (20) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ __
11 • LEXICO-GRAM
Part 1: For questions~~: (30 points)
and writ 0, choose the correct answ A B
2 e your answers in the corresp d. er ' ' C, or D to each of the following questions
1. David's hard-working Wh . on mg numbered boxes provided.
A. means en sup~rv1sed ; left to his own _ _ _ , he becomes lazy.
22 Bus· th B. instruments C tools D. devices
. iness . ese days are looking for people who are .
th an one role if necessary. - - - ' or in other words , are able to fulfil more

A . ever-changing B. resourceful C. action-oriented D. versatile


23 th
· The vote on e anti-bullying policy was _ _ _and it wll be put into effect immediately at the school.
A . unanimous B. united C. undoutbed D. undivided
24
- The sports complex is likely to become a _ _ _after the championships are over.
A . white elephant B. wild goose C. fat cat D. black sheep
25. He'd be an excellent candidate for promotion _ _ _ his hot temper.
A . if not B. if it wasn 't C. if only D. if it weren 't for
26. You w ill save money if you buy the large, ___ size of the shampoo.
A. economy B. economical C. economic D. economized
27. The installation of CCTV across the city center will hopefully act as a strong _ _ _ to anyone tempted
to commit vandalism .
A. constraint B. restriction C. deterrent D. boundary
28. Without experience, she's got _ _ _ to come for an interview.
A. little chance of being asked B. little chance for asking
C . a little chance to ask D. a little chance in asking
29. The list of the sources for the information in this book is contained in the book's
---
A. acknowledgements B. bibliograhpy C. appendix D. contents
30. Having some volunteer work on your CV can be a real ___ in your cap when it comes to applying to
university.
A. feather B. hair C. beard D. sideburn
31 . The company was taken to court and fined for not___ with local environmental regulations.
A. wrestling B. complying C. experiencing D. collaborating
32 . As the two seminars are running _ _ _ , I will have to make a choice on which one to attend.
A. continually B. concurrently C. continuously D. currently
33. Advertisers often aim their campaigns at young people as they have considerable spending _ __
A. force B. energy C. power D. ability
34. Exercise can be classified as active or passive with the former ___ effort and the latter the use of
machines or training assistants .
A. involves physical B. physics is involved C. involving physical D. physically involved
35. We all hope that the boss is going to _ _ _ the bill for the staff party.
A. arm B. leg C. foot D. head
36 . Gobal warming has progressed _ _ _ glaciers everywhere are shrinking .
A. too much that 8. enough to cause
C. to such an extent that D. so great an extent that
37 . Mary has been abroad for two months, but she will be home___ the next few days.
A. between 8 . among C. within D. by
38 . He went to great lengths to _ _ _ the details of the intricate plans to his co-workers .
A. spell out 8 . stand up C. take in D. measure out
39 . Peter needs to learn how to put limits to his ___ otherwise nothing and nobody will ever be good
enoug h fo r him.
A. diligence 8 . introspection C. procrastination D. perfection ism
40. _ _ _ martial arts , Mike now has considerably more free time to dedicate to his new business venture.
A Havin g been dropped B. Having dropped C. Dropp ing D. Dropped
Your an s wers ·
21. 22 . I 23 . 24. 25 . I 26 . 1 21. 1 28. 1 29. I 3o . I
3 1. 32. I 33. 34. 35 . 1 36. I 37 . I 38 . I 39 . I 4o. I
Tnrn o 1/ 11
•l,,jart 2 : F or questions 41-50, write the cor·r-:ect
,• &orm
,, of eacn vracKeceu 11o/v1 u u/1 ..,oi.._ /.;; in fl-,..
''"'
corresponding numbered boxes provided.

41 . The account of his trips is rather repetitive and uninspired , ___ only by his humorous dealing wi th locals
who could not speak English . (LIVE)
42 . The company decided to hire an ___ with marketing experience in an effort to revive its business after
the economic reccession . (OUT)
43. The high abstention rate at the election reflected the voters' growing ___ with politics. (ILLUSION)
44. The teacher was careful not to show ___ to any one student because this may cause discontentment
among students. (FAVOR)
45. Both suspects refused to answer any questions before their lawyers arrived, in fear that they might
_ _ _themselves . (CRIME)
46. The employer knows that he cannot recover worthwhile damages and is in any case unwilling
to _ _ relations with his employees by taking legal action . (BITTER)
47. In factories where workers are required to perform only a single set of actions, the work is repetitive and
_ _ _ . (TONE)
48. Improved safety measures in cars can be ___ as they encourage people to drive faster. (PRODUCE)
49. Recovering from the serious car accident will be an ___battle for her, but she's doing well. (HILL)
50. The journalist uncovered proof that the government had ___ the public about the source of the funding .
(LEAD)

Your answers:

41.

42 .

43.

44 .

45.

46 .

47.

48.

49 .

50.

Trang 4/ 11
Ill. READING (40 points)
~art 1 : For questions 51-60, read the following passage and decide which answer (A B C or D11 best
, its ea c h gap. w:r,te
· your answers (A, B, C, or D) in corresponding numbered boxes. ' ' '
THE FULFILLING GAP YEAR
Gap years are quite common in many parts of the world and most young people , upon leaving high school,
feel (51) _ _ _ _ to one. It's plain to see how the idea would be (52) _ _ _ ; talking a year off from studies
to travel the world and consider your future sound like bliss . Adverts for gap years contain (53) _ _ _ _ that
read 'The best year of my life' and 'Total adventure , Totally rewarding ', and offer the newly (54) _ _ __
student the opportunity to learn more about th emselves while learn ing about the world .
Of course , a gap year shouldn 't be (55) _ _ _ _ as just a time to party, and as attractive as it may sound,
one must not get (56) _ _ _ _ in by that notion . One way to make the most of this tim e is to get involved
(57) _ _ _ _ some inspiring voluntary work abroad. There is more than a (58) _ _ _ _ of truth in the idea
that (59) _ _ _ _ in a new culture will teach you more about yourself than any classroom ever would . It will
allow you to reach a level of emotional (60) ____ that will stay with you for a lifetime.

51 . A. permitted 8 . entitled C. designated D. allowed


52 . A. teasing 8 . touting C. tempting D. taunting
53. A. editions 8 . billboards C. jingles D. captions
54 . A. emancipated 8 . liberated C. independent D. sovereign
55 . A. dismissed 8 . denied C. denounced D. dissuaded
56. A. pulled 8 . sucked C. forced D. swept
57. A. in 8 . on C. at D. about
58. A. mark 8 . grade C. degree D. notch
59. A. immersion 8 . diversion C. compulsion D. emersion
60. A. wisdom 8 . ripeness C. adulthood D. maturity
Your answers:
151 152 153. I 54. 1 55.
56. 57. 58. I 59. I 60.
Part 2: For questions 61-70, fill each of the following numbered blanks with ONE suitable word and
write your answers in the corresponding numbered boxes provided.
NOTHING VENTURED, NOTHING GAINED
It is no coincidence that people who (61) ___ risks are far more likely to make progress in life and
accomplish their goals. The (62) _ _ _ why is simple: in embracing risks , big or small, one also embraces
opportunities.
(63) _ _ _ though we realise this, many of us are often incapable of taking a chance, (64) _ _ _ because
of the fear of failure or the uneasiness of being pushed out of our comfort zone. (65) _ _ _ been disappointed
by past failures, many people have trouble embracing new risks as their feelings of vulnerability can lead to
avoidance-type behaviours. This is apparent in many individuals (66) _ _ _ primary reaction after such an
experience is, understandably, to protect themselves from further disappointment by simply avoiding (67)
___ caused the disappointment. Although this is a logical reaction , it definitely holds us (68) ___ from
fulfilling our potential. Undoubtedly, reaching a point at (69) _ _ _ we feel we have achieved at least some
of our life goals is integral to our happiness; without taking a chance (70) ___ now and then , this may never
be possible.
Your answers:
16166. 162
67.
163.
68 .
I 64. 1 65 .
1 69. 1 7o.

Part 3: For questions 71-80, read the following passage and choose the best answer (A , B, C, or DJ
according to the text. Write your answers (A , B, C, or D) in the corresponding numbered boxes.
WORK, WORK , WORK!
Stress, sleeplessness, depression , heart disease, shortn ess of temper, memory loss, anxiety, marital
breakdown , child delinquency, rud eness , suicide - a mere shortli st of some of th e symptoms of the postmodern
malaise. The cause of all our woes? An avalanche of surveys, polls and expert comme ntaries show that we
all work too long , too hard , that ou r bosses are beastly; that we are insecure and afraid . You know all th is stuff.
We seem to be workers on the verge of a nervous breakdown . So far, so bad . But there's plenty of good news
about work, too - even if it is not alwa ys shared with the sa me enthusiasm as the 'Work is Terrible' stories.
Four out of 10 UK workers declare themselves 'very satisfied ' with their jobs, more than in France, Germany,
. the impact of work on our health 0
W ork has become our national obsession . Whether we are damning l we are talking writin ' ur
' k 1. ~ a
nd
fami lies, our time or celebra ting its new-found flexibility, rewards a nd opportunr reS , 'th
th
thinking about w~rk like never before. As with so many obsessive relationshipS , e o~e w\h w_or ~ a ove-
hate one. Mixed messages are everywhere - on the one hand , the government emphas:es e ,m~ob ance of
th
paid work , and then cautions about the impact of too much paid work on fam ilies. or~en ce e rabte e
· · ·1 b t their children Salaries go up , ut few
economic independence work brings, then are made to feel gu1 ty a ou · ..
of us feel richer. We find a job we love and so work long hours at it, and then feel that we are falling to get our
'work/life' balance right.
Why is work under the microscope? Perhaps because our work simply occupies a more important place
in our lives than it did . Maybe we care , and worry , more about work for the same reason we care a nd worry so
much about our children or our health - because it is important to us. Men and (for the first time in centuries)
women are placing work closer to the centre of their lives. And maybe that's no bad thing . The 'leisure society'
would probably have been a boring place in any case.
Our work fixation springs from a series of profound changes in the nature of employment, all of which push
work more deeply into our individual lives, our families and our communities. Work has become a more
important element of our personal identity; we have greater control and choice over the shape of our working
lives ; women have entered and transformed the workplace ; the nine-to-five has become more sociable; more
of us want or need the financial independence that a wage offers; and the economic rewards of working have
increased - work pays .
Work has become a more important personal identity tag , supplanting the three traditional indicators of our
uniqueness - place, faith and blood . As geographical roots have weakened , religious affiliations have
diminished and the extended family has dispersed, how we spend our labouring hours has become a more
important window into our souls. This trend reflects and reinforces a desire for work which brings personal
fulfilment, for work we are proud of. If work means not just income but identity, then the choice of job becomes
critical. This is why tobacco companies find it so hard to hire people - to work for them would be to taint your
own identity.
But the new salience of work has come with a price; fewer people are able to feel secure; the need to keep
pace with change is tiring and stressful; white-collar workers are putting in longer hours to try and keep a
toehold - with potentially damaging consequences for the children ; and the deification of work threatens to
push those who are outside the paid workforce further towards the margins of society. This would not matter
so much if work did not matter so much . Not just in terms of income, but in terms of identity. When work
becomes more than simply a passport to a pay cheque , when it opens the door to friends , purpose, satisfaction
and a place in the world , its absence is more keenly felt. Once we admit the centrality of work to our lives, it
might be harder to kid ourselves that we are doing older employees a favour by 'letting them go'.
But we dare not admit work's importance to us. We like to moan about it, preferably with work colleagues
just after work . The love of your job is now the only one that dare not speak its name. The idea of work as
intrinsically bad has poisoned us for too long . The poet and mystic Kahlil Gibran said that work was "love
made visible" . Wouldn't it be great if we could capture a bit of that spirit, even if just for a wh ile?

71 . In the first paragraph the writer implies that _ __


A workers suffer from mental problems B. modern lifestyles can sometimes make us ill
C. working people are generally insecure people D. we exaggerate the negative effects of work
72 . The word "damming" in the second paragraph is closest in meaning to _ __
A criticizing strongly B. discussing widely C. debating fiercely D. appreciating greatly
73 . In th e second paragraph , th e writer gives the impression that _ __
A people have ambivalent attitud es to work B. women should not con tinue to work
C. peopl e need a more balanced approach to life D. work has made us feel better about ou rselves
74. How does the writer answer the question "Why is work under the microscope?" in the th ird
parag ra ph?
A Because we wo rry about it all tl1e time 6. 0eca use it is as importan t as our children
C. Because ,t is a large part of our lives D. Because it ca n affect our health
~o . lhe :unction of the fourth paragraph is
B. expla1_n the constant need of people to w-o-rk--
. examine the changes in the nature of employment
C . show how work h as become a focal point in our lives
D. summarise the changes in the workplace
76 - The term "window into our souls" in the fifth paragraph can be best described as

A. something that we really like and want 8 . something that we earn for a-liv-in_g_
C. somet~ing that we don't want to have D. something that we don 't care about
77 . In talking about the jobs we choose , the writer says that _ _ _ .
A . our families have become less important to us 8 . social change has made work more significant
C. the type of job is becoming less relevant D. money has become a more important factor
78 . According to the article , people who lose their jobs _ __
A. generally welcome the change 8 . may have fewer social relationships
C . identify strongly with each other D. have higher stress level
79 . The word "intrinsically" in the seventh paragraph is closest in meaning to _ __
A. significantly 8 . fundamentally C. temporarily D. profoundly
80 . From the article as a whole, we understand that the writer believes - - -
A. we should rethink our attitudes to work B. we should admit that work is a necessary evil
C . home life should pay a more important role D. we should widen our social circles
Your answers:

I!1
76.
172.
77.
173
78.
I 74
79 .
I 75
80.

Part 4: For questions 81-90, read the text and do the tasks that follow.
THE ROBOTS ARE COMING - OR ARE THEY?
What is the current state of play in Artificial Intelligence?
A. Can robots advance so far that they become the ultimate threat to our existence? Some scientists say no ,
and dismiss the very idea of Artificial Intelligence. The human brain , they argue, is the most complicated system
ever created , and any machine designed to reproduce human thought is bound to fail. Physicist Roger Penrose
of Oxford University and others believe that machines are physically incapable of human thought. Colin
McGinn of Rutgers University backs this up when he says that Artificial Intelligence 'is like sheep trying to do
complicated psychoanalysis. They just don 't have the conceptual equipment they need in their limited brains'.
8. Artificial Intelligence, or Al , is different from most technologies in that scientists still understand very little
about how intelligence works. Physicists have a good understanding of Newtonian mechanics and the quantum
theory of atoms and molecules, whereas the basic laws of intelligence remain a mystery. But a sizeable number
of mathematicians and computer scientists, who are specialists in the area , are optimistic about the
possibilities . To them it is only a matter of time before a thinking machine walks out of the laboratory. Over the
years, various problems have impeded all efforts to create robots. To attack these difficulties, researchers tried
to use the 'top-down approach', using a computer in an attempt to program all the essential rules onto a single
disc. By inserting this into a machine, it would then become self-aware and attain human-like intelligence.
C. In the 1950s and 1960s great progress was made, but the shortcomings of these prototype robots soon
became clear. They were huge and took hours to navigate across a room . Meanwhile, a fruit fly, with a bra in
containing only a fraction of the computing power, can effortlessly navigate in three dimensions. Our brains ,
like the fruit fly's , unconsciously recognise what we see by performing countless calcu lations . This unconscious
awareness of patterns is exactly what computers are missing . The second problem is robots ' lack of common
sense. Humans know that water is wet and that mothers are older than th eir daughters. But there is r.o
mathematics that can express these truths . Children learn th e intuitive laws of biology and phys ics by
interacting with the real world . Robots know only what has bee n programmed into th em .
D. Because of the limitation s of the top-down approach to Artificial Intelligence , attemp ts have been made to
use a 'bottom -up' approach instead - that is , to try to imita te evolution and the wa y a bab y learns. Rodn ey
Brooks was the director of MIT's Artificia l Intelligence la boratory , famous for its lum bering 'top-down' walking
Trang 7/ ll
robots. He changed the course of research when he explored the unorthodox idea of tiny 'insectoid' robots th at
learned to walk by bumping into things instead of computing mathematically the precise position of th err foet.
Today many of the descendants of Brooks' insectoid robots are on Mars gathering data for NASA (The Nationa l
Aeronautics and Space Administration) , running across the dusty landscape of the planet. For all their
successes in mimicking the behaviour of insects, however, robots using neural networks have performed
miserably when their programmers have tried to duplicate in them the behaviour of higher organisms such as
mammals. MIT's Marvin Minsky summarises the problems of Al : 'The history of Al is sort of funny because the
first real accomplishments were beautiful things , like a machine that could do well in a maths cou rse . But then
we started to try to make mach ines that could answer questions about simple ch ildren 's stories. There's no
machine today that can do that. '
E. There are people who believe that eventually there will be a combination between the top-down and
bottom-up, wh ich may provide the key to Artificial Intelligence. As adults, we blend the two approaches. It has
been suggested that our emotions represent the quality that most distinguishes us as human, that it is
impossible for machines ever to have emotions. Computer experts Hans Moravec thinks that in the future
robots will be programmed with the emotions such as fear to protect themselves so that they can signal to
human when their batteries are running low, for example. Emotions are vital in decision-making . People who
have suffered a certain kind of brain injury lose the ability to experience emotions and become unable to make
decisions. Without emotions to guide them , they debate endlessly over their options. Moravec points out that
as robots become more intelligent and are able to make choices , they could likewise become paralysed with
indecision . To aid them , robots of the future might need to have emotions hardwired into the ir brains.
F. There is no universal consensus as to whether machines can be conscious , or even , in human terms, what
consciousness means. Minsky suggests the thinking process in our brain is not localised but spread out, with
different centres competing with one another at any given time. Consciousness may then be viewed as a
sequence of thoughts and images issuing from these different, smaller 'minds', each one competing for our
attention . Robots might eventually attain a 'silicon consciousness'. Robots, in fact, might one day embody an
architecture for thinking and processing information that is different from ours - but also indistingui shable. If
that happens, the question of whether they really 'understand' becomes largely irrelevant. A robot that has
perfect mastery of syntax, for all practical purposes, understands what is being said .
Questions 81-87: The reading passage has six paragraphs marked A-F. Which paragraphs contain the
following information? Write your answers in the corresponding numbered boxes provided.
81 . an insect that proves the superiority of natural intelligence over Artificial Intelligence
82 . robots being able to benefit from their mistakes
83. many researchers not being put off believing that Artificial Intelligence will eventually be developed
84. an innovative approach that is having limited success
85. the possibility of creating Artificial Intelligence being doubted by some academics
86. no generally accepted agreement of what our brains do
87. robots not being able to extend their intelligence in the same way as humans
Your answers:

1 81. 182. 183. 184. 185. 186. 187.


Questions 88-90: Complete the summary below. Choose ONE WORD ONLY from the passage for
each answer. Write your answers in the corresponding numbered boxes provided.
When will we have a thinking machine?
Despite some advances, the earl y robots had certain weaknesses . They were given the information they
needed on a (88) ___ . This was known as the 'top-down ' approach and enabled them to do certain tasks
but th€y were unable to recogni se (89) ___ . Nor did they have any intu ition or abi li ty to make decisions
based on experience. Rodney Brooks tried a different approach. Robots si milar to those inve nted by Brooks
are to be found on (90) ___ where th ey are collectin g information.
Your ans wers :

1 as. 1 s9. 190.

Trang 8/1 1
,
IV. WRITING (30 points)
Part 1: Read the following extract and use
between 70 and BO words lo . your own wo rds to summarise it. Your summary should be
The social and eco . . ng. Wr,te your summary in the space provided.
nomic importance of tourism has b d
countries over the past few een more a~ more significant. In most industrialised
segment Of th . . years the fastest growth has been seen in the area of services. One of the largest
s . e service industry, although largely unrecognised as an entity in some of these countries is
t rave I and tourism According t th w Id T . . '
. . · o e or ravel and Tourism Council (1992), 'travel and tourism is the largest
t
induS ry m th~ w~rld on virtually any economic measure including value-added capital investment, employment
nd
a tax contributions'. In 1992' the industry's gross output was estimated to be $3 .5 trillion , over 12 per cent
of all consumer spending . The travel and tourism industry is the world 's largest employer the almost 130 million
jobs, or almost 7 per cent of all employees. This industry is the world 's leading industrial contributor, producing
over 6 per cent of the world 's national product and accounting for capital investment in excess of $422 billion
m direct indirect and personal taxes each year. Thus, tourism has a profound impact both on the world
economy and , because of the educative effect of travel and the effects on employment, on society itself.

However, the major problems of the travel and tourism industry that have hidden, or obscured, its economic
impact are the diversity and fragmentation of the industry itself. The travel industry includes: hotels, motels
and other types of accommodation; restaurants and other food services; transportation services and facilities ;
amusements, attractions and other leisure facilities; gift shops and a large number of other enterprises. Since
many of these businesses also serve local residents, the impact of spending by visitors can easily be
overlooked or underestimated. In addition , Meis (1992) points out that the tourism industry involves concepts
that have remained amorphous to both analysts and decision makers. Moreover, in all nations this problem
has made it difficult for the industry to develop any type of reliable or credible tourism information base in order
to estimate the contribution it makes to regional, national and global economies. However, the nature of this
very diversity makes travel and tourism ideal vehicles for economic development in a wide variety of countries ,
regions or communities.

·· ········ ····· ····· ······························ ····· ·········· ······················· ······ ··· ··· ······ ·· ········ ···· ···· ·· ······ ··· ······· ···· ········· ·· ············· ···

·········· ·· ············ ············ ···· ·· ·· ··· ·· ···· ······ ··· ··· ······ ···· ···· ·· ···· ······ ·· ··· ··· ········ ········· ······ ···· ···················· ···· ···· ········· ·· ········

··· ·· ········ ·· ·· ······ · ·· ··· · ···· · ···· · ·· ·· ·· ·· · · · · · ·· ·· · · · · ·· ···· · · ·· · ········ · ······· · ··· ·· · · · ·· ····· ·· · ··· · ··· · ··········· ····· ··· ···· · ········· ···· · ··· ··· ··· ·· ··· ······

···· ····· ·· ··· ······ ·· ··· ··· ···· ·········· ······· ··········· ·· ·· ·· ···· ········ ······ ·· ····· ·· ··· ········· ····· ······· ····· ······ ···· ····· ······ ·· ··· ······· ··· ··· ····· ·······

···· ···· ············ ·· ······ ······ ·· ··· ··· ·· ····· ·· ······ ···· ···· ······ ···· ·· ·· ····· ·········· ··· ········· ············ ··········· ·········· ··· ······· ·· ······· ····· ··· ····· ··

············· ··· ·· ···· ··· ····· ·· ········ ·· ··· ····· ······· ·· ··· ····· ········· ····· ···· ········· ···· ··· ··

········ ·············· ········ ······ ··· ··········· ·· ······ ··· ······· ··· ·· ·· ·· ···· ················ ··· ········ ········ ······· ············ ····· ··· ··•· ·· ························

·· ··· ········ ··· ······ ··· ·· ······ ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ···· ·· ··· ··· ····· ····· ··· ····· ·· ············ . ..

·············· ······· ··· ········· ·· ··· ····· ······ ······ ·· ····· ····· ······· ······ ····· · ···· · ···· ······ ·· ···· ··· ·· ····· ········· ...... . ······

············ ·· ·········· ··· ···· ········· ····· ··················· · ···················· · ····· ····· ··· ······· ··

···· ·· ················· ·· ····················· ···· ······· ·· ····· ·· ······ ···· ·· ······ ····· ··········· ... ······ ·· ·· ··· ······ ··· · ·· ··· ············

································· ····· .. ... •················ ···· ·· ··· ········ ······· ··· ·· ···· ·····

····· ·· ····· · · · · ··· ······· · · ·•······ ·· · ··· ········ ·•· ·· ·


.... ········ ·· · ·• ·· •··· ·· ·· ··· ·· ········· ········ ·· .... . .. .

. . ···· ·•·· ····· .. ...... .... .... . .. .. · · •· .. ... .. .


Part 2: Write an essay of about 300 words on the following topic: ~
A lthough it is generally prohibited, corporal (physical) punishment still persists in many sch ools and
families . Do you think corporal punishment is an acceptable way to regulate children 's b eh avior?
Give reasons and specific examples to support your opinion(s). Write your essay in the space provided.

····· ·· ·· ····· ·· ········ ·· ··· ···· ·· ··· ······ ··· ·····•· · ·· · ······· · · · ·· ···· ···· ··· ··· · ······················· · ·· · ···· ···· · ···· · ·· ····· ..... .

·· · · ·· ······· ·············· · ····· · ··· ·· ···· · ······· · · ··· · ·· ·· · · · ··· · ·· ··· · ······ ····· · ········· · ·· ·········· · · •·· ·· ······································ ··· ··· · · ······· · ····

... ...... ...... ... ............. ...... ..... ...... ...... ... ........ ... ..... .. .... ..... ........ ............ .. ..... .. ... ... .. . ... .... .. .. ' ....... . .... .. ........ .. . . ............ .

·· ····· ········ ···· ·········· ····· ······ ··· ··· ············ ···· ···

·· ················· ················ ··

··· ······ ·· ·· ·· ·· · ····· ··· ·· · ····· · · ······ ·· ·········· ·· ·· · · · ·· ···· ·· ······ ···· · ······ · ······· · ·· · ·· ··· ···· · ·············· ·· ·· ······· ···· ·· ······························ ····

············· ·· ··· ······· ·· ·· ·· ··· ······ ········ ··· ·········· ····· ········ ·························· ·· ·· ········ ·· ···· ··· ········· ······ ··· ··· ···
· · ·········· ·· ········· ·· ···· ··· · ··············· ···· ·· · ···· · · ····

············ ····· ········ ······· ·· ·· ·

········· · ····· · ···· · · · ······ · · ····· ·· ··· · ··· ···· · ·· · · · ·· ·· ···· ···· ····· ······ ····· ··· ··· ······ ····· ··· ·· ······ · ···· ··· · ·· ·· ············· · · ·· ·········· ······ · ·· · · · ········· ·

·· ········ ··· · ·· ········· ···· ····· · ······ · ····· ····· ······ ····· ·· ·· ····· · ·· ···· ··· ····· ········· ···· ···· ······ ·········· ····· ··· ···· ······ ······ ····· ········ · ······· ······ ··

·· ·· ·· ·· ···· ·· ····· ···· ······ ···· ···· ·· ··· ······ ·· ·· ·· ····· ·· ·· ·· ·· ···· ·· ······ ·· ·· ··· ············ ··················· ········ ·· ················· ····· ····· ······· ··· ·········

····· ········ ······· ··· ···· ··· ······· ··· ···· ······· ··· ······ ·· ······· ······· ···· ···· ·· ····· ····· ···· ·················· ······ ···· ········· ······· ·········· ···· ······· ········

·· ········ ···· ·· ·· ······ ······· ··· ·· ·· ···· ······ ·· ···· ··········· ····· ······ ·· ············· ·········· ····· ·· ··· ····· ··· ······· ·· ··· ···· ······· ······ ······· ······ ············

·· · ······· · ··· ··· ··· · ··· · · ·· ····· · · ·· · ····· · ···· · ·· ····· · ···· ··· · · ························· · · · · ················· · ·· · ··············· · ······· ······ · ····· ·· · ·· ··· ··· · · ·· ·······

·· ········· ······ ··· ··· ····· ················ ·· . . · .... ....... . ... .... ....... ... .......... .. .. ... ... ... ............... ..... ...... ..... . ..... ..... .. ........... ...... ........... .

·· ········ ··············· ··· ····· ····· ··· ····· ···· ···· ························ ········· ·· ······ ··· ······ ·· ··· ····· ······ ··· ···· ··· ························· ······· ·· ······ ···

·· ············ ······ ········ ···· ··· ····· ········· ··· ·· ···· ·· ·· ···· ······ ···· ·········· ·· ····· ···· ········ ··· ·· ······ ··· ·········· ········ ····· ····· ······· ··· ··· ····· ······· ·

····· ··· ··· ················ ·· ···· ·· ·· ··· ··· ···· ·· ········ ···· ····· ·· ·· ··· ····· ··· ·· ·· ··· ········· ···· ·········· ······ ······· ··· ······ ·· ····•····· ···· ····· ·· ··· ············•·

···· ···· · ·· ········· ··· ···· ······· · ·········· · ·· ·· ······· ··· ·· ·· ·· ··· · ······ ·········· ·············· ·················· ·· ···· ····· ····· •··········· --·· ·········•····

·· ······· ·· ··· ·· ······························· ···· · · · · ··············· · ·· ······ · · · ·· · · · ···· · · · · · · ·········· ·· ············· · ··· ········· ··· · ·· ····· ······• .. ··· ····· ···· ··· ··· ·

·· ········· ··· ··· ·· ··· ······ ··········· ············· · ·· ·· ······ · ···· ··· ············· ···· ········ ············· ·· ·· ····· ····· ······ ··· ... .. .... ..... ...... ........... .......... .

······· ········ ·· ········· ·· ··· · .. · ·· ·· · · ··· ·· · ···· · · · · · · ············· · ·· · ··· ··· ···· · · ··· ···· ······· ··•·········· ··• ······· · ······ ···· ·····················•···· ··· · ······ ·· · ·

·· ········ ···· ···· ·· ··························· · ····· ·· ··· ····· ········ ···· ··· ···· ········ ··· ·· ······· ·············· ··•·· •· ·· ···· ·· ·························•·· ······· ··•····

····· · · ···· ·· · ········ · ··· ··· · · ········ .. ········ · ······························· · ·· ····· ················ ····· ··············· .. ·· · · · · · · · · · ·· · ·· · ·

··········· ····· ···· ··· ···· ·· ··· ···· ··· ···· ··· ······ ······ ····· ·· ··· ··· ·········· .. ······· ·················· ···· ···· ·
. • ·· .. ····· ·· ······ ·· .. . ·•··· · ... .. .
·· · · ··· · ····· ········ · ·· · ·· ··· ·· ···· ······ · · ······· ·············· ···· ·· ···•· ········ ···· •·· ···· · ······· ···· · ··· ··· ··· ···· ...

···· ··· · · · ·· · · · .. · · ·•····················· · ··· · · · ·· · ·· · ······ ·· ··········· · ····· ·· ·· · ·· ··· ···· ·· · ···· · · ·· · ········ · ·· · ·· ·