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Meetings & Conferences

of the AMS

IMPORTANT INFORMATION REGARDING MEETINGS PROGRAMS: AMS Sectional Meeting programs do not appear
in the print version of the Notices. However, comprehensive and continually updated meeting and program information
with links to the abstract for each talk can be found on the AMS website. See http://www.ams.org/meetings/. Final
programs for Sectional Meetings will be archived on the AMS website accessible from the stated URL and in an electronic
issue of the Notices as noted below for each meeting.

Louisville, Kentucky Ralph McKenzie, Vanderbilt University, A perspective


on fifty years of work, delight and discovery in general
algebra.
University of Louisville Victor Moll, Tulane University, 2-adic valuations of
classical sequences: A collection of examples.
October 5–6, 2013
Saturday – Sunday Special Sessions
Algebraic Coding Theory, Steve Szabo, Eastern Ken-
Meeting #1092 tucky University, and Heide Gluesing-Luerssen, University
Southeastern Section of Kentucky.
Associate secretary: Brian D. Boe Algebraic Cryptography, Daniel Smith, University of
Announcement issue of Notices: June 2013 Louisville.
Program first available on AMS website: August 22, 2013 Applied Analysis and Inverse Problems, Peijun Li,
Program issue of electronic Notices: October 2013 Purdue University, Jiguang Sun, Michigan Technological
Issue of Abstracts: Volume 34, Issue 3 University, and Yongzhi Steve Xu, University of Louisville.
Combinatorial Commutative Algebra, Juan Migliore,
Deadlines University of Notre Dame, and Uwe Nagel, University of
For organizers: Expired Kentucky.
For abstracts: Expired Commutative Rings, Ideals, and Modules, Ela Celikbas
and Olgur Celikbas, University of Missouri-Columbia.
The scientific information listed below may be dated. Extremal Graph Theory, Jozsef Balogh, University of
For the latest information, see www.ams.org/amsmtgs/ Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and Louis DeBiasio and
sectional.html. Tao Jiang, Miami University, Oxford, OH.
Finite Universal Algebra, Ralph McKenzie, Vanderbilt
Invited Addresses University, and Matthew Valeriote, McMaster University.
Michael Hill, University of Virginia, Framed manifolds Fixed Point Theorems and Applications to Integral,
and equivariant homotopy: A solution to the Kervaire In- Difference, and Differential Equations, Jeffrey W. Lyons,
variant One problem. Nova Southeastern University, and Jeffrey T. Neugebauer,
Suzanne Lenhart, University of Tennessee and NIMBioS, Eastern Kentucky University.
Using optimal control of PDEs to investigate population Harmonic Analysis and Partial Differential Equations,
questions. Russell Brown and Katharine Ott, University of Kentucky.

October 2013 Notices of the AMS 1221


Meetings & Conferences

History of Mathematics and Its Use in Teaching, Daniel The scientific information listed below may be dated.
J. Curtin, Northern Kentucky University, and Daniel E. For the latest information, see www.ams.org/amsmtgs/
Otero, Xavier University. sectional.html.
Homogenization of Partial Differential Equations,
Zhongwei Shen, University of Kentucky, and Yifeng Yu, Invited Addresses
University of California, Irvine. Patrick Gerald Brosnan, University of Maryland, Nor-
Mathematical Analysis of Complex Fluids and Flows, mal functions.
Xiang Xu, Carnegie Mellon University, and Changyou Xiaojun Huang, Rutgers University at New Brunswick,
Wang, University of Kentucky. Equivalence problems in several complex variables.
Mathematical Issues in Ecological and Epidemiological Barry Mazur, Harvard University, Arithmetic statistics:
Modeling, K. Renee Fister, Murray State University, and Elliptic curves and other mathematical objects (Erdős Me-
Suzanne Lenhart, University of Tennessee. morial Lecture).
Mathematical Models in Biology and Physiology, Yun Robert Strain, University of Pennsylvania, On the
Kang, Arizona State University, and Jiaxu Li, University Boltzmann equation without angular cut-off.
of Louisville.
Partial Differential Equations from Fluid Mechanics,
Special Sessions
Changbing Hu, University of Louisville, and Florentina Analysis and Computing for Electromagnetic Waves,
Tone, University of West Florida. David Ambrose and Shari Moskow, Drexel University.
Partially Ordered Sets, Csaba Biro and Stephen J. Combinatorial Commutative Algebra, Tái Huy Há, Tu-
Young, University of Louisville. lane University, and Fabrizio Zanello, Massachusetts Insti-
Recent Advances on Commutative Algebra and Its Ap- tute of Technology and Michigan Technological University.
plications, Hamid Kulosman and Jinjia Li, University of Contact and Symplectic Topology, Joshua M. Sabloff,
Louisville, and Hamid Rahmati, Miami University. Haverford College, and Lisa Traynor, Bryn Mawr College.
Set Theory and Its Applications, Paul Larson, Miami Difference Equations and Applications, Michael Radin,
University, Justin Moore, Cornell University, and Grigor Rochester Polytechnic Institute, and Faina Berezovskaya,
Sargsyan, Rutgers University. Howard University.
Spreading Speeds and Traveling Waves in Spatial- Geometric Aspects of Topology and Group Theory,
Temporal Evolution Systems, Bingtuan Li, University of David Futer, Temple University, and Ben McReynolds,
Purdue University.
Louisville, and Roger Lui, Worcester Polytechnic Institute.
Geometric Topology of Knots and 3-manifolds, Abhijit
The Work of Mathematicians and Mathematics Depart-
Champanerkar, Ilya Kofman, and Joseph Maher, College
ments in Mathematics Education, Benjamin Braun, Carl
of Staten Island and The Graduate Center, City University
Lee, and David Royster, University of Kentucky.
of New York.
Topological Dynamics and Ergodic Theory, Alica Miller,
Geometric and Spectral Analysis, Thomas Krainer,
University of Louisville, and Joe Rosenblatt, University of
Pennsylvania State Altoona, and Gerardo A. Mendoza,
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
Temple University.
Weak Convergence in Probability and Statistics, Cristina
Higher Structures in Algebra, Geometry and Physics,
Tone, Ryan Gill, and Kiseop Lee, University of Louisville.
Jonathan Block, University of Pennsylvania, Vasily Dol-
gushev, Temple University, and Tony Pantev, University

Philadelphia, of Pennsylvania.
History of Mathematics in America, Thomas L. Bartlow,

Pennsylvania Villanova University, Paul R. Wolfson, West Chester Uni-


versity, and David E. Zitarelli, Temple University.
Mathematical Biology, Isaac Klapper, Temple Univer-
Temple University sity, and Kathleen Hoffman, University of Maryland,
Baltimore County.
October 12–13, 2013 Meshfree, Particle, and Characteristic Methods for Par-
Saturday – Sunday tial Differential Equations, Toby Driscoll and Louis Rossi,
University of Delaware, and Benjamin Seibold, Temple
Meeting #1093 University.
Eastern Section Modular Forms and Modular Integrals in Memory of
Associate secretary: Steven H. Weintraub Marvin Knopp, Helen Grundman, Bryn Mawr College,
Announcement issue of Notices: June 2013 and Wladimir Pribitkin, College of Staten Island and the
Program first available on AMS website: August 29, 2013 Graduate Center, City University of New York.
Program issue of electronic Notices: October 2013 Multiple Analogues of Combinatorial Special Numbers
Issue of Abstracts: Volume 34, Issue 3 and Associated Identities, Hasan Coskun, Texas A&M Uni-
versity Commerce.
Deadlines Nonlinear Elliptic and Wave Equations and Applications,
For organizers: Expired Nsoki Mavinga, Swarthmore College, and Doug Wright,
For abstracts: Expired Drexel University.

1222 Notices of the AMS Volume 60, Number 9


Meetings & Conferences

Parabolic Evolution Equations of Geometric Type, Special Sessions


Xiaodong Cao, Cornell University, Longzhi Lin, Rutgers Advances in Difference, Differential, and Dynamic Equa-
University, and Peng Wu, Cornell University. tions with Applications, Elvan Akin, Missouri S&T Univer-
Partial Differential Equations, Stochastic Analysis, and sity, Youssef Raffoul, University of Dayton, and Agacik
Applications to Mathematical Finance, Paul Feehan and Zafer, American University of the Middle East.
Ruoting Gong, Rutgers University, and Camelia Pop, Uni- Advances in Mathematical Methods for Disease Model-
versity of Pennsylvania. ing, Jimin Ding, Washington University in St. Louis, Necibe
Recent Advances in Harmonic Analysis and Partial Dif- Tuncer, University of Tulsa, and Naveen K. Vaidya, Uni-
ferential Equations, Cristian Gutiérrez and Irina Mitrea, versity of Missouri-Kansas City.
Temple University. Algebraic Cycles and Coherent Sheaves, Roya Beheshti,
Recent Developments in Noncommutative Algebra, Matt Kerr, and N. Mohan Kumar, Washington University
Edward Letzter and Martin Lorenz, Temple University. in St. Louis.
Representation Theory, Combinatorics and Categorifica- Algebraic and Combinatorial Invariants of Knots,
tion, Corina Calinescu, New York City College of Technol- Heather Dye, McKendree University, Allison Henrich,
ogy, City University of New York, Andrew Douglas, New Seattle University, Aaron Kaestner, North Park University,
York City College of Technology and Graduate Center, and Louis Kauffman, University of Illinois.
City University of New York, and Joshua Sussan and Bart Automorphic Forms and Representation Theory, Du-
Van Steirteghem, Medgar Evers College, City University bravka Ban and Joe Hundley, Southern Illinois University,
of New York. and Shuichiro Takeda, University of Missouri, Columbia.
Several Complex Variables and CR Geometry, Andrew Commutative Algebra, Lianna Sega, University of Mis-
Raich, University of Arkansas, and Yuan Zhang, Indiana souri, Kansas City, and Hema Srinivasan, University of
University-Purdue University Fort Wayne. Missouri, Columbia.
The Geometry of Algebraic Varieties, Karl Schwede, Computability Across Mathematics, Wesley Calvert,
Pennsylvania State University, and Zsolt Patakfalvi, Southern Illinois University, and Johanna Franklin, Uni-
Princeton University. versity of Connecticut.
Convex Geometry and its Applications, Susanna Dann,

St. Louis, Missouri


Alexander Koldobsky, and Peter Pivovarov, University
of Missouri.
Geometric Aspects of 3-Manifold Invariants, Oliver Das-
Washington University bach, Louisiana State University, and Effie Kalfagianni,
Michigan State University.
October 18–20, 2013 Geometric Topology in Low Dimensions, William H.
Friday – Sunday Kazez, University of Georgia, and Rachel Roberts, Wash-
ington University in St. Louis.
Meeting #1094 Groupoids in Analysis and Geometry, Alex Kumjian,
Central Section University of Nevada at Reno, Markus Pflaum, University
Associate secretary: Georgia M. Benkart of Colorado, and Xiang Tang, Washington University in
Announcement issue of Notices: August 2013 St. Louis.
Program first available on AMS website: September 5, 2013 Interactions between Geometric and Harmonic Analysis,
Program issue of electronic Notices: October 2013 Leonid Kovalev, Syracuse University, and Jeremy Tyson,
Issue of Abstracts: Volume 34, Issue 4 University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
Linear and Non-linear Geometry of Banach Spaces,
Deadlines Daniel Freeman and Nirina Lovasoa Randrianarivony,
For organizers: Expired St. Louis University.
For abstracts: Expired Noncommutative Rings and Modules, Greg Marks and
Ashish Srivastava, St. Louis University.
The scientific information listed below may be dated. Operator Theory, John McCarthy, Washington Univer-
For the latest information, see www.ams.org/amsmtgs/ sity in St. Louis.
sectional.html. PDEs of Fluid Mechanics, Roman Shvydkoy, University
of Illinois Chicago, and Vladimir Sverak, University of
Invited Addresses Minnesota.
Ronny Hadani, University of Texas at Austin, Title to Spectral, Index, and Symplectic Geometry, Alvaro
be announced. Pelayo and Xiang Tang, Washington University in St.
Effie Kalfagianni, Michigan State University, Title to be Louis.
announced. Statistical Properties of Dynamical Systems, Timothy
Jon Kleinberg, Cornell University, Title to be announced. Chumley and Renato Feres, Washington University in St.
Vladimir Sverak, University of Minnesota, Title to be Louis, and Hongkun Zhang, University of Massachusetts,
announced. Amherst.

October 2013 Notices of the AMS 1223


Meetings & Conferences

Topological Combinatorics, John Shareshian, Washing- Computational Problems on Large Graphs and Applica-
ton University in St. Louis, and Russ Woodroofe, Missis- tions, Kevin Costello and Laurent Thomas, University of
sippi State University. California, Riverside.
Wavelets, Frames, and Related Expansions, Marcin Computer, Mathematics, Imaging, Technology, Network,
Bownik, University of Oregon, Darrin Speegle, Saint Louis Health, Big Data, and Statistics, Subir Ghosh, University
University, and Guido Weiss, Washington University in of California, Riverside.
St. Louis. Developments in Markov Chain Theory and Methodol-
p-local Group Theory, Fusion Systems, and Representa- ogy, Jason Fulman, University of California, Riverside, and
tion Theory, Justin Lynd, Rutgers University, and Julianne Mark Huber, Claremont McKenna College.
Rainbolt, Saint Louis University. Diophantine Geometry and Nevanlinna Theory, Aaron
Levin, Michigan State University, David McKinnon, Univer-

Riverside, California sity of Waterloo, and Paul Vojta, University of California,


Berkeley.
Dynamical Systems, Nicolai Haydn, University of South-
University of California, Riverside ern California, and Huyi Hu, Michigan State University.
Fluids and Boundaries, James P. Kelliher, Juhi Jang, and
November 2–3, 2013
Gung-Min Gie, University of California, Riverside.
Saturday – Sunday Fractal Geometry, Dynamical Systems, and Mathemati-
cal Physics, Michel L. Lapidus, University of California,
Meeting #1095
Riverside, Erin P. J. Pearse, California State Polytechnic
Western Section
University, San Luis Obispo, and John A. Rock, California
Associate secretary: Michel L. Lapidus
State Polytechnic University, Pomona.
Announcement issue of Notices: August 2013
From Harmonic Analysis to Partial Differential Equa-
Program first available on AMS website: September 19,
tions: In Memory of Victor Shapiro, Alfonso Castro, Harvey
2013
Mudd College, Michel L. Lapidus, University of California,
Program issue of electronic Notices: November 2013
Riverside, and Adolfo J. Rumbos, Pomona College.
Issue of Abstracts: Volume 34, Issue 4
Geometric Analysis, Zhiqin Lu, University of California,
Deadlines Irvine, Bogdan D. Suceava, California State University,
Fullerton, and Fred Wilhelm, University of California,
For organizers: Expired
Riverside.
For abstracts: Expired
Geometric and Combinatorial Aspects of Representation
Theory, Wee Liang Gan and Jacob Greenstein, University
The scientific information listed below may be dated.
of California, Riverside.
For the latest information, see www.ams.org/amsmtgs/
Geometry of Algebraic Varieties, Karl Fredrickson,
sectional.html.
University of California, Riverside, Mark Gross, Univer-
Invited Addresses sity of California, San Diego, and Ziv Ran, University of
Michael Christ, University of California, Berkeley, Title California, Riverside.
to be announced. Heights, Diophantine Problems, and Lattices, Lenny Fuk-
Mark Gross, University of California, San Diego, Title shansky, Claremont McKenna College, and David Krumm,
to be announced. University of Georgia and Claremont McKenna College.
Matilde Marcolli, California Institute of Technology, Homotopy Theory and K-Theory, Julie Bergner, Univer-
Title to be announced. sity of California, Riverside, and Christian Haesemeyer,
Paul Vojta, University of California, Berkeley, Title to University of California, Los Angeles.
be announced. Teaching ODEs: Best Practices from CODEE (Community
of Ordinary Differential Equations Educators), Nishu Lal,
Special Sessions Pomona College and Pitzer College, and Ami Radunskaya,
Algebraic Structures in Knot Theory, Allison Henrich, Pomona College.
Seattle University, and Sam Nelson, Claremont McKenna The Mathematics of Planet Earth, John Baez, University
College. of California, Riverside.
Analysis and Geometry of Metric Spaces, Asuman G.
Aksoy, Claremont McKenna College, and Zair Ibragimov,
California State University, Fullerton.
Categorification in Representation Theory, Aaron Lauda
and David Rose, University of Southern California.
Commutative Algebra and its Interaction with Algebraic
Geometry and Combinatorics, Kuei-Nuan Lin and Paolo
Mantero, University of California, Riverside.

1224 Notices of the AMS Volume 60, Number 9


Meetings & Conferences

Baltimore, Maryland Award for Distinguished Service to Mathematics; Deborah


and Franklin Tepper Haimo Awards for Distinguished
College or University Teaching of Mathematics; David P.
Baltimore Convention Center, Hilton Robbins Prize in Algebra, Combinatorics, and Discrete
Baltimore, and Baltimore Marriott Inner Mathematics; and Certificates of Meritorious Service. The
Harbor Hotel AWM will present the Alice T. Schafer Prize for Excellence
in Mathematics by an Undergraduate Woman, Louise Hay
January 15–18, 2014 Award for Contributions to Mathematics Education, and
Wednesday – Saturday the M. Gweneth Humphreys Award for Mentorship of
Undergraduate Women in Mathematics.
Meeting #1096 This session will also be the venue for the announce-
Joint Mathematics Meetings, including the 120th Annual ment of the Joint Policy Board for Mathematics (JPBM)
Meeting of the AMS, 97th Annual Meeting of the Math- Communication Award.
ematical Association of America (MAA), annual meetings
of the Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM) and
the National Association of Mathematicians (NAM), and the 120th Meeting of the AMS
winter meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic (ASL),
with sessions contributed by the Society for Industrial and AMS Invited Addresses
Applied Mathematics (SIAM). Andrew Blake, Microsoft Research Cambridge, Ma-
Associate secretary: Georgia M. Benkart chines that see, powered by probability ; Wednesday, 8:20
Announcement issue of Notices: October 2013 p.m. (AMS Josiah Willard Gibbs Lecture).
Program first available on AMS website: November 1, 2013 Emmanuel Candès, Stanford University, title to be an-
Program issue of electronic Notices: January 2013 nounced; Friday, 10:05 a.m.
Issue of Abstracts: Volume 35, Issue 1 Eric Friedlander, University of Southern California,
title to be announced; Thursday, 3:20 p.m.; (AMS Retiring
Deadlines Presidential Address);
For organizers: Expired Christopher Hacon, University of Utah, Which powers of
For abstracts: September 17, 2013 a holomorphic function are integrable? Saturday, 9:00 a.m.
Dusa McDuff, Columbia University, Symplectic Topol-
The scientific information listed below may be dated. ogy Today, I: Recent results and open questions; II: Embed-
For the latest information, see www.ams.org/amsmtgs/ ding questions: obstructions and constructions); III: Embed-
national.html. ding ellipsoids and Fibonacci numbers; Wednesday-Friday,
1:00 p.m. (AMS Colloquium Lectures).
Joint Invited Addresses Paul Seidel, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, title
Benson Farb, University of Chicago, title to be an- to be announced.; Wednesday, 10:05 a.m.
nounced; Friday, 11:10 a.m. (AMS-MAA). H.-T. Yau, Harvard University, Random matrices and
Eitan Grinspun, Columbia University, Movie magic: The regularity of parabolic equations; Thursday, 2:15 p.m.
mathematics behind Hollywood’s visual effects; Saturday,
3:00 p.m. (MAA-AMS-SIAM Gerald and Judith Porter Public AMS Special Sessions
Lecture). Some sessions are cosponsored with other organiza-
Carl Pomerance, Dartmouth College, Paul Erdős and the tions. These are noted within the parenthesis at the end
rise of statistical thinking in elementary number theory ; of each listing, where applicable.
Wednesday, 11:10 a.m. (AMS-MAA). Accelerated Advances in Higher Order Invexities/
Univexities with Applications to Optimization and Math-
Joint Prize Session ematical Programming (Code: SS 8A), Ram U. Verma, In-
In order to showcase the achievements of the recipients ternational Publications USA, and Alexander J. Zaslavski,
of various prizes, the AMS and MAA are cosponsoring Technion-Israel Institute of Technology.
this event at 4:25 p.m. on Thursday. A cash bar recep- Advances in Analysis and PDEs (Code: SS 49A), Tepper
tion will immediately follow. All participants are invited L. Gill and Daniel A. Williams, Howard University.
to attend. The AMS, MAA, and SIAM will award the Frank Algebraic Geometry (Code: SS 50A), Christopher
and Brennie Morgan Prize for Outstanding Research in Hacon, University of Utah, and Zsolt Patakfalvi, Princeton
Mathematics by an Undergraduate Student. The AMS will University.
announce the winners of the Award for Distinguished Algebraic Structures Motivated by Knot Theory (Code:
Public Service, Bôcher Memorial Prize, Frank Nelson Cole SS 17A), Mieczyslaw K. Dabkowski, University of Texas
Prize in Number Theory, Levi L. Conant Prize, Joseph at Dallas, Jozef Przytycki, George Washington University,
L. Doob Prize, Leroy P. Steele Prizes, and the Leonard and Radmila Sazdanovic, University of Pennsylvania.
Eisenbud Prize for Mathematics and Physics. The MAA Algebraic and Analytic Aspects of Integrable Systems
will award the Beckenbach Book Prize; Chauvenet Prize; and Painlevé Equations (Code: SS 32A), Anton Dzhamay,
Euler Book Prize; Yueh-Gin Gung and Dr. Charles Y. Hu University of Northern Colorado, Kenichi Maruno,

October 2013 Notices of the AMS 1225


Meetings & Conferences

University of Texas-Pan America, and Christopher Geometric Applications of Algebraic Combinatorics


Ormerod, California Institute of Technology. (Code: SS 48A), Elizabeth Beazley, Haverford College, and
Analytic Number Theory (Code: SS 23A), Angel Kum- Kristina Garrett, St. Olaf College (AMS-AWM).
chev, Towson University, Scott Parsell, West Chester Geometric Group Theory, I (a Mathematics Research
University, and Gang Yu, Kent State University. Communities Session) (Code: SS 54A), Tariq Aougab, Yale
Applied Harmonic Analysis: Large Data Sets, Signal University, Curt Kent, University of Toronto, Sang Rae Lee,
Processing, and Inverse Problems (Code: SS 12A), Mauro Texas A&M University, and Emily Stark, Tufts University.
Maggioni, Duke University, and Naoki Saito and Thomas Global Dynamics and Bifurcations of Difference Equa-
Strohmer, University of California, Davis. tions (Code: SS 37A), Mustafa Kulenovic and Orlando
Banach Spaces, Metric Embeddings, and Applications Merino, University of Rhode Island.
(Code: SS 16A), Mikhail Ostrovskii, St. John’s University, Heavy Tailed Probability Distributions and Their Ap-
and Beata Randrianantoanina, Miami University. plications (Code: SS 22A), Tuncay Alparslan and John P.
Big Data: Mathematical and Statistical Modeling, Nolan, American University.
Tools, Services, and Training (Code: SS 18A), Ivo Dinov, Highlighting Achievements and Contributions of
University of California Los Angeles. Mathematicians of the African Diaspora (Code: SS 34A),
Categorical Topology (Code: SS 42A), Frédéric Mynard, Asamoah Nkwanta, Morgan State University, and Talitha
Georgia Southern University, and Gavin Seal, École Poly- M. Washington, Howard University.
technique Fédérale de Lausanne. History of Mathematics (Code: SS 29A), Sloan De-
Classification Problems in Operator Algebras (Code: speaux, Western Carolina University, Della Dumbaugh,
SS 38A), Ionut Chifan, University of Iowa, and David Pen- University of Richmond, and Glen van Brummelen, Quest
neys, University of Toronto. University.
Communication of Mathematics via Interactive Activi- Homological and Characteristic p Methods in Com-
ties (Code: SS 47A), Benjamin Levitt and Glen Whitney, mutative Algebra (Code: SS 4A), Neil Epstein, George
National Museum of Mathematics. Mason University, Sean Sather-Wagstaff, North Dakota
Complex Dynamics, I (a Mathematics Research Com- State University, and Karl Schwede, Penn State University.
munities Session) (Code: SS 55A), Scott Kaschner, Univer- Homotopy Theory (Code: SS 20A), Niles Johnson, Ohio
sity of Arizona, Holly Krieger, Massachusetts Institute of State University at Newark, Mark W. Johnson, Penn State
Technology, and Paul Reschke, University of Michigan. University, Altoona, Nitu Kitchloo, Johns Hopkins Univer-
Computability in Geometry and Topology (Code: SS sity, James Turner, Calvin College, and Donald Yau, Ohio
39A), Mieczyslaw Dabkowski, University of Texas at Dal- State University at Newark.
las, and Rumen D. Dimitrov, Western Illinois University. Hyperplane Arrangements and Applications (Code:
De Bruijn Sequences and Their Generalizations (Code: SS 41A), Takuro Abe, Kyoto University, Max Wakefield,
SS 53A), Abbas Alhakim, American University of Beirut, United States Naval Academy, and Masahiko Yoshinaga,
and Steven Butler, Iowa State University. Hokkaido University.
Deformation Spaces of Geometric Structures on Low- Logic and Probability (Code: SS 2A), Wesley Calvert,
dimensional Manifolds (Code: SS 40A), Caleb Ashley, Southern Illinois University, Doug Cenzer, University of
Howard University, Michelle Lee and Melissa Macasieb, Florida, Johanna Franklin, University of Connecticut,
University of Maryland, and Andy Sanders, University of and Valentina Harizanov, George Washington University
Illinois at Chicago. (AMS-ASL).
Difference Equations and Applications (Code: SS 9A), Mathematics and Mathematics Education in Fiber
Michael A. Radin, Rochester Institute of Technology. Arts (Code: SS 14A), Sarah-Marie Belcastro, Smith College,
Dispersive and Geometric Partial Differential Equa- and Carolyn Yackel, Mercer University.
tions (Code: SS 1A), Shuanglin Shao, University of Kansas, Mathematics in Natural Resource Modeling (Code: SS
Chongchun Zeng, Georgia Institute of Technology, and 43A), Shandelle Henson, Andrews University, and Cath-
Shijun Zheng, Georgia Southern University. erine Roberts, College of the Holy Cross.
Ergodic Theory and Symbolic Dynamics (Code: SS Mathematics of Computation: Differential Equations,
31A), Aimee Johnson, Swarthmore College, and Cesar Linear Algebra, and Applications (Code: SS 30A), Susanne
Silva, Williams College. C. Brenner, Louisiana State University, and Chi-Wang Shu,
Fractal Geometry: Mathematics of Fractals and Re- Brown University (AMS-SIAM).
lated Topics (Code: SS 11A), Michel Lapidus, University My Favorite Graph Theory Conjectures (Code: SS 35A),
of California Riverside, Erin Pearse, California State Poly- Craig Larson, Virginia Commonwealth University, and
technic University, San Luis Obispo, Robert Strichartz, Ralucca Gera, Naval Postgraduate School.
Cornell University, and Machiel Van Frankenhuijsen, Utah Nineteenth Century Algebra and Analysis (Code: SS
Valley University. 10A), Frank D. Grosshans, West Chester University, Karen
Fractional, Stochastic, and Hybrid Dynamic Systems H. Parshall, University of Virginia, and Paul R. Wolfson,
with Applications (Code: SS 7A), John Graef, University of West Chester University.
Tennessee at Chattanooga, Gangaram S. Ladde, University Nonlinear Systems: Polynomial Equations, Nonlinear
of South Florida, and Aghalaya S. Vatsala, University of PDEs, and Applications (Code: SS 27A), Wenrui Hao, Uni-
Louisiana at Lafayette. versity of Notre Dame.

1226 Notices of the AMS Volume 60, Number 9


Meetings & Conferences

Outreach for Mathematically Talented Youth (Code: Symplectic and Contact Structures on Manifolds with
SS 45A), Christina Eubanks-Turner, University of Loui- Special Holonomy (Code: SS 51A), Sergey Grigorian, Uni-
siana at Lafayette, Virginia Watson, Kennesaw State versity of Texas Pan American, Sema Salur, University of
University, and Daniel Zaharopol, Art of Problem Solving Rochester, and Albert J. Todd, University of California,
Foundation. Riverside.
Progress in Free Probability (Code: SS 26A), Dmitry The Changing Education of Preservice Teachers in
Kaliuzhnyi-Verbovetskyi, Drexel University, and Todd Light of the Common Core (Code: SS 52A), William McCal-
Kemp, University of California San Diego. lum, University of Arizona, Kristin Umland, University of
Quantum Walks, Quantum Computation, and Related New Mexico, and Ellen Whitesides, University of Arizona.
Topics (Code: SS 6A), Chaobin Liu, Bowie State University, The Ubiquity of Dynamical Systems (Code: SS 33A),
Takuya Machida, University of Tokyo, Nelson Petulante, Edray H. Goins, Purdue University, and Talitha M. Wash-
Bowie State University, and Salvador E. Venegas-Andraca, ington, Howard University.
Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Estado de México. Topological Graph Theory: Structure and Symmetry
Random Matrices: Theory and Applications (Code: (Code: SS 5A), Jonathan L. Gross, Columbia University,
SS 13A), Paul Bourgade and Horng-Tzer Yau, Harvard and Thomas W. Tucker, Colgate University.
University. Trends in Graph Theory (Code: SS 36A), Ralucca Gera,
Reaction Diffusion Equations and Applications (Code: Naval Postgraduate School.
SS 44A), Jerome Goddard, II, Auburn University Mont- Tropical and Nonarchimedean Analytic Geometry, I
gomery, and Ratnasingham Shivaji, University of North (a Mathematics Research Communities Session) (Code:
Carolina Greensboro. SS 56A), Dustin Cartwright, Yale University, Melody Chan,
Recent Advances in Homogenization and Model Re- Harvard University, and Joseph D. Rabinoff, Georgia In-
duction Methods for Multiscale Phenomena (Code: SS stitute of Technology.
21A), Silvia Jiménez Bolaños and Burt S. Tilley, Worcester
Polytechnic Institute. AMS Sessions for Contributed Papers
Recent Progress in Geometric and Complex Analysis There will be sessions of ten-minute contributed talks.
(Code: SS 3A), Zheng Huang, City University of New York, Although an individual may present only one contributed
Graduate Center and College of Staten Island, Longzhi Lin, paper at a meeting, any combination of joint authorship
Rutgers University, and Marcello Lucia, City University of may be accepted, provided no individual speaks more than
New York, Graduate Center and College of Staten Island. once on the program. Contributed papers will be grouped
Recent Progress in Multivariable Operator Theory together by related subject classifications into sessions.
(Code: SS 46A), Ron Douglas, Texas A&M University, and
Michael Jury, University of Florida. Submission of Abstracts for AMS Sessions
Recent Progress in the Langlands Program (Code: SS Authors must submit abstracts of talks through joint
15A), Moshe Adrian, University of Utah, and Shuichiro mathematicsmeetings.org/meetings/abstracts/
Takeda, University of Missouri. abstract.pl?type=jmm. Indicate the number of authors
Regulatory Problems for Nonlinear PDEs Modeling for the paper, click on the “New Abstract” button, and you
Fluids and Complex Fluids, I (a Mathematics Research will be taken to the submission form. Simply follow the
Communities Session) (Code: SS 57A), Tak Kwong Wong, step-by-step instructions (read them carefully) until you
University of Pennsylvania, Hao Jia, University of Chicago, received your unique abstract number. No submission is
Jared Whitehead, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and complete until you receive your abstract receipt number.
Jacob Bedrossian, New York University. The deadline for all submissions is September 17, 2013.
Representation Theory of p-adic Groups and Auto- Late papers cannot be accommodated. Please email abs-
morphic Forms (Code: SS 28A), Arsalan Chademan, Uni- coord@ams.org if you have questions. If you make an
versity of Kurdistan, and Manouchehr Misaghian, Prairie inquiry about your specific abstract, please include your
View A&M University. abstract number.
Research in Mathematics by Undergraduates and
Students in Post-Baccalaureate Programs (Code: SS 25A), Other AMS Sessions
Bernard Brooks and Jobby Jacobs, Rochester Institute Access and Opportunities in STEM Education: The
of Technology, Jacqueline Jensen-Vallin, Slippery Rock Challenges of Building an Equitable Diverse Society,
University, and Carl Lutzer, Darren Narayan, and Tamas organized by Carlos Castillo-Chavez, Arizona State Uni-
Wiandt, Rochester Institute of Technology. versity, Wednesday, 9:30 a.m.–11:00 a.m. The sense of ur-
Set-Valued Optimization and Variational Problems gency that the NAS’s report “Expanding Underrepresented
with Applications (Code: SS 24A), Akhtar Khan, Roches- Minority Participation: America’s Science and Technology
ter Institute of Technology, Mau Nam Nguyen, Portland Talent at the Crossroads” places on the diversification
State University, Miguel Sama, Universidad Nacional de of the work force in STEM demands increased access to
Educacin e Distancia, and Christiane Tammer, Martin colleges and universities, not only because it is the right
Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg. thing to do but because it is in the best national interest.
Structural and Extremal Problems (Code: SS 19A), This has been carried out under the leadership of Presi-
Daniel Cranston, Virginia Commonwealth University, and dent Freeman Hrabowski of the University of Maryland
Gexin Yu, College of William & Mary. at Baltimore County. President Hrabowski will share the

October 2013 Notices of the AMS 1227


Meetings & Conferences

national responses that this report has generated over the it serves as a pilgrimage for those interested in the legend
past two years. His presentation will be followed by the and legacy of the great Indian mathematician. The film
responses of two recipients of the Presidential Medal of also highlights the trajectory of Ramanujan’s seminal
Science: James S. Gates, University of Maryland, College work and its relevance today. Cosponsored by the AMS
Park, and Richard Tapia, Rice University. Cosponsored by and MAA.
the AMS, MAA, and SIAM Grad School Fair, Friday, 8:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m. Here is
INGenIOuS: Workforce Preparation for Students in the opportunity for undergrads to meet representatives
the Mathematical Sciences, organized by John Bailer, from mathematical sciences graduate programs from
Miami University; Jenna Carpenter, Louisiana Tech universities all over the country. January is a great time
University, William Jaco, Oklahoma State University, Peter for juniors to learn more, and college seniors may still be
Turner, Clarkson University; and Paul Zorn, St. Olaf Col- able to refine their search. This is your chance for one-stop
lege; Wednesday, 2:15 p.m.–3:45 p.m. Representatives shopping in the graduate school market. At last year’s
of AMS, ASA, MAA, and SIAM met in July 2013, at the meeting about 300 students met with representatives
INGenIOuS workshop, to discuss positioning mathemat- from 50 graduate programs. If your school has a graduate
ics and statistics departments to create a workforce that program and you are interested in participating, a table
is ready to meet the challenges of the 21st century. The will be provided for your posters and printed materials for
goal is to ensure that the next generation of undergradu- US$75 (registration for this event must be made by a per-
ate and graduate students view the study of mathematical son already registered for the JMM), and you are welcome
sciences as a vibrant path leading to many career options. to personally speak to interested students. Complimentary
Cosponsored by the AMS, ASA, MAA, and SIAM. coffee will be served. Cosponsored by the AMS and MAA.
Online Courses: Benefits and Pitfalls, organized by Current Events Bulletin, organized by David Eisenbud,
Dan Abramovich, Brown University, and Patricia Hersh, Mathematical Sciences Research Institute; Friday, 1:00
North Carolina State University; Wednesday, 4:30 p.m.– p.m.–5:00 p.m. Speakers in this session follow the model of
6:00 p.m. Massively open online courses (MOOCs) are the Bourbaki Seminars in that mathematicians with strong
currently developing at a rapid pace. Their educational po- expository skills speak on work not their own. Written
tential and possible effect on the structure of colleges and versions of the talks will be distributed at the meeting
universities are hot topics in higher education. This panel and will also be available online at www.ams.org/ams/
aims to discuss the potential impact on students, faculty current-events-bulletin.html after the conclusion
and mathematics departments. How is student learning of the meeting.
in a MOOC different from in a conventional classroom The Public Face of Mathematics, Friday, 2:30 p.m.–4:00
environment? What kinds of support do students need p.m. Experienced spokespeople will share ideas and lead
at their home institutions? How will allowing students to discussion about how the mathematics community can
take MOOCs for credit, in lieu of traditional courses, affect mobilize more members to become proactive in represent-
departments at the home institutions? How should the ing mathematics to the general public and to key audi-
mathematics community respond to this trend? The panel ences of leaders in discussions of public policy. Sponsored
will aim to discuss these and other questions concerning by the Committee on Science Policy and the Committee
MOOCs. Sponsored by the Committee on the Profession. on Education.
Who Wants to Be a Mathematician—National Contest, Promoting Post-Secondary Mathematics Education,
organized by Michael A. Breen, AMS, and William T. But- organized by Eric M. Friedlander, University of Southern
terworth, DePaul University; Thursday, 9:30 a.m.–11:00 California, Mark L. Green, University of California, Los
a.m. See ten of the nation’s best high school students Angeles, and Phillip A. Griffiths, Institute for Advanced
compete for a US$5,000 first prize for themselves and Study; Friday, 4:15 p.m.–6:00 p.m. Leaders from outside
US$5,000 for their school’s math department. Semifinals the academic community of mathematical scientists,
are at 9:30 a.m. and finals at 10:30 a.m. You are invited including representatives of other math-intensive and
to come and take part in this educational and fun pre- interdisciplinary subjects, government, industry, and
sentation. other employers, will participate in a discussion of the
Conversation on Nonacademic Employment, Thurs- challenges and prospects for systemic change in post-
day, 10:30–noon. This session will concentrate on how to secondary mathematics education. This discussion should
find nonacademic positions, types of jobs, the interview promote substantial, constructive responses to achieve
process, work environments, and advancement opportuni- goals which include 1) creating and disseminating course
ties. The discussion will be led by a panel of mathematical content to meet the needs of today’s students, especially
scientists working in government and industry. by emphasizing the roles that mathematics plays in the
The Genius of Srinivasa Ramanujan, Thursday, 6:00 modern world; 2) strengthening the pipeline for prospec-
p.m.–7:10 p.m. The Prime Minister of India declared 2012 tive STEM graduates; and 3) developing, adapting, and
the “National Year of Mathematics” to commemorate the evaluating new teaching methodologies. Cosponsored by
125th anniversary of the birth of Srinivasa Ramanujan. the AMS Committee on Education, MAA, and SIAM.
To honor the occasion, Nandan Kudhyadi produced this Congressional Fellowship Session, organized by Sam-
docudrama. The film features well-known number theo- uel M. Rankin III, AMS; Friday, 4:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m. This
rists from around the world associated with Ramanujan’s fellowship provides a public policy learning experience,
oeuvre. Shot at various locations in India and Cambridge, demonstrates the value of science-government interaction

1228 Notices of the AMS Volume 60, Number 9


Meetings & Conferences

and brings a technical background and external perspec- Nonmember $185; Student, Unemployed, or Emeritus $75.
tive to the decision-making process in Congress. Learn Please see the complete article on page 1220 or at www.
more about this program and speak with current and ams.org/meetings/short-courses/short-course-
former AMS Fellows. Application deadline for the 2014- general.
15 AMS Congressional Fellowship is February 15, 2014.
NSF-EHR Grant Proposal Writing Workshop
Other AMS Events Writing a Competitive Proposal to NSF-EHR, Monday,
Council, Tuesday, 1:30 p.m. 3:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m. The goal of this workshop is to famil-
Business Meeting, Saturday, 11:45 a.m. The Secre- iarize participants with current direction/priorities in EHR,
tary notes the following resolution of the Council: Each familiarize participants with key EHR education research
person who attends a business meeting of the Society and development programs, consider common issues of
shall be willing and able to identify himself as a mem- competitive proposals, and prepare participants to write
ber of the Society. In further explanation, it is noted a competitive proposal. There is no registration fee for
that each person who is to vote at a meeting is thereby this workshop, but participants must register separately
identifying himself as and claiming to be a member of in advance. Please contact the AMS Washington Office at
the American Mathematical Society. The Society has a 202-588-1100 or send email to amsdc@ams.org for further
Committee on the Agenda for Business Meetings. The information.
purpose is to make business meetings orderly and effec-
tive. The committee does not have legal or administrative Department Chairs Workshop
power. It is intended that the committee consider what This annual one-day workshop for department chairs
may be called “quasipolitical” motions. The committee has and leaders is designed to stimulate discussion on a wide
several possible courses of action on a proposed motion, range of issues facing departments today, including per-
including but not restricted to: sonnel issues (staff and faculty), long-range planning, hir-
(a) doing nothing, ing, promotion and tenure, budget management, assess-
(b) conferring with supporters and opponents to arrive ments, outreach, stewardship, junior faculty development,
at a mutually accepted amended version to be circulated communication, and departmental leadership. There is a
in advance of the meeting, separate registration and fee to participate. Interested at-
(c) recommending and planning a format for debate to tendees should also consider attending the NSF-EHR Grant
suggest to a business meeting, Proposal Writing Workshop to be held on Monday, Janu-
(d) recommending referral to a committee, and ary 13. For further information, please contact the AMS
(e) recommending debate followed by referral to a Washington Office at 202-588-1100 or amsdc@ams.org.
committee.
There is no mechanism that requires automatic sub-
mission of a motion to the committee. However, if a
motion has not been submitted through the committee, it
97th Meeting of the MAA
may be thought reasonable by a business meeting to refer MAA Invited Addresses
it rather than to act on it without benefit of the advice of Sarah-Marie Belcastro, Sarah Lawrence College, Snark
the committee. attack!: Visualizations of “uncolorable” graphs on surfaces;
In order that a motion for this business meeting Thursday at 9:00 a.m.
receive the service offered by the committee in the most William Dunham, Muhlenberg College, Heron, Newton,
effective manner, it should be in the hands of the AMS Euler, and Barney ; Saturday at 10:05 a.m.
Secretary by December 18, 2013. Helaman and Claire Ferguson, Mathematics in stone
and bronze; Wednesday, 2:15 p.m.
AMS Short Course on Geometry and Topology in
Jill Pipher, Brown University, The mathematics of
Statistical Inference
lattice-based cryptography ; Friday at 9:00 a.m.
This two-day course will take place on Monday and Michael Starbird, University of Texas at Austin, Effec-
Tuesday before the meeting actually begins. It is orga- tive thinking and mathematics; Wednesday at 3:20 p.m.
nized by Sayan Mukherjee, Duke University, who will give
talks on Geometry in statistical inference and Topology Presentations by Teaching Award Recipients
in statistical inference, and features these talks by Yusu Friday, 2:30 p.m.–3:50 p.m., organized by MAA Sec-
Wang, Ohio State University, Computing geometric and retary Barbara J. Faires, Westminster College, and MAA
topological summaries; Monica Nicolau, Stanford Univer-
President, Robert Devaney, Boston University. Winners
sity, Geometry and topology in cancer systems biology;
of the Deborah and Franklin Tepper Haimo Awards for
Matthew Kahle, Ohio State University, Random geometry
Distinguished College or University Teaching will give
and topology; and Lek-Heng Lim, University of Chicago,
presentations on the secrets of their success.
Hodge operator in data analysis.
There are separate registration fees to participate in MAA Invited Paper Sessions
this course. Advance registration (before December 24): The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Modern Mathemat-
Member $106, Nonmember $155, Student, Unemployed, ics, organized by Andrew Conner and Ellen Kirkman,
or Emeritus $54. Onsite registration: Member $140, Wake Forest University; Wednesday morning. The session

October 2013 Notices of the AMS 1229


Meetings & Conferences

will demonstrate that abstract mathematics continues to College; David Bressoud, Macalester College; Edward
provide tools for use outside of mathematics. Speakers Burger, Southwestern University; Jodi Cotton, Westches-
include Robert Ghrist, University of Pennsylvania, on ter Community College; Sandra Laursen, University of
topology; Daniel Nakano, University of Georgia, on repre- Colorado Boulder; Michael Pearson, Mathematical Asso-
sentation theory; Alice Silverberg, University of California ciation of America; Carol Schumacher, Kenyon College;
Irvine, on number theory; and Bernd Sturmfels, University Katherine Socha, Math for America; Francis Su, Harvey
of California Berkeley, on algebraic geometry, combinator- Mudd College; Stan Yoshinobu, California State University
ics, and commutative algebra. Dominguez Hills; and Paul Zorn, St. Olaf College.
The Continuing Influence of Paul Erdős in Number Six Crash Courses on Mapping Class Groups, orga-
Theory, organized by Paul Pollack, University of Georgia, nized by Benson Farb, University of Chicago, and Dan
and Carl Pomerance, Dartmouth College; Friday morning. Margalit, Georgia Institute of Technology; Friday morning
For the better part of the twentieth century, Paul Erdős and Saturday afternoon. Topics will include the basics,
stood as a leading figure in number theory. This session mapping class groups in 3-manifold theory, mapping
brings together experts from that area to discuss the im- class groups in 4-manifold theory, dynamics of surface
pact of Erdős's work on modern research. Speakers include diffeomorphisms, braids, (co)homology and char classes
Michael Filaseta, University of South Carolina; Ron Gra- of surface bundles, and open problems.
ham, University of California, San Diego; Mits Kobayashi,
Cal Poly Pomona; Florian Luca, National Autonomous Uni- MAA Minicourses
versity of Mexico; Melvyn Nathanson, City University of
New York; and Andrew Granville, University of Montreal. MAA Minicourses are open only to persons who register
Uniform Distribution, Discrepancy, and Related for the Joint Meetings and pay the Joint Meetings reg-
Fields, organized by Dmitriy Bilyk, University of Min- istration fee in addition to the appropriate minicourse
nesota, and Jill Pipher, Brown University; Friday after- fee. The MAA reserves the right to cancel any minicourse
noon. How well can one approximate various continuous that is undersubscribed. Participants in minicourses 4, 5,
geometric objects by discrete sets of points and how big and 9 are required to bring their own laptop computer
are the inevitable errors? Different manifestations of this equipped with appropriate software. Instructions on how
question, which lies at the interface of number theory, to download any data files needed for those courses will be
probability, approximation theory, combinatorics, analy- provided by the organizers. The enrollment in each mini-
sis, and geometry, will be discussed from various points course is limited to 50; the cost of a minicourse is US$80.
of view. Speakers include Art Owen, Stanford University; Minicourse #1: Humanistic mathematics, presented
Michael Lacey, Georgia Institute of Technology; Ed Saff, by Gizem Karaali, Pomona College, and Eric Marland,
Vanderbilt University; and Vladimir Temlyakov, Univer- Appalachian State University; Part A, Wednesday, 9:00
sity of South Carolina. a.m.–11:00 a.m.; Part B, Friday, 9:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m. As a
Graphs Don’t Have to Lie Flat: The Shape of Topologi- scholarly stance, humanistic mathematics describes an ap-
cal Graph Theory, organized by Sarah-Marie Belcastro, proach to mathematics that views it as a human endeavor
Sarah Lawrence College, and Mark Ellingham, Vanderbilt and focuses on its aesthetic, cultural, historical, literary,
University; Thursday morning. Topological graph theory pedagogical, philosophical, psychological, and sociological
is the study of graphs drawn on topological surfaces, usu- aspects. As a pedagogical framework, humanistic math-
ally (but not always!) so that no edges cross. The field is ematics explores and builds on the relationship of math-
concerned with most of the same topics as ordinary graph ematics with its nontraditional partners in the humanities,
theory as well as questions that arise from encoding the the fine arts, and social sciences, providing additional
embedding of a graph in a surface. Speakers include Mark perspective for the role of mathematics in a liberal arts
Ellingham, Vanderbilt University; Joan Hutchinson, Ma- education. This minicourse exposes participants to both
calester College; Jo Ellis-Monaghan, St. Michael’s College; facets of humanistic mathematics.
and Michael Pelsmajer, Illinois Institute of Technology. In the first session, participants will learn about the
Mathematics and Effective Thinking, organized by implications of a humanistic approach to teaching and
Michael Starbird, University of Texas Austin; Thursday, explore how it can contribute to a more sophisticated un-
morning and afternoon. Mathematics classes can and do derstanding of mathematics for all students. Also included
influence students’ thinking well beyond the mathematical will be a discussion of common implementation issues and
content. Mathematics classes can help students in all parts an overview of a spectrum of materials available to use
of their lives by helping them to think effectively—that in the classroom. In the second session, participants will
is, being innovative problem-solvers, insightful and clear- engage with the scholarship of humanistic mathematics, a
minded, intellectually curious, able to ask illuminating body of literature that eschews disciplinary jargon in favor
questions, and confident and competent to reason through of reaching a more diverse audience. After a thorough in-
complex issues. These habits of mind can be fostered troduction, participants will, through guided group work,
and developed systematically through mathematical ex- initiate their own scholarly projects. Possible venues of
periences. This session focuses on how the mathematical communication, collaboration, and dissemination of work
curriculum and strategies of instruction can intentionally in humanistic mathematics will be discussed.
help students to learn to think effectively throughout their Minicourse #2: CATALST: Introductory statistics
lives. Speakers include Deborah Bergstrand, Swarthmore using randomization and bootstrap methods, presented

1230 Notices of the AMS Volume 60, Number 9


Meetings & Conferences

by Andrew Zieffler, Robert delMas, and Nicola Parker, know. Internet sources of real data, activities, and best
University of Minnesota; Part A, Thursday, 1:00 p.m.– practices articles will be examined. Participants will find
3:00 p.m.; Part B, Saturday, 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. This out how they can continue to learn about the best practices
workshop introduces and provides hands-on experi- for the first course in statistics by becoming involved in
ence with curriculum materials, lesson plans, and stu- statistics education related conferences, newsletters, and
dent assessments developed as part of the CATALST groups. Participants are required to bring their laptops.
(Change Agents for Teaching and Learning Statistics) Minicourse #5. Using randomization methods to
project (NSF DUE-0814433). Focused on the introductory, build conceptual understanding of statistical inference,
noncalculus-based statistics course, CATALST’s goals were presented by Robin H. Lock and Patti Frazer Lock, St.
to radically change the content and pedagogy in such a Lawrence University; Kari Lock Morgan and Eric Frazer
course. Lock, Duke University; and Dennis Frazer Lock, Iowa
CATALST makes exclusive use of simulation to carry State University; Part A, Thursday, 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.;
out inferential analyses. The course also builds on best Part B, Saturday, 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. The goal of this
practices and materials developed in statistics educa- minicourse is to demonstrate how computer simulation
tion, research and theory from cognitive science, as well techniques, such as bootstrap confidence intervals and
as materials and methods that are successfully achieving randomization tests, can be used to introduce students
parallel goals in other disciplines (e.g., mathematics and to fundamental concepts of statistical inference in an
engineering education). introductory statistics course. Simulation methods are
Minicourse participants will be introduced to the Tin- becoming increasingly important in statistics, and can
kerPlots™ software. They will learn how this software can be effective tools for building student understanding of
be used in the classroom to introduce students to random- inference. Through easy to use free online tools and class
ization and bootstrap methods through empirical simula- activities, participants will see how to engage students and
tion. In addition, participants will leave the workshop with make these methods readily accessible. We illustrate how
lesson plans, in-class student activities, and data to help to use these methods to build conceptual understanding
them teach a one-semester introductory statistics course and also how to integrate them into an existing introduc-
using randomization and bootstrap methods. tory statistics course without requiring a major overhaul.
Minicourse #3. Improvisation for the mathematics Participants are required to bring their laptops.
classroom, presented by Andrea Young, Ripon College; Minicourse #6. Historical role-playing in the math-
Part A, Wednesday, 4:45 p.m.–6:45 p.m.; Part B, Friday, 3:30 ematics classroom, presented by John P. Curran, Eastern
p.m.–5:30 p.m. Improvisational comedy, or just simply Michigan University; Part A, Thursday, 9:00 a.m.–11:00
improv, is theater that is made up on the spot. Besides a.m.; Part B, Saturday, 9:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m. Participants
being funny, improv comedians take risks, solve problems, in this session will learn how to use role-playing games in
and support fellow actors. In this interactive minicourse, the mathematics classroom according to the “Reacting to
participants will explore how some of the fundamental the Past” pedagogy. This method lends itself to project-
tenets of improv can be applied to creating an open and based and group-work-oriented courses, and encourages
engaging mathematics classroom. Participants will learn intensive student participation.
theater exercises that have been modified for use in un- The presenter will discuss two games that he uses, in-
dergraduate math courses, both as tools to demonstrate or cluding one he has cowritten. The “Ways & Means 1935”
review course content and as methods to boost participa- game can be used in a quantitative literacy course. Players,
tion, collaboration, and creativity of students. Participants representing congressmen, debate the form of the Social
will gain experience doing and leading these exercises, Security bill, which contained a broad range of social
which will range from introductory name games to verbal welfare provisions in addition to old-age pensions. The
concept-connection exercises to physical exam-review game “Math Wars 1870: Educating for Empire”, designed
activities. We will also explore the concept of “teacher as by David Cohen et al, is appropriate for a history of math-
performer”, and we will see how classroom management ematics or a mathematical education course. Students act
skills can be enhanced by the study of improv. Comfort- as members of or witnesses testifying at the Royal Com-
able clothes and shoes are encouraged. mission on Scientific Instruction and the Advancement
Minicourse #4. Teaching introductory statistics (for of Science, intended to reform education at Cambridge
instructors new to teaching intro stats), presented by University.
Michael Posner, Villanova University, and Carolyn Cuff, In order to learn how to teach with this method, and
Westminster College; Part A, Wednesday, 9:00 a.m.–11:00 to gain confidence in it, it is important to play such a
a.m. ; Part B, Friday, 9:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m. This minicourse, game oneself. We will spend part of the session playing a
intended for instructors new to teaching statistics, ex- shortened version of one of the games mentioned above.
poses participants to the big ideas of statistics and the The session will include a discussion of how to develop
ASA-endorsed Guidelines for Assessment and Instruction games for your own courses.
in Statistics Education (GAISE) report. It considers ways to Minicourse #7. Mathematics and dance, presented by
engage students in statistical literacy and thinking, and Karl Schaffer, De Anza College; Part A, Wednesday, 4:45
contrast conceptual and procedural understanding in the p.m.–6:45 p.m.; Part B, Friday, 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. We will
first statistics course. Participants will engage in many of present several activities which combine dance and math-
the classic activities that all statistics instructors should ematics content in nontrivial ways. The activities connect

October 2013 Notices of the AMS 1231


Meetings & Conferences

to a variety of dance forms, as well as to several areas of geography motivated by the needs of Muslim religious
mathematics, including symmetry, number theory, com- ritual. The beautiful modern theory of spherical trigonom-
binatorics, dynamical systems, and topology. Participants etry (including the pentagramma mirificum), developed
will take away activities useful in a wide range of under- by John Napier along with his logarithms, leads eventu-
graduate math classes or math clubs. The activities are ally to an astonishing alternate path to the subject using
collaborative and physically comfortable, and easily per- stereographic projection discovered only in the early 20th
formed by those with little or no dance experience. These century. We conclude with a consideration of some of the
include folk dances, improvisations, and choreographic ingenious techniques developed by navigators in the 19th
exercises with specific mathematical content, as well as century to find their locations, using as data only a couple
kinesthetic tasks involving explorations of mathematical of observations of stellar altitudes.
principles. In all cases, mathematics will illuminate the Minicourse #11. Public- and private-key cryptogra-
dance, and the dance will realize, in kinesthetic form, the phy, presented by Chris Christensen, Northern Kentucky
mathematical concepts. University, and Jeffrey Ehme, Spelman College; Part
Minicourse #8. Directing undergraduate research, A, Wednesday, 4:45 p.m.–6:45 p.m.; Part B, Friday, 3:30
presented by Aparna Higgins, University of Dayton; Part p.m.–5:30 p.m. The interesting mathematical aspects of
A, Thursday, 9:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.; Part B, Saturday, 9:00 public-key ciphers have sparked interest by mathematics
a.m.–11:00 a.m. This minicourse will cover many aspects faculty in these ciphers as applications of mathematics
of facilitating research by undergraduates, such as getting that can be presented in undergraduate courses. Often
students involved in research, finding appropriate prob- ignored, however, are the modern private-key ciphers—
lems, deciding how much help to provide, and presenting “the workhorses of cryptography”. Modern private-key
and publishing the results. Similarities and differences ciphers are equally mathematically interesting. In this
between research conducted during summer programs minicourse, we will explore both modern public-key and
and research that can be conducted during the academic private-key ciphers and their mathematical foundations.
year will be discussed. The minicourse is designed for We will also briefly explore the historical evolution of
faculty who are new to directing undergraduate research.
both types of ciphers. No previous experience with these
Although the examples used will be primarily in the area
topics is assumed.
of discrete mathematics, the strategies discussed can be
Minicourse #12. A Game Theory path to quantitative
applied to any area of mathematics.
literacy, presented by David Housman, Goshen College;
Minicourse #9. WeBWorK: An open source alterna-
Part A, Wednesday, 9:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.; Part B, Friday,
tive for generating and delivering online homework
9:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m. Game Theory, defined in the broad-
problems, presented by John Travis, Mississippi College;
est sense, can be used to model many real world scenarios
Jason Aubrey, University of Missouri; and Paul Pearson,
of decision making in situations involving conflict and
Hope College; Part A, Wednesday, 2:15 p.m.–4:15 p.m., Part
cooperation. Further, mastering the basic concepts and
B, Friday, 1:00–3:00 p.m. We will introduce participants
tools of game theory requires only an understanding of
to the WeBWorK online homework system. Supported by
basic algebra, probability, and formal reasoning. These two
grants from the NSF, WeBWorK has been adopted by well
over 500 colleges, universities, and secondary schools and features of Game Theory make it an ideal path to devel-
is a popular open source alternative to commercial prod- oping habits of quantitative literacy among our students.
ucts. WeBWorK can handle problems in college algebra, This audience participation minicourse develops some of
calculus, linear algebra, ODEs, and more and comes with the material used by the presenter in general education
an extensive library of nearly 30,000 problems across the and math major courses on Game Theory and encourages
mathematics curriculum. WeBWorK recognizes a multi- participants to develop their own, similar, courses.
tude of mathematical objects and allows for elegant solu- Minicourse #13. Teaching an applied topology course,
tion checking. This minicourse will introduce participants presented by Colin Adams, Williams College, and Robert
to WeBWorK and equip participants with the knowledge Franzosa, University of Maine; Part A, Thursday, 9:00
and skills to use WeBWorK in the classroom. Participants a.m.–11:00 a.m.; Part B, Saturday, 9:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.
are required to bring their own laptops/tablet computers Applications of topology have proliferated in recent
with wireless Internet capabilities. years. It is now possible to teach a course in topology, still
Minicourse #10. Heavenly mathematics: The forgot- covering much of the same material that would appear
ten art of spherical trigonometry, presented by Glen Van in a traditional topology course, but motivated entirely
Brummelen, Quest University, and Joel Silverberg, Roger by applications. Typically, offering an “applied” topology
Williams University; Part A, Friday, 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.; course immediately doubles the enrollments. Applications
Part B, Saturday, 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. Trigonometry came include areas such as geographic information systems,
into being at the birth of science itself, merging Greek robotics, chaos, fixed point theory in economics, knots
geometric models of the motions of celestial bodies with in DNA and synthetic chemistry, and the topology of
the desire to predict where the planets will go. With the sky the spatial universe. Through the applications students
as the arena, spherical trigonometry was the “big brother” become engaged with the material. In this minicourse
to the ordinary plane trigonometry our children learn in we will introduce the various applications, and provide
school. We shall explore the surprisingly elegant theory participants with the background necessary to design and
that emerges, as well as its appropriation into mathematical teach their own applied topology course.

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Meetings & Conferences

Minicourse #14. Visualizing projective geometry Peter, Utica College; and Cassie Williams, James Madison
through photographs and perspective drawings, University; Wednesday afternoon.
presented by Annalisa Crannell, Franklin & Marshall Assessment of Proof Writing Throughout the Math-
College; Marc Frantz, Indiana University Bloomington; ematics Major, organized by Sarah Cook, Washburn
and Fumiko Futamura, Southwestern University; Part A, University, and Miriam Harris-Botzum, Lehigh Carbon
Wednesday, 2:15 p.m.– 4:15 p.m.; Thursday, 1:00 p.m.–3:00 Community College; Thursday morning.
p.m. Projective geometry is the study of properties invari- At the Intersection of Mathematics and the Arts, orga-
ant under projective transformations, often taught as an nized by Douglas Norton, Villanova University; Thursday
upper level course. Although projective geometry was afternoon.
born out of the ideas of Renaissance artists, it is often Bridging the Gap: Designing an Introduction to Proofs
taught without any reference to perspective drawing or Course, organized by Sarah Mabrouk, Framingham State
photography. This minicourse seeks to re-establish the University; Thursday morning.
link between mathematics and art, motivating several Data, Modeling, and Computing in the Introductory
important concepts in projective geometry, including Statistics Course, organized by Andrew Zieffler, Univer-
Desargues’ Theorem, Casey’s Theorem and its applica- sity of Minnesota; Scott Alberts, Truman State University;
tions, and Eves’ Theorem. This minicourse will consist of and Randall Pruim, Calvin College; Friday afternoon.
hands-on activities, but no artistic experience is required. Flipping the Classroom, organized by Krista Maxson,
Minicourse #15. Developing strong mentoring rela- Shawnee State University, and Zsuzsanna Szaniszlo, Val-
tionships, presented by Donna Joyce Dean, Association paraiso University; Saturday morning.
for Women in Science; Part A, Wednesday, 2:15 p.m.– 4:15 The History of Mathematical Communities, organized
p.m.; Part B, Friday, 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. This minicourse by Amy Shell-Gellasch, Montgomery College, and Linda
will provide individuals with an appreciation for the im- McGuire, Muhlenberg College; Thursday afternoon.
portance of mentoring, from the mentor’s perspective as Innovative and Effective Ways to Teach Linear Alge-
well as from the mentee’s perspective. Pragmatic tools bra, organized by David Strong, Pepperdine University;
and techniques will be presented that participants can Gilbert Strang, MIT; and Megan Wawro, Virginia Tech;
deploy in their roles as mentor or mentee. The intent of Friday morning.
the minicourse is to help individuals to 1) understand the Instructional Approaches to Increase Awareness of
differences among mentoring, advising, coaching, and the Societal Value of Mathematics, organized by Jessica
sponsoring roles; 2) recognize how to identify mentoring Deshler, West Virginia University, and Elizabeth Bur-
needs from both perspectives; 3) learn how to identify and roughs, Montana State University; Friday afternoon.
approach potential mentors; 4) understand how mentors Is Mathematics the Language of Science?, organized
can help participants achieve their professional goals; 5) by Carl Behrens, Alexandria, VA; Thomas Drucker,
identify the do’s and don’ts involved in being a good men- University of Wisconsin Whitewater; and Dan Sloughter,
tee or mentor; and 6) appreciate how mentoring can have Furman University; Wednesday morning.
an impact on understanding one's work-life satisfaction. Mathematics and Sports, organized by Drew Pasteur,
College of Wooster, and John David, Virginia Military
MAA Contributed Papers Institute; Saturday morning.
Mathematics Experiences in Business, Industry, and
The MAA Committee on Contributed Paper Sessions so- Government, organized by Carla Martin, James Madison
licits contributed papers pertinent to the sessions listed University; Phil Gustafson, Mesa State University; and
below. Contributed Paper Session presentations are Michael Monticino, University of North Texas; Friday
limited to fifteen minutes, except in the general session afternoon.
where they are limited to ten minutes. Each session room Open Source Mathematics Textbooks, organized by
is equipped with a computer projector, an overhead pro- Albert Schueller, Whitman College, and Kent Morrison,
jector, and a screen. American Institute of Mathematics; Friday morning.
Please note that the days and times scheduled for Programs and Approaches for Mentoring Women and
these sessions remain tentative. Full descriptions of Minorities in Mathematics, organized by Jenna Carpenter,
these sessions may be found at jointmathematics Louisiana Tech University, and Brooke Shipley, University
meetings.org/meetings/national/jmm2014/2160_ of Chicago; Wednesday afternoon.
maacall. Projects, Demonstrations, and Activities that Engage
Assessing Quantitative Reasoning and Literacy, Liberal Arts Mathematics Students, organized by Sarah
organized by Semra Kilic-Bahi, Colby-Sawyer College; Mabrouk, Framingham State University; Thursday after-
Eric Gaze, Bowdoin College; Andrew Miller, Belmont noon.
University; and Aaron Montgomery, Central Washington Putting a Theme in a History of Mathematics Course,
University; Wednesday morning. organized by Eugene Boman, Penn State Harrisburg, and
Assessing Student Learning: Alternative Approaches, Robert Rogers, SUNY Fredonia; Saturday morning.
organized by Jane Butterfield, University of Minnesota; Reinventing the Calculus Sequence, organized by
Robert Campbell III, College of St. Benedict/St. John’s David Dwyer and Mark Gruenwald, University of Evans-
University; David Clark, University of Minnesota; John ville; Saturday afternoon.

October 2013 Notices of the AMS 1233


Meetings & Conferences

Research on the Teaching and Learning of Under- Teaching Introductory Mathematics; Teaching Mathemat-
graduate Mathematics, organized by Kyeong Hah Roh, ics Beyond the Calculus Sequence; or Other Assorted Topics.
Arizona State University, Mikael Oehrtman, University
of Northern Colorado; and Timothy Fukawa-Connelly, Submission Procedures for MAA Contributed
University of New Hampshire; Thursday morning and Paper Abstracts
afternoon.
Abstracts must be submitted electronically at joint
The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Col-
mathematicsmeetings.org/meetings/abstracts/
legiate Mathematics, organized by Jackie Dewar, Loyola
abstract.pl?type=jmm. Simply fill in the number
Marymount University; Tom Banchoff, Brown Univer-
of authors, click “New Abstract”, and then follow the
sity; Curtis Bennett, Loyola Marymount University; Pam
step-by-step instructions. The deadline for abstracts
Crawford, Jacksonville University; and Edwin Herman,
submission is Tuesday, September 17, 2013.
University of Wisconsin Stevens Point; Wednesday after-
Each participant may give at most one talk in any
noon.
one themed contributed paper session or the general
Student Activities, organized by Lisa Marano, West
contributed paper session. If your paper cannot be ac-
Chester University of Pennsylvania, and Jennifer Bergner,
commodated in the session for which it was submitted, it
Salisbury State University; Thursday morning. will automatically be considered for the general session.
Teaching with Technology: Impact, Evaluation and The organizer(s) of your session will automatically
Reflection, organized by Peter Gavin LaRose, University receive a copy of the abstract, so it is not necessary for
of Michigan; Saturday afternoon. you to send it directly to the organizer. All accepted
Topics and Techniques for Teaching Real Analysis, abstracts are published in a book that is available to reg-
organized by Paul Musial, Chicago State University; Erik istered participants at the meeting. Questions concern-
Talvila, University of the Fraser Valley; and James Peter- ing the submission of abstracts should be addressed to
son, Benedictine University; Wednesday morning. abs-coord@ams.org.
Trends in Undergraduate Mathematical Biology
Education, organized by Timothy Comar, Benedictine MAA Panels, Posters, Workshops, and Other
University; Friday morning. Sessions
USE Math: Undergraduate Sustainability Experiences What Do I Need to Know about Common Core and
in the Introductory Mathematics Classroom, organized Common Core Assessments?, organized by Bonnie Gold,
by Ben Galluzzo, Shippensburg University; Monika Kiss, Monmouth University, and Genevieve Knight, Coppin
Saint Leo University; and Corrine Taylor, Wellesley Col- State University; Wednesday, 9:00 a.m.–10:20 a.m. What
lege; Saturday morning. are the policy implications of Common Core for higher
Using Online Resources to Augment the Traditional education? How should mathematics departments pre-
Classroom, organized by Mike May, Saint Louis University, pare for the implementation of Common Core in the K-12
and Paul Seeburger, Monroe Community College; Friday Schools?
morning. Higher education cannot afford to ignore the most im-
Wavelets in Undergraduate Education, organized by portant school reform initiative of the past twenty years—
Caroline Haddad, SUNY Geneseo; Edward Aboufadel, the implementation of the Common Core Standards across
Grand Valley State University; and John Merkel, Oglethorpe 48 states. Common Core Standards reflect a national
University; Saturday afternoon. commitment to raising standards in U.S. public schools
We Did More with Less: Streamlining the Undergradu- to invest in the next generation of citizens and increase
ate Mathematics Curriculum, organized by Wade Ellis, global competitiveness. This session will describe why
West Valley College, and Barbara Edwards, Oregon State the success of this monumental reform effort depends
University; Wednesday afternoon. on active support and advocacy from higher education.
General Contributed Paper Sessions, organized by Once this school reform effort is successfully imple-
Jennifer Beineke, Western New England University; Bem mented, better prepared students will enter our institu-
Cayco, San Jose State University; and Kimberly Presser, tions, leading to lower remediation rates, higher retention
Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania; Wednesday, rates, and higher college completion rates—all emerging
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday mornings and afternoons. accountability measures for higher education.
These sessions accept contributions in all areas of In order to take best advantage of the new standards,
mathematics, curriculum, and pedagogy. When you submit colleges and universities need to become informed about
your abstract you will be asked to classify it according to the content and progression of the skills, competencies,
the following scheme: Assessment and Outreach; Calculus; and knowledge that students will bring when they enter
History and Philosophy of Mathematics; Interdisciplinary college. Panelists Nancy Shapiro, University System of
Topics; Mathematics Education; Mathematics and Technol- Maryland; Bernadette Sandruck, Howard Community
ogy; Modeling and Applications of Mathematics; Probability College; and Denny Gulick, University of Maryland, will
and Statistics; Research in Geometry and Linear Algebra; also address the role and relationship between college
Research in Analysis; Research in Number Theory; Re- placement tests and new Common Core Assessments that
search in Graph Theory and Combinatorics; Research in are designed to assess college readiness. Sponsored by the
Algebra and Topology; Research in Applied Mathematics; MAA Committee on Assessment.

1234 Notices of the AMS Volume 60, Number 9


Meetings & Conferences

Inquiry-Based Learning Miniworkshop: What is IBL 2:15 p.m.–3:45 p.m. Representatives of AMS, ASA, MAA,
and Why Use It?, organizeed by Stan Yoshinobu, Cal Poly and SIAM met in July 2013, at the INGenIOuS work-
San Luis Obispo; Matthew Jones, Cal State Dominguez shop, to discuss positioning mathematics and statistics
Hills; and Carol Schumacher, Kenyon College; Wednes- departments to create a workforce that is ready to meet
day, 9:00 a.m.–10:20 a.m. There exists a growing body of the challenges of the 21st century. The goal is to ensure
evidence that supports the use of active, student-centered that the next generation of undergraduate and graduate
instruction, such as Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL). The IBL students view the study of mathematical sciences as a
miniworkshop provides opportunities for math faculty vibrant path leading to many career options. Cosponsored
to discuss what IBL is in a mathematics classroom and by the AMS, ASA, MAA, and SIAM.
the evidence why IBL should be used. This workshop is NSF Programs Supporting Learning, Teaching and
especially useful for instructors who have not used IBL or the Future Workforce in Mathematics, organized by Lee
have just begun using it in their own classes, although all Zia, Michael Jacobson, Ron Buckmire, and Jennifer Pearl,
interested faculty are welcome to attend. Attendees of the National Science Foundation; Wednesday, 2:15 p.m. –3:35
workshop will be actively involved in discussions, and will p.m. A number of NSF divisions offer a variety of grant
also learn about methods that they can take back to the programs that support innovations in learning and teach-
classroom for the upcoming term. Additional support and ing in the mathematical sciences. These programs will be
resources for IBL instructors will also be shared. discussed along with examples of successful projects.
Assistive Technologies for Math Students and Faculty Anticipated budget highlights and other new initiatives
with Disabilities, organized by James Hamblin, Shippens- for the next fiscal year will also be presented. Sponsored
burg University, and Bruce Yoshiwara, Los Angeles Pierce by the National Science Foundation.
College; Wednesday, 9:00 a.m.–10:20 a.m. When creating Poster Session of Projects Supported by the NSF Divi-
instructional math content—whether traditional or online sion of Undergraduate Education, organized by Jon Scott,
—it’s important to provide materials that are accessible to Montgomery College; Wednesday, 2:15 p.m.–4:15 p.m. This
all participants, including those with disabilities who may session will feature principal investigators (PIs) presenting
use adaptive software or devices to access the materials.
progress and outcomes from various NSF funded projects
The challenge of making mathematics content accessible
in the Division of Undergraduate Education. The poster
is greater than ever—especially for individuals with vision
session format will permit ample opportunity for attend-
impairment—due in large part to the advent of interac-
ees to engage in small group discussions with the PIs and
tive and dynamic content. Panelists Rick Clinton, Pearson
to network with each other. Information about presenters
Education; Gaier Dietrich, De Anza College; and Maryka
and their projects will appear in the program.
Baraka, Wolfram Research, will discuss factors that make
Career Options for Undergraduate Mathematics
creating accessible mathematics materials particularly
Majors, organized by Timothy Goldberg, Lenoir-Rhyne
challenging, and methods for identifying and delivering
University, and Ralucca Gera, Naval Postgraduate School;
acceptable alternatives. Sponsored by the MAA Commit-
Wednesday, 2:15 p.m.–3:35 p.m. There are a vast number
tee on Technologies in Mathematics Education (CTiME).
of options available for students in today’s global mar-
Access and Opportunities in STEM Education: The
Challenges of Building an Equitable Diverse Society, ket. A degree in mathematics continues to be a desirable
organized by Carlos Castillo-Chavez, Arizona State Uni- asset, yet a common question for students to ask is “What
versity, Wednesday, 9:30 a.m.–11:00 a.m. The sense of ur- options are available for someone with a math degree?”
gency that the NAS’s report “Expanding Underrepresented Panelists Emily Kessler, Society of Actuaries; Rebecca
Minority Participation: America’s Science and Technology Goldin, George Mason University; John Workman, the
Talent at the Crossroads” places on the diversification Advisory Board Company; and Kim Sacra, National Secu-
of the work force in STEM demands increased access to rity Agency, showcase several options for career paths for
colleges and universities, not only because it is the right students with an undergraduate degree in mathematics
thing to do but because it is in the best national interest. and will speak on their own experiences of finding a job.
This has been carried out under the leadership of Presi- Sponsored by the Young Mathematicians’ Network.
dent Freeman Hrabowski of the University of Maryland What Experiences Matter On Your Resumé? organized
at Baltimore County. President Hrabowski will share the by Kristine Roinestad, Georgetown College, and Ralucca
national responses that this report has generated over the Gera, Naval Postgraduate School; Wednesday, 3:50 p.m.–
past two years. His presentation will be followed by the 5:10 p.m. Whether you are looking for a fellowship, a
responses of two recipients of the Presidential Medal of scholarship, a professorship, or a job outside academia,
Science: James S. Gates, University of Maryland, College making certain your curriculum vita (CV) stands out is
Park, and Richard Tapia, Rice University. Cosponsored critical for success. A CV is a key element of an application
by the MAA Committee on Minority Participation in Math- submission, and is an opportunity to concisely showcase
ematics, AMS, and SIAM. your achievements and be shortlisted for an interview.
INGenIOuS: Workforce Preparation for Students in the Panelists Michael Bardzell, Salisbury University; Derrick
Mathematical Sciences, organized by John Bailer, Miami Stolee, Iowa State University; Steve Horton, United States
University; Jenna Carpenter, Louisiana Tech University, Wil- Military Academy; Robert Campbell, National Security
liam Jaco, Oklahoma State University, Peter Turner, Clark- Agency; and Glenn Lilly, National Security Agency, will
son University; and Paul Zorn, St. Olaf College; Wednesday, discuss the type of CV that makes a great first impression

October 2013 Notices of the AMS 1235


Meetings & Conferences

and grabs their attention. Sponsored by the Young Math- and universities host a day each year for local high school
ematicians' Network. students to visit campus, participate in math activities,
Undergraduate Internships and Research Experiences attend talks, compete in AMC or regional math competi-
for Undergraduates, organized by Thomas Wakefield, tions, listen to career opportunities in the mathematical
Youngstown State University, and Ralucca Gera, Naval sciences, and/or celebrate mathematics. These days not
Postgraduate School; Thursday, 9:00 a.m.–10:20 a.m. It only provide exposure to the physical university campus,
has become increasingly important for undergraduates which some students would never have had before, but
to participate in internship or research experiences dur- also introduce students to role models, beyond their
ing their time in college. Panelists Emily Kessler, Society teachers, for enjoying mathematics. Several colleges with
of Actuaries; Stephanie Edwards, Hope College; Krista established programs for Math Day-type events will share
Maxson, Shawnee State University, Saad El-Zanati, Illinois successful ideas and best practices. Sponsored by the MAA
State University; Leslie Hogben, Iowa State University; and Council on Outreach.
Cindy Wyels, California State University Channel Islands, Finding the Right Grant, organized by Josh Laison,
will discuss various options for undergraduates as they Willamette University, and Jacob White, Texas A&M Uni-
look to apply to REUs or internships. Sponsored by the versity; Thursday, 1:00 p.m.–2:20 p.m. Are you looking for
Young Mathematicians’ Network. a grant, and having trouble with the application process?
Introductory Proposal Writing Workshop for Grant The focus of this panel is on finding and applying for
Applications to the NSF Division of Undergraduate grants, whether they be for education, travel, or research.
Education, presented by John Haddock, Michael Jacob- Panelists Lloyd Douglas, University of North Carolina,
son, and Lee Zia, Division of Undergraduate Education, Greensboro; Florence Fasanelli, AAAS; Eric Gaze, Bowdoin
National Science Foundation; Thursday, 9:00 a.m.–10:55 College; and Frank Sottile, Texas A&M University, will
a.m. The presenters will describe the general NSF grant discuss the different funding sources, as well as how to
proposal process and consider particular details relevant make a great application, and to avoid common pitfalls.
to programs in the Division of Undergraduate Education. Sponsored by the Young Mathematicians’ Network
This workshop is geared towards those who have not College Board/MAA Mutual Concerns Panel on AP
submitted a proposal to NSF and are unfamiliar with the Calculus, Computer Science, and Statistics, organized
organization. If you believe you have an idea, project, or by Roxy Peck, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo; Thursday, 1:00
program worthy of federal support that will positively p.m.–2:20 p.m. Across the nation, educators are invest-
impact undergraduate education in mathematics you ing much time and effort to understand and improve
should attend this session. This workshop will provide students’ transition from high school to college. To help
information on the specific components of a NSF proposal, provide deeper context in these discussions, this panel
demonstrate the NSF peer review process, provide access will address Advanced Placement programs in the math-
to previously funded proposals and explicate the NSF ematical sciences. Panelists Don King, Northeastern Uni-
merit review criteria by which proposals are evaluated. versity; Paul Tymann, Rochester Institute of Technology;
Participants should leave this workshop with a draft of Bob Taylor, Clemson University; and Lien Diaz, College
a project summary. Attendance is limited to 50 persons; Board, will provide updates on the status of AP Calculus,
please sign up in advance on the JMM registration form. AP Statistics, and AP Computer Science and a report on
Sponsored by the National Science Foundation Division of a new computer science principles course that is under
Undergraduate Education. development. They will discuss the use of technology in AP
Mathematical Outreach Programs, organized by courses, curriculum alignment with college courses, exam
Elizabeth Yanik, Emporia State University; Thursday, development and scoring, gender and ethnic diversity in
9:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m. This poster session is designed to AP mathematical sciences courses, success rates, and ac-
highlight outreach programs that have been developed to cess to AP mathematical sciences courses. Sponsored by
encourage students to maintain and interest in mathemat- the College Board/MAA Committee on Mutual Concerns.
ics. These programs might include such activities as after YMN/Project NExT Poster Session, organized by Kim
school clubs, weekend activities, one-day conferences, Roth, Juniata College, and Mike Axtell, University of St.
mentoring opportunities, summer camps, etc. This poster Thomas; Thursday, 2:15 p.m.–4:15 p.m. We seek to pro-
session encompasses a wide variety of outreach efforts for vide an open venue for people who are near completion,
a variety of age groups. For example, projects supported or have finished their graduate studies in the last five
by MAA Tensor, SUMMA, and Dolciani grants would find years, to present their work and make connections with
this an ideal venue in which to share the results of their other same-stage professionals, in much the same spirit
work. We encourage everyone involved with offering as YMN and Project NExT. This poster session is intended
mathematical outreach activities to consider submitting to highlight the research activities, both mathematical
an abstract to the session organizer, Betsy Yanik, eyanik@ and pedagogical, of recent or future Master’s/Ph.D.s in
emporia.edu. Sponsored by the MAA Committee on the mathematics and related fields. Trifold posterboards
Participation of Women. measuring 48" wide by 36" high, plus glue, tape, tacks, etc.
Math Days for High School Students at Local Colleges will be available at the session to post your material to
and Universities, organized by Deanna Haunsperger, the posterboard. We expect to accept about forty posters
Carleton College, and Rebecca Swanson, Colorado School from different areas within the mathematical sciences. To
of Mines; Thursday, 10:35 a.m.–11:55 a.m. Some colleges apply, send a poster abstract, when and where you have

1236 Notices of the AMS Volume 60, Number 9


Meetings & Conferences

or will receive your Ph.D. or master’s degree, and your from around the world associated with Ramanujan's oeu-
current college or university affiliation to the organizers. vre. Shot at various locations in India and Cambridge, it
Applicants should send a poster abstract to one of the serves as a pilgrimage for those interested in the legend
organizers, Kim Roth (roth@juniata.edu) or Mike Axtell and legacy of the great Indian mathematician. The film
(axte2004@stthomas.edu). also highlights the trajectory of Ramanujan's seminal
Directing Undergraduate Research: How to Get work and its relevance today. Cosponsored by the MAA
Started, organized by Herbert Medina, Loyola Marymount and AMS.
University, and Rebecca Garcia, Sam Houston State Uni- Advanced Proposal Writing Workshop for Grant Appli-
versity; Thursday, 2:35 p.m.–3:55 p.m. The number of un- cations to the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education,
dergraduates engaging in mathematical sciences research organized by John Haddock, Michael Jacobson, and Lee
has increased dramatically the past few years. Indicators Zia, Division of Undergraduate Education, National Science
of this growth are the size of the undergraduate poster Foundation; Friday, 9:00 a.m.–10:55 a.m. This workshop
session at the Joint Mathematics Meetings (e.g., over 300 is geared towards people who have previously submitted
posters at the 2013 meeting), the number of mathemat- a proposal to NSF for funding and intend to do so again.
ics Research Experience for Undergraduates (at least 65), Participants are expected to register in advance and bring
and the recent creation of journals devoted to mathemat- a one-page summary of a particular proposal they are
ics research done by undergraduates (e.g., Involve at UC intending to submit to NSF’s Division of Undergraduate
Berkeley). This success is in contradiction to the view held Education in the near future. All participants will have an
by some today and many in the past that “undergradu- opportunity to verbally present a one-minute summary
ates cannot do mathematics research because there is so of their proposed project and receive written and verbal
much background needed to understand and successfully feedback on it in the presence of NSF program officers.
tackle a problem.” A discussion of the current Transforming Undergradu-
Many mathematics faculty, some motivated by the ate Education in STEM (TUES) solicitation and changes
success of colleagues with undergraduate research, want to the NSF merit review criteria will occur. Attendance is
to begin their own undergraduate research program, but limited to 25 persons; please sign up in advance on the
are hesitant, because they are unsure how to get started. JMM registration form. Sponsored by the National Science
i.e., how to find/choose tractable problems, how to re- Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education.
cruit students, how to get funding or release time for Maximizing Your Impact in the Classroom: Case Stud-
the endeavor, how to guide students towards a solution ies in Best Practices for Classroom Teaching, organized
without solving the problem for them, etc. Panelists Mi- by Martha Abell, Georgia Southern University; Brigitte
chael Dorff, Brigham Young University; Joyati Debnath, Lahme, Sonoma State University; Michael Oehrtman, Uni-
Winona State University; Angel Pineda, California State versity of Northern Colorado; and Karen Rhea, University
University, Fullerton; and Sandy Ganzell, St. Mary's Col- of Michigan; Friday, 9:00 a.m.–10:20 a.m. The goal of the
lege of Maryland, all having enjoyed success in directing panel discussion is to address the importance of faculty
undergraduate research, will address these questions involvement in student learning while acknowledging the
and provide concrete advice on how to get started with changing times we face in education today. Panelists Lew
directing undergraduate research. Sponsored by the MAA Ludwig, Denison University; Stan Yoshinobu, California
Subcommittee on Research by Undergraduates State University, and Michelle Zandieh, Arizona State Uni-
Collaborations Between Two-Year and Four-Year versity, will present case studies in best practices in the
Institutions that Create Pathways to a Math Major, use of inquiry-based learning, active learning, and flipped
organized by Elizabeth Teles, National Science Founda- classrooms. In addition, they will share their experiences
tion, and Judy Ackerman, Montgomery College Rockville, and provide guidance to audience members in making
Thursday, 2:35 p.m.–3:55 p.m. As more students start their the most of lecture/class time. The panel discussion also
college education at two-year colleges prior to transfer- serves as an introduction to materials included in the
ing to a four-year program, it is increasingly important Pedagogy Guide being developed by the CTUM. Sponsored
for two-year and four-year mathematics departments to by the MAA Committee on the Teaching of Undergraduate
collaborate to create student pathways to the mathemat- Mathematics.
ics major and for alignment of credit courses. Successful Nonacademic Career Paths for Mathematicians, or-
models that attract and retain community college transfer ganized by Jennifer Bergner, Salisbury University; Lisa
students in the major will be explored by panelists Debra Marano, West Chester University; Phil Gustafson, Colo-
Poese, Montgomery College; Nancy Sattler, Terra State rado Mesa University; and Ben Galluzzo, Shippensburg
Community College; and Eric Kostelich, Arizona State University; Friday, 9:00 a.m.–10:20 a.m. You’re about to
University. Sponsored by MAA Committee on Two Year earn a degree in mathematics, now what? You may be
Colleges. surprised to know that teaching isn’t your only option; in
The Genius of Srinivasa Ramanujan, Thursday, 6:00 the “real world” mathematical knowledge is a valued com-
p.m.–7:10 p.m. The Prime Minister of India declared 2012 modity and there are many interesting job opportunities
the "National Year of Mathematics" to commemorate the for mathematicians in nonacademic settings. So, whether
125th anniversary of the birth of Srinivasa Ramanujan. you are a mathematics student looking for a job once you
To honor the occasion, Nandan Kudhyadi produced this graduate or an advisor looking for advice to give to future
docudrama. The film features well-known number theorists job-seeking students, this session will help you gain new

October 2013 Notices of the AMS 1237


Meetings & Conferences

perspectives on nonacademic career experiences and what Colorado State University, will discuss the design of such a
employers value in their employees. Panelists Greg Cox- course, consider issues related to teaching the course, and
son, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory; Jim Fife, Educational describe its implementation in a mathematics program.
Testing Service; Carla Martin, U.S. Government; and Such courses were originally developed for teachers at
Katie Ford, NASA Wallops, will share their paths to their the Park City Mathematics Institute but are applicable for
current positions and offer advice to others looking for undergraduate majors, prospective teachers, or as part of
employment in similar venues. The panel discussion will continuing education programs for experienced teachers.
be relevant to all students, but there will be more empha- Discussion will be framed by asking what the mathemati-
sis on undergraduates than graduates. Sponsored by the cal goals of such a course might be, how these goals could
MAA Committee on Undergraduate Student Activities and contribute to a better student understanding of what it
Chapters and BIG SIGMAA. means to do mathematics, and how such courses might be
MAA Session for Chairs: Planning for the Future with part of the offerings in a typical math department.
New Curriculum Guides, organized by Catherine Murphy, The Changing Face of Calculus at the University
Purdue University Calumet, and Daniel Maki, Indiana Level, organized by David M. Bressoud, Macalester Col-
University Bloomington; Friday, 1:00 p.m.–2:20 p.m. The lege; Friday, 2:35 p.m.—3:55 p.m. More than half the
soon to be released CUPM Curriculum Guide, the recent students who take mainstream Calculus I in college have
METS II, and the ASA guide for the statistics education already passed such a course in high school. At research
of teachers are useful planning tools. A distinguished universities, the proportion is over 70%. This is forcing
panel of authors of these documents, including Martha us to rethink what and how we teach in college calculus.
Siegel, Towson University; William McCallum, University Panelists Larissa Schroeder, University of Hartford; An-
of Arizona; and Christine Franklin, University of Georgia, gela Kubena, University of Michigan; Elgin Johnston, Iowa
will speak to their recommendations and discuss with at- State University; and Mariah Birgen, Wartburg College,
tendees possible implementation strategies. This is a great will discuss how different institutions are approaching
opportunity for Chairs to ask questions of experts as well the restructuring of calculus. Cosponsored by the College
as to give and receive advice from our peers.
Board and the MAA Committee on Mutual Concerns.
Interactive Dynamic Technology: Its Role in Teach-
Promoting Post-Secondary Mathematics Education,
ing and Learning Calculus, organized by Gail Burrill,
organized by Eric M. Friedlander, University of Southern
Michigan State University; Friday, 1:00 p.m.–2:20 p.m. Too
California, Mark L. Green, University of California, Los
often calculus courses engage students in procedures to
Angeles, and Phillip A. Griffiths, Institute for Advanced
the detriment of understanding. Carefully designed, pur-
Study; Friday, 4:15 p.m.–6:00 p.m. Leaders from outside
poseful activities using interactive dynamic technology
the academic community of mathematical scientists,
can make a difference by helping students as they contend
including representatives of other math-intensive and
with fundamental calculus concepts. The panelists will
interdisciplinary subjects, government, industry, and
discuss how such technology can help students develop
other employers, will participate in a discussion of the
key understandings, identify areas in which students need
challenges and prospects for systemic change in post-
more practice in order to succeed in Advanced Placement
Calculus, discuss the issues this raises for designing and secondary mathematics education. This discussion should
scoring AP Tests, and consider what interactive dynamic promote substantial, constructive responses to achieve
links can bring to online texts. Panelists Tom Dick, Oregon goals which include: 1) creating and disseminating course
State University; Wade Ellis, West Valley Community Col- content to meet the needs of today’s students, especially
lege; Steven Kokoska, Bloomsburg University; and Gail by emphasizing the roles that mathematics plays in the
Burrill, Michigan State University, will focus on interac- modern world; 2) strengthening the pipeline for prospec-
tive dynamic technology but will also include a broader tive STEM graduates; 3) developing, adapting, and evalu-
perspective on technologies available for use in teaching. ating new teaching methodologies. Cosponsored by the
Questions for the audience will include what they see as MAA, AMS, and SIAM.
barriers to the use of interactive dynamic technologies, Poetry Reading, organized by Gizem Karaali, Pomona
what might be done to overcome these barriers, and sug- College; Mark Huber, Claremont McKenna College; and
gestions for other ways or uses of any types of technol- JoAnne Growney, poetrywithmathematics.blogspot.
ogy that have been effective in promoting better student com; Friday, 4:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m. All mathematical poets
learning. and those interested in mathematical poetry are invited.
Designing and Implementing a Problem Based Math- Share your poetry or simply enjoy the company of like-
ematics Course, organized by Gail Burrill, Michigan State minded poetic-math people! The reading is sponsored by
University; Friday, 2:35 p.m.–3:50 p.m. A problem based the Journal of Humanistic Mathematics (scholarship.
math course, where students spend most of the time in claremont.edu/jhm). Though we do not discourage last-
an interactive, collaborative environment, working on minute decisions to participate, we invite and encourage
problems connecting various mathematical domains, can poets to submit poetry (≤ 3 poems, ≤ 5 minutes) and a
simultaneously engage a broad range of students and biography in advance, and, as a result, be listed on our
enlarge their understanding of what it means to do math. printed program. Inquiries and submissions may be made
Panelists Darryl Yong, Harvey Mudd College; Bowen Ker- to Gizem Karaali (gizem.karaali@pomona.edu) no later
ins, Educational Development Center; and Mary Pilgrim, than November 30, 2013.

1238 Notices of the AMS Volume 60, Number 9


Meetings & Conferences

Actuarial Science Education Session for Faculty, orga- of mathematicians in each. The projects are varied and
nized by Kevin Charlwood, Washburn University; Bettye will highlight collaborations between mathematicians and
Anne Case, Florida State University; Robert Buck, Slippery teachers, the use of classroom video in teaching math-
Rock University; Steve Paris, Florida State University; and ematics, the development of mathematics tasks via the
Patrick Brewer, Lebanon Valley College; Friday, 5:00 p.m. Illustrative Mathematics Project, and the use of resources
–7:00 p.m. The pace of change in actuarial science is faster developed by the National Council of Teachers of Mathe-
than in most academic areas, and this session aims to help matics. Panelists Sybilla Beckmann, University of Georgia;
faculty adjust curriculum and activities to meet student Sid Rachlin, East Carolina University; Alison Superfine,
needs and expectations. CUPM has a Program Area Study University of Illinois Chicago; Kristin Umland, University
Group concentrating on undergraduate programs in actu- of New Mexico; and Rose Mary Zbiek, Pennsylvania State
arial science. Their progress may be a topic for discussion. University, will provide opportunities for discussion about
The next anticipated changes in the CAS and SOA exam how mathematicians can engage in the implementation of
series will also be discussed by panelists Patrick Brewer, CCSSM. Sponsored by the MAA Committee on the Math-
Lebanon Valley College; Jim Daniel, University of Texas at ematical Education of Teachers.
Austin; and Michelle Guan, Indiana University Northwest. The Environment, Mathematics, and Community
Mathematically Bent Theater, by Colin Adams and the Engagement, organized by Ben Fusaro, Florida State
Mobiusbandaid Players; Friday, 7:30 p.m.–8:30 p.m. Why University; Charlie Hadlock, Bentley University; and
is it that math and humor are considered synonymous? Marty Walter, University of Colorado Boulder; Saturday,
Why do students laugh maniacally when they see their 2:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m. We have an opportunity—and an
score on the calculus final? How did the Bernoulli Broth- obligation—to show how mathematics can help avert an
ers bring down the house in their first comedy appear- environmental-sustainability cliff. The three presenters
ance? Who came up with the word "functor"? These are (collectively) have been doing their part for over 35 years,
just a few of the questions we will not answer in this working at every level—local to international—to sound
presentation of several short mathematically inclined, the alarm about environmental challenges. Presentations
humorous performances. in public forums typically use simple mathematics. A
Two Worlds Collide: MOOCs and the Ivory Tower, or- critical aspect is the format and tone of the presentation.
ganized by John Travis, Mississippi College, and Martha
Consulting in industry is similar but uses more complex
Siegel, Towson University; Saturday, 8:30 a.m.–9:50 a.m.
mathematics. This is an opportunity to conserve, or even
Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have begun to stir
increase, the momentum generated by Mathematics for
up the academic playing field and force institutions to
Planet Earth 2013 at the San Diego JMM. It is also an op-
consider their impact on the usual collection of university
portunity to showcase how we can simplify, clarify, or
course offerings. As students continue to discover MOOCs,
solve environmental problems. This workshop will be a
the broader academic world should consider whether to
We-have-done-it, You-can-do-it, This–is-how activity.
embrace, eschew, or just endure them. The efficacy of
If you would like to participate, please contact Ben
such courses in mathematics and their impact on learning
Fusaro by email at fusaro@math.fsu.edu or call him at
are currently unknown. This event will attempt to inform
850- 297-2052. Sponsored by the SIGMAA on Mathematics
participants on the variety of available MOOCs and start
and the Environment.
a dialogue among all stakeholders.
The panel will include pioneers in MOOC development
for mathematics to discuss how MOOCs have been used Special Interest Groups of the MAA (SIGMAAs)
and how these courses can successfully encourage the
cognitive skills unique to mathematics. Keith Devlin, Stan- SIGMAAs will be hosting a number of activities, ses-
ford University; Robert Ghrist, University of Pennsylvania; sions, and guest lectures. There are currently twelve such
Michael Starbird, University of Texas Austin; and Marilyn focus groups in the MAA offering members opportuni-
Carlson, Arizona State University, will discuss their views ties to interact, not only at meetings, but throughout the
on the potential for MOOCs to promote effective teaching year, via newsletters and email-based communications.
and learning and the contribution of technology and so- For more information visit www.maa.org/community/
cial media to enhance student understanding. Sponsored sigmaas/.
by the MAA Committee on Technologies in Mathematics
Education (CTME), MAA Committee on the Undergraduate SIGMAA Officers Meeting, Thursday, 10:30 a.m.–noon,
Program in Mathematics (CUPM), and WebSIGMAA. chaired by Karen A. Marrongelle, Portland State Univer-
Mathematicians Supporting Implementation of the sity.
Common Core State Standards for Mathematics, orga-
nized by Elizabeth Burroughs, Montana State University; Mathematics and the Arts: SIGMAA ARTS
Pari Ford, University of Nebraska at Kearney; and Debbie At the Intersection of Mathematics and the Arts,
Gochenaur, Shippensburg University; Saturday, 1:00 p.m.– Thursday afternoon (See MAA Contributed Paper Sessions)
2:20 p.m. Mathematicians have been active in projects that
support state-level implementation of the Common Core Mathematical and Computational Biology: BIO SIGMAA
State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM). This panel will Reception, Thursday, 6:00 p.m.– 6:30 p.m.
offer examples of such projects and highlight the roles Business Meeting, Thursday, 6:30 p.m.–6:50 p.m.

October 2013 Notices of the AMS 1239


Meetings & Conferences

Guest Lecture, Thursday, 7:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m., Lisa Business Meeting and Reception, Friday, 5:00 p.m.–
Fauci, Tulane University, Explorations in phytoplankton 5:30 p.m.
fluid dynamics. Guest Lecture, Friday, 5:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m., Doug Ens-
Trends in Undergraduate Mathematical Biology ley, Shippensburg University, Mobile math apps.
Education; Friday morning (see MAA Contributed Paper Using Online Resources to Augment the Traditional
Sessions) Classroom, Friday morning (see MAA Contributed Paper
Sessions)
Mathematicians in Business, Industry and Government: Two Worlds Collide: MOOCs and the Ivory Tower,
BIG SIGMAA Saturday morning (see MAA Panels et al.)
Mathematics Experiences in Business, Industry, and
Government; Friday afternoon (see MAA Contributed Environmental Mathematics: SIGMAA EM
Paper Sessions) The Environment, Mathematics, and Community
Guest Lecture, Friday, 6:30 p.m.–7:20 p.m., William Engagement, Saturday afternoon (See MAA Panels et al.)
Noel, University of Pennsylvania, on Eureka! The Archi- USE Math: Undergraduate Sustainability Experiences
medes Palimpsest. in the Introductory Mathematics Classroom, Saturday
Reception, Friday, 7:30 p.m.–8:00 p.m. morning (See MAA Contributed Paper Sessions)
Business Meeting, Friday, 8:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.
MAA Sessions for Students
Nonacademic Career Paths for Mathematicians, Fri-
day, 9:00 a.m.–10:20 a.m. (See MAA Panels, et al.) Grad School Fair, Friday, 8:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m. Here is
the opportunity for undergrads to meet representatives
History of Mathematics: HOM SIGMAA from mathematical sciences graduate programs from
Reading, Writing and Doing the History of Mathemat- universities all over the country. January is a great time
ics: Learning the Methods of Historical Research, Monday for juniors to learn more, and college seniors may still be
and Tuesday (See MAA Short Course) able to refine their search. This is your chance for one-stop
shopping in the graduate school market. At last year’s
The History of Mathematical Communities, Thursday
meeting about 300 students met with representatives
afternoon (see MAA Contributed Paper Sessions)
from 50 graduate programs. If your school has a graduate
Putting a Theme in a History of Mathematics Course,
program and you are interested in participating, a table
Saturday morning (see MAA Contributed Paper Sessions)
will be provided for your posters and printed materials for
US$75 (registration for this event must be made by a per-
Philosophy of Mathematics: POM SIGMAA
son already registered for the JMM), and you are welcome
Is Mathematics the Language of Science?, Wednesday
to personally speak to interested students. Complimentary
morning (See MAA Contributed Paper Sessions)
coffee will be served. Cosponsored by the MAA and AMS.
Reception, Thursday, 5:30 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
MAA Lecture for Students, Friday, 1:00 p.m.–1:50 p.m.,
Business Meeting, Thursday, 6:00 p.m.– 6:30 p.m.
will be given by Carl Cowen, Indiana University–Purdue
Guest Lecture, Thursday, 6:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m., Steve
University Indianapolis, on An unexpected group.
Gimbel, Gettysburg College, Hermann Minkowski: The Student Poster Session, organized by Joyati Debnath,
quiet genius. Winona State University; Friday, 4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. The ses-
sion is reserved for undergraduate and first-year graduate
Quantitative Literacy: SIGMAA QL students submitting posters on work done while an under-
Assessing Quantitative Reasoning and Literacy. graduate. Appropriate poster topics include: a new result,
Wednesday morning (See MAA Contributed Paper Ses- a new proof of a known result, a new mathematical model,
sions) an innovative solution to a Putnam problem, or a method
Reception and Business Meeting, Thursday, 6:00 of solution for an applied problem. Purely expository
p.m.–7:00 p.m. topics are not appropriate for this session. The proposal
Guest Lecture, Thursday, 7:00 p.m.–7:50 p.m., speaker submission deadline is midnight Pacific Daylight Time,
and title to be announced. October 11. Notification of acceptance or rejection will
be sent by November 1, 2013. See http://www.maa.org/
Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education: programs/students/undergraduate-research/
SIGMAA RUME jmm-poster-session.html for further details and
Research on the Teaching and Learning of Under- a link to the abstracts submission form. See http://
graduate Mathematics, Thursday morning and afternoon www.maa.org/sites/default/files/pdf/students/
(See MAA Contributed Paper Sessions) writing%20Abstracts.pdf for “A Guide to Writing an
Abstract”. Posters will be judged during the session and
Statistics Education: SIGMAA STAT-ED award certificates will be mailed to presenters with the
Data, Modeling, and Computing in the Introductory highest scores. Trifold, self-standing 48" by 36" tabletop
Statistics Course, Friday afternoon (See MAA Contributed poster boards will be provided, plus tape, glue, tacks,
Paper Sessions) etc. for attaching your material to the posterboard. See
http://www.ncsu.edu/project/posters/for “Creating
Mathematics Instruction Using the Web: WEB SIGMAA an Effective Poster”. Additional materials and equipment

1240 Notices of the AMS Volume 60, Number 9


Meetings & Conferences

are the responsibility of the presenters. Participants must of historical writings and results. We will conclude our
be available between 2:30 and 5:30 p.m. for the session course with a panel discussion by all of our experts to
(2:30-3:30 set-up, 3:30-4:30 judges only, 4:30-5:30 judges discuss how to implement these ideas into the mathemat-
and public viewing). Questions regarding this session ics classroom and the pedagogical implications of correct
should be directed to Joyati Debnath at jdebnath@ historical study. The speakers are all established and
winona.edu. respected math historians who will share their particular
expertise (please note that some talk titles are tentative):
Some more advanced students might be interested in Ron Calinger, Catholic University of America, The contex-
these sessions listed elsewhere in this announcement: tualization of history ; Joe Dauben, Lehman College, CUNY,
Career Options for Undergraduate Mathematics Majors, Cultural bias and translations; Michael Fried, Ben Gurion
Wednesday at 2:15 p.m.; What Experiences Matter On Your University of the Negev, Israel, Our relationship to history:
Resumé?, Wednesday at 3:50 p.m.; Undergraduate Intern- Who does history ; Colin McKinney, Wabash College, Read-
ships and Research Experiences for Undergraduates, ing and translating without bias. The case of Euclid ; Karen
Thursday at 9:00 a.m.; YMN/Project NExT Poster Session, Parshall, University of Virginia, The reading and writing
Thursday at 2:15 p.m.; Nonacademic Career Path for of history ; and Fred Rickey, USMA, Historical documents
Mathematicians, Friday at 9:00 a.m. See the full descrip- and sources and implications to pedagogy.
tions in the “MAA Panels…” section. You may also be There are separate registration fees to participate in
interested in the AMS-MAA-SIAM Special Session on Re- this Short Course. See the fee schedule on the registration
search in Mathematics by Undergraduates and Students form at the back of this issue or visit jointmathematics
in Post-Baccalaureate Programs on Wednesday morning meetings.org/2160_regfees.html.
and afternoon, Friday morning, and Saturday afternoon,
listed in the “AMS Special Sessions” section. Other MAA Events
Also see the “Social Events” section for the open hours Board of Governors, Tuesday, 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
of the Student Hospitality Center, Reception for Under- Department Liaisons Meeting, Wednesday, 9:30 a.m.–
graduates, and Reception for Graduate Students and 11:00 a.m.
First-Time Participants. Section Officers, chaired by Rick Gillman, Valparaiso
University; Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.
MAA Short Course Business Meeting, Saturday, 11:10 a.m.–11:40 a.m.,
This two-day Short Course on Reading, Writing and chaired by MAA President Robert Devaney, Boston Uni-
Doing the History of Mathematics: Learning the Meth- versity.
ods of Historical Research is organized by Amy Shell- Minority Chairs Meeting, day and time to be deter-
Gellasch, Montgomery College. Browse the mathematics mined.
section of your favorite book store or catalog and you will See the listings for various receptions in the “Social
have noticed that over the past few decades, the offerings Events” section.
in the history of mathematics and its uses in teaching have
skyrocketed. The history of mathematics has become an MAA Ancillary Workshops
important component of the study of mathematics. More To register for either of the workshops described below,
and more mathematicians are choosing to delve into the please visit www.causeweb.org/workshop. There is no
history of mathematics, either as a hobby or as a serious registration fee, however, participants must register in ad-
pursuit. Likewise, more and more schools are offering vance; no walk-ins will be allowed. Registration for the JMM
history of mathematics courses, and many states are now is not a prerequisite for participating in these sessions.
requiring it of their math education majors. Perhaps you Interactive Probability Instruction, presented by Den-
have a growing interest in the field, simply as a consumer nis Pearl, The Ohio State University, Kyle Siegrist, Univer-
or perhaps you are a budding historian yourself. Or per- sity of Alabama, and Ivo Dinov, University of California
haps you are finding yourself using it in your teaching Los Angeles; Tuesday, 1:00 p.m.–4:30 p.m. This half-day
more and more. But just as the study of mathematics has workshop will introduce participants to novel web-based
rigorous methods that cannot be ignored without peril, technologies for blended teaching of computational sta-
so does historical study. tistics and applied probability theory. Specifically, 50% of
This Short Course will introduce participants to the the time will be dedicated to training using the Probability
methods of correct historical research in mathematics, Distributome webapps (www.Distributome.org), 25% for
as well as the theory and philosophy underlying accurate demonstrating the classroom use of the Virtual Labora-
and unbiased historical research, analysis and reporting. tories in Probability and Statistics (www.math.uah.edu/
We will address the following areas: Theories of history, stat), and 25% for exploratory data analysis using the Sta-
cultural and temporal context, reading historical sources tistics Online Computational Resource (www.SOCR.ucla.
and translating, writing the history of mathematics, his- edu). Participants should bring a laptop to this workshop
tory compared to historiography, historical sources, and to take part in hands-on demonstrations illustrating data
implications to pedagogy. modeling, exploring of properties of probability distribu-
The course will consist of lectures by prominent his- tions and interdistributional relationships, resampling and
torians, followed by participant workshops in which the simulation, dynamic data plots, and model fitting. These
participants will examine, analyze, and discuss examples topics and techniques are suitable for introductory and

October 2013 Notices of the AMS 1241


Meetings & Conferences

cross-listed applied probability and statistical methods p.m.–3:40 p.m. The goal of the discussion will be to dis-
courses. The workshop is designed to be accessible to cuss ways in which mathematicians can develop a serious
those with little or no computational background, and will research program at any institution. We hope to provide
provide you with skills, examples, and resources that you information that will be useful to department chairs who
can use in your own teaching. wish to support their faculty as well as providing insights
Teaching the Statistical Investigation Process with and encouragement directly to the young mathematicians
Randomization-Based Inference, presented by Nathan themselves. All panelists, including Ruth Charney, Brandeis
Tintle, Dordt College, Tuesday, 9:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m. This University; Joan Hutchinson, Macalester College; Smith Col-
full day workshop is intended for faculty members who lege emerita; Deleram Kahrobaei, City University of New
have experience with or soon will be teaching introduc- York Graduate City and NYC College of Technology; Tanya
tory statistics. The goals of this workshop are to help Leise, Amherst College; Chikako Mese, John Hopkins Uni-
participants to revise their introductory statistics course versity; and Judy Walker, University of Nebraska, are math-
in two ways: 1) Using randomization-based methods, as ematicians with highly successful research careers who have
opposed to methods based on the normal distribution, to worked in a wide range of mathematics departments over
introduce concepts of statistical inference, and 2) Empha- the years. See sites.google.com/site/awmpanel2014/
sizing the overarching process of conducting statistical for the latest information.
investigations, from formulating a question and collecting Business Meeting, Wednesday, 3:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.
data through exploring data and drawing inferences to Workshop Poster Presentations and Reception, Friday,
communicating results, throughout the course. 6:00 p.m.–7:15 p.m. With funding from the National Science
The workshop will provide direct experience with Foundation, AWM will conduct its workshop poster presen-
hands-on activities designed to introduce students to tations by women graduate students. Organizers for these
fundamental concepts of inference using randomization- presentations are Maria Basterra, University of New Hamp-
based methods. The learning activities involve using freely shire; Erin Chambers, Saint Louis University; and Kathryn
available applets to explore concepts and analyze real data Leonard, California State University Channel Islands.
from genuine research studies. Presenters will also offer AWM Workshop, Saturday, 8:00 a.m.–5:50 p.m. With
implementation and assessment suggestions during these funding from the National Science Foundation, AWM will
activity-based sessions and discussion sessions. More conduct its workshop with presentations by senior and ju-
information about the project on which this workshop is nior women researchers. All mathematicians (female and
based can be found at www.math.hope.edu/isi. male) are invited to attend the entire program. Departments
are urged to help graduate students and recent Ph.D.’s who
Activities of Other Organizations do not receive funding to obtain some institutional support
to attend the workshop and other meeting sessions. Up-
This section includes scientific sessions. Several organi- dated information about the workshop is available at www.
zations or special groups are having receptions or other awm-math.org/workshops.html. AWM seeks volunteers
social events. Please see the “Social Events” section of this to serve as mentors for workshop participants. If you are
announcement for details. interested, please contact the AWM office; inquiries regard-
ing future workshops may be made to the office at awm@
Association for Symbolic Logic (ASL) awm-math.org.
This-two day program on Friday and Saturday will include Reception, Wednesday, 9:30 p.m.–11:00 p.m. See the
sessions of contributed papers as well as Invited Ad- listing in the “Social Events,” section of the announcement.
dresses by Jeremy Avigad, Carnegie Mellon University;
Damir Dzhafarov, University of Connecticut; Su Gao, National Association of Mathematicians (NAM)
University of North Texas; Joel Hamkins, City University Granville-Brown-Haynes Session of Presentations by Re-
of New York; Maryanthe Malliaris, University of Chicago; cent Doctoral Recipients in the Mathematical Sciences,
and Alice Medvedev, City College of New York. Friday, 1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
See also the session cosponsored by the ASL, Logic Cox-Talbot Address, to be given Friday after the ban-
and Probability, on Wednesday and Thursday in the “AMS quet, speaker and title to be announced.
Special Sessions” listings. Panel Discussion, Saturday, 9:00 a.m.-9:50 a.m., title
to be announced.
Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM) Business Meeting, Saturday, 10:00 a.m.-10:50 a.m.
Thirty-Fifth Annual Noether Lecture, Thursday, 10:05 Claytor-Woodward Lecture, Saturday, 1:00 p.m.,
a.m., will be given by Georgia Benkart, University of speaker and title to be announced.
Wisconsin-Madison, on Walking on graphs the representa- See details about the banquet on Friday in the “Social
tion theory way. Events” section.
Also see the session on Geometric Applications of
Algebraic Combinatorics, jointly sponsored by the AWM, National Science Foundation (NSF)
in the “AMS Special Sessions” listings. The NSF will be represented at a booth in the exhibit
Building a Research Career in Mathematics, organized area. NSF staff members will be available to provide
by Bettye Anne Case, Florida State University, and Christina counsel and information on NSF programs of interest to
Sormani, City University of New York; Wednesday, 2:15 mathematicians. The booth is open the same days and

1242 Notices of the AMS Volume 60, Number 9


Meetings & Conferences

hours as the exhibits. Times that staff will be available Summer Program for Women in Mathematics (SPWM)
will be posted at the booth. Reunion, organized by Murli M. Gupta, George Washing-
ton University, Thursday, 1:00 p.m.– 4:00 p.m. This is a
Pi Mu Epsilon (PME) reunion of the summer program participants from our past
Council Meeting, Friday, 8:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m. 19 years who are in various states in their mathematical
careers: some are students (undergraduate or graduate),
Rocky Mountain Mathematics Consortium others are in various jobs, both in academia as well as gov-
(RMMC) ernment and industry. The participants will describe their
Board of Directors Meeting, Friday, 2:15 p.m.–4:10 p.m. experiences relating to all aspects of their careers, and a
few will give talks on the research areas they are explor-
Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics
ing. There will also be a presentation on the increasing
(SIAM)
participation of women in mathematics over the past two
This program consists of an Invited Address at 11:10 a.m. decades and the impact of SPWM and similar programs.
on Thursday given by Eitan Tadmor, University of Mary- See http://www.gwu.edu/~spwm.
land, and a series of Minisymposia to include Modeling Negotiating in Mathematical Careers, organized by Ja-
Modules and Activities for Students, Suzranne Lenhart, net Best, Ohio State University; Christine Guenther, Pacific
University of Tennesee, Knoxville; Maeve McCarthy,
University; and Amber Puha, California State University
Murray State University; Peter Turner, Clarkson Univer-
San Marcos; Thursday, 1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m. Panelists Rach-
sity; and others to be announced.
elle De Coste, Lehman College; Peter March, Ohio State
See also these special presentations cosponsored by
University; Tanya Moore, Building Diversity in Science;
SIAM in the AMS or MAA listings: Access and Opportu-
and Catherine Roberts, College of the Holy Cross, will ad-
nities in STEM Education: The Challenges of Building
dress how to negotiate successfully throughout a career
an Equitable Diverse Society (Wednesday at 9:30 a.m.);
in academia or industry, from making the most of a first
INGenIOuS: Workforce Preparation for Students in the
Mathematical Sciences (Wednesday at 2:15 p.m.); and job offer to maximizing post-promotion opportunities.
Promoting Post-Secondary Mathematics Education (Fri- Strategic career negotiation is of particular relevance to
day at 4:15 p.m.). women, who in part because of a reluctance to negotiate
earn less than their male counterparts. The panel will
Young Mathematicians' Network (YMN) cover specific issues to negotiate and strategies for doing
Open Forum, organized by Jacob White, Texas A&M so. Sponsored by the Joint Committee on Women in the
University and Timothy Goldberg, Lenoir-Rhyne University; Mathematical Sciences.
Thursday, 7:30 p.m.–8:30 p.m. All meeting participants, es- Pure and Applied Talks by Women Math Warriors
pecially undergraduates and graduate students, and early presented by EDGE (Enhancing Diversity in Graduate
career mathematicians are invited to discuss topics and Education), organized by Amy Buchmann, University of
issues affecting early career mathematicians. Notre Dame; and Candice Price, United States Military
Also see details about other sessions cosponsored by Academy, West Point; Saturday, 1:00 p.m.– 5:00 p.m. Since
the YMN in the MAA Panels, etc. section: Project NExT- its beginning in 1998 nearly two hundred women have
YMN Poster Session, Thursday, 2:15 p.m.; Career Options participated in the EDGE program. Approximately seventy
for Undergraduate Mathematics Majors, Wednesday, are currently working towards a Ph.D., over one hundred
2:15 p.m.; What Experiences Matter on Your Resumé?, have earned Master’s, and fifty-four have gone on to suc-
Wednesday, 3:50 p.m.; Undergraduate Internships and cessfully complete Ph.D’s. This session will be comprised
Research Experiences for Undergraduates, Thursday, of research talks in a variety of different subdisciplines
9:00 a.m.; and Finding the Right Grant, Thursday, 1:00 given by women involved with the EDGE program. For
p.m. more information on the EDGE program see www.edge
forwomen.org/.
Others
Mathematical Art Exhibition, organized by Robert
Fathauer, Tessellations Company; Nathaniel A. Friedman,
ISAMA and SUNY Albany, Anne Burns, Long Island Univer-
Social Events
sity C. W. Post Campus, Reza Sarhangi, Towson University, All events listed are open to all registered participants.
and Nathan Selikoff, Digital Awakening Studios. A popular It is strongly recommended that for any event requiring
feature at the Joint Mathematics Meetings, this exhibition a ticket, tickets should be purchased through advance
provides a break in your day. On display are works in registration. Only a very limited number of tickets, if any,
various media by artists who are inspired by mathemat- will be available for sale on site. If you must cancel your
ics and by mathematicians who use visual art to express participation in a ticketed event, you may request a 50%
their findings. Topology, fractals, polyhedra, and tiling refund by returning your tickets to the Mathematics Meet-
are some of the ideas at play here. Don’t miss this unique ings Service Bureau (MMSB) by January 7. After that date
opportunity for a different perspective on mathematics. no refunds can be made. Special meals are available at
The exhibition will be located inside the Joint Mathematics banquets upon advance request, but this must be indicated
Exhibits and open during the same exhibit hours. on the Advanced Registration/Housing Form.

October 2013 Notices of the AMS 1243


Meetings & Conferences

AMS Dinner Celebrating Connection & Collaboration: MAA Two-Year College Reception, Thursday, 5:45
Attend the AMS Dinner and celebrate your connections p.m.–7:00 p.m., is open to all meeting participants, particu-
to collaborators, old friends, and the mathematical com- larly two-year faculty members. This is a great opportunity
munity. This event provides an excellent opportunity to to meet old friends and make some new ones. There will
socialize with colleagues and reflect on the past while be hot and cold refreshments and a cash bar. This recep-
taking a look at new and exciting developments. AMS mem- tion is sponsored by Pearson.
bers present at the dinner will be honored for 25+ years Mathematical Reviews Reception, Friday, 6:00 p.m.–
of membership and the longest-term member present will 7:00 p.m. All friends of the Mathematical Reviews (MR) are
receive a special award. This evening of celebration will invited to join reviewers and MR editors and staff (past and
include gourmet food stations and a special program. It present) for a reception in honor of all of the efforts that
will be held on Saturday evening with dinner served at go into the creation and publication of the Mathematical
7:30 pm. Tickets are US$62 including tax and gratuity. Reviews database. Refreshments will be served.
The banquet will be preceded by a reception at 6:30 pm. Mathematical Institutes Open House, Wednesday, 5:30
Association of Christians in the Mathematical Sci- p.m.–8:00 p.m. Participants are warmly invited to attend
ences (ACMS) Reception and Guest Lecture, Thursday, this open house which is co-sponsored by several of the
5:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m. The reception will take place between mathematical science institutes in North America. This re-
5:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. and will be followed by a talk at ception precedes the Gibbs Lecture. Come find out about
6:30 p.m. from John Roe, Pennsylvania State University, the latest activities and programs at each of the institutes
on Math on the Rocks. An opportunity will be provided that may be suited to your own research. Please join us!
afterwards for participants to go to dinner at local res- Curious Construction Conclave, Thursday, 6:30 p.m.–
taurants in small groups. 7:30 p.m. Become a part of North America's only Museum
Annual Association of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and of Math! Help construct a new geometric structure for
Transgendered Mathematicians Reception, Thursday, the National Museum of Mathematics in New York City,
6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m. All are welcome to attend this open and sign up to collaborate on new museum content for a
reception affiliated with NOGLSTP, the National Organiza- chance of winning a family pass to MOMATH!
tion of Gay and Lesbian Scientists and Technical Profes- National Association of Mathematicians Banquet,
sionals, Inc. Friday, 6:00 p.m.–8:40 p.m. A cash bar reception will be
AWM Reception, Wednesday, 9:30 p.m. after the AMS held at 6:00 p.m., and dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m.
Gibbs Lecture, has been a popular, well-attended event Tickets are US$62 each, including tax and gratuity. The
in the past. All of the honorees of the Alice T. Schaffer Cox-Talbot Invited Address will be given after the dinner.
Prize for Excellence in Mathematics by an Undergraduate NSA Women in Mathematics Society Networking
Woman, the recipient of the AWM-Microsoft Research Session, Thursday, 6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m. All participants
Prize in Algebra and Number Theory, the AWM-Sadosky are welcome to this annual event. Please stop by the NSA
Research Prize in Analysis, and the AWM Service Awards booth in the exhibit hall for information and the specific
will be recognized by the AWM President at 10:00 p.m. location of the event.
Budapest Semesters in Mathematics Annual Alumni Pennsylvania State University Mathematics Alumni
Reunion, Thursday, 5:30 p.m.–7:00 p.m. Reception, Wednesday, 6:30 p.m.–8:30 p.m. Please join us
Reception for Graduate Students and First-Time Par- for hors d’oeuvres and beverages and mingle with math
ticipants, Wednesday, 5:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m. The AMS and alumni, faculty, and College of Science representatives.
MAA cosponsor this social hour. Graduate students and Student Hospitality Center, Wednesday–Friday, 9:00
first-timers are especially encouraged to come and meet a.m.–5:00 p.m., and Saturday, 9:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m., orga-
some old-timers to pick up a few tips on how to survive nized by Richard and Araceli Neal, American Society for
the environment of a large meeting. Light refreshments the Communication of Mathematics.
will be served. Reception for Undergraduates, Wednesday, 4:00
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Depart- p.m.–5:00 p.m.
ment of Mathematics Alumni Reception, Friday, 5:30
p.m.–7:30 p.m. Everyone ever connected with the depart- Other Events of Interest
ment is encouraged to get together for conversation and to AMS Information Booth: All meetings participants are
hear about mathematics at the University of Illinois. Please invited to visit the AMS Information Booth during the
see www.math.illinois.edu/jmm-reception.html. meetings. A special gift will be available for participants,
Knitting Circle, Thursday, 8:15 p.m.–9:45 p.m. Bring compliments of the AMS. AMS staff will be at the booth to
a project (knitting/crochet/tatting/beading/etc.) and chat answer questions about AMS programs and membership.
with other mathematical crafters! Book Sales and Exhibits: All participants are encour-
MAA/Project NExT Reception, Friday, 8:00 p.m.–10:00 aged to visit the book, education media, and software
p.m.; organized by Julia Barnes, Western Carolina Univer- exhibits from 12:15 p.m.–5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, 9:30
sity; Judith Covington, Louisiana State University, Shreve- a.m.–5:30 p.m. on Thursday and Friday, and 9:00 a.m.–
port; Matthew DeLong, Taylor University; and Aparna W. noon on Saturday. Books published by the AMS and MAA
Higgins, University of Dayton. All Project NExT Fellows, will be sold at discounted prices somewhat below the cost
consultants, and other friends of Project NExT are invited. for the same books purchased by mail. These discounts

1244 Notices of the AMS Volume 60, Number 9


Meetings & Conferences

will be available only to registered participants wearing the Acknowledgments of registrations will be sent by email
official meetings badge. Participants visiting the exhibits to the email addresses given on the ARH Form. If you do
are required to display their meetings badge in order to not wish your registration acknowledged by email, please
enter the exhibit area. mark the appropriate box on the ARH form.
The MAA and the AMS cordially invite all registered Advance registration forms accompanied by insuf-
participants to enjoy complimentary tea and coffee while ficient payment will be returned and a US$5 charge will
perusing the associations’ booths. be assessed if an invoice must be prepared to collect the
Mathematical Sciences Employment Center: Those delinquent amount. Overpayments of less than US$5 will
wishing to participate in the Mathematical Sciences Em- not be refunded.
ployment Center should read carefully the important For each invalid check or credit card transaction that
article about the center beginning on page 1218 in this results in an insufficient payment for registration or hous-
issue of Notices or at www.ams.org/emp-reg/. Employers ing, a US$5 charge will be assessed. Participants should
should pay the appropriate fees; there are no fees for ap- check with their tax preparers for applicable deductions
plicants to participate, except that all Employment Center for education expenses as they pertain to these meetings.
participants must also register for the Joint Mathematics If you wish to be included in a list of individuals
Meetings (JMM). Official meeting badges are required to sorted by mathematical interest, please provide the one
enter the Employment Center. mathematics subject classification number of your major
Networking Opportunities: There are many opportu- area of interest on the ARH Form. (A list of these num-
nities to meet new friends and greet old acquaintances bers is available by sending an empty email message to
in addition to the vast array of scientific sessions offered at abs-submit@ams.org; include the number 1096 as the
these meetings. These opportunities are listed on the net- subject of the message.) Copies of this list will be posted
working page at jointmathematicsmeetings.org/2160_ on the JMM website. If you do not wish to be included in
newcomers.html. any mailing list used for promotional purposes, check the
First-Time Participants: A special welcome is ex- appropriate box on the ARH Form.
tended to all new participants of these meetings. For your Online Advance Registration: This service is available for
convenience tips on how to navigate the meetings are found advance registration and hotel reservations at www.joint
at the newcomers’ page at jointmathematicsmeetings/ mathematicsmeetings.org/meetreg?meetnum=2160.
2160_newcomers.html. You may want to investigate the VISA, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express are the
many receptions listed in the “Social Events” section, the only methods of payment which are accepted for online
Student Hospitality Center, and the Employment Center. advance registrations, and charges to credit cards will be
On site you will find a Networking Center featuring casual made in U.S. funds. All online advance registrants will
seating and complimentary internet access. This is a great receive acknowledgment of payment upon submission of
place to relax between sessions and forge new friend- this completed form.
ships. You should also check out the lists of registered Paper Form Registration: For your convenience, a
participants sorted by school and math subject classifica- copy of the form is available in pdf format at joint
tion which will be available on the website for your perusal mathematicsmeetings.org/meetings/national/
shortly before the meetings begin in January. jmm2014/jmm14_regform.pdf. Forms must be mailed
or faxed to the MMSB at MMSB, P. O. Box 6887, Providence,
Registering in Advance RI 02940 or 401-455-4004. For your security, we do not
The importance of advance registration cannot be over- accept credit card numbers by email or fax. If you are regis-
emphasized. Advance registration fees are considerably tering by paper form and wish to pay for your registration
lower than onsite registration fees. The AMS and the MAA or guarantee your hotel reservation by credit card, please
encourage all participants to register for the meeting. so indicate on the form and someone from the MMSB will
When you pay the registration fee, you are helping to sup- contact you by phone.
port a wide range of activities associated with planning, Cancellation Policy: Participants who cancel their ad-
organizing, and execution of the meetings. All registra- vance registration for the meetings, minicourses, short
tions are processed by the Mathematics Meetings Service courses, or banquets by January 7, 2014, will be eligible
Bureau (MMSB). Participants who register by November to receive a 50% refund of fees paid. No refunds will be
19 may receive their badges, programs, and tickets (where issued after January 7.
applicable) in advance by U.S. mail approximately three
weeks before the meetings. Those who do not want their Joint Mathematics Meetings Registration Fees
materials mailed should check the appropriate box on by Dec. 24 at meeting
the Advance Registration/Housing (ARH) Form. However, Member of AMS, ASL, CMS,
materials will not be mailed to Canada, Mexico, or other MAA, SIAM US$240 US$315
countries outside of the U.S. due to delays. Participants Nonmember 374 486
from these countries must pick up their materials at Ad- Graduate Student Member of AMS, MAA 53 63
vance Registration Pickup Desk at the meetings. Please Graduate Student Nonmember 82 93
note that a US$5 replacement fee will be charged for pro- Undergraduate Student 53 63
grams and badges that were mailed but not taken to the Temporarily Employed 195 224
meeting. See the staff at the Registration Assistance Desk. Emeritus Member of AMS, MAA;

October 2013 Notices of the AMS 1245


Meetings & Conferences

Unemployed; High School Teacher; All mathematicians who wish to attend sessions are
Developing Countries; Librarian 53 63 expected to register and should be prepared to show their
High School Student 5 10 badges if so requested. Badges are required to enter the
One-Day Member of AMS, ASL, CMS, Exhibits and the Employment Center, to obtain discounts
MAA, SIAM N/A 171 at the AMS and MAA Book Sales, and to cash a check with
One-Day Nonmember N/A 268 the Joint Meetings cashier.
Nonmathematician Guest 15 15
Commercial Exhibitor 0 0 Advance Registration Deadlines
There are three separate advance registration deadlines,
MAA Minicourses US$80 US$80* each with its own benefits.
*if space is available EARLY meetings advance registration
(room drawing) November 4
Grad School Fair Table US$75 US$75
(table/posterboard/electricity) ORDINARY meetings advance registration
(hotel reservations, materials mailed) November 19
AMS Short Course
Member of AMS or MAA US$106 US$140 FINAL meetings advance registration
Nonmember 155 185 (advance registration, short courses,
Student/Unemployed/Emeritus 54 75 minicourses, and banquets) December 24
MAA Short Course Early Advance Registration: Those who register by the
MAA or AMS Member US$159 US$169 early deadline of November 4 will be included in a random
Nonmember 234 244 drawing to select winners of complimentary hotel rooms in
Student/Unemployed/Emeritus 81 91 Baltimore. Multiple occupancy is permissible. The location
Full-Time Students: Any person who is currently of rooms to be used in this drawing will be based on the
working toward a degree or diploma. Students are asked number of complimentary rooms available in the various
to determine whether their status can be described as hotels. Therefore, the free room may not necessarily be in
graduate (working toward a degree beyond the bachelor’s), the winner’s first-choice hotel. The winners will be notified
undergraduate (working toward a bachelor’s degree), or by mail prior to December 24, so register early!
high school (working toward a high school diploma) and to Ordinary Advance Registration: Those who register
mark the Advance Registration/Housing Form accordingly. after November 4 and by the ordinary deadline of No-
Graduate Student: Any graduate student who is a vember 19 may use the housing services offered by the
member of the AMS or MAA. These students should check MMSB but are not eligible for the room drawing. You may
with their department administrator to check their mem- also elect to receive your badge and program by mail in
bership status. advance of the meetings.
Emeritus: Any person who has been a member of the Final Advance Registration: Those who register after
AMS or MAA for twenty years or more and who retired November 19 and by the final deadline of December 24
because of age or long-term disability from his or her must pick up their badges, programs, and any tickets for
latest position. social events at the meetings. Unfortunately it is some-
Librarian: Any librarian who is not a professional times not possible to provide final advance registrants
mathematician. with housing, so registrants are strongly urged to make
Unemployed: Any person who is currently unemployed, their hotel reservations by November 19. Please note that
actively seeking employment, and is not a student. It is the December 24 deadline is firm; any forms received after
not intended to include any person who has voluntarily that date will be returned and full refunds issued. To pick
resigned or retired from his or her latest position. up your materials, please come to the Meetings Registra-
Developing Country Participant: Any person employed tion Desk located inside the Pratt Street Lobby on the 300
in developing countries where salary levels are radically level of the Baltimore Convention Center.
noncommensurate with those in the U.S.
Temporarily Employed: Any person currently em- Hotel Reservations
ployed but who will become unemployed by June 1, 2014, The AMS and MAA contract only with facilities who are
and who is actively seeking employment. working toward being in compliance with the public ac-
Nonmathematician Guest: Any family member or commodations requirements of ADA. Participants requir-
friend who is not a mathematician and who is accompa- ing hotel reservations should read the instructions on the
nied by a participant in the meetings. These official guests following hotel pages.
will receive a badge and may accompany a mathematician
to a session or talk and may also enter the exhibit area.
Participants who are not members of the AMS or MAA Miscellaneous Information
and register for the meetings as a nonmember will receive Audio-Visual Equipment: Standard equipment in all ses-
mailings after the meetings with special membership of- sion rooms is one overhead projector and screen. Invited
fers. 50-minute speakers are automatically provided with an

1246 Notices of the AMS Volume 60, Number 9


How to Obtain Hotel Accommodations – 2014 Joint Mathematics Meetings
Importance of Staying in an Official JMM Hotel your security, credit card numbers will not be accepted by a winner of free room nights in a hotel. The number of
postal mail, email, or fax. If you wish to guarantee your drawings is based on the number of complimentary room
The importance of reserving a hotel room at one of
room by credit card and are submitting a paper form, the nights available in the various hotels. Multiple occupancy is

October 2013
the official JMM hotels cannot be stressed enough. The
MMSB will call you at the phone number you provided. The permissible. The winners will be drawn at random from the
AMS and the MAA make every effort to keep participant hotel reservation lists and notified by email or phone prior
housing link is located on the meeting website at http://
expenses at meetings, registration fees, and hotel rooms to December 24, 2013. Good luck!
www.jointmathematicsmeeting.org. The paper form is
for the meetings as low as possible. They work hard to
located at the back of this announcement. Participants
negotiate the best hotel rates and to make the best use interested in suites should contact the MMSB at mmsb@ Confirmations
of your registration dollars to keep the meetings afford- ams.org or 1-800-321-4267 ext. 4137 or ext. 4144 for An immediate and real-time email confirmation number
able. The AMS and the MAA encourage all participants to further information. Sorry, reservations cannot be taken will be provided for each reservation made online. This
register for the meeting. When you pay the registration over the phone. confirmation number will provide you with direct access
fee and reserve a room with an official JMM hotel, you to edit reservations up to December 13, 2013. After this
are helping to support not only the 2014 JMM, but also ADA Accessibility date, a second email confirmation for your reservation
future meetings. We strive to take the appropriate steps required to will be sent from the hotel. Please contact the MMSB at
ensure that no individual with a disability is excluded, mmsb@ams.org or 1-800-321-4266, ext. 4137 or 4144 if
General you did not receive a confirmation number from your hotel
denied services, segregated or otherwise treated differ-
or if there are any other questions about the reservation
Participants are encouraged to register for the JMM in ently. Please tell us what you require to help make your
advance in order to obtain hotel accommodations through process.
participation more enjoyable and meaningful. If you
the Mathematics Meetings Service Bureau (MMSB). If you require special assistance, auxiliary aids or other reason-
need to reserve a hotel room before you register for the Deadlines
able accommodations to fully participate in this meeting, • Complimentary Room Drawing: November 4
JMM, contact the MMSB at mmsb@ams.org or 1-800-321-
please check off the appropriate box on the ARH Form • Reservations through MMSB: November 19
4267 ext. 4137 or ext. 4144 for further instructions. Spe-
or email the MMSB at mmsb@ams.org. All requests for

Notices
cial rates have been negotiated exclusively for this meeting • Changes/Cancellations through MMSB: December 13
at the following hotels: Hilton Baltimore, Marriott Inner special accommodations under the Americans with Dis-
Harbor, Sheraton Inner Harbor Hotel, Hyatt Regency Balti- abilities Act of 1990 (ADA) must be made allowing enough Environmental Policies
more, Marriott Waterfront Hotel, Renaissance Harborplace time for evaluation and appropriate action by the AMS All of the listed hotels have environmental-friendly pro-

of the
Hotel, Royal Sonesta Harbor Court, Days Inn Baltimore and MAA. Any information obtained about a disability grams in place.
Inner Harbor, Holiday Inn Inner Harbor, and Hotel Monaco. will remain confidential.

AMS
Guarantee Requirements
To receive JMM rates, reservations for the hotels listed Cancellation Policies • One night deposit by check, or
must be made through the MMSB, who will be using a • The Sheraton, Renaissance, Marriott Waterfront, Royal • Credit cards (online only): Visa, MC, AMEX, and Discover.
Passkey Housing System to process reservations. The Sonesta, Days Inn, and the Holiday Inn have a 24-hour For your security, we do not accept credit card numbers by
hotels will not be able to accept reservations directly until cancellation policy prior to check-in. postal mail, email or fax. If you reserve a room by paper
after December 13, 2013. At that time, rooms and rates • The Hotel Monaco has a 48-hour cancellation policy form and want to guarantee by credit card, the MMSB will
will be based on availability. Higher rates may be applied prior to check-in. contact you at the phone number you provided.
to any rooms reserved directly with the hotels before • The Hilton, Marriott Inner Harbor, and the Hyatt have
December 13, 2013. a 72-hour cancellation policy prior to check-in. Internet Access/Wireless
The Sheraton Inner Harbor, Royal Sonesta, Days Inn Bal-
To reserve a room online, use the housing link pro- Check-in/Check-out
vided. If you cannot reserve a room online, please com- timore Inner Harbor, Holiday Inn Inner Harbor, and Hotel
Check-in at all of the hotels, except the Days Inn is 4:00 Monaco all offer complimentary high-speed wireless in all
plete the housing section of the Advanced Registration/
p.m. Check-in at the Days Inn is 3:00 p.m. Check-out at of their guest rooms and public space.
Housing (ARH) form and send it to the MMSB via email at
each hotel is noon.
mmsb@ams.org or fax to 401-455-4004 before December The Marriott Inner Harbor, Marriott Waterfront, and Re-
13, 2013. All reservations must be guaranteed by either a naissance Harborplace Hotel offer complimentary high-speed
credit card or a check deposit in the total amount of your Complimentary Room Drawing wireless in all of their public spaces and wired internet in
first night stay. If you reserve a room online, only a credit All participants who register and reserve a room at
their guest rooms for US$12.95 plus tax per each 24-hour
card guarantee is accepted. If you use the paper form, any of the official JMM hotels by November 4, 2013 will
period.
a credit card or a check may be given for guarantee. For automatically be included in a random drawing to select
Meetings & Conferences

1247
Hilton Baltimore Baltimore Marriott Inner Harbor
The Hilton Baltimore offers complimentary high-speed (Co-Headquarters) (Co-Headquarters)

1248
wireless in all of their public spaces and wired internet in
their guest rooms for US$14.95 plus tax per each 24-hour
period. 0.2 miles from the Baltimore Convention Center 0.2 miles from the Baltimore Convention Center
(connected to the center)
The Hyatt Regency offers complimentary high-speed
wireless high speed internet in all of their public spaces 401 West Pratt Street 110 South Eutaw Street
(lobby and second floor) for up to six hours at a time, and Baltimore, MD 21201 Baltimore, MD 21201
wireless access in their sleeping rooms for US$19.95 plus Single/Double Rate: US$159.00 Single/Double Rate: US$149.00
tax per each 24-hour period. Student Single/Double Rate: US$127.00 Student Single/Double Rate: US$115.00
Meetings & Conferences

Looking for a Roommate? Smoke-free hotel. Restaurants: Diamond Tavern and Smoke-free hotel. Restaurants: The Yard and Gift Shop
For your convenience, an interactive search board is Lobby Bar; Fitness center; Heated indoor lap pool; UPS Cafe; Fitness center; Business center; Safes at front desk;
available at http://bboards.jointmathematicsmeetings. Store; Full amenities in guest rooms; Laptop-sized safes Full amenities in guest rooms; Windows do not open;
org to help you find a roommate. in guest rooms; Windows do not open; Children under Children under 17 free in room with an adult; Cribs
17 free in room with an adult; Cribs available upon available upon request at no charge; No cost for rolla-
Rates request at no charge; Rollaways US$25 one-time fee; All ways; Pets are not allowed; Self-parking US$26 per day
• All rates are subject to applicable local and state taxes size pets allowed; Valet parking US$40 per day with in/ with in/out privileges, tax included in parking rate. See
in effect at the time of check-in; currently 15.5% state out privileges; Self-parking US$28 per day with in/out the travel section of this announcement for other park-
tax. privileges, tax included in both parking rates. See the ing options. Confirmations sent by email only.
• Only certified students or unemployed mathematicians travel section of this announcement for other parking
qualify for student rates. options. Confirmations sent by email only.

Notices
Hyatt Regency Baltimore on the
Sheraton Inner Harbor Hotel
Inner Harbor

of the
0.3 miles from the Baltimore Convention Center 0.4 miles from the Baltimore Convention Center

AMS
300 South Charles Street 300 Light Street
Baltimore, MD 21201 Baltimore, MD 21202
Single/Double Rate: US$149.00 Single/Double Rate: US$145.00
Student
FONT: AVANTSingle/Double
GARDE GOTHIC Rate: US$139.00 Student Single/Double Rate: US$135.00

Smoke-free hotel. Restaurants: Orioles Grille and Smoke-free hotel. Restaurants: Bistro 300 and Perk’s
Morton’s, The Steakhouse; Fitness center; Heated Coffee House; Fitness center; Seasonal outdoor pool;
indoor pool and sauna; Business center; Full ameni- Business center; Full amenities in guest rooms; Laptop-
ties in guest rooms; Windows do not open; Children sized safes in guest rooms; Windows do not open;
under 17 free in room with an adult; Cribs available Children under 18 free in room with an adult; Cribs
upon request at no charge; Rollaways US$20 per day; available upon request at no charge; Rollaways US$25
Small pets allowed; Valet parking US$33 per day with one-time fee; Pets are not allowed; Valet parking US$40
in/out privileges; Self-parking US$27 per day with per day with in/out privileges; Self-parking US$28 per
in/out privileges, tax included in both parking rates. day with in/out privileges, tax included in both parking
See the travel section of this announcement for other rates. See the travel section of this announcement for
parking options. Confirmations sent by email only. other parking options. Confirmations sent by email
only.

Volume 60, Number 9


Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel Royal Sonesta Harbor Court Baltimore

0.4 miles from the Baltimore Convention Center 1.1 mile from the Baltimore Convention Center 0.5 miles from the Baltimore Convention Center

October 2013
202 East Pratt Street 700 Alicenna Street 550 Light Street
Baltimore, MD 21202 Baltimore, MD 21202 Baltimore, MD 21202
Single/Double Rate: US$135.00 Single/Double Rate: US$135.00 Single/Double Rate: US$125.00
Student Single/Double Rate: US$115.00 Student Single/Double Rate: US$115.00 Student Single/Double Rate: US$99.00

Smoke-free hotel. Restaurants: Watertable, Watert- Smoke-free hotel. Restaurants: Grille 700, Kozmo’s Smoke-free hotel. Restaurants: Brighton’s, Explorers
able Lounge, and The Ground Floor Café & Bar; Fitness Lounge, Rigano’s Bakery & Deli, and Starbucks; Fit- Lounge, and Formula Espresso; Fitness center; Heated
center; Heated indoor lap pool; Business center; Full ness center; Heated indoor pool; Business center; Full indoor pool; Business center; Full amenities in guest
amenities in guest rooms; Laptop-sized safes in guest amenities in guest rooms; Laptop-sized safes in guest rooms; Laptop-sized safes in guest rooms; Windows
rooms; Children under 18 free in room with an adult; rooms; Windows do not open; Children under 18 free do not open; Children under 18 free in room with an
Cribs available upon request at no charge; Rollaways in room with an adult; Cribs available upon request adult; Cribs available upon request at no charge; Rol-
US$20 per day; Pets are not allowed; Valet parking at no charge; No additional charge for rollaways; Pets laways US$25 daily fee; Small pets allowed with US$150
US$40 per day with in/out privileges; Self-parking are not allowed; Valet parking US$40 per day with in/ per-stay accommodation fee; Valet parking US$36 per
US$28 per day with in/out privileges, tax included in out privileges; Self-parking US$26 per day with in/out day with in/out privileges; Self-parking US$26 per day
both parking rates. See the travel section of this an- privileges, tax included in both parking rates. See the with in/out privileges; parking fees are subject to an
nouncement for other parking options. Confirmations travel section of this announcement for other parking additional 20% tax. See the travel section of this an-
sent by email only. options. Confirmations sent by email only. nouncement for other parking options. Confirmations
sent by email only.

Notices
Days Inn Baltimore Inner Harbor Holiday Inn Inner Harbor Hotel Monaco

of the
AMS
0.1 miles from the Baltimore Convention Center 0.1 miles from the Baltimore Convention Center 0.4 miles from the Baltimore Convention Center

100 Hopkins Place 301 West Lombard Street 2 North Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21201 Baltimore, MD 21201 Baltimore, MD 21201
Single/Double Rate: US$119.00 Single/Double Rate: US$119.00 Single/Double Rate: US$119.00
Student Single/Double Rate: US$109.00 Student Single/Double Rate: US$99.00 Student Single/Double Rate: US$109.00

Smoke-free hotel. Restaurants: Flemings Steak House, Smoke-free hotel. Restaurants: Eden West Restau- Smoke-free hotel. Restaurant: B&O Brasserie; Fitness
Kawasaki Japanese, and Kona Grill; Fitness center; rant, Dottie’s Café, and Eden West Lounge; Fitness center; Business center; Full amenities in guest rooms;
Business center; Full amenities in guest rooms; Lap- center; Heated indoor pool; Business center; Safe Laptop-sized safes in guest rooms; Windows do not
top-sized safes in guest rooms; Windows do not open; deposit boxes at front desk; Full amenities in guest open; Children under 16 free in room with an adult;
Children under 16 free in room with an adult; Cribs rooms; Windows do not open; Children under 16 free Cribs available upon request at no charge; Rollaways
available upon request at no charge; Rollaways US$10 in room with an adult; Cribs available upon request US$25 one-time fee; All size pets allowed; Valet parking
daily fee; Pets under 20 lbs allowed with a US$100 at no charge; Rollaways US$15 daily fee; Small pets only US$45 per day with in/out privileges, tax included
refundable deposit; Self-parking only US$25 per day allowed; Self-parking only US$25 per day with in/out in parking rate. See the travel section of this announce-
with in/out privileges, tax included in parking rates. privileges, tax included in parking rate. See the travel ment for other parking options. Confirmations sent by
See the travel section of this announcement for other section of this announcement for other parking op- email only.
parking options. Confirmations sent by email only. tions. Confirmations sent by email only.
Meetings & Conferences

1249
2014 Joint Mathematics Meetings

1250
N

Baltimore Convention Center 1 Hilton Baltimore Convention Center*

Skywalk to Convention Center (Hilton) 2 Baltimore Marriott Inner Harbor*

Water Taxi Harbor Connector 3 Holiday Inn Inner Harbor Hotel


Water Taxi Harbor Landing
Meetings & Conferences

4 Days Inn Inner Harbor


MARC Train 5 Hotel Monaco Baltimore
Metro Subway Light Rail 6 Sheraton Inner Harbor
Visitor Center Charm City Circulator Routes 7 Royal Sonesta Harborcourt Hotel

8 Hyatt Regency Baltimore

9 Renaissance Harborplace Hotel

10 Baltimore Marriott Waterfront

Notices
* Co-Headquarters Hotel

of the
5 approx. 1/4 mile (0.4 km)

AMS
Map courtesy of
3 4

2
9
1

6 8

7
Camden Station
MARC Trains to 10
Washington, D.C.

O’Donnell St

Bo
sto
nS
t

Volume 60, Number 9


Meetings & Conferences

ELMO visual presenter (document camera/projector), one near the JMM Registration Desk, Pratt Lobby, on the 300
overhead projector, and a laptop projector; AMS Special level in the Baltimore Convention Center. The hours of
Sessions and Contributed Papers, and MAA Invited and operation will be published in the program. Participants
Contributed Paper Sessions, are provided with the stan- should be aware that complimentary Internet access will
dard equipment and a laptop projector. Blackboards are be available in the networking center located in Hall F,
not available, nor are Internet hookups in session rooms. ground level of the Baltimore Convention Center.
Any request for additional equipment should be sent to
Information Distribution: Tables are set up in the
meet@ams.org and received by November 1.
exhibit area for dissemination of general information of
Equipment requests made at the meetings most likely
possible interest to the members and for the dissemination
will not be granted because of budgetary restrictions. Un-
of information of a mathematical nature not promot-
fortunately no audio-visual equipment can be provided for
ing a product or program for sale. Information must
committee meetings or other meetings or gatherings not
on the scientific program. be approved by the director of meetings prior to being
placed on these tables.
Childcare: The AMS and the MAA will again offer child- If a person or group wishes to display information of a
care services for the Joint Mathematics Meetings to regis- mathematical nature promoting a product or program for
tered participants. sale, they may do so in the exhibit area at the Joint Books,
The childcare will be offered through KiddieCorp Chil- Journals, and Promotional Materials exhibit for a fee of
dren’s Program. KiddieCorp is an organization that has US$50 (posters are slightly higher) per item. Please contact
been providing high-quality programs for children of all the exhibits manager, MMSB, P.O. Box 6887, Providence,
ages at meetings throughout the United States and Canada RI 02940, or by email at cpd@ams.org for further details.
since 1986. Read all about them at www.kiddiecorp.com/. The administration of these tables is in the hands of the
The childcare services provided at the JMM are for chil- AMS-MAA Joint Meetings Committee, as are all arrange-
dren ages 6 months through 12 years old. Space per day will ments for Joint Mathematics Meetings.
be limited and is on a space available basis. The dates and
Local Information: For information about the city see
times for the program are January 15–18, 2014, 8:00 a.m.–
baltimore.org.
5:00 p.m. each day. It will be located at the Marriott Balti-
more Inner Harbor at Camden Yards. If you would like to Telephone Messages: It will be possible to leave a
know how many children will be in the same age group as message for any registered participant at the meetings
your child’s, please call KiddieCorp. Parents are encouraged registration desk from January 15 through 18 during
to bring snacks and beverages for their children but items the hours that the desk is open. These messages will be
such as juice boxes, Cheerios, and crackers will be provided. posted on the Mathematics Meetings Message Board in the
KiddieCorp can arrange meals for children at cost plus 15% networking center; however, staff at the desk will try to
or parents can be responsible for meals for their children. locate a participant in the event of a bona fide emergency.
Parents who have questions about specific programs that The telephone number will be published in the program
will be offered or special requests, rules, or needs for their and daily newsletter.
children must call KiddieCorp ahead of time.
Registration starts on September 3. The registration fee Travel/Transportation
is US$30 per family (nonrefundable). Additional cost will Baltimore is on Eastern Standard Time. The Baltimore/
be US$16 per hour per child or US$11 per hour per child Washington International, Thurgood Marshall Airport
for graduate students. These reduced child care rates are (BWI) (www.bwiairport.com/en) is served by all major
made possible to the meetings participants by the MAA and airlines and is approximately twelve miles from the Inner
the AMS, who heavily subsidize the cost of this service, thus Harbor area where the Baltimore Convention Center and
keeping this program affordable for families. Parents must the conference hotels are located. The street address of
be registered for the JMM to participate. Full payment is due the airport is 7062 Elm Road, Baltimore, MD 21240.
at the time of registration with KiddieCorp. The deadline Airline: The official airline for this meeting is Delta
for registering is December 18, 2013. Airlines. Participants are encouraged to book their flights
If parents do not pick up their children at the time sched- for the meeting, where possible, with Delta and receive
uled or by the end of the day (no later than 5:00 p.m.), they special pricing (in most cases a 5% discount) on scheduled
will be charged a late fee of US$5 per child for every 15 service to Baltimore. Discounts are applicable to U. S. and
minutes thereafter. Canada originating passengers. The discount is not valid
Cancellations must be made to KiddieCorp prior to with other discounts, certificates, coupons, or promotional
December 18, 2013, for a full refund. Cancellations made offers. To make a reservation, go to www.Delta.com, and
after that date will be subject to a 50% cancellation fee. Once click on the box that says “Book a Trip”. At the bottom of
the program has begun, no refunds will be issued. the box, click on “More Search Options (includes Flexible
To register, go to www.kiddiecorp.com/jmmkids.htm Airport and Meeting Event Code)”. On the reservation
or jointmathematicsmeetings.org/2141_daycare. screen, please enter the Meeting Event Code NMGJ8.
html, or call KiddieCorp at 858-455-1718 to request a form. It will be to the right of “Number of Passengers”. Please
Email Services: Limited email access for all Joint Meet- note that reservations can also be made by calling Delta at
ings participants will be available in an email center located 1-800-328-1111 and giving the meeting ticket designation

October 2013 Notices of the AMS 1251


Meetings & Conferences

file number of NMGJ8. A US$25 ticketing fee will be levied Please refer to www.bwiairport.com/en/travel/
for reservations made by telephone. ground-transportation for additional information
Super Shuttle offers service from the airport to about ground transportation from the airport.
downtown; see www.supershuttle.com/Locations/ Public Transportation in Baltimore: The MTA-Maryland
BWIAirportShuttleBaltimore.aspx, or call 800-BLUE Transit Administration Baltimore has a regular bus, sub-
VAN (800-258-3826). There are two shuttle ticket coun- way, and light rail system. For details, maps, and schedules
ters located on the lower level baggage claim area. One see mta.maryland.gov/ or call 410-539-5000. One-way
is near door #2 near the Southwest Airlines Terminal in fares are currently US$1.60. In addition, Baltimore also
Concourse A, and the other is near door #9 in Concourse has a free shuttle service with four routes around Balti-
C. They are open between the hours of 6:00 a.m. and 2:00 more, called the Charm City Circulator (CCC), see www.
a.m. When the counters are closed, please call 800-258- charmcitycirculator.com/ for information on routes
3826 for information or to arrange service. The fare for and schedules. The Green Route runs from City Hall to
the shuttle is currently US$14 (one person, one way). Fells Point to Johns Hopkins, the Purple Route runs from
Car Rental: The car rental facility at BWI is located at Penn Station to Federal Hill, the Orange Route runs from
7432 New Ridge Road, Hanover, MD, 21076 and hosts all of Hollins Market to Harbor East, and the Banner Route runs
the major car rental agencies. Free shuttle service carries from the Inner Harbor to Fort McHenry. All the routes
customers to and from the airport approximately every 10 have stops in the Inner Harbor area. The Orange route
minutes. The shuttle leaves the lower level terminal near has a Convention Center stop, and the Banner Route
the baggage claim area. The trip takes around 10 minutes. has stops at Pratt Street and at Otterbein, both near the
Hertz is the official car rental company for the meeting. To Convention Center. The Purple route has a stop at Pratt
access the JMM special meeting rates at www.hertz.com, and South Calvert Street. The Green route stops near the
please click the box that says “Enter a discount or promo Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel. Many local attrac-
code” and enter CV#04N30004 as the convention number. tions are accessible on the CCC. The National Aquarium,
Reservations can also be made by calling Hertz directly at the Jewish Museum of Baltimore, and the B&O Railroad
800-654-2240 (U.S. and Canada) or 405-749-4434. Meet- Museum are on the Orange Line. The Banner Line goes
to Fort McHenry, the Baltimore Museum of Industry, and
ing rates include unlimited mileage and are subject to
the American Visionary Art Museum. The airport is not
availability. Advance reservations are recommended and
included on CCC routes.
blackout dates may apply. Government surcharges, taxes,
Train: Amtrak Baltimore Penn Station is located at 1500
tax reimbursement, airport-related fees, vehicle licensing
North Charles Street, Baltimore, approximately two miles
fees and optional items are extra. Standard rental condi-
from the Inner Harbor area. For information about rail
tions and qualifications apply. Minimum rental age is 20
service to Baltimore, please call 1-800-USA-RAIL, or visit
(age differential charge for 20-24 applies). At the time of
www.amtrak.com.
your reservation, the meeting rates will be automatically
Parking: There are online and downloadable maps of
compared to other Hertz rates and you will be quoted the
parking garages at the “Visit Baltimore” parking informa-
best comparable rate available.
tion page at baltimore.org/transportation/parking-
Driving Directions from the Airport: Head northeast information/. The online map at baltimore.org/maps
and take I-195 West. Take exit 2A to get on Maryland will display the local parking garages if you select “park-
295N/Baltimore Washington Parkway towards Baltimore ing”. The parking information page also offers a link to a
and drive approximately seven miles. Turn right onto W. service called "Parking Panda”, which allows you to book
Pratt Street. The Convention Center will be on the right. your parking space at a nearby garage in advance; see
Taxis: The taxi stand is located just outside of the bag- https://www.parkingpanda.com/baltimore-parking.
gage claim area of the lower level of the terminal. There More information about parking can be found at www.
are always taxis available. For more information, call 410- baltimorecity.gov/Government/QuasiAgencies/
859-1100 or visit www.bwiairporttaxi.com. The average ParkingAuthority/ParkingGarages.aspx.
taxi fare to the Baltimore Inner Harbor area is US$35.
Public Transportation from the Airport: Take the
Light Rail from the BWI Marshall Light Rail Station, located
outside the lower level of the terminal building near Con-
Knoxville, Tennessee
course E. The route is called “Hunt Valley and BWI Marshall University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Airport”. Take the train towards Hunt Valley. There is a
stop at the Convention Center (Howard and Pratt Street), March 21–23, 2014
after Camden Yards, and the Hilton and Marriott Inner Friday – Sunday
Harbor hotels are one block west of the stop. For more
details, see mta.maryland.gov/light-rail. The train Meeting #1097
runs from 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. weekdays, 6:00 a.m. Southeastern Section
to 11:00 p.m. on Saturday, and 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Associate secretary: Brian D. Boe
on Sunday, approximately every 30 minutes (varies with Announcement issue of Notices: January 2014
time of day) and takes about 30-35 minutes. The cost is Program first available on AMS website: February 6, 2014
US$1.60 one way. Program issue of electronic Notices: March 2014

1252 Notices of the AMS Volume 60, Number 9


Meetings & Conferences

Issue of Abstracts: Volume 35, Issue 2 Deadlines


For organizers: Expired
Deadlines
For abstracts: January 28, 2014
For organizers: Expired The scientific information listed below may be dated.
For abstracts: January 28, 2014 For the latest information, see www.ams.org/amsmtgs/
sectional.html.
The scientific information listed below may be dated.
For the latest information, see www.ams.org/amsmtgs/ Invited Addresses
sectional.html. Maria Gordina, University of Connecticut, Title to be
announced.
Invited Addresses L. Mahadevan, Harvard University, Title to be an-
Maria Chudnovsky, Columbia University, Title to be nounced.
announced (Erdős Memorial Lecture). Nimish Shah, Ohio State University, Title to be an-
Ilse Ipsen, North Carolina State University, Title to be nounced.
announced. Dani Wise, McGill University, Title to be announced.
Daniel Krashen, University of Georgia, Title to be an-
nounced. Special Sessions
Suresh Venapally, Emory University, Title to be an- Invariants in Low-Dimensional Topology (Code: SS 1A),
nounced. Jennifer Hom, Columbia University, and Tye Lidman,
University of Texas at Austin.
Special Sessions Knots and Applications (Code: SS 3A), Louis Kauffman,
Commutative Ring Theory (in honor of the retirement University of Illinois at Chicago, Samuel Lomonaco, Uni-
of David E. Dobbs) (Code: SS 1A), David Anderson, Uni- versity of Maryland, Baltimore County, and Jozef Przy-
versity of Tennessee, Knoxville, and Jay Shapiro, George tycki, George Washington University.
Mason University. Mathematical Finance (Code: SS 2A), Agostino Capponi,
Diversity of Modeling and Optimal Control: A Celebra- John Hopkins University.
tion of Suzanne Lenhart’s 60th Birthday (Code: SS 3A), Novel Developments in Tomography and Applications
Wandi Ding, Middle Tennessee State University, and Renee (Code: SS 4A), Alexander Katsevich, Alexandru Tamasan,
Fister, Murrray State University. and Alexander Tovbis, University of Central Florida.
Fractal Geometry and Ergodic Theory (Code: SS 2A), Theory and Applications of Differential Equations on
Mrinal Kanti Roychowdhury, University of Texas Pan Graphs (Code: SS 5A), Jonathan Bell, University of Mary-
American. land Baltimore County, and Sergei Avdonin, University
Harmonic Analysis and Nonlinear Partial Differential of Alaska Fairbanks.
Equations (Code: SS 5A), J. Denzler, M. Frazier, Tuoc Phan,
and T. Todorova, University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
Invariant Subspaces of Function Spaces (Code: SS 6A),
Catherine Beneteau, University of South Florida, Alberto Albuquerque, New
Mexico
A. Condori, Florida Gulf Coast University, Constanze Liaw,
Baylor University, and Bill Ross, University of Richmond.
Randomized Numerical Linear Algebra (Code: SS 4A),
Ilse Ipsen, North Carolina State University. University of New Mexico
April 5–6, 2014
Baltimore, Maryland Saturday – Sunday

University of Maryland, Baltimore County Meeting #1099


Western Section
March 29–30, 2014 Associate secretary: Michel L. Lapidus
Saturday – Sunday Announcement issue of Notices: January 2014
Program first available on AMS website: To be announced
Meeting #1098 Program issue of electronic Notices: April 2014
Eastern Section Issue of Abstracts: To be announced
Associate secretary: Steven H. Weintraub
Announcement issue of Notices: January 2014 Deadlines
Program first available on AMS website: February 26, 2014 For organizers: Expired
Program issue of electronic Notices: March 2014 For abstracts: February 11, 2014
Issue of Abstracts: Volume 35, Issue 2

October 2013 Notices of the AMS 1253


Meetings & Conferences

The scientific information listed below may be dated. For abstracts: February 10, 2014
For the latest information, see www.ams.org/amsmtgs/ The scientific information listed below may be dated.
sectional.html. For the latest information, see www.ams.org/amsmtgs/
sectional.html.
Invited Addresses
Anton Gorodetski, University of California, Irvine, To Invited Addresses
be announced. Nir Avni, Northwestern University, To be announced.
Fan Chung Graham, University of California, San Diego, Alessio Figalli, University of Texas, To be announced.
To be announced. Jean-Luc Thiffeault, University of Wisconsin-Madison,
Adrian Ioana, University of California, San Diego, To To be announced.
be announced. Rachel Ward, University of Texas at Austin, To be an-
Karen Smith, University of Michigan, Ann Harbor, To
nounced.
be announced.
Special Sessions
Special Sessions Algebraic Geometry (Code: SS 9A), David Weinberg,
Commutative Algebra (Code: SS 7A), Daniel J. Her- Texas Tech University.
nandez, University of Utah, Karen E. Smith, University Analysis and Applications of Dynamic Equations on Time
of Michigan, and Emily E. Witt, University of Minnesota. Scales (Code: SS 2A), Heidi Berger, Simpson College, and
Descriptive Set Theory and its Applications (Code: SS 6A), Raegan Higgins, Texas Tech University.
Alexander Kechris, California Institute of Technology, Applications of Special Functions in Combinatorics and
and Christian Rosendal, University of Illinois, Chicago. Analysis (Code: SS 12A), Atul Dixit, Tulane University, and
Interactions in Commutative Algebra (Code: SS 4A),
Timothy Huber, University of Texas Pan American.
Louiza Fouli and Bruce Olberding, New Mexico State
Complex Function Theory and Special Functions (Code:
University, and Janet Vassilev, University of New Mexico.
SS 7A), Roger W. Barnard and Kent Pearce, Texas Tech
Progress in Noncommutative Analysis (Code: SS 2A),
University, Kendall Richards, Southwestern University,
Anna Skripka, University of New Mexico, and Tao Mei,
and Alex Solynin and Brock Williams, Texas Tech Uni-
Wayne State University.
Stochastics and PDEs (Code: SS 5A), Juraj Földes, Insti- versity.
tute for Mathematics and Its Applications, Nathan Glatt- Fractal Geometry and Dynamical Systems (Code: SS 3A),
Holtz, Institute for Mathematics and Its Applications and Mrinal Kanti Roychowdhury, The University of Texas-Pan
Virginia Tech, and Geordie Richards, Institute for Math- American.
ematics and Its Applications and University of Rochester. Homological Methods in Algebra (Code: SS 8A), Lars
The Inverse Problem and Other Mathematical Methods W. Christensen, Texas Tech University, Hamid Rahmati,
Applied in Physics and Related Sciences (Code: SS 1A), Miami University, and Janet Striuli, Fairfield University.
Hanna Makaruk, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Interactions between Commutative Algebra and Al-
Robert Owczarek, University of New Mexico and Enfitek, gebraic Geometry (Code: SS 11A), Brian Harbourne and
Inc. Alexandra Seceleanu, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.
Topics in Spectral Geometry and Global Analysis (Code: Issues Regarding the Recruitment and Retention of
SS 3A), Ivan Avramidi, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Women and Minorities in Mathematics (Code: SS 5A), James
Technology, and Klaus Kirsten, Baylor University. Valles Jr. and Doug Scheib, Saint Mary-of-the-Woods Col-
lege.
Noncommutative Algebra, Deformations, and Hochs-

Lubbock, Texas child Cohomology (Code: SS 10A), Anne Shepler, Univer-


sity of North Texas, and Sarah Witherspoon, Texas A&M
Texas Tech University University.
Qualitative Theory for Non-linear Parabolic and Ellip-
April 11–13, 2014 tic Equations (Code: SS 6A), Akif Ibragimov, Texas Tech
Friday – Sunday University, and Peter Polacik, University of Minnesota.
Recent Advancements in Differential Geometry and In-
Meeting #1100 tegrable PDEs, and Their Applications to Cell Biology and
Central Section Mechanical Systems (Code: SS 4A), Giorgio Bornia, Akif
Associate secretary: Georgia M. Benkart Ibragimov, and Magdalena Toda, Texas Tech University.
Announcement issue of Notices: February 2014 Topology and Physics (Code: SS 1A), Razvan Gelca and
Program first available on AMS website: February 27, 2014 Alastair Hamilton, Texas Tech University.
Program issue of electronic Notices: April 2014
Issue of Abstracts: Volume 35, Issue 2

Deadlines
For organizers: September 18, 2013

1254 Notices of the AMS Volume 60, Number 9


Meetings & Conferences

Tel Aviv, Israel Invited Addresses


Matthew Kahle, Ohio State University, To be announced.
Markus Keel, University of Minnesota, To be announced.
Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan and Tel- Svitlana Mayboroda, University of Minnesota, To be
Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv announced.
Dylan Thurston, Indiana University, To be announced.
June 16–19, 2014
Monday – Thursday Special Sessions
Directions in Commutative Algebra: Past, Present and
Meeting #1101 Future (Code: SS 1A), Joseph P. Brennan, University of
The Second Joint International Meeting between the AMS Central Florida, and Robert M. Fossum, University of Il-
and the Israel Mathematical Union. linois at Urbana-Champaign.
Associate secretary: Michel L. Lapidus
Announcement issue of Notices: January 2014
Program first available on AMS website: To be announced Halifax, Canada
Program issue of electronic Notices: To be announced
Issue of Abstracts: To be announced Dalhousie University
Deadlines October 18–19, 2014
For organizers: To be announced Saturday – Sunday
For abstracts: To be announced
Meeting #1103
The scientific information listed below may be dated. Eastern Section
For the latest information, see www.ams.org/amsmtgs/ Associate secretary: Steven H. Weintraub
internmtgs.html. Announcement issue of Notices: August 2014
Program first available on AMS website: September 5, 2014
Special Sessions Program issue of electronic Notices: October 2014
Mirror Symmetry and Representation Theory, David Issue of Abstracts: Volume 35, Issue 3
Kazhdan, Hebrew University, and Roman Bezrukavnikov,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Deadlines
Nonlinear Analysis and Optimization, Boris Morduk- For organizers: March 18, 2014
hovich, Wayne State University, and Simeon Reich and For abstracts: August 19, 2014
Alexander Zaslavski, The Technion-Israel Institute of
Technology. The scientific information listed below may be dated.
Qualitative and Analytic Theory of ODE’s, Yosef Yom- For the latest information, see www.ams.org/amsmtgs/
din, Weizmann Institute. sectional.html.
Invited Addresses

Eau Claire, Wisconsin François Bergeron, Université du Québec à Montréal,


Title to be announced.
Sourav Chatterjee, New York University, Title to be
University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire announced.
William M. Goldman, University of Maryland, Title to
September 20–21, 2014
be announced.
Saturday – Sunday Sujatha Ramdorai, University of British Columbia, Title
to be announced.
Meeting #1102
Central Section
Associate secretary: Georgia M. Benkart San Francisco,
California
Announcement issue of Notices: June 2014
Program first available on AMS website: August 7, 2014
Program issue of electronic Notices: September 2014
Issue of Abstracts: Volume 35, Issue 3 San Francisco State University
Deadlines October 25–26, 2014
For organizers: March 20, 2014 Saturday – Sunday
For abstracts: July 29, 2014
Meeting #1104
The scientific information listed below may be dated. Western Section
For the latest information, see www.ams.org/amsmtgs/ Associate secretary: Michel L. Lapidus
sectional.html. Announcement issue of Notices: August 2014

October 2013 Notices of the AMS 1255


Meetings & Conferences

Program first available on AMS website: September 11, The scientific information listed below may be dated.
2014 For the latest information, see www.ams.org/amsmtgs/
Program issue of electronic Notices: October 2014 sectional.html.
Issue of Abstracts: Volume 35, Issue 4
Invited Addresses
Deadlines Susanne Brenner, Louisiana State Unviersity, Title to
For organizers: March 25, 2014 be announced.
For abstracts: September 3, 2014 Skip Garibaldi, Emory University, Title to be announced.
Stavros Garoufaldis, Georgia Institute of Technology,
The scientific information listed below may be dated. Title to be announced.
For the latest information, see www.ams.org/amsmtgs/ James Sneyd, University of Auckland, Title to be an-
sectional.html. nounced (AMS-NZMS Maclaurin Lecture).

San Antonio, Texas


Invited Addresses
Kai Behrend, University of British Columbia, Vancou-
ver, Canada, To be announced.
Kiran S. Kedlaya, University of California, San Diego, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center and
To be announced. Grand Hyatt San Antonio
Julia Pevtsova, University of Washington, Seattle, To
be announced. January 10–13, 2015
Burt Totaro, University of California, Los Angeles, To Saturday – Tuesday
be announced. Meeting #1106
Special Sessions Joint Mathematics Meetings, including the 121st Annual
Meeting of the AMS, 98th Annual Meeting of the Math-
Algebraic Geometry (Code: SS 1A), Renzo Cavalieri,
ematical Association of America (MAA), annual meetings
Colorado State University, Noah Giansiracusa, University
of the Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM) and
of California, Berkeley, and Burt Totaro, University of
the National Association of Mathematicians (NAM), and the
California, Los Angeles.
winter meeting of the Association of Symbolic Logic (ASL),
Geometry of Submanifolds (Code: SS 3A), Yun Myung
with sessions contributed by the Society for Industrial and
Oh, Andrews University, Bogdan D. Suceava, California Applied Mathematics (SIAM).
State University, Fullerton, and Mihaela B. Vajiac, Chap- Associate secretary: Steven H. Weintraub
man University. Announcement issue of Notices: October 2014
Polyhedral Number Theory (Code: SS 2A), Matthias Program first available on AMS website: To be announced
Beck, San Francisco State University, and Martin Henk, Program issue of electronic Notices: January 2015
Universität Magdeburg. Issue of Abstracts: Volume 36, Issue 1

Greensboro, North Deadlines


For organizers: April 1, 2014

Carolina
For abstracts: To be announced

University of North Carolina, Greensboro Washington, District


November 8–9, 2014
Saturday – Sunday
of Columbia
Georgetown University
Meeting #1105
Southeastern Section March 7–8, 2015
Associate secretary: Brian D. Boe Saturday – Sunday
Announcement issue of Notices: August 2014 Eastern Section
Program first available on AMS website: September 25, Associate secretary: Steven H. Weintraub
2014 Announcement issue of Notices: To be announced
Program issue of electronic Notices: November 2014 Program first available on AMS website: To be announced
Issue of Abstracts: Volume 35, Issue 4 Program issue of electronic Notices: To be announced
Issue of Abstracts: To be announced
Deadlines
For organizers: April 8, 2014 Deadlines
For abstracts: September 16, 2014 For organizers: August 7, 2014
For abstracts: To be announced

1256 Notices of the AMS Volume 60, Number 9


Meetings & Conferences

Huntsville, Alabama Chicago, Illinois


University of Alabama in Huntsville Loyola University Chicago
March 20–22, 2015 October 3–4, 2015
Friday – Sunday Saturday – Sunday
Central Section
Southeastern Section
Associate secretary: Georgia M. Benkart
Associate secretary: Brian D. Boe
Announcement issue of Notices: To be announced
Announcement issue of Notices: To be announced Program first available on AMS website: To be announced
Program first available on AMS website: To be announced Program issue of electronic Notices: October 2015
Program issue of electronic Notices: To be announced Issue of Abstracts: To be announced
Issue of Abstracts: To be announced
Deadlines
Deadlines For organizers: March 10, 2015
For organizers: August 20, 2014 For abstracts: To be announced
For abstracts: To be announced

Fullerton, California
Las Vegas, Nevada California State University, Fullerton
University of Nevada, Las Vegas October 24–25, 2015
Saturday – Sunday
April 18–19, 2015 Western Section
Saturday – Sunday Associate secretary: Michel L. Lapidus
Western Section Announcement issue of Notices: To be announced
Associate secretary: Michel L. Lapidus Program first available on AMS website: To be announced
Program issue of electronic Notices: October 2015
Announcement issue of Notices: To be announced
Issue of Abstracts: To be announced
Program first available on AMS website: To be announced
Program issue of electronic Notices: To be announced Deadlines
Issue of Abstracts: To be announced For organizers: March 27, 2015
For abstracts: To be announced
Deadlines
For organizers: September 18, 2014
For abstracts: To be announced Seattle, Washington
Washington State Convention Center and
Porto, Portugal the Sheraton Seattle Hotel
January 6–9, 2016
University of Porto Wednesday – Saturday
June 11–14, 2015 Joint Mathematics Meetings, including the 122nd Annual
Meeting of the AMS, 99th Annual Meeting of the Math-
Thursday – Sunday ematical Association of America (MAA), annual meetings
First Joint International Meeting involving the American of the Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM) and
Mathematical Societry (AMS), the European Mathematical the National Association of Mathematicians (NAM), and the
Society (EMS), and the Sociedade de Portuguesa Matematica winter meeting of the Association of Symbolic Logic (ASL),
(SPM). with sessions contributed by the Society for Industrial and
Associate secretary: Georgia M. Benkart Applied Mathematics (SIAM).
Announcement issue of Notices: To be announced Associate secretary: Michel L. Lapidus
Announcement issue of Notices: October 2015
Program first available on AMS website: To be announced
Program first available on AMS website: To be announced
Program issue of electronic Notices: To be announced
Program issue of electronic Notices: January 2016
Issue of Abstracts: Not applicable Issue of Abstracts: Volume 37, Issue 1
Deadlines Deadlines
For organizers: To be announced For organizers: April 1, 2015
For abstracts: To be announced For abstracts: To be announced

October 2013 Notices of the AMS 1257