Sie sind auf Seite 1von 880

Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Systems Operation
3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5546-15 Publication Date -01/07/2013 Date Updated -30/07/2013

i01563814

Air Inlet and Exhaust System


SMCS - 1050

Illustration 1 g00549374
Air Inlet and Exhaust System Schematic

(1) Exhaust manifold

(2) Inlet manifold

(3) Engine cylinder

(4) Air inlet heater

(5) Turbocharger compressor wheel

(6) Turbocharger turbine wheel

(7) Air inlet

(8) Exhaust outlet

(9) Turbocharger

The components of the air inlet and the components of the exhaust system control the quality of
available air for combustion. The components of the air inlet and the components of the exhaust
system also control the amount of available air for combustion. The air inlet and the exhaust system
consist of the following components:

• Air cleaner

• Inlet manifold

• Cylinder head

• Valves

• Valve components

• Exhaust manifold

• Turbocharger

Turbocharger compressor wheel (5) pulls clean inlet air from the air cleaner through air inlet (7). The
rotation of turbocharger compressor wheel (5) causes compression of the air and the rotation of the
turbocharger compressor wheel forces the air through inlet manifold (2) to the inlet valves in the
cylinder head. The inlet valves control the air flow into each engine cylinder.

There is one inlet and one exhaust valve for each cylinder. Refer to "Valves and Valve System
Components". The inlet valves open when the piston moves down on the inlet stroke. Compressed air
from inlet manifold (2) is pulled into engine cylinder (3). The inlet valve closes. The piston starts to
move up on the compression stroke. When the piston is near the top of the compression stroke, fuel is
injected into the engine cylinder. The fuel mixes with the air and combustion begins. The force of
combustion pushes the piston downward. The piston is pushed downward on the power stroke. The
piston moves up again on the exhaust stroke. The exhaust valve opens and the exhaust gases are
pushed through the exhaust port into exhaust manifold (1). After the piston makes the exhaust stroke,
the exhaust valve closes and the cycle starts again. The cycle consists of the following items: inlet,
compression, power and exhaust.

Exhaust gases from exhaust manifold (1) go into the turbine side of turbocharger (9) and the exhaust
gases cause turbocharger turbine wheel (6) to turn. Turbocharger turbine wheel (6) and turbocharger
compressor wheel (5) are connected to the same shaft. The exhaust gases travel through the exhaust
outlet (8). The exhaust gases travel through the exhaust system.

Turbocharger

Illustration 2 g00818379

Left side view of the 3066 Engine

(1) Turbocharger

(2) Exhaust manifold

Turbocharger (1) is installed on the center of the exhaust manifold (2). All of the exhaust gases from
the engine travel through turbocharger (1). The compressor side of turbocharger (1) is connected to
the elbow of the air heater of the inlet manifold by a rubber hose.
Illustration 3 g00819448

Turbocharger

(3) Air inlet

(4) Compressor housing

(5) Compressor wheel

(6) Bearing

(7) Oil inlet port

(8) Bearing

(9) Turbine housing

(10) Turbine wheel

(11) Exhaust outlet

(12) Oil outlet port

(13) Exhaust inlet


The exhaust gases travel into the turbine housing (9) through exhaust inlet (13). The exhaust gases
push the blades of turbocharger turbine wheel (10). Turbocharger turbine wheel (10) and turbocharger
compressor wheel (5) have the same shaft.

Clean air from the air cleaners is pulled through the air inlet (3) of the compressor housing by the
rotation of the turbocharger compressor wheel (5). The inlet air is compressed by the movement of the
blades of the compressor. The compression allows the engine to burn more air and fuel during
combustion. The result is greater power for the engine.

More fuel is injected into the cylinders when the load on the engine increases. More exhaust gases are
produced and turbocharger turbine wheel (10) and turbocharger compressor wheel (5) of the
turbocharger turn faster. More air is forced into the engine as turbocharger compressor wheel (5) turns
faster. The engine burns more fuel with greater efficiency because of the increased air flow. More
engine power is the result.

The maximum rpm of the turbocharger is controlled by the fuel setting, the high idle speed setting,
and the height above sea level of the engine.

NOTICE

If the fuel setting is higher than given in the TMI (Technical Marketing
Information), there can be damage to engine or turbocharger parts.
Damage will result when increased heat and/or friction due to the
higher engine output goes beyond the engine cooling and lubrication
systems abilities. A mechanic that has the proper training is the only
one to make the adjustment of fuel setting and high idle rpm setting.

The fuel setting adjustment is performed at the factory for a specific engine application. The governor
housing is sealed in order to prevent changes in the adjustment of the fuel. The governor housing is
also sealed in order to prevent changes of the high idle speed setting.

Bearing (6) and bearing (8) of the turbocharger use engine oil under high pressure for lubrication. The
oil passes through the oil inlet port (7). The oil then travels through the passages in the center section
for the lubrication of the bearings. Oil from the turbocharger travels through the oil outlet port (12) in
the bottom of the center suction. The oil then travels back to the engine lubrication system.

Valves and Valve System Components


The valves and the valve system components control the flow of inlet air into the cylinder during
engine operation. The valves and the valve system components also control the flow of exhaust gases
out of the cylinder during engine operation.
Illustration 4 g00549381

Valve System Components

(1) Rocker arm

(2) Valve retainer

(3) Valve cap

(4) Adjusting screw

(5) Pushrod

(6) Valve spring

(7) Valve guide

(8) Valve
The inlet and exhaust valves are opened and the inlet and exhaust valves are closed by the movement
of the following components: crankshaft, camshaft, tappets, pushrods, rocker arms and valve springs.
Rotation of the crankshaft causes rotation of the camshaft. The camshaft gear is timed to a gear on the
front of the crankshaft. The camshaft gear is also driven by the gear on the front of the crankshaft.
The rotation of the camshaft causes the lobes to rotate. The rotation of the lobes of the camshaft cause
the tappets to move. The movement causes pushrod (5) to move rocker arm (1). Movement of rocker
arm (1) causes the inlet and exhaust valves to open according to the firing order (injection sequence)
of the engine. Valve spring (6) for each valve makes the valve return to the closed position. The valve
spring also holds the valve closed.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Thu Jul 20 20:53:24 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Disassembly and Assembly


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5553-10 Publication Date -01/05/2012 Date Updated -15/05/2012

i01575215

Inlet Manifold - Remove


SMCS - 1058-011

Removal Procedure
Start By:

A. Remove fuel filter base. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly, "Fuel Filter Base - Remove and
Install".
B. Remove fuel injection lines. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly, "Fuel Injection Lines -
Remove and Install".
C. Remove the air inlet heater. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly, "Air Inlet Heater - Remove
and Install".

NOTICE

Keep all parts clean from contaminants.

Contaminants may cause rapid wear and shortened component life.


Illustration 1 g00604352

1. Loosen clamp (1) on hose assembly (3) .

2. Remove two bolts (2) that secure the hose assembly to the engine.

3. Slide the hose assembly (3) from the retaining ring (4) .

4. Remove the bolts and washers (5) that secure the air inlet manifold to the cylinder heads. The
3066 Engine has eleven bolts and washers while the 3064 Engine has eight bolts and washers.

Note: One bolt has previously been removed in order to remove the fuel return line.

5. Remove one bolt (6) and the washer that secures the lifting bracket (7) to the cylinder block.

6. Remove inlet manifold (8) and remove the lifting bracket (7) .

7. Remove gaskets (9) (not shown). Check the gaskets for wear or damage. Replace the gaskets, if
the gasket is worn or damaged.

Note: The 3064 Engine has one gasket, while the 3066 Engine has two gaskets.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 12:51:06 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Specifications
3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5545-18 Publication Date -01/09/2012 Date Updated -14/09/2012

i01030372

Turbocharger
SMCS - 1052

Illustration 1 g00530558

(1) Compressor wheel

(2) Turbine wheel

(3) Turbine housing

(4) Compressor housing


(5) Cartridge housing

Note: Mark the orientation of the compressor housing, the cartridge housing and the turbine housing
before disassembly.

Illustration 2 g00530560

(6) Turbine shaft

Place a dial indicator on the end of the turbine shaft. Move the compressor wheel (1) in the
axial direction in order to measure end play. End play ... 0.057 to 0.103 mm (.0022 to .0041
inch)

Note: The turbocharger must be disassembled and the turbocharger must be checked for clearances if
the end play is beyond the specifications.
Illustration 3 g00530561

(7) Lock plates

Position the lock plates and tighten the bolts to the following torque. ... 20 N·m (15 lb ft)

Illustration 4 g00530562

Turbine housing (3) and Cartridge housing (5)


Align the turbine housing (3) with the cartridge housing (5).

Illustration 5 g00530564

(8) Clamp

Apply 5P-3931 Anti-Seize Compound to the threads of the clamp. Tighten the clamp to the
following torque. ... 4 ± 1 N·m (35 ± 9 lb in)

Tap clamp (8) lightly around the circumference. Tighten clamp (8) to the following torque. ... 4 ± 1
N·m (35 ± 9 lb in)

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 12:52:48 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Disassembly and Assembly


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5553-10 Publication Date -01/05/2012 Date Updated -15/05/2012

i01615171

Turbocharger - Disassemble
SMCS - 1052-015

Disassembly Procedure
Start By:

A. Remove the turbocharger. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly, "Turbocharger - Remove".

NOTICE

Keep all parts clean from contaminants.

Contaminants may cause rapid wear and shortened component life.

NOTICE

Care must be taken to ensure that fluids are contained during


performance of inspection, maintenance, testing, adjusting and repair
of the product. Be prepared to collect the fluid with suitable containers
before opening any compartment or disassembling any component
containing fluids.

Refer to Special Publication, NENG2500, "Caterpillar Tools and Shop


Products Guide" for tools and supplies suitable to collect and contain
fluids on Caterpillar products.
Dispose of all fluids according to local regulations and mandates.

1. Place an index mark on all of the components. The marks will help to align the components
during the assembly procedure.

Illustration 1 g00608212

2. Remove two bolts (1) from the oil return line. Remove bolt (2) from the oil supply line.

3. Remove oil return line (3) from the cartridge.

4. Remove oil supply line (4) from the cartridge.

Illustration 2 g00608210

5. Remove gasket (5) from the cartridge.

6. Remove gasket (6) from the turbine housing.


Illustration 3 g00608342

7. Remove the bolt and nut (7) from clamp (8). Remove clamp (8) that secures the turbine housing
(9) to the cartridge (10) .

8. Separate turbine housing (9) from the cartridge (10) .

Illustration 4 g00608415
Illustration 5 g00608452

9. Remove snap ring (11) from compressor housing (12) .

10. Separate compressor housing (12) from the cartridge (10) .

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 12:53:00 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Testing and Adjusting


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5546-15 Publication Date -01/07/2013 Date Updated -30/07/2013

i05192642

Finding Top Center Position for No. 1 Piston


SMCS - 1105-531

Note: Refer to the Disassembly and Assembly for your machine for the removal of components.

Note: A timing mark for top dead center is present on the crankshaft pulley. If the mark cannot be
found or if the mark is suspected to be incorrect, refer to the procedure below.

Table 1
Required Tools
Callout Part Number Description Quantity
A 299-9126 Crankshaft Turning Tool 1

1. Remove the valve mechanism cover from the engine.


Illustration 1 g01420177

(A) 299-9126 Crankshaft Turning Tool

2. Install Tooling (A) on the engines flywheel housing. Use Tooling (A) in order to rotate the
engine. Refer to Illustration 1.

3. Rotate the crankshaft clockwise when you face the front of the engine. Rotate the crankshaft
until the pushrod for the inlet valve of the rear cylinder begins to tighten.

4. Rotate the crankshaft further by 1/8 of a turn in a clockwise direction. Insert a suitable lever
between the rocker arm and the valve spring cap of the No. 1 inlet valve. Open the inlet valve.
Put a spacer that is approximately 5 mm (0.2 inch) thick between the valve stem and the rocker
arm.

5. Slowly rotate the crankshaft in a counterclockwise direction until the piston contacts the open
valve. Make a temporary mark on the damper or the pulley. The temporary make must align
accurately with the tip of the pointer.

6. Rotate the crankshaft in a clockwise direction by 1 degrees or 2 degrees. Remove the spacer
that is between the valve stem and the rocker arm. Rotate the crankshaft by 1/4 of a turn in a
counterclockwise direction. Put a spacer that is approximately 5 mm (0.2 inch) thick between
the valve stem and the rocker lever of the No. 1 inlet valve.

7. Slowly rotate the crankshaft clockwise until the piston contacts the open valve. Make another
temporary mark on the damper or the pulley. The temporary mark must align accurately with
the tip of the pointer.

8. Make a temporary mark at the center point between the two marks on the damper or the pulley.
Remove the other two marks. Rotate the crankshaft by 1/8 of a turn in a counterclockwise
direction. Remove the spacer between the valve stem and the rocker arm.
Illustration 2 g01811376

(1) Pointer

(2) Pulley

(3) Top center mark

Illustration 3 g01830733
(1) Pointer

(2) Pulley

(3) Top center mark

9. Slowly rotate the crankshaft in a clockwise direction until the mark on the damper of the pulley
(2), which was made in Step 8, aligns with the tip of the pointer (1). The No. 1 piston is now at
the top center on the compression stroke. Refer to Illustration 2 and Illustration 3.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 12:55:15 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Testing and Adjusting


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5546-15 Publication Date -01/07/2013 Date Updated -30/07/2013

i02646340

Fuel Injection Nozzle - Test


SMCS - 1254-081

Perform the following procedures in order to determine if a fuel injection nozzle does not work
correctly.

Table 1
Required Tools
Part Number Part Name Qty
5P-4150 Nozzle Testing Group 1
5P-7448 Adapter 1
6V-2170 Tube As 1
8S-2270 Fuel Collector 1
1U-8857 Extension Tube 1
6V-6068 Calibration Fluid 1
8S-2245 Injector Cleaning Tool Gp 1
Illustration 1 g01328160

Fuel injection nozzle assembly

(1) Holder assembly

(2) Shim

(3) Pressure spring

(4) Pressure pin

(5) Gasket

(6) Pin

(7) Fuel injection nozzle

(8) Retaining nut


1. Start the engine and run the engine at low idle.

2. Loosen the nut for fuel supply line at each fuel injection nozzle. Listen for the low idle to
decrease at each cylinder. Also, listen for the low idle to become rough at each cylinder.

3. The fuel injection nozzle may be damaged if the items that follow occur:

◦ Engine rpm does not decrease.

◦ The engine continues to run properly.

Remove the fuel injection nozzle from the engine cylinder head for additional testing.

Note: If leakage at the nut for fuel supply line occurs, make sure that the fuel supply line and
the nut for the fuel supply line are correctly aligned with the inlet connection of the fuel
injection nozzle. Do not tighten the nut for the fuel supply line on the high pressure fuel line
more than the recommended torque. If the nut is tightened more, the fuel line may become
restricted or the threads of the fuel injection nozzle and the nut may be damaged.

Cleaning Of Fuel Injection Nozzles

Personal injury can result from improper handling of chemicals.

Make sure you use all the necessary protective equipment required to
do the job.

Make sure that you read and understand all directions and hazards
described on the labels and material safety data sheet of any product
used to clean the components.

Observe all safety precautions recommended by the chemical


manufacturer for handling, storage, and disposal of cleaning agents.

NOTICE

Do not use a steel brush or wire wheel to clean the nozzle body or the
nozzle tip. Use of these tools can cause a small reduction of orifice size,
and this will cause a large reduction in engine horsepower. Too much
use of a wire brush will also remove the coating that is on the fuel
injection nozzle for protection.
Illustration 2 g00570038

Remove carbon with the 8S-2258 Brass Wire Brush which is included in the 8S-2245 Injector Cleaning Tool Gp .

Before the fuel injection nozzle can be tested, remove all loose carbon around the tip of the fuel
injection nozzle. Use the 8S-2245 Injector Cleaning Tool Gp to clean the fuel injection nozzle. Refer
to Special Instruction , SEHS8627, "Use of 8S-2245 injection Nozzle Cleaning Tool Group"for more
information.

1. Remove retaining nut (8) from the holder assembly (1) . Remove the tip assembly of fuel
injection nozzle (7) . Wash the needle valve and the body.

Note: Do not mix the needle valve and bodies of different nozzles. The components of the
nozzle tip assembly are a precise fit. The components must not be exchanged with other
components. Do not touch the sliding surfaces of the needle valve.

2. Wash tip assembly of fuel injection nozzle (7) in clean kerosene. After washing, assemble the
needle valve and the body in clean fuel.

3. Tighten retaining nut (8) to a torque of 30 to 39 N·m (22 to 29 lb ft).


4. Replace the nozzle tip if the discharge pattern is still unacceptable.

Note: Extra care should be used in handling the fuel injection nozzle in order to prevent damage to
the nozzle tip. A scratch or a burr could cause needle leakage or spray distortion. Dirt that is in the
orifices of the nozzle tip can damage engine components. Dirt can also cause spray distortion.

Fuel Injection Lines


Fuel from the fuel injection pump goes to the fuel injection nozzle through the fuel injection lines.
When the fuel injection lines are disconnected or removed, always put caps or plugs on the ends of
the lines in order to keep dirt out of the lines. Ensure that all of the line clamps and all of the vibration
dampers are installed in the original locations when the fuel injection lines are installed.

Note: Fuel injection lines can leak if the fuel injection lines are bent or damaged. Fuel injection lines
can also leak if the fuel injection lines are rubbing. Leakage of fuel can also cause a fire. Replace any
lines which have damage or leaks that can not be corrected when the nuts are tightened to the correct
torque.

Note: Ensure that the fuel injection line clamps are installed in the correct location. Incorrectly
installed clamps may allow the fuel injection lines to vibrate. Incorrectly installed clamps may allow
the fuel injection lines to become damaged. The damaged lines may leak. Leakage of fuel can cause a
fire.

All nuts that hold a fuel injection line to the fuel injection nozzle or to the fuel injection pump must be
tightened to the correct torque. If the nut is loose, fuel will leak from the connection. If the nut is too
tight, the inside diameter of the fuel line will become smaller. This causes a restriction to the flow of
fuel in the fuel line. Use a torque wrench to tighten the nuts of the fuel injection lines to a torque of
26.5 to 32.4 N·m (20 to 24 lb ft).

Pressure Test

Ensure that you wear eye protection at all times during testing. When
fuel injection nozzles are tested, test fluids travel through the orifices of
the nozzle tip with high pressure. Under this amount of pressure, the
test fluid can pierce the skin and cause serious injury to the operator.
Always keep the tip of the fuel injection nozzle pointed away from the
operator and into the fuel collector and extension.

NOTICE
Do not use dirty test fluids when you test fuel injection nozzles. Also, do
not test fuel injection nozzles unless you have the correct service
tools.The use of dirty test fluids and the use of incorrect service tools
will result in damage to fuel injection nozzles.

Illustration 3 g01328191

Pressure test the fuel injection nozzle by using 5P-4150 Nozzle Testing Group .

(9) 5P-7448 Adapter

(10) Fuel injection nozzle

(11) 5P-4721 Tube

(12) 1U-8857 Extension Tube

(13) 8S-2270 Fuel Collector

(14) 8T-5313 Filter


Note: This procedure is a test of the first opening pressure of the fuel injection nozzle. The test for the
second opening pressure of the fuel injection nozzle can not be performed with this procedure. A test
of the second opening pressure requires the disassembly of the fuel injection nozzle and the use of
special shims. Disassembly of the fuel injection nozzles may invalidate the standards for emissions of
the engine.

1. Connect fuel injection nozzle (10) to the tooling that is shown in Illustration 3.

The spray from the fuel injection nozzle must be directed into 1U-8857 Extension Tube (12)
and 8S-2270 Fuel Collector (13) .

Refer to the table in the Specifications Module, "Fuel Injection Nozzles" topic for the correct
pressure settings. If the opening pressure is not within the range of the setting which is given in
the table, the fuel injection nozzle must be replaced.

Use clean 6V-6068 Calibration Fluid when the fuel injection nozzles are tested. The calibration
fluid is similar to SAE J-967 (ISO 4113) oil.

2. Close the gauge protector valve. Close the shutoff valve. Open the pump isolator valve. Flush
the fuel injection nozzle by operating the nozzle tester. Operate the nozzle tester for 10 to 15
strokes at a rate of approximately sixty strokes per minute.

3. Open the gauge protector valve. Slowly increase the pressure until the valve in the fuel injection
nozzle opens. Note the highest pressure indication on the dial indicator before the pointer
moves to 0 kPa (0 psi). This highest pressure indication is the opening pressure of the fuel
injection nozzle. The opening pressure will happen when valve needle rises from the nozzle
seat.

Refer to Specifications Module, "Fuel Injection Nozzles" for correct pressure settings. If the
opening pressure is not within the range of the setting that is given in the table, the fuel
injection nozzle must be replaced.

Back Leakage Test


1. Connect fuel injection nozzle (10) to the tooling that is shown in Illustration 3.

Position the fuel injection nozzle so that the direction of the fuel spray is into 1U-8857
Extension (12) and 8S-2270 Fuel Collector (13) .

2. Pump the pressure to about 1957 kPa (284 psi) below the opening pressure of the fuel injection
nozzle. Refer to the Specifications Module, "Fuel Injection Nozzles" topic for the correct
setting of the opening pressure. Release the handle. When the pressure begins to decrease, note
the time that is required for the pressure to decrease to approximately 0 kPa (0 psi). If the fuel
injection nozzle is not damaged, the time will not be less than 5 seconds or more than 45
seconds.

If the time that is required for the pressure to decrease to 0 kPa (0 psi) is less than 5 seconds,
too much fuel is leaking around the valve needle. Replace the fuel injection nozzle.
Illustration 4 g00570047

Leakage test after ten seconds

(A) Acceptable

(B) Unacceptable

3. Look for any leakage from the pressure faces of the holder and the retaining nut of the fuel
injection nozzle. If leakage is visible, make sure that the components are tightened to the
correct torque.

If leakage continues to occur, unscrew the retaining nut from the body. Inspect the threaded
surfaces for foreign particles and damage. If the faces are clean and undamaged, test the fuel
injection nozzle. Repeat Steps 1 and 2.

Fuel Injector Nozzle And Seat Test


1. Connect fuel injection nozzle (10) to the tooling that is shown in Illustration 3.

Position fuel injection nozzle so that the direction of the fuel spray is into 1U-8857 Extension
Tube (12) and 8S-2270 Fuel Collector (13) .
2. Pump the pressure of the nozzle tester to approximately 1957 kPa (284 psi) below the opening
pressure of the fuel injection nozzle. Fuel should not collect on the tip of the fuel injection
nozzle in a sufficient quantity in order to drip from the tip for at least ten seconds. A light
dampness is acceptable.

If the results of the tests are not acceptable, replace the fuel injection nozzle.

Test The Spray Pattern

Ensure that you wear eye protection at all times during testing. When
fuel injection nozzles are tested, test fluids travel through the orifices of
the nozzle tip with high pressure. Under this amount of pressure, the
test fluid can pierce the skin and cause serious injury to the operator.
Always keep the tip of the fuel injection nozzle pointed away from the
operator and into the fuel collector and extension.

The pressure adjustment must be correct before the spray pattern is tested.

Illustration 5 g00322083

Correct Spray Pattern For Fuel Injector Nozzles


1. Connect fuel injection nozzle (10) to tooling that is shown in Illustration 3.

Position the fuel injection nozzle so that the direction of fuel spray is into 1U-8857 Extension
Tube (12) and 8S-2270 Fuel Collector (13) .

2. Close the gauge protector valve and the shutoff valve. Open the pump isolator valve.

3. Quickly pump the nozzle tester and look at the spray pattern when the fluid begins to flow
through the orifices of the fuel injection nozzle.

The spray, which flows from all of the orifices, must have the same pattern. A difference in the
nozzle spray patterns indicates that fuel injection nozzle is damaged. Refer to the correct spray
pattern in Illustration 5.

Note: Be sure that the gauge protector valve is closed before fuel injection nozzle is removed
from the nozzle tester. Closing the gauge protector valve will prevent damage to the pressure
gauge.

Installation Of Fuel Injection Nozzles

Illustration 6 g01328217

Typical example of fuel injection nozzle

(1) Retainer for fuel injection nozzle

(2) Fuel injection nozzle

(3) Seat washer


1. When a fuel injection nozzle is removed from the cylinder head, replace the following
components:

◦ Retainer for fuel injection nozzle (1)

◦ Fuel injection nozzle (2)

◦ Seat washer (3)

Ensure that seat washer is 2.0 mm (0.08 inch) thick.

Ensure that all mating surfaces are clean.

Note: Ensure that all old gaskets are removed and that the new gasket is undamaged. If an old
gasket remains in the recess of the cylinder head for fuel injection nozzle, the depth of the
nozzle into the precombustion chamber will be incorrect.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 12:56:48 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Testing and Adjusting


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5546-15 Publication Date -01/07/2013 Date Updated -30/07/2013

i01906072

Engine Valve Lash - Inspect/Adjust


SMCS - 1102-025

Be sure the engine cannot be started while this maintenance is being


performed. To prevent possible injury, do not use the starting motor to
turn the flywheel.

Hot engine components can cause burns. Allow additional time for the
engine to cool before measuring/adjusting engine valve lash clearance.

The valve lash is measured between the top of the cap of the valve stem and the rocker arm. The valve
lash is measured with a feeler gauge.

Valve Lash Setting with Stopped Engine (Cold)

Inlet and Exhaust Valve ... 0.25 mm (0.010 inch)

Use the following procedure to check and make adjustments to the valve lash:

1. Remove the valve covers.


Illustration 1 g00565561

Finding The Location of Top Center

2. Turn the crankshaft in a counterclockwise direction until the No. 1 piston is at the top center on
the compression stroke. The rotation of the crankshaft is viewed from the rear of the engine.
The alignment mark on the pulley assembly will be in alignment with the timing pointer.

Note: The crankshaft may be turned by using a socket wrench on the bolt in the crankshaft
pulley. The crankshaft may also be turned by turning the alternator. This will turn the belt and
this will turn the crankshaft pulley.

Note: Refer to the Engine Supplement, Disassembly and Assembly for your specific machine
for additional information.
Illustration 2 g00526261

Valve Lash

3. 3064 Engine: Adjust the valve lash on the inlet valves for cylinders 1 and 2. Adjust the valve
lash on the exhaust valves for cylinders 1 and 3.

3066 Engine: Adjust the valve lash on the inlet valves for cylinders 1, 2, and 4. Adjust the valve
lash on the exhaust valves for cylinders 1, 3, and 5.

4. Turn the flywheel for 360 degrees in the direction of engine rotation. The No. 4 piston (four
cylinder) and the No. 6 piston (six cylinder) will be at the top center (TC) on the compression
stroke.

5. 3064 Engine: Adjust the valve lash on the inlet valves for cylinders 3 and 4. Adjust the valve
lash on the exhaust valves for cylinders 2 and 4.

3066 Engine: Adjust the valve lash on the inlet valves for cylinders 3, 5, and 6. Adjust the valve
lash on the exhaust valves for cylinders 2, 4, and 6.

6. Hold the adjustment screw and tighten the locknut after the adjustment is complete.

Adjusting the valve lash several times in a short period indicates wear in a different part of the engine.
Find the problem and make any necessary repairs in order to prevent more damage to the engine.

Rapid wear of the camshaft and tappets can occur if insufficient valve lash is not corrected.
Insufficient valve lash can also be an indication of faulty valve seats. The following items are reasons
for faulty seats of the valves: faulty fuel injection nozzles, restrictions to the air inlet, dirty air filters,
incorrect fuel setting and overloading the engine.
Broken valve stems, broken pushrods, or broken spring retainers can be caused by insufficient valve
lash that is not corrected. A fast increase in valve lash can be an indication of any of the following
items:

• Worn camshaft and tappets

• Worn rocker arms

• Bent pushrods

• Loose adjustment screws for valve lash

• Broken socket on the upper end of pushrod

Fuel in the lubrication oil may be a possible cause of rapid wear of the camshaft and the tappets. Dirty
lubrication oil may also be a possible cause of rapid wear of the camshaft and tappets.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 13:02:29 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Testing and Adjusting


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5546-15 Publication Date -01/07/2013 Date Updated -30/07/2013

i01906072

Engine Valve Lash - Inspect/Adjust


SMCS - 1102-025

Be sure the engine cannot be started while this maintenance is being


performed. To prevent possible injury, do not use the starting motor to
turn the flywheel.

Hot engine components can cause burns. Allow additional time for the
engine to cool before measuring/adjusting engine valve lash clearance.

The valve lash is measured between the top of the cap of the valve stem and the rocker arm. The valve
lash is measured with a feeler gauge.

Valve Lash Setting with Stopped Engine (Cold)

Inlet and Exhaust Valve ... 0.25 mm (0.010 inch)

Use the following procedure to check and make adjustments to the valve lash:

1. Remove the valve covers.


Illustration 1 g00565561

Finding The Location of Top Center

2. Turn the crankshaft in a counterclockwise direction until the No. 1 piston is at the top center on
the compression stroke. The rotation of the crankshaft is viewed from the rear of the engine.
The alignment mark on the pulley assembly will be in alignment with the timing pointer.

Note: The crankshaft may be turned by using a socket wrench on the bolt in the crankshaft
pulley. The crankshaft may also be turned by turning the alternator. This will turn the belt and
this will turn the crankshaft pulley.

Note: Refer to the Engine Supplement, Disassembly and Assembly for your specific machine
for additional information.
Illustration 2 g00526261

Valve Lash

3. 3064 Engine: Adjust the valve lash on the inlet valves for cylinders 1 and 2. Adjust the valve
lash on the exhaust valves for cylinders 1 and 3.

3066 Engine: Adjust the valve lash on the inlet valves for cylinders 1, 2, and 4. Adjust the valve
lash on the exhaust valves for cylinders 1, 3, and 5.

4. Turn the flywheel for 360 degrees in the direction of engine rotation. The No. 4 piston (four
cylinder) and the No. 6 piston (six cylinder) will be at the top center (TC) on the compression
stroke.

5. 3064 Engine: Adjust the valve lash on the inlet valves for cylinders 3 and 4. Adjust the valve
lash on the exhaust valves for cylinders 2 and 4.

3066 Engine: Adjust the valve lash on the inlet valves for cylinders 3, 5, and 6. Adjust the valve
lash on the exhaust valves for cylinders 2, 4, and 6.

6. Hold the adjustment screw and tighten the locknut after the adjustment is complete.

Adjusting the valve lash several times in a short period indicates wear in a different part of the engine.
Find the problem and make any necessary repairs in order to prevent more damage to the engine.

Rapid wear of the camshaft and tappets can occur if insufficient valve lash is not corrected.
Insufficient valve lash can also be an indication of faulty valve seats. The following items are reasons
for faulty seats of the valves: faulty fuel injection nozzles, restrictions to the air inlet, dirty air filters,
incorrect fuel setting and overloading the engine.
Broken valve stems, broken pushrods, or broken spring retainers can be caused by insufficient valve
lash that is not corrected. A fast increase in valve lash can be an indication of any of the following
items:

• Worn camshaft and tappets

• Worn rocker arms

• Bent pushrods

• Loose adjustment screws for valve lash

• Broken socket on the upper end of pushrod

Fuel in the lubrication oil may be a possible cause of rapid wear of the camshaft and the tappets. Dirty
lubrication oil may also be a possible cause of rapid wear of the camshaft and tappets.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 13:03:49 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Testing and Adjusting


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5546-15 Publication Date -01/07/2013 Date Updated -30/07/2013

i05183361

Piston Ring Groove - Inspect


SMCS - 1214-040

Introduction
This procedure is intended to give information on inspecting piston ring grove. Refer to the
Specifications Manual for specifications for this procedure.

Required Tools
Table 1
Required Tools
Part Number Part Name Qty
8H-8581 Feeler Gauge 1

Inspection Procedure
Inspect the Piston and the Piston Rings

1. Check the piston for wear and other damage.

2. Check that the piston rings are free to move in the grooves and that the rings are not broken.

Inspect the Clearance of the Piston Ring

1. Remove the piston rings and clean the grooves and the piston rings.
Illustration 1 g01284934

(1) Feeler gauge

(2) Piston ring

(3) Piston grooves

2. Fit new piston rings (2) in the piston grooves (3) .

3. Check the clearance for the piston ring by placing the 8H-8581 Feeler Gauge (1) between
piston groove (3) and the top of piston ring (2) . Refer to Specifications, "Piston and Rings" for
the dimensions.

Note: Some pistons have a tapered top groove and the piston ring is wedged. The clearance for
the top piston ring cannot be checked by the above method when this occurs.

Inspect the Piston Ring End Gap


Illustration 2 g01358235

(1) Piston ring

(2) Cylinder ring ridge

(3) Feeler gauge

1. Clean all carbon from the top of the cylinder bores.

2. Place each piston ring (1) in the cylinder bore just below the cylinder ring ridge (2) .

3. Use the 8H-8581 Feeler Gauge (3) to measure piston ring end gap. Refer to Specifications,
"Piston and Rings" for the dimensions.

Note: The coil spring must be removed from the oil control ring before the gap of the oil
control ring is measured.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 13:09:15 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Testing and Adjusting


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5546-15 Publication Date -01/07/2013 Date Updated -30/07/2013

i01764002

Connecting Rod - Inspect


SMCS - 1218-040

Note: The bolts on the connecting rod are installed in the connecting rod by a special process. The
bolts should not be rotated or removed. If the bolts are rotated or removed, the connecting rod and the
bolts will be damaged.

These procedures determine the following characteristics of the connecting rod.

• Length of the connecting rod

• Distortion of the connecting rod

• Parallel alignment of the bores of the connecting rod

Note: If the connecting rod or the bearing for the piston pin is replaced, a new piston must also be
installed. A new piston is required in order to ensure that the height of the piston above the cylinder
block is correct.

Length of a Connecting Rod


CRL is the connecting rod length. The length of the connecting rod is given in Table 1 for each length
grade of connecting rod.

In order to ensure that the piston height above the cylinder block is correct, six length grades of
connecting rods are used in production. The length grade is identified by a letter or a color which is
marked on the side of the connecting rod. The longest grade is marked with the letter "A". The
shortest grade is marked with the letter "F". The difference in each length grade is 0.03 mm (0.001
inch).

The length grade of a connecting rod is determined in the factory by machining an eccentric hole in a
semi-finished piston pin bushing.
If the connecting rod must be replaced, a new connecting rod assembly must be purchased and
installed. The length grade of the new connecting rod must be specified. The new connecting rod
contains a new piston pin bearing. The piston pin bearing is reamed to the correct bore. Refer to Table
1.

Replace Only the Piston or the Bearing for the Piston Pin

This procedure is applicable when the original connecting rod is used with the following components:
piston and piston pin bearing.

1. Remove the bearing for the piston pin, which was installed in the factory, from the connecting
rod. Install a new bushing in the connecting rod. If necessary, ream the new bearing in order to
obtain the correct clearance between the piston pin and the bearing.

Refer to Specifications, "Piston and Rings" for dimensions of bearings and piston pins.

2. Install a new piston, if necessary. The new piston will be the "Std" height grade. Also, a new
piston pin may be required.

Refer to Specifications, "Piston and Rings" for specifications of pistons and piston rings.

3. Measure the height of the piston above the cylinder block in order to ensure the correct piston
height.

If the height of the piston is incorrect, a new connecting rod must be installed. If the piston
height is too high, a shorter connecting rod is required. If the piston height is too low, a longer
connecting rod is required. Refer to Table 1.

Replacing the Connecting Rod and Piston

This procedure determines the length of the connecting rod. The length of the connecting rod must be
known so that the correct length of a replacement for the connecting rod can be purchased.

Determine the length grade of the connecting rod by one of the following characteristics:

• Length grade letter

• Measuring the length

If the letter for the length grade is used in order to determine the length grade, refer to Table 1. If the
length of the connecting rod must be measured in order to determine the length grade, refer to
Illustration 1.

Table 1
Length grades of the connecting rod
Length grade that is used in Length Grade that is used for Length Of The Connecting
Production Replacement Rod (CRL)
"A" and "B" "B"
132.05 to 132.08 mm (5.199
to 5.200 inch)

"C" and "D" "D" 131.99 to 132.02 mm (5.196 to


5.198 inch)

"E" and "F" "F" 131.93 to 131.96 mm (5.194 to


5.195 inch)

If the mark for the length grade cannot be observed on the connecting rod, perform the following
procedure in order to measure the length of the connecting rod ("CRL").

Illustration 1 g00396379

(1) Measuring pins

(2) Connecting rod

1. Use the following tools that are provided by the customer in order to measure the distances for
the connecting rod (2) which are specified in Illustration 1:

◦ Appropriate gauges for measuring distance

◦ Measuring pins (1)


2. Ensure that the measuring pins (1) are parallel. If the measuring pins are not parallel, refer to
"Distortion of a Connecting Rod". This will determine if the distortion is within the tolerance.

Measure "CRL". Compare the "CRL" that is measured to the "CRL" that is given in Table 1.
The length grade of the connecting rod is determined by this "CRL".

Distortion of a Connecting Rod

Illustration 2 g00720855

(A) 127 mm (5.0 inch)

(B) The allowable tolerance for parallelism between center lines is ± 0.25 mm (± 0.010 inch).

(1) Measuring pins

(2) Connecting rod

1. Use the following tools that are provided by the customer in order to measure the distances for
the connecting rod (2) which are specified in Illustration 2:

◦ Appropriate gauges for measuring distance

◦ Measuring pins (1)

2. Measure the connecting rod for distortion between the bores.

The bores for the crankshaft bearing and the bearing for the piston pin must be square and
parallel with each other within the required limits. When the bearings for the connecting rod are
removed, the limits for parallelism and for squareness are 0.25 mm (0.010 inch) . The limits are
measured at a distance of 127 mm (5.0 inch) (A) from each side of the connecting rod.

Inspect the Bearing and Piston Pin for Wear


Note: The bolts on the connecting rod are installed in the connecting rod by a special process. The
bolts should not be rotated or removed. If the bolts are rotated or removed, the connecting rod and the
bolts will be damaged.

1. Inspect the bearing for the piston pin and the piston pin for wear.

2. Measure the clearance of the piston pin in the bearing for the piston pin.

Refer to Specifications, "Connecting Rod" for dimensions.

If the bearing or the piston pin are not within tolerances, the component must be replaced. If the
clearance between the bearing and piston pin is not within the tolerance, one or both components must
be replaced.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 13:14:03 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Testing and Adjusting


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5546-15 Publication Date -01/07/2013 Date Updated -30/07/2013

i01652707

Cylinder Head - Inspect


SMCS - 1100-040

Table 1
Required Tools
Part Number Part Name Quantity
8S - 6691 Cylinder Head Repair Stand 1
1U - 7234 Feeler Gauge 1
Illustration 1 g00876723

Bolt tightening sequence

1. Remove the cylinder head bolts in the reverse sequence that is shown in Illustration 1. A 14 mm
extended socket is required in order to remove the bolts which are numbered 12 through 15.
Remove the cylinder head from the engine.

2. Clean the cylinder head thoroughly. Make sure that the contact surfaces of the cylinder head
and the cylinder block are clean, smooth and flat.

3. Inspect the bottom surface of the cylinder head for pitting, corrosion, and cracks. Inspect the
area around the valve seat inserts and the holes for the fuel injection nozzles.

Illustration 2 g00876690

(1) Cylinder head

(2) Cylinder head repair stand

4. Put the cylinder head (1) on the 8S-6691 Cylinder Head Stand Set (2) .
Illustration 3 g00876693

(3) Straight edge

(4) Feeler gauge

Illustration 4 g00859749

Positions for measuring the flatness of the cylinder head

Typical example
5. Measure the cylinder head for flatness. Measure the flatness with a straight edge (3) and with a
feeler gauge (4) .

◦ Measure the cylinder head from point (A) to the opposite end.

◦ Measure the cylinder head from point (B) to the opposite end.

◦ Measure the cylinder head from point (C) to the opposite end.

Refer to the Specifications, "Cylinder Head" for the requirements of flatness.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 13:16:18 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Testing and Adjusting


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5546-15 Publication Date -01/07/2013 Date Updated -30/07/2013

i01582547

Piston Height - Inspect


SMCS - 1214-040

If the height of the piston above the cylinder block is not within the tolerance that is given in the
Specifications Module, "Piston and Rings", the piston and the bearing for the piston pin must be
replaced. If any of the following components are replaced or remachined, the piston height above the
cylinder block must be measured:

• Crankshaft

• Cylinder head

• Connecting rod

• Bearing for the piston pin

• Piston

The correct piston height must be maintained in order to ensure that the engine conforms to the
standards for emissions.

Note: The top of the piston should not be machined. If the original piston is installed, be sure that the
original piston is assembled to the correct connecting rod and installed in the original cylinder.

Six grades of length of connecting rods determine the piston height above the cylinder block. The
grade of length of a connecting rod is identified by a letter or a color. The letter or the color is marked
on the side of the connecting rod. Refer to Testing and Adjusting, "Connecting Rod - Inspect" and
Specifications, "Connecting Rod" for additional information.
Illustration 1 g00323908

8T-0455 Liner Projection Tool Group

(1) 1P-2403 Dial indicator

(2) 1P-2402 Gauge body

(3) 1P-5507 Gauge block

1. Use the 8T-0455 Liner Projection Tool Group in order to measure the piston height above the
cylinder block. Use the gauge block (3) to zero the dial indicator (1) on the face of the cylinder
block.

2. Position the gauge block (3) on the cylinder block. Rotate the crankshaft until the piston is at
the approximate top center. Ensure that the flame ring of the cylinder liner does not interfere
with the gauge block or the dial indicator.
Illustration 2 g00326383

Measurement of the piston height

(1) 1P-2403 Dial indicator

(2) 1P-2402 Gauge body

3. Position the gauge body (2) and dial indicator (1) in order to measure the piston height above
the cylinder block. Slowly rotate the crankshaft in order to determine when the piston is at the
highest position. Record this dimension. Compare this dimension with the dimensions that are
given in Specifications, "Piston and Rings".

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 13:19:22 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Specifications
3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5545-18 Publication Date -01/09/2012 Date Updated -14/09/2012

i02830690

Camshaft
SMCS - 1210

Illustration 1 g01411978

(1) Maximum permissible temperature of the camshaft gear for installation on the camshaft ... 315 °C
(599 °F)

NOTICE
Do not use a torch to heat the gear. A torch can unevenly heat the gear
causing warpage. The hardness of the gear may also be changed with
the use of a torch.

(A) Diameters of camshaft journals

Table 1
Number of Journal for Number of Journal for Service Limit (1)
Standard Diameter
3064 Engine 3066 Engine

1, 2 1, 2, 3 53.94 to 53.96 mm (2.123 53.90 mm


to 2.124 inch) (2.122 inch)

3 4 52.94 to 52.96 mm (2.084 52.90 mm


to 2.085 inch) (2.083 inch)
(1)
The service limit is the maximum dimension or the service limit is the minimum dimension that is specified for a part.
Replace the part if the service limit is reached.

(2) Torque for two bolts ... 10 to 13 N·m (90 to 115 lb in)

Illustration 2 g01411984

(B) Specified camshaft lobe lift


Exhaust lobe ... 7.344 mm (0.2891 inch)
Inlet lobe ... 6.689 mm (0.2633 inch)
Service limit for lobe lift for exhaust ... 6.844 mm (0.2694 inch)
Service limit for lobe lift for inlet ... 6.189 mm (0.2437 inch)

Note: Replace the camshaft if the service limit for the lobe lift is reached.

In order to find the lobe lift, use the following procedure:

1. Measure the camshaft lobe height (C) .

2. Measure the base circle (D) .

3. Subtract the base circle that is found in Step 2 from the lobe height that is found in Step 1. The
difference is the actual camshaft lobe lift (B) .

Illustration 3 g01411985

Note: Use a dial indicator and blocks in order to determine the runout of the camshaft. Take one half
of the dial indicator reading as the runout.

(3) Camshaft

Maximum permissible runout for camshaft ... 0.020 mm (0.0008 inch)


Straighten the camshaft if runout is less than the following amount. ... 0.050 mm (0.0020 inch)
Replace the camshaft if runout is more than the following amount. ... 0.050 mm (0.0020 inch)
Illustration 4 g01411986

(4) Measure the camshaft bearing with a dial indicator. Subtract the diameter of the camshaft journal
in order to give bearing clearances. Refer to Table 3 for the clearance between the camshaft journals
and the bushings.

Table 2
Number of Journal for Number of Journal for Repair Limit (2)
Standard Diameter
3064 Engine 3066 Engine

1, 2 1, 2, 3 0.04 to 0.09 mm (0.002 to 0.15 mm (0.006


0.004 inch) inch)

3 4 0.040 to 0.119 mm (0.0016 0.15 mm (0.006


to 0.0047 inch) inch)
(2)
The repair limit is the maximum dimension or the repair limit is the minimum dimension that is specified for a part.
Repair the part if the repair limit is reached.
Illustration 5 g01411988

(5) Install the dial indicator in order to determine gear end play.

End play ... 0.10 to 0.25 mm (0.004 to 0.010 inch)


Replace the thrust plate if the end play exceeds the following amount. ... 0.30 mm (0.012 inch)
Thrust plate thickness ... 4.85 mm (0.191 inch)

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 13:21:58 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Disassembly and Assembly


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5553-10 Publication Date -01/05/2012 Date Updated -15/05/2012

i01558850

Camshaft Gear - Remove and Install


SMCS - 1210-010-GE

Removal Procedure
Table 1
Required Tools
Tool Part Number Part Description Qty
1P-2321 Combination Puller 1
A
9S-9153 Puller Jaws 3

Start By:

A. Remove the camshaft. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly, "Camshaft - Remove".

NOTICE

Keep all parts clean from contaminants.

Contaminants may cause rapid wear and shortened component life.


Illustration 1 g00598317

1. Use tool (A) to remove camshaft gear (1) from camshaft (3) .

2. Remove thrust plate (2) from camshaft (3) .

Note: It is not necessary to remove the camshaft gear unless the gear (1) or the thrust plate (2) is
damaged.

Note: Check the slot in the camshaft for the woodruff key for wear or damage.

Note: Check the thrust plate (2) for wear or damage.

Installation Procedure

NOTICE

Keep all parts clean from contaminants.

Contaminants may cause rapid wear and shortened component life.


Illustration 2 g00598318

Note: During installation, ensure that camshaft (3) is clean and lubricate all of the components
with clean engine oil.

1. Install the thrust plate (2) on the camshaft (3) .

Always wear protective gloves when handling parts that have been
heated.

2. Heat camshaft gear (1) in an oven to a temperature of about 100 °C (212 °F) and install
camshaft gear (1) onto camshaft (3) .

Note: The camshaft gear is heated in order to ease the installation of the camshaft gear.

Note: Ensure that the timing marks of the camshaft gear are on the front.

End By: Install the camshaft. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly, "Camshaft - Install".

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 13:23:11 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Specifications
3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5545-18 Publication Date -01/09/2012 Date Updated -14/09/2012

i03946149

Crankshaft
SMCS - 1202

Illustration 1 g01412588

(1) Crankshaft main bearing journal

Table 1
Main Bearing Journal
Original size journal (1)
89.95 to 89.97 mm (3.541 to 3.542 inch)
Undersize journal
89.70 to 89.72 mm (3.531 to 3.532 inch)
0.25 mm (0.010 inch)
Undersize journal
89.45 to 89.47 mm (3.521 to 3.522 inch)
0.50 mm (0.020 inch)
Undersize journal
89.20 to 89.22 mm (3.512 to 3.513 inch)
0.75 mm (0.030 inch)
(1)
Regrind the main bearing journals to the next undersize dimension if the repair limit of 89.85 mm (3.537 inch) is
exceeded.

Illustration 2 g02157240

Measurement of connecting rod bearing journal

Table 2
Connecting Rod Journal

Original Size
59.945 to 59.965 mm (2.36003 to 2.3608 inch)
Undersize journal
59.695 to 59.715 mm (2.35019 to 2.35098 inch)
0.25 mm (0.010 inch)
Undersize journal
59.445 to 59.465 mm (2.34035 to 2.3411 inch)
0.50 mm (0.020 inch)
Undersize journal
59.195 to 59.215 mm (2.3305 to 2.3313 inch)
0.75 mm (0.030 inch)

Illustration 3 g01412590

(2) Support the crankshaft in a set of vee blocks. Measure the runout dimension at the center journal.
Maximum runout ... 0.10 mm (0.004 inch)

Note: The allowable tolerance for main bearing journals that are out of round is 0.010 mm (0.0004
inch). The maximum repair limit is 0.030 mm (0.0012 inch). If the repair limit is exceeded, regrind
the bearing journals to the specified dimension.

Note: The maximum service limit for the crankshaft journal is 0.90 mm (0.035 inch). Replace the
crankshaft if the crankshaft journal is worn beyond this specification.

Note: Replace the crankshaft if the runout exceeds the repair limit of 0.13 mm (0.005 inch).
Illustration 4 g01412592

(A) Width of crankshaft main bearing journal ... 33.000 to 33.039 mm (1.2992 to 1.3007 inch)

Illustration 5 g01412596

(3) Crankshaft end play ... 0.100 to 0.264 mm (0.0039 to 0.0104 inch)

Note: The maximum repair limit is 0.300 mm (0.0118 inch).


Replace the standard thrust plates if the end play exceeds the standard clearance. Three oversize thrust
plates are available as replacements if the end play still exceeds the maximum limit. Generally, the
rear journal is likely to be worn more rapidly than the front journal. If necessary, replace the rear
thrust plate. Refer to Table 3 for oversize thrust plates.

Table 3
Dimensions for Grinding of Crankshaft
Oversize Thrust Plates
Oversize Thrust Oversize (front or Oversize (front or
Tolerance
Plate rear) rear)

+0.15 mm (+0.006 33.15 mm (1.305 inch) 33.30 mm (1.311 inch) +0.039 mm (+0.0015
inch) inch)

+0.30 mm (+0.012 33.30 mm (1.311 inch) 33.45 mm (1.317 inch) +0.039 mm (+0.0015
inch) inch)

+0.45 mm (+0.018 33.45 mm (1.317 inch) 33.60 mm (1.323 inch) +0.039 mm (+0.0015
inch) inch)

Refer to Specifications, "Crankshaft Pulley" for the applicable torque of the crankshaft pulley nut.

The maximum temperature for installing the crankshaft gear is the following value. ... 100 °C (212 °
F)

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 13:25:00 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Specifications
3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5545-18 Publication Date -01/09/2012 Date Updated -14/09/2012

i02876647

Main Bearing Journal


SMCS - 1202; 1203

Illustration 1 g01358113

(1) Main bearing cap

(2) Dial indicator

Procedure to measure the bore of main bearing journal


1. Put the main bearing caps in position in the cylinder block. Apply clean engine oil on the main
bearing bolts. Install the main bearing bolts and tighten the main bearing bolts to a torque of
137 ± 5 N·m (100 ± 4 lb ft).

2. Measure the main bearing bores with a dial indicator. Subtract the diameter of the crankshaft
journal from the inside diameter of the main bearing in order to determine the bearing clearance
on the main journal. Clearance between the crankshaft journal and the main bearing is 0.050 to
0.118 mm (0.0020 to 0.0047 inch).

Note: Replace the bearings or refinish the crankshaft to the next undersize bearing if the main bearing
clearance exceeds 0.20 mm (0.008 inch).

Note: The allowable tolerance for main bearing journals that are out of round is 0.010 mm (0.0004
inch). The maximum repair limit is 0.030 mm (0.0012 inch). If the repair limit is exceeded, regrind
the bearing journals to the specified dimension.

Illustration 2 g01358114

(1) Main bearing cap

(3) Bolts

(4) Main bearing

(5) Main bearing journal

(3) Torque for bolts ... 137 ± 5 N·m (100 ± 4 lb ft)

Table 1
Thickness for Crankshaft Main Bearing
Size of Crankshaft Main Bearing Journal Bearing Thickness

Original size journal


2.477 to 2.490 mm (0.0975 to 0.0980 inch)
Undersize
0.25 mm (0.010 inch) 2.602 to 2.615 mm (0.1024 to 0.1030 inch)
Undersize
0.50 mm (0.020 inch) 2.727 to 2.740 mm (0.1074 to 0.1079 inch)
Undersize
0.75 mm (0.030 inch) 2.852 to 2.865 mm (0.1123 to 0.1128 inch)

The diameter of the crankshaft main bearing journal is given in Table 3.

Table 2
Main Bearing Journal

Original size journal (1)


89.95 to 89.97 mm (3.541 to 3.542 inch)
Undersize journal
89.70 to 89.72 mm (3.531 to 3.532 inch)
0.25 mm (0.010 inch)
Undersize journal
89.45 to 89.47 mm (3.521 to 3.522 inch)
0.50 mm (0.020 inch)
Undersize journal
89.20 to 89.22 mm (3.512 to 3.513 inch)
0.75 mm (0.030 inch)
(1)
Regrind the main bearing journals to the next undersize dimension if the repair limit of 89.85 mm (3.537 inch) is
exceeded.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 13:30:59 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Specifications
3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5545-18 Publication Date -01/09/2012 Date Updated -14/09/2012

i02832437

Cylinder Block
SMCS - 1201

Illustration 1 g01412583

(1) Cylinder block

Measure the amount of the warpage of the cylinder block with a straightedge and feeler gauge.
Maximum allowable clearance ... 0.05 mm (0.002 inch)
Repair limit ... 0.20 mm (0.008 inch)

Resurface the top of the block if the repair limit is reached.


Illustration 2 g01412585

(2) Cylinder liner

Measure the inside diameter of the cylinder sleeve that is parallel to the crankshaft. Measure the
inside diameter of the cylinder liner that is in a perpendicular position to the crankshaft. Measure the
top, the middle and the bottom of the cylinder liner. Refer to Table 2 for tolerances of the cylinder
liner.

Table 1
Tolerances of Cylinder Sleeves
Standard at Assembly Repair Limit (1) Service Limit (2)

Inside
102.010 to 102.045 mm (4.0161 to 102.200 mm (4.0236 102.700 mm (4.0433
Diameter
4.0175 inch) inch) inch)
Out of Round
N/A N/A
0.010 mm (0.0004 inch)

Taper N/A N/A


0.015 mm (0.0006 inch)
(1)
The repair limit is the maximum dimension or the repair limit is the minimum dimension that is specified for a part.
Repair a part if the repair limit is reached.
(2)
The service limit is the maximum dimension or the service limit is the minimum dimension that is specified for a part.
Replace the part if the service limit is reached.
Bore the cylinder to the specified oversize dimension if the inside diameter reaches the repair limit but
the inside diameter does not reach the service limit. Refer to Table 3.

Hone the liner to +0.25 mm (+0.010 inch) or +0.50 mm (+0.020 inch) oversize. Hone the liner to an
accuracy within 0.010 to 0.045 mm (0.0004 to 0.0018 inch).

Determine the oversize dimension that is necessary in order to clean up the cylinder if any liner has
uneven wear.

Replace all cylinder liners that are in excess of the service limit.

Note: Refinish all liners to the same oversize dimension. Use a ridge reamer in order to cut the ridge
of the cylinder if the liner is in good condition. Hone the cylinder bore.

Table 2
Oversize Bore Cylinder Bore Size

102.260 mm (4.0260 inch)


0.250 mm (0.0098 inch)
102.295 mm (4.0274 inch)

102.510 mm (4.0358 inch)


0.500 mm (0.0197 inch)
102.545 mm (4.0372 inch)

Illustration 3 g01412586

(3) Service limit of cylinder liner ... 102.700 mm (4.0433 inch)


Note: Replace all cylinder liners that exceed the service limit.

Illustration 4 g00529962

Cylinder liner

Use the following procedure in order to repair the cylinder liners:

1. Set up a boring machine on the cylinder block. Align the boring machine with the center of the
bottom of the cylinder liner with the less worn area.

2. Bore the liner until the thickness is 0.50 mm (0.020 inch).

3. Remove the remainder of the liner. Be careful not to damage the cylinder block.

4. Install a new liner. Align the liner with the top of the cylinder block.

5. The bore of the cylinder must be 102.000 to 102.035 mm (4.0157 to 4.0171 inch).

Diameter for the main bearing bores ... 95.000 mm (3.7401 inch)

Maximum diameter of the main bearing bores ... 95.022 mm (3.7410 inch)

New height of deck from centerline of crankshaft to deck ... 307.00 ± 0.05 mm (12.087 ± 0.002 inch)

Minimum height from the centerline of crankshaft to deck ... 306.70 mm (12.075 inch)

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 13:31:47 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Disassembly and Assembly


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5553-10 Publication Date -01/05/2012 Date Updated -15/05/2012

i01568680

Camshaft Bearings - Remove


SMCS - 1211-011

Removal Procedure
Table 1
Required Tools
Tool Part Number Part Description Qty
8S-2241 Camshaft Bearing Tool Group 1
A
8H-0684 Ratchet Wrench 1

Start By:

A. Remove the flywheel housing. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly, "Flywheel Housing -
Remove and Install".
B. Remove the camshaft. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly, "Camshaft - Remove".

NOTICE

Keep all parts clean from contaminants.

Contaminants may cause rapid wear and shortened component life.


Illustration 1 g00612707

1. Remove plug (1) from the cylinder block.

Illustration 2 g00533095

Illustration 3 g00533096
2. Use Tool (A) in order to remove the camshaft bearings from the cylinder block.

Note: Refer to the instructions of the 8S-2241 Camshaft Bearing Tool Group for the proper
procedure.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 13:33:19 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Disassembly and Assembly


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5553-10 Publication Date -01/05/2012 Date Updated -15/05/2012

i01140160

Cylinder Liner - Remove


SMCS - 1216-011

Removal Procedure
Start By:

A. Remove the crankshaft. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly, "Crankshaft - Remove".


B. Remove the pistons and connecting rods. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly, "Pistons and
Connecting Rods - Remove".

NOTICE

Keep all parts clean from contaminants.

Contaminants may cause rapid wear and shortened component life.

Wear eye protection in order to prevent possible personal injury while


performing the following steps.

Note: Before you proceed with the removal of the cylinder liner, check the cylinder liners for the
following items: wear, damage and rusting.
Note: If the liner is found in good condition and the liner wear is less than the repair limit, then
perform the following tasks: replace the piston rings, and ream the "ridge" at the top of the liner. Hone
the bore, if necessary.

Illustration 1 g00605128

Use the following procedure in order to remove the cylinder liners from the engine cylinder block.

1. Set up a boring machine on the cylinder block. Align the boring machine with the center of the
bottom of the cylinder liner with the less worn area.

2. Bore the liner until the thickness of the liner is 0.50 mm (0.020 inch).

Illustration 2 g00605130
Illustration 3 g00529962

3. Break the cylinder liner in order to remove the remainder of the cylinder liner. Be careful not to
damage the cylinder block.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 13:34:39 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Specifications
3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5545-18 Publication Date -01/09/2012 Date Updated -14/09/2012

i02910133

Fuel Injection Nozzles


SMCS - 1254

Illustration 1 g01381489

(1) Seat washer

(2) Fuel injection nozzle

(3) Retainer for fuel injection nozzle

Tighten the retaining bolt to the following torque. ... 20 to 23 N·m (14 to 17 lb ft)
Illustration 2 g01381491

(4) Body for fuel injection nozzle

(5) Shims

Refer to Table 2 for the correct injector valve opening pressures.

Table 1
Engine Part Number of the Nozzle Injector Valve Opening Pressure
(22.1 to 23.1 MPa)
193-2749
(3205 to 3350 psi)
(22.1 to 23.1 MPa)
3064 212-8470
(3205 to 3350 psi)
(22.1 to 23.1 MPa)
5I-7706
(3200 to 3343 psi)
(22.1 to 23.1 MPa)
193-2749
(3205 to 3350 psi)
(22.1 to 23.1 MPa)
212-8470
(3205 to 3350 psi)
3066
(18.1 to 19.1 MPa)
233-1161
(2625 to 2770 psi)
(22.1 to 23.1 MPa)
5I-7706
(3200 to 3343 psi)

Increasing shims by 0.10 mm (0.004 inch) changes injection pressure by approximately 1375 kPa
(200 psi). Shims are available in nine sizes from 0.10 mm (0.004 inch) to 0.58 mm (0.023 inch).

(6) Pressure spring

(7) Pressure pin

(8) Gasket

(9) Pin

(10) Tip for fuel injection nozzle

(11) Retaining nut for fuel injection nozzle

Tighten the nut to the following torque. ... 30 to 39 N·m (22 to 29 lb ft)

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 13:35:57 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Disassembly and Assembly


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5553-10 Publication Date -01/05/2012 Date Updated -15/05/2012

i01615235

Inlet and Exhaust Valve Springs - Remove and Install


SMCS - 1108-010

Removal Procedure
Table 1
Required Tools
Tool Part Number Part Description Qty
A 5S-1322 Valve Keeper Installer 1
B 9U-6145 Air Connector (1) 1
9U-6144 Adapter 1
7F-4292 Valve Spring Compressor 1
C 6V-5223 Bolt 1
8T-4121 Washer 1
6V-5218 Bolt 1
D 8S-2263 Spring Tester 1
(1)
The 9U-6145 Air Connector is part of the 9U-6274 Compression Test Kit. The 9U-6145 Air Connector can be
ordered separately.

Start By:

A. Remove the rocker shaft assembly and the pushrods. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly,
"Rocker Shaft and Pushrod - Remove".
B. Remove the fuel injection nozzles. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly, "Fuel Injection
Nozzles - Remove".

NOTICE

Care must be taken to ensure that fluids are contained during


performance of inspection, maintenance, testing, adjusting and repair
of the product. Be prepared to collect the fluid with suitable containers
before opening any compartment or disassembling any component
containing fluids.

Refer to Special Publication, NENG2500, "Caterpillar Tools and Shop


Products Guide" for tools and supplies suitable to collect and contain
fluids on Caterpillar products.

Dispose of all fluids according to local regulations and mandates.

NOTICE

Keep all parts clean from contaminants.

Contaminants may cause rapid wear and shortened component life.

Note: The following procedure is for the removal of the inlet valve springs and the exhaust valve
springs without removing the cylinder head.

Illustration 1 g00609904
1. Install Tool (B). Attach an air hose to Tool (B) in order to force air pressure into the cylinder.
This will hold the valves in position while the inlet and exhaust valve springs are removed and
installed.

Note: Maintain air pressure in each cylinder until both of the valve springs are removed and
installed.

2. Use Tool (C) to compress the valve spring (1) .

Note: Compress the valve spring evenly in order to avoid damage to the valve stem.

3. Use the magnetic end of Tool (A) to remove cap (2) (not shown) and valve keepers (3) (not
shown) from the inlet and exhaust valves.

4. Slowly release the tension on Tool (C) .

5. Remove the retainer and spring (1) from the cylinder head assembly.

Note: Repeat Steps 1 through 5 in order to remove the remaining valve spring of the same
cylinder.

Illustration 2 g00525271

6. Check the valve spring force with Tool (D). Refer to Specifications, "Valve Mechanism" for
information on the valve springs.

7. Install the valve springs. Refer to the following installation procedure.

8. Perform Steps 1 through 7 for the removal and installation of the remaining inlet and exhaust
valve springs.

Installation Procedure
Table 2
Required Tools
Tool Part Number Part Description Qty
A 5S-1322 Valve Keeper Installer 1
B 9U-6145 Air Connector 1
9U-6144 Adapter 1
7F-4292 Valve Spring Compressor 1
C 6V-5223 Bolt 1
8T-4121 Washer 1
6V-5218 Bolt 1

NOTICE

Keep all parts clean from contaminants.

Contaminants may cause rapid wear and shortened component life.

Illustration 3 g00609904

1. Keep an air hose connected to Tool (B) in order to force air pressure into the cylinder. This will
hold the valves in position while the inlet and exhaust valve springs are removed and installed.

2. Position valve spring (1) and the retainer over the valve stem.

3. Use Tool (C) to compress valve spring (1) .


Note: Compress the valve spring evenly in order to avoid damage to the valve stem.

4. Place the valve keepers (3) (not shown) in position on the inlet and exhaust valves.

Note: Tool (A) may be used to install valve keepers.

The valve keepers can be thrown from the valve when the valve spring
compressor is released. Ensure that the valve keepers are properly
installed on the valve stem. To help prevent personal injury, keep away
from the front of the valve keepers and valve springs during the
installation of the valves.

5. Install cap (2) (not shown) on the inlet and exhaust valves and slowly release the tension on
Tool (C). Tap the top of valve with a soft faced hammer in order to ensure that the valve
keepers are properly installed.

Note: Repeat Steps 1 through 5 in order to install the remaining valve spring of the same
cylinder.

6. Remove air hose and Tool (B) .

7. Perform Steps 1 through 6 for the installation of the remaining inlet and exhaust valve springs.

End By:

a. Install the fuel injection nozzles. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly, "Fuel Injection Nozzles -
Install".
b. Install the rocker shaft assembly and the pushrods. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly,
"Rocker Shaft and Pushrod - Install".

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 13:37:49 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Disassembly and Assembly


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5553-10 Publication Date -01/05/2012 Date Updated -15/05/2012

i01615246

Inlet and Exhaust Valves - Remove and Install


SMCS - 1105-010

Removal Procedure
Table 1
Required Tools
Tool Part Number Part Description Qty
A 8S-6691 Cylinder Head Repair Stand 1
B 1P-3527 Valve Spring Compressor 1
C 5S-1322 Valve Keeper Installer 1
D 8S-2263 Spring Tester 1

Start By:

A. Remove the cylinder head. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly, "Cylinder Head - Remove".

NOTICE

Keep all parts clean from contaminants.

Contaminants may cause rapid wear and shortened component life.


Illustration 1 g00610449

Illustration 2 g00610469

1. Support cylinder head assembly (1) on Tool (A) .

2. Use tool (B) to compress valve spring (2) .

3. Use the magnetic end of tool (C) (not shown) to remove cap (4) and valve keepers (3). Slowly
release the pressure on tool (B) and remove tool (B) .

4. Remove retainer (5) and remove spring (2) .


Illustration 3 g00525271

5. Check the valve spring force with Tool (D). Refer to Specifications, "Valve Mechanism" for
information on the valve springs.

6. Remove exhaust valve (6) and inlet valve (7) through the bottom of the cylinder head assembly
(1). Put identification marks on the valves for installation purposes.

7. Perform the following procedure, if the valves need to be refaced:

a. Set the machine that will reface the valves at an angle of 30 degrees.

b. The valve has a stellite facing. This facing will be gone, if the margin of the valve
exceeds the service limit.

c. Replace the valve, if the margin exceeds the service limit after refacing.

d. Grind the valve seat in order to reface the valve seat, if necessary.

e. Replace the valve seat, if the width exceeds the repair limit as a result of wear or
grinding.

8. Perform Steps 2 through 7 for the remaining inlet valves and exhaust valves in the cylinder
head assembly.

Installation Procedure
Table 2
Required Tools
Tool Part Number Part Description Qty
A 8S-6691 Cylinder Head Repair Stand 1
B 1P-3527 Valve Spring Compressor 1
C 5S-1322 Valve Keeper Installer 1
NOTICE

Keep all parts clean from contaminants.

Contaminants may cause rapid wear and shortened component life.

Illustration 4 g00610469

Illustration 5 g00610449

1. Support cylinder head assembly on Tool (A). Lubricate the inlet and exhaust valves with clean
engine oil. Install the inlet and exhaust valves through the bottom of the cylinder head.

Note: Ensure that the inlet and exhaust valves are installed in the original location in the
cylinder head.

2. Install spring (2) and retainer (5) .


3. Use Tool (B) to compress spring (2). Install valve keepers (3) and cap (4) on the valve stem
with Tool (C) .

The valve keepers can be thrown from the valve when the valve spring
compressor is released. Ensure that the valve keepers are properly
installed on the valve stem. To help prevent personal injury, keep away
from the front of the valve keepers and valve springs during the
installation of the valves.

4. Carefully remove Tool (B). Tap the top of exhaust valve (6) or inlet valve (7) with a soft faced
hammer in order to ensure that the valve keepers are properly installed.

5. Repeat Steps 2 through 4 for the installation of the remaining inlet and exhaust valves.

End By: Install the cylinder head. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly, "Cylinder Head - Install".

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 13:38:42 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Disassembly and Assembly


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5553-10 Publication Date -01/05/2012 Date Updated -15/05/2012

i02088121

Cylinder Head - Remove


SMCS - 1100-011

Removal Procedure
Table 1
Required Tools
Tool Part Number Part Description Qty
A 138-7573 Link Bracket 2

Start By:

A. Remove the exhaust manifold. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly, "Exhaust Manifold -
Remove and Install".
B. Remove the rocker shaft and pushrods. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly, "Rocker Shaft and
Pushrod - Remove".
C. Remove the inlet manifold. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly, "Inlet Manifold - Remove".
D. Remove the water temperature regulator. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly, "Water
Temperature Regulator- Remove and Install".

NOTICE

Keep all parts clean from contaminants.

Contaminants may cause rapid wear and shortened component life.


NOTICE

Care must be taken to ensure that fluids are contained during


performance of inspection, maintenance, testing, adjusting and repair
of the product. Be prepared to collect the fluid with suitable containers
before opening any compartment or disassembling any component
containing fluids.

Refer to Special Publication, NENG2500, "Caterpillar Tools and Shop


Products Guide" for tools and supplies suitable to collect and contain
fluids on Caterpillar products.

Dispose of all fluids according to local regulations and mandates.

Note: The 3064 Engine has one cylinder head, while the 3066 Engine has two cylinder heads.

Illustration 1 g00527527

Torque sequence for the cylinder head bolts ( 3066 Engine)


Illustration 2 g00527556

Torque sequence for the cylinder head bolts ( 3064 Engine)

Illustration 3 g00604993

1. Gradually remove the cylinder head bolts (1) from the cylinder head. The 3066 Engine has
thirteen cylinder head bolts while the 3064 Engine has seventeen cylinder head bolts. Remove
the bolts in reverse order of the torque sequence.

Note: Do not use a pry bar to separate the cylinder head from the engine block.
Illustration 4 g00605044

Typical example

2. Install Tooling (A), chains and a suitable lifting device to cylinder head (2) .

3. Remove the cylinder head (2) from the cylinder block. The weight of the cylinder head
assembly for the 3066 Engine is 32 kg (70 lb). The weight of the cylinder head assembly for the
3064 Engine is 45 kg (100 lb).

Note: Place the cylinder head on a surface that will not damage the face of the cylinder head.

Illustration 5 g00605078

Note: When the gasket is removed from the cylinder block, be careful not to damage the
mounting face of the cylinder block.

4. Remove the cylinder head gasket (3) from the cylinder block.

5. Repeat Step 1 through Step 4 for the other cylinder head ( 3066 Engine).
Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 13:40:59 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Disassembly and Assembly


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5553-10 Publication Date -01/05/2012 Date Updated -15/05/2012

i01568680

Camshaft Bearings - Remove


SMCS - 1211-011

Removal Procedure
Table 1
Required Tools
Tool Part Number Part Description Qty
8S-2241 Camshaft Bearing Tool Group 1
A
8H-0684 Ratchet Wrench 1

Start By:

A. Remove the flywheel housing. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly, "Flywheel Housing -
Remove and Install".
B. Remove the camshaft. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly, "Camshaft - Remove".

NOTICE

Keep all parts clean from contaminants.

Contaminants may cause rapid wear and shortened component life.


Illustration 1 g00612707

1. Remove plug (1) from the cylinder block.

Illustration 2 g00533095

Illustration 3 g00533096
2. Use Tool (A) in order to remove the camshaft bearings from the cylinder block.

Note: Refer to the instructions of the 8S-2241 Camshaft Bearing Tool Group for the proper
procedure.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 13:41:47 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Disassembly and Assembly


SUPPLEMENT FOR 320 & 320 L EXCAVATORS (3066 ENGINE)
Media Number -SENR5556-02 Publication Date -01/03/2004 Date Updated -19/09/2014

SENR55560008

Crankshaft Pulley
SMCS - 1205-010

Remove & Install Crankshaft Pulley

Start By:

a. remove fan

1. Loosen air compressor idler mounting bolt to release tension in the compressor V-belt.

NOTE: Photo does not show engine equipped with air conditioning compressor.

2. Remove the V-belt.


3. Loosen three bolts (1).

4. Push alternator (2) towards the engine to provide slack for the V-belts to be removed.

5. Remove two V-belts (3).

6. Use tool (B) to remove nut (4) and washer. When installing, tighten the crankshaft pulley bolt to a
torque of 490 ± 5 N·m (361.5 ± 3.5 lb ft).

7. Use tool (A) to remove crankshaft pulley (5).


NOTICE

Take extreme care not to damage the sleeve.

NOTE: After removal, check the crankshaft pulley for worn belt grooves.

NOTE: Refer to Specifications Manual Form No. SENR5545 for assembly component specifications
and adjusting the tension for the V-belts.

NOTE: For installation of the crankshaft pulley, reverse the removal steps.

End By:

a. install fan

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 13:44:28 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Disassembly and Assembly


SUPPLEMENT FOR 320 & 320 L EXCAVATORS (3066 ENGINE)
Media Number -SENR5556-02 Publication Date -01/03/2004 Date Updated -19/09/2014

SENR55560032

Water Pump
SMCS - 1361-010; 1361-017

Remove & Install Water Pump


Start By:

a. remove fan

2. Loosen bolt (1).

3. Loosen two bolts (4).

4. Push alternator (2) towards the engine.

5. Loosen the idler mounting bolt to release tension in air compressor V-belt.

6. Remove the V-belt from the air compressor pulley. Check for wear or damage. Replace if
necessary.

7. Remove two V-belts (3). Check for wear or damage. Replace if necessary.
8. Remove four bolts (5).

9. Remove pulley (6) and water pump as a unit. Replace O-ring when installing water pump. Apply
glycerine to O-ring when installing the water pump to the timing gear case.

NOTE: When installing, be sure the grease fitting is facing up and the weep hole is facing down.

NOTE: Refer to Specifications Manual, Form No. SENR5545 for the water pump components
assembly specifications.

NOTE: For installation of the water pump, reverse the removal steps.

NOTICE

When installing the water pump to the timing gear case make sure that
the impeller does not contact the case.

End By:

a. install fan

NOTE: Refer to Specifications Manual, Form No. SENR5545 for adjusting the tension for the V-
belts.

Disassemble & Assemble Water Pump

Start By:
a. remove water pump

NOTICE

Do not reassemble the flange, water pump shaft and impeller more
than two times.

NOTE: If the water pump housing is heated up to 80° C (176° F), the components can be removed
easily.

1. Remove four bolts (1) and washers.

2. Remove pulley (2).

NOTE: Check water pump pulley for V-belt groove for wear and damage. Replace if necessary.

NOTE: Use tool (C) in the disassembly and assembly procedures that require the use of a press or
hammer.
3. Install tool (A). Remove flange (3).

4. Use tool (B) to remove retaining ring (4).

5. Use press to remove shaft assembly (5) from water pump assembly (6).

6. Remove impeller (8).

NOTE: Check impeller for wear or corrosion and metal to metal contact. Replace if necessary.

7. Remove bearing (10).

8. Remove spacer (11).

9. Remove bearing (12).

NOTE: When assembling, check two bearings (10) and (12) for correct rotation.

10. Remove washer (13).

NOTE: Check shaft (9) for distortion after all components have been removed. Replace if necessary.
11. Remove unit seal (14) from the water pump assembly (8) if necessary.

NOTE: Check unit seal (14) for wear and damage. Replace the seal if any signs of leakage occurs
during operation of the water pump.

NOTE: Check water pump assembly (8) for corrosion, cracks and other defects.

12. Replace O-ring (7) with a new O-ring.

NOTE: Refer to Specifications Manual, Form No. SENR5545 for water pump components assembly
specifications.

NOTE: For assembly of the water pump, reverse the disassembly steps.

End By:

a. install water pump

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 13:45:30 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Specifications
3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5545-18 Publication Date -01/09/2012 Date Updated -14/09/2012

i02830261

Flywheel
SMCS - 1156

Illustration 1 g01411600

(1) Place the flywheel on a surface plate in order to measure the flatness of the flywheel. Use a dial
indicator to measure the flatness of the flywheel.

Standard at assembly of flywheel ... 0.15 mm (0.006 inch)


Repair limit of flywheel ... 0.50 mm (0.020 inch)

Note: Refinish the flywheel if the repair limit is exceeded.


Illustration 2 g01411604

(2) Measure the runout on the flywheel face with a dial indicator.

Maximum face runout ... 0.15 mm (0.006 inch)


Repair limit of face runout ... 0.50 mm (0.020 inch)

Note: Refinish the flywheel if the repair limit is exceeded.

Maximum permissible temperature of the ring gear for installation on the flywheel without using a
torch ... 150 °C (302 °F)

Note: The ring gear is pressed on the flywheel.

Torque for flywheel bolts ... 83 ± 5 N·m (60 ± 4 lb ft)

Number of teeth of the flywheel ring gear ... 127

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 13:46:19 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Disassembly and Assembly


SUPPLEMENT FOR 320 & 320 L EXCAVATORS (3066 ENGINE)
Media Number -SENR5556-02 Publication Date -01/03/2004 Date Updated -19/09/2014

SENR55560009

Crankshaft Rear Oil Seal


SMCS - 1161-010

Remove & Install Crankshaft Rear Oil Seal

Start By:

a. remove flywheel

NOTE: Check the lip on the seal for wear, tear and deterioration. Replace if necessary.
1. Drill three small, evenly spaced holes in seal (1). Use tool (A) to remove seal.

NOTE: If the oil seal shows a sign of oil leaks, remove the wear sleeve and oil seal.

2. If wear sleeve (2) (not shown) is to be replaced, use tool (B) to remove.

NOTICE

When removing the wear sleeve, take extreme care not to damage the
crankshaft.
3. To install a new wear sleeve complete with seal, use 6V1541 Quick Cure Primer to clean the
outer diameter of the crankshaft and the inside diameter of the wear sleeve. Apply 9S3265 Retaining
Compound to the inside surface of the wear sleeve and its mating surface. Install it with oil seal
installer (C).

End By:

a. install flywheel

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 13:49:13 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Disassembly and Assembly


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5553-10 Publication Date -01/05/2012 Date Updated -15/05/2012

i01480856

Pistons and Connecting Rods - Disassemble


SMCS - 1225-015

Disassembly Procedure
Table 1
Required Tools
Tool Part Number Part Description Qty
A 1P-1857 Retaining Ring Pliers 1
B 1U-6683 Ring Expander 1
C 1P-0510 Driver Group 1

Start By:

A. Remove the pistons and connecting rods. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly, "Pistons and
Connecting Rods - Remove".

NOTICE

Keep all parts clean from contaminants.

Contaminants may cause rapid wear and shortened component life.


Illustration 1 g00535802

1. Use Tool (A) to remove two retaining rings (1) from piston (4) .

2. Remove piston pin (2) and connecting rod (3) from piston (4) .

Note: Check the condition of the following parts: retaining rings (1), piston pin (2) and piston
(4). If these items are worn or damaged, use new parts for replacement.

Illustration 2 g00535803
Illustration 3 g00535398

Illustration 4 g00535400

3. Remove piston rings (5) from pistons (4) with tool (B) .

Note: Check the condition of the piston rings. If the piston rings are worn or damaged, use new
parts for replacement.
Illustration 5 g00770925

4. Remove connecting rod bearing (6) and two bolts (7) from connecting rod (3) .

Note: Check the condition of the following items: connecting rod bearing (6), connecting rod
bolt (7), piston pin bushing (8) and connecting rod (3). If the items are worn or damaged, use
new parts for replacement.

Illustration 6 g00535406

5. Use Tool (C) and a suitable press to remove piston pin bushing (8) from connecting rod (3) .

Illustration 7 g00662979

Piston and Connecting Rod Assembly

(1) Retaining rings

(2) Piston pin

(3) Connecting rod


(4) Piston

(5) Piston rings

(6) Connecting rod bearing

(7) Connecting rod bolts

(8) Piston pin bushing

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 14:15:31 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Systems Operation
3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5546-15 Publication Date -01/07/2013 Date Updated -30/07/2013

i01570640

Cooling System
SMCS - 1350

Illustration 1 g00549894
Cooling system schematic (warm engine)

(1) Radiator

(2) Water temperature regulator

(3) Water outlet pipe

(4) Cylinder head

(5) Cylinder block

(6) Water pump

The engine has a pressure type cooling system. A pressure type cooling system gives two advantages.
First, the cooling system can have safe operation at a temperature that is higher than the normal
boiling point of water. The pressure type cooling system also prevents water pump cavitation.
Cavitation is the sudden making of low pressure bubbles in liquids by mechanical forces. With a
pressure type cooling system, it is more difficult for an air or steam pocket to be made in the cooling
system.

Under normal operation, water pump (6) sends coolant into cylinder block (5). Coolant travels
through cylinder block (5) into cylinder head (4). Coolant then travels through water outlet pipe (3) to
the housing for water temperature regulator (2). When water temperature regulator (2) is open, the
coolant travels through the outlet hose to radiator (1). The coolant is cooled as the coolant travels
through radiator (1). When the coolant gets to the bottom of the radiator, the coolant travels through
the inlet hose to water pump (6) .

When the engine is cold, water temperature regulator (2) is closed. The coolant does not travel to
radiator (1). The coolant travels from the housing for the water temperature regulator through a hose
to water pump (6) .

Note: Water temperature regulator (2) is an important part of the cooling system. The water
temperature regulator divides coolant flow between the radiator and the bypass in order to maintain
the correct temperature. Water temperature regulator (2) must be installed in order to mechanically
control the system. Most of the coolant will travel through the bypass if the water temperature
regulator is not installed. The engine will overheat in hot weather if water temperature regulator (2) is
not installed. In cold weather, the engine will not obtain operating temperature if even small amounts
of coolant travel through the radiator.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 14:17:09 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Disassembly and Assembly


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5553-10 Publication Date -01/05/2012 Date Updated -15/05/2012

i01566087

Water Pump - Disassemble


SMCS - 1361-015

Disassembly Procedure
Table 1
Required Tools
Tool Part Number Part Description Qty
A 1P-2321 Combination Puller 1
B 1P-1861 Retaining Ring Pliers 1
C 1P-0510 Driver Group 1

Start By:

A. Remove the water pump. Refer to Disassembly and Assembly, "Water Pump - Remove".

NOTICE

Keep all parts clean from contaminants.

Contaminants may cause rapid wear and shortened component life.


Always wear protective gloves when handling parts that have been
heated.

Note: If the water pump is heated up to 80 °C (176 °F), the components can be easily removed.

Illustration 1 g00610108

1. Remove four bolts (1) and the washers that secure the water pump pulley to the water pump.

2. Remove water pump pulley (2) from the water pump.

Note: Check the groove for the V-belt of the water pump pulley for wear and damage. Replace the
water pump pulley, if necessary.

Note: Use Tool (C) during disassembly procedures of the water pump, which require the use of a
press or a hammer.
Illustration 2 g00610120

3. Use Tool (A) to remove flange (3) from the water pump.

Illustration 3 g00610127

4. Use Tool (B) to remove retaining ring (4) from the water pump.
Illustration 4 g00610140

5. Use a press and Tool (C) to remove shaft assembly (5) from water pump assembly (6) .

Illustration 5 g00813948

6. Remove impeller (8) from the shaft assembly (5) .

Note: Check the impeller for wear, corrosion, and metal to metal contact. Replace the impeller, if
necessary.
7. Remove the following items from shaft (9) :

◦ Bearing (10)

◦ Spacer (11)

◦ Bearing (12)

◦ Washer (13)

8. Once all of the components have been removed, then check shaft (9) for distortion. Replace the shaft,
if necessary.

9. Check seal (14) for wear and damage. Use Tool (C) in order to remove the seal from the water pump
housing, if necessary.

Note: Replace the seal if any signs of leakage occurs during the operation of the water pump.

10. Replace O-ring (7) with a new O-ring.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 14:20:07 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Systems Operation
3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5546-15 Publication Date -01/07/2013 Date Updated -30/07/2013

i02877985

Electrical System
SMCS - 1400; 1550; 1900
Illustration 1 g01432420

Electrical circuit

(1) Air inlet heater

(2) Indicator

(3) Relay

(4) Relay

(5) Alternator

(6) Pilot light for battery charge


(7) Switch for starting motor

(8) Starting motor

(9) Battery

(A) 1 gauge wire

(B) 6 gauge wire

(C) 18 gauge wire

The electrical system has three separate circuits: charging circuit, starting circuit and low amperage
circuit. Some of the components of the electrical system are used in more than one circuit. The
following items are common in each of the circuits: battery, circuit breaker, ammeter (not shown),
cables and wires from the battery.

The charging circuit is in operation when the engine is running. Alternator (5) makes electricity for
the charging circuit. A voltage regulator in the circuit controls the electrical output in order to keep
the battery at full charge.

The starting circuit is in operation only when the start switch is activated.

The low amperage circuit is connected through the ammeter and the charging circuit is connected
through the ammeter.

Grounding Practices
Proper grounding for the vehicle system is necessary for proper vehicle performance and reliability.
Proper grounding for the electrical system is necessary for proper machine performance and
reliability. Improper grounding will result in uncontrolled electrical circuit paths and improper
grounding will result in unreliable electrical circuit paths. Damage to main bearing and damage to the
crankshaft bearing journal surfaces can occur. Uncontrolled electrical circuit paths can also cause
electrical noise which may degrade machine performance.

Use an engine-to-frame ground strap. The engine-to-frame ground strap must have a direct path to the
battery. The direct path will ensure proper functioning of the machine electrical system. The direct
path will also ensure proper functioning of the engine electrical system. Use a frame to starting motor
ground or use a frame to engine ground.

Ground wires should be combined at ground studs. The ground studs should be dedicated for ground
use only. The engine alternator must be grounded to the negative terminal of the battery. The size of
ground wire must be adequate to handle a full current for charging the alternator.

NOTICE

This engine has a 24 Volt starting system.

Use only the same voltage (24 volts) for jump starting.
Use of a welder or higher voltage will damage the electrical system.

Charging System Components


Alternator

Illustration 2 g01383972

Typical alternator components

(10) Voltage regulator

(11) Bearing

(12) Stator winding

(13) Bearing

(14) Rectifier bridge

(15) Field winding

(16) Rotor assembly

(17) Fan

NOTICE
The alternator should never be operated without the battery in the
circuit. The making or the breaking of an alternator connection with a
heavy load on the circuit can cause damage to the regulator.

The alternator is driven by a belt from the pulley of the crankshaft. The alternator is three-phase and
the alternator is a self-rectifying charging unit. The voltage regulator is part of the alternator.

The alternator does not need slip rings and the alternator does not need brushes. The rotator assembly
is the only part in the alternator that moves. The conductors that carry current are stationary. The
following items are conductors: wiring, stator windings, six rectifying diodes and components of the
regulator circuit.

The rotor assembly has many magnetic poles. An air space is between the opposite poles. The poles
have residual magnetism that produces a small magnetic field between the poles. Residual magnetism
is similar to permanent magnets. As the rotor assembly begins to turn between the field winding and
the stator windings, a small amount of alternating current (AC) is produced in the stator windings.
The small amount of current is produced from the small magnetic lines of force. The small magnetic
lines of force are made by the residual magnetism of the poles. The alternating current passes through
the diodes of the rectifier bridge and the alternating current is then converted into direct current (DC).

The current primarily charges the battery and the current primarily supplies the low amperage circuit.
The remainder of the current is sent to the field windings (wires around an iron core). This increases
the strength of the magnetic lines of force. The amount of alternating current that is produced in the
stator windings increases. The increased speed of the rotor assembly increases the current output of
the alternator. The increased speed of the rotor assembly also increases the voltage output of the
alternator.

The voltage regulator is an electronic switch. The voltage regulator consists of a transistor and
stationary parts. The voltage regulator turns on and the voltage regulator turns off in order to control
the field current (DC current to the field windings) for the alternator.

Starting System Components


Electric Starting Motor
Illustration 3 g01383978

Components of the starting motor

(18) Solenoid

(19) Pinion

(20) Reduction gear

(21) Overrunning clutch

The starting motor has gear reduction. The starting motor is provided with a one-way roller clutch.
Major components of the starting motor include the following items: motor, overrunning clutch (21)
and solenoid (18) . The motor generates power. The overrunning clutch transmits torque of the
armature. The overrunning clutch also limits the engine rpm after start-up. Solenoid (18) engages
pinion (19) with the flywheel ring gear. Reduction gear (20) reduces the speeds of the armature and
the reduction gear transmits torque to the pinion.

Reduction Gear
Illustration 4 g01383983

Assembly of reduction gear

(22) Armature shaft

(23) Pinion

(24) Overrunning clutch

The end of armature shaft (22) has a gear. The gear engages with an internal gear. The reduction gear
reduces high motor speed. The reduction gear also transmits higher cranking torque to the pinion
shaft.

Overrunning Clutch
Illustration 5 g01383987

Components of overrunning clutch

(25) Outer race

(26) Inner race

(27) Spring

(28) Roller

The overrunning clutch has rollers. Outer race (25) and inner race (26) form a groove. The shape of
the groove is a wedge. Each roller (28) is located in the groove. Each roller is pressed by a spring
(27vO) . The roller is pressed against the narrower side of the groove by the spring. The rotation of
the outer race is transmitted to the pinion. No torque is transmitted from the pinion as the roller moves
to the wider side. The action from the wedge is released.

Starting Motor Operation


Illustration 6 g01383992

Switch for starting motor In ON position

(29) Starter switch

(30) Starter relay

(31) Plunger

(32) Field coil

(33) Reduction gear

(34) Pinion

(35) Battery

(36) Ring gear


Current flows from the "SW" terminal of the starting motor relay to the "L" terminal when the starter
switch of the starting motor is in the ON position. The "P2" contact closes. Current from the battery
flows from the "S" terminal of the magnetic switch to the pull in coil "P". Current from the battery
also flows from the "S" terminal of the magnetic switch to the hold in coil "H". The current decreases.
The current flows from the "M" terminal to the motor.

Plunger (31) is energized by the magnetic flux of the pull in the field coil and the hold in the field
coil. The plunger closes the "P1" terminal. The plunger also pushes out the pinion (34) . The pinion
turns slowly on weak current.

Illustration 7 g01384000
Engaged pinion gear

(29) Starter switch

(30) Starter relay

(31) Plunger

(32) Field coil

(33) Reduction gear

(34) Pinion

(35) Battery

(36) Ring gear

The "P1" contact closes and the current of the battery flows directly to the starting motor when the
pinion completely meshes with the ring gear. The starting motor turns the pinion. No current flows to
the pull in coil "P". The plunger is retained by the hold in coil "H".
Illustration 8 g01384005

Switch for starting motor In OFF position

(29) Starter switch

(30) Starter relay

(31) Plunger

(32) Field coil

(33) Reduction gear

(34) Pinion

(35) Battery

(36) Ring gear


The "P2" contact opens when starter switch (29) for the starting motor is set to the OFF position. The
starter switch for the starting motor is opened. The "P1" terminal is in the closed position. The battery
current flows from the "B" terminal to the pull in coil "P" and the hold in coil "H"when the starting
motor is opened.

The magnetic fluxes cancel each other since the direction of current flow is reversed. The spring
returns to the original position. Contact point "P1" opens. The current to the starting motor is cut off.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 14:21:37 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Systems Operation
320, & 320L EXCAVATORS ELECTRONIC AND ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
Media Number -SENR6048-00 Publication Date -01/12/1992 Date Updated -12/10/2001

Systems Operation
SMCS - 1400; 1550; 1900

Introduction
Reference: For systems operation information of the hydraulic system, make reference to Hydraulic
System Systems Operation module for the machine being serviced.

Reference: For testing and adjusting information of the hydraulic, electric and electronic systems,
make reference to the Hydraulic And Electronic Systems Testing And Adjusting module for the
machine being serviced.

Reference: For electrical circuit schematics, make reference to the Electrical System Schematic
module for the machine being serviced.

The electric and electronic systems consist of the following three systems:

Electric System

Includes power, start/stop, charging and low current circuits.

Engine/Pump Control System

Controls engine speed depending on signals from the engine speed dial and power mode selector.
Controls the pump output depending on engine speed and/or the load placed on the machine.

Monitoring System

Warns the operator of occurrence of problem(s) in the machine and also provides information used for
adjustment and diagnosis of the machine.
Controller Compartment (Rear Of Cab)
(1) Controller.

All the functions of the engine/pump control system and monitoring system are done through
activation of electronic controller (1) (referred to as "controller"). Part of electric system components
such as lights, windshield wiper, etc. are electronically controlled by the controller.

Electric System

Electric Circuit Schematic


(1) Disconnect switch. (2) Battery. (3) Power circuit. (4) Circuit breaker. (5) Main relay. (6) Fuse box. (7) Low current
circuit. (8) Radio. (9) Cigar lighter. (10) Engine shutoff solenoid. (11) Engine shutoff relay. (12) Starter switch. (13)
Neutral start switch. (14) Safety relay. (15) Cab heater. (16) Air conditioner. (17) Light. (18) Windshield wiper. (19)
Windshield washer. (20) Start/stop circuit. (21) Starter motor. (22) Starter relay. (23) Alternator. (24) Controller. (25)
Relay box. (26) Horn. (27) Air heater. (28) Heater relay. (29) Charging circuit.

Introduction
The electric system consists of power circuit (3), start/stop circuit (20), charging circuit (29) and low
current circuit (7).

Power Circuit

This circuit supplies power to electric components and includes battery (2), disconnect switch (1),
circuit breaker (4) and main relay (5).

Start/Stop Circuit

This circuit starts/stops the engine and includes starter motor (21), starter relay (22), starter switch
(12), engine shutoff solenoid (10), engine shutoff relay (11), safety relay (14) and neutral start switch
(13). A preheat circuit is provided for low temperature starting purposes. The circuit includes start
switch (12), heater relay (28) and air heater (27).

Charging Circuit

This circuit uses alternator (23) to charge battery (2) during engine operation and to supply current to
low current circuit (7) through fuse box (6).

Low Current Circuit.

Light circuit.Windshield wiper/washer circuit.Radio circuit.Cigar lighter circuit.Air conditioner


circuit.Horn circuit.Cab heater circuit.

Only light and wiper/washer circuits of the above low current circuits are activated through controller
(24).

Operation
Description of operation is given relative to power, start/stop and charge circuits. For details of
symbols used in the electric circuit diagram and for machine specific electrical schematic, make
reference to the Electrical System Schematic module for the machine being serviced.

Only symbols for connectors should be referred to from the top of the following illustration.

Power Circuit
Power Circuit Schematic
(2) Battery. (5) Main relay. (12) Starter switch. (23) Alternator. (30) Fuse box. (31) Fuse box.

Right Console
(12) Starter switch. (32) OFF position. (33) PREHEAT position. (34) ON position. (35) START position.
Current is available at starter switch (12), alternator (23) and fuse box (31). When starter switch (12)
is placed in ON position (34), the contacts of main relay (5) are closed and there is current flow to
fuse box (30).

Start/Stop Circuit

Start/Stop Circuit Schematic (Typical Example)


(2) Battery. (5) Main relay. (10) Engine shutoff solenoid. (11) Engine shutoff relay. (12) Starter switch. (13) Neutral start
switch. (21) Starter motor. (22) Starter relay. (23) Alternator. (24) Controller. (36) Starter solenoid.

When starter switch (12) is placed in START position (35) with the hydraulic activation control lever
in LOCKED position, there is current flow through neutral start switch (13) to starter relay (22). The
starter relay contacts are closed which enables current flow to starter solenoid (36).

NOTE: If starter switch (12) is placed in the ON position with the hydraulic activation control lever
in UNLOCKED position, no current flows to starter relay (22) and the engine will not start.

As starter solenoid (36) is energized the plunger in starter solenoid (36) shifts and lets the pinion of
starter motor (21) operate. The pinion engages with the ring gear on the engine flywheel to start the
engine. When the alternator starts to generate electricity, a signal is sent from alternator terminal P to
terminal P of the safety relay. The signal at terminal P of the safety relay opens the ground connection
for the start relay at terminal S, deactivating the start relay. This circuitry keeps the starter from being
engaged after the engine is started. Releasing the start switch returns the plunger in starter solenoid
(36) to its original position and causes the pinion of the starter motor to disengage from the flywheel
ring gear.
When the starter switch (12) is moved to OFF position (32), the circuit between terminals B and ACC
is open. Controller (24) senses this on wire #308 and activates engine shutoff relay (11) with wire
#332. The engine shutoff relay contacts close and allow current flow to engine shutoff solenoid (10)
which activates to move the fuel rack to the fuel CLOSE position. No fuel is supplied to the engine
and the engine stops. Approximately 30 seconds after this occurs, controller (24) deactivates engine
shutoff relay (11) which stops the current flow to engine shutoff solenoid (10).

Preheat Circuit

Preheat Circuit
(12) Starter switch. (27) Air heater. (28) Heater relay.

This circuit activates an engine starting aid in cold weather below 0°C (32°F). When starter switch
(12) is placed in PREHEAT position (33), current flows from starter switch (12) to air heater (27)
through heater relay (28). Air heater (27) increases the temperature in the engine cylinders to aid
engine starting.

Charging Circuit
Charge Circuit Schematic
(2) Battery. (4) Circuit breaker. (12) Starter switch. (23) Alternator.

When starter switch (12) is placed in ON position (34), initial current goes to alternator (23). The field
coil of alternator (23) is initially closed. When the engine has started, the charged current from
terminal B+ of alternator (23) goes through circuit breaker (4) to batteries (2). Alternator (23) supplies
current to the electric components in the electric system.

Electronic System
Introduction

Controller Compartment (Rear Of Cab)


(1) Controller.
Right Console
(2) Monitor. (3) Monitor panel. (4) Switch panel.

The electronic system is made up of the engine/pump control system and the monitoring system and
activates through controller (1). Major functions of the electronic system are as follows.

Engine/Pump Control System

* Changes the available engine horsepower to hydraulic horsepower in the most effective
manner for machine operation.
* Regulates the pump output depending on machine load. This results in improved fuel
consumption.
* Assures a smooth control of pump output depending on the engine speed selected from the
"10" speed positions.
* Includes the Automatic Engine Speed Control (AEC) system which automatically reduces the
engine speed when there is little or no hydraulic demand.
* Includes the Low Idle system which allows the operator to change the engine speed to a
reduced RPM without moving the engine speed dial.

Monitoring System

* Monitor (2) for this system is located on the front of the right console. Monitor (2) is made up
of monitor panel (3) and switch panel (4). The monitor panel continually informs the operator
of machine conditions that are electronically monitored. The switch panel contains switches and
controls for machine operation.
* Controller (1) has the ability to diagnose itself and its system for problems. Any problems
identified by the controller are indicated by alert indicators on the monitor panel.

Components
Illustration Of Inputs To Outputs From Controller
(1) Monitor. (2) Controller. (3) Starter switch. (4) Engine. (5) Pulley. (6) Pump. (7) Fuse box. (8) Battery. (9) Governor
backup switch. (10) Speed sensor (magnetic pickup). (11) Feedback sensor. (12) Speed change switch. (13) Governor
actuator. (14) Pump backup switch. (15) Proportional reducing valve. (16) Engine speed dial. (17) Travel pressure switch.
(18) Implement/swing pressure switch. (19) Engine coolant temperature sensor. (20) Hydraulic oil temperature sensor.
(21) Fuel level sensor. (22) Alternator. (23) Engine oil pressure switch. (24) Low idle switch. (25) Fine control solenoid
valve. (26) Swing priority solenoid valve. (27) Travel speed solenoid valve. (28) Fault alarm. (29) Travel alarm. (30)
Relay box. (31) Windshield wiper. (32) Windshield washer. (33) Chassis light. (34) Boom light. (35) Electric system. (45)
Backup resistor. (46) Boom RAISE pressure switch. (47) Air heater relay. (48) Air heater.
Controller Compartment (Rear Of Cab)
(2) Controller. (8) Battery.

Controller Compartment
(7) Fuse box. (30) Relay box.

Components On Input Side

These components inform controller (2) of the status of the vehicle systems.

Engine Speed Sensor (Magnetic Pickup)

Engine Flywheel Housing


(10) Speed sensor.

Speed sensor (10) is installed on the engine flywheel housing. Speed sensor (10) creates an electrical
pulse each time a flywheel tooth passes. This pulse goes to the electronic controller which processes
this pulse information to determine engine speed.

Feedback Sensor
Controller Compartment
(13) Governor actuator.

Feedback sensor (11) is incorporated in governor actuator (13) and sends a signal to the controller of
the governor lever position. As governor actuator (13) operates, pulley (5) turns and moves the
governor lever to the position that matches engine speed dial (16) position.

Monitor

Right Console
(1) Monitor. (36) Power mode selector switch. (37) Light switch. (38) Travel speed switch. (39) Monitor panel. (40) Work
mode selector switch. (41) AEC switch. (42) Washer switch. (43) Wiper switch. (44) Alarm cancel switch.

Signals from these switches are sent to and processed by the controller. The monitor switches are used
to select various functions for the controller to perform or modes to operate in.

Engine Speed Dial

Right Console
(16) Engine speed dial. (24) Low idle switch.
Engine speed dial (16) sends a signal to the controller, of the no-load engine speed selected from the
ten positions.

Low Idle Switch

Low idle switch (24) is located on the top of the right control lever. Activating the low idle system by
pressing low idle switch (24) once with no hydraulic load, reduces engine speed to 940 rpm. Pressing
low idle switch (24) again or activating the hydraulic system will deactivate the low idle system.

Travel And Implement/Swing Pressure Switches

Main Control Valve Compartment


(17) Travel pressure switch. (18) Implement swing pressure switch. (46) Boom RAISE pressure switch.

Travel pressure switch (17) and implement/swing pressure switch (18) monitor the hydraulic system
and keep the controller aware of the hydraulic demands. When there is no hydraulic demand these
switches are open. The automatic engine speed control (AEC) function of the controller uses these
switches to determine how to operate.

Sensors For Engine Coolant Temperature, Hydraulic Oil Temperature And Fuel Level

Engine coolant temperature sensor (19), hydraulic oil temperature sensor (20) and fuel level sensor
(21) are attached to the engine, hydraulic tank and fuel tank, respectively. The three sensors inform
the controller of the different fluid temperatures and levels.

Engine Oil Pressure Switch

Engine oil pressure switch (23) is located on the engine and informs the controller of the oil pump
delivery pressure.

Alternator

Alternator (22) sends a generating frequency signal to the controller.

Boom RAISE Pressure Switch

When the boom control lever is moved to the full boom RAISE position and the power mode switch
is in the BOOM PRIORITY position, boom RAISE pressure switch (46) closes. Fine control solenoid
valve (25) is energized causing front pump oil to go to the boom circuit only. Now the boom can
move faster, even in a combined operation of boom and stick.

Air Heater

When the starter switch is placed in the PREHEAT position, heater relay (47) energizes, activating air
heater (48) and sending an activation signal to the controller.

Components On Output Side

The controller processes the information from the inputs and sends signals to the output components.
The output components allow the controller to control the engine and hydraulic system and inform the
operator of the vehicle status.

Governor Actuator

When engine speed dial (16) is placed at a position selected from the 10 positions, governor actuator
(13) moves the governor lever to the position which corresponds to the selected speed dial position.
This determines the engine RPM, depending on the selected dial position.

Proportional Reducing Valve

Pilot Oil Manifold Compartment


(15) Proportional reducing valve. (25) Fine control solenoid valve. (26) Swing priority solenoid valve. (27) Travel speed
solenoid valve.

Depending on power mode and engine speed, a signal from the controller is sent to proportional
reducing valve (15) which uses the signal to control the power shift pressure to the pump. The
controller regulates the power shift pressure to the pump so the pump output closely matches the
power mode and engine speed.

Solenoid Valves

Work mode selector switch (40) on monitor (1) controls activation of solenoid valves (25), (26) and
(27). Fine control solenoid valve (25) and swing priority solenoid valve (26) function to provide easy
fine control and trenching operations, respectively. When travel speed switch (38) is switched to
LOW or HIGH travel speed mode, travel speed solenoid valve (27) engages the travel speed mode
selected.
Monitor

Monitor (1), through alarm indicators on monitor panel (39), alert the operator of problems in the
following areas:

Engine coolant temperature.Hydraulic oil temperature.Fuel level.Engine oil pressure.Charging


frequency of alternator.Controller.Monitor.

Fault Alarm

Fault alarm (28) sounds when the engine oil pressure abnormally decreases.

Travel Alarm

Travel alarm (29) sounds when the travel control is being used.

Electronically Controlled Electric Components

Activation of wiper (31), washer (32), chassis light (33) and boom light (34) are electronically
controlled by the controller.

Backup System Components

The electronic control system is provided with pump backup switch (14) and governor backup switch
(9). The switches function as a backup to the controller to prevent the machine from shutting down if
a problem occurs in the controller.

Turning pump backup switch (14) to the TORTOISE position disconnects proportional reducing valve
solenoid (15) from the controller. Solenoid (15) now is connected to battery positive and negative
through a resistor. Connected like this, solenoid (15) will not change positions and the pump will
operate continuously with a 15 to 25 percent lower output than the maximum (approximately equal to
power mode II). When pump backup switch (14) is ON a signal is also sent to the controller.

Turning governor backup switch (9) to the MAN position disconnects governor actuator (13) from the
controller. This overrides the engine speed dial switch and the controller allowing manual engine
speed control by activating speed change switch (12).

Engine/Pump Regulation
Illustration Of Input To Outputs From Controller (Partial)
(1) Monitor. (2) Power mode selector switch. (3) Controller. (4) l Pulley. (5) Engine. (6) Pump. (7) Engine speed dial. (8)
Speed sensor (magnetic pickup). (9) Feedback sensor. (10) Governor actuator. (11) Proportional reducing valve.

Controller Compartment
(10) Governor actuator. (12) Accelerator wire cable. (13) Decelerator wire cable.
Engine Compartment (Viewed From Top)
(4) Pulley. (12) Accelerator wire cable. (13) Decelerator wire cable.

Controller (3) processes the input from engine speed dial (7). Controller (3) then sends a signal to
governor actuator (10) to adjust the engine speed to match engine speed dial (7) setting. Using cables
(12) and (13) the governor actuator causes pulley (4) to rotate. If the pulley is rotated
counterclockwise by cable (12), the governor lever connected to the pulley moves in the accelerate
direction. If the pulley is rotated clockwise by cable (13), the governor lever moves in the decelerate
direction.

Right Console
(7) Engine speed dial. (14) Low idle setting "1" (tortoise sign). (15) High idle setting "10" (rabbit sign).

Right Console
(16) Monitor panel. (17) Character display.
Engine speed dial (7) has 10 positions. Position "1" (14) is for low idle and position "10" (15) is for
high idle. The selected dial position is indicated by character display (17). The no load engine RPM
for each engine speed dial setting is shown in the following charts:

The controller receives inputs from engine speed dial (7), power mode selector switch (2) and the
speed sensor. The controller processes these inputs and sends a control signal to proportional reducing
valve solenoid (11). The proportional reducing valve changes the electric signal to a hydraulic signal
(power shift pressure). The power shift pressure is used to regulate pump (6) output. As the power
shift pressure increases, pump (6) destrokes for decreased hydraulic output and if the power shift
pressure decreases, the pump (6) upstrokes for increased hydraulic output.

Pump output is regulated depending on the engine speed dial position. Dial position "10" causes
minimum power shift pressure for maximum allowable pump output. As the dial is turned in
decreased speed direction, the power shift pressure increases for decreased pump output. The
maximum allowable pump output is set with power mode switch (2). Power mode III provides
maximum pump output. Power mode II position provides medium pump output. Power mode I
position provides minimum pump output.

Power Mode Operation


Introduction
Right Console
(1) Monitor. (2) Engine speed dial.

Right Console
(1) Monitor. (3) Power mode selector switch. (4) Mode III. (5) Mode II. (6) Mode I.

Power mode switch (3) is used to change the mode of available engine power for an operation. The
mode selected depends on the working conditions or operation being performed. When the engine
start switch is moved to the ON position, the power mode defaults to mode II (5). Each time the push-
on switch is pushed, the power mode changes. One of the three power mode indicators will be ON,
indicating the power mode selected.

The modes listed below represent Pump Pressure/Flow (P-Q) characteristic curves of the three power
modes. With the engine speed dial in position "10", the pump output in each mode is:

Mode III: 100 percent.Mode II: about 85 percent.Mode I: about 65 percent.


P-Q Characteristic Curves
(7) Point (start of pump destroke in mode I). (8) Point (start of pump destroke in mode II). (9) Point (start of pump
destroke in mode III). (10) Power mode I. (11) Power mode II. (12) Power mode III.

Mode III (With Engine Speed Dial At HIGH Idle "10")

Power mode position III is used for heavy work which needs higher operating speed. Turning the
power mode switch to this position with speed dial (2) in HIGH IDLE "10" position allows regulation
of pump output through engine speed in addition to regulation through delivery pressure. This
provides the maximum available engine horsepower for a work operation.

The electronic controller regulates the pump so the engine can maintain the target speed which results
in maximum torque and horsepower available from the engine. As a load increases on the engine,
there is an incremental decrease from no-load speed (1980 rpm) to the rated speed (1800 rpm). The
rated speed provides the maximum available horsepower. If the load further increases, the engine
speed decreases below the rated speed. At this time, the controller regulates the pump output so the
engine maintains the target speed (1750 rpm). Now the engine can provide almost the same level
horsepower as that at the rated speed.

Once the engine speed decreases below target speed due to increased load, maximum available engine
horsepower cannot be maintained. Immediately after the engine speed decreases below the target
speed, the controller regulates the pump to decrease its output flow. This causes the engine to
maintain the target speed for maximum available horsepower. Again, if the engine speed increases
beyond the target speed due to decreased load, engine horsepower again decreases. At this time, the
controller regulates the pump to increase its output flow. This causes the engine to maintain the target
speed for maximum horsepower. The engine runs at a speed close to the target speed for most of the
pressure/flow points on power mode III (12).

Controller (13) continually monitors engine speed through speed sensor (16). The controller then
sends appropriate signals to proportional reducing valve (17) to maintain the target engine RPM.
Proportional reducing valve (17) processes the signal and sends the power shift pressure (Ps) to
regulator (19) of pump (15). As a result, power shift pressure (Ps) regulates the pump output to
maintain the target engine speed.

Illustration Of Inputs To Controller (Partial)


(13) Controller. (14) Engine. (15) Pump. (16) Speed sensor (magnetic pickup). (17) Proportional reducing valve.
Pump Regulator
(15) Pump. (18) Regulator. (19) Passage. (20) Passage. (21) Control piston. (Pd) Pump delivery pressure. (Ps) Power shift
pressure.

In power mode III, as the pump delivery pressure (Pd) increases due to increased load, the pump starts
to destroke from output point (9) to maintain the target engine speed. Pump delivery pressure (Pd)
goes through passage (19) to the shoulder of control piston (21). Power shift pressure (Ps) goes
through passage (20) to the top surface of control piston (21). This causes the pump to destroke.

Reference: For more information on flow control by pump regulator, make reference to "Main Pump"
in the Hydraulic System Systems Operation module for the machine being serviced.
In power mode III, the controller receives signals from engine speed sensor and either the travel
pressure switch or implement swing pressure switch. The controller interprets these signals and sends
a signal to the proportional reducing valve. The proportional reducing valve controls the power shift
pressure that is sent to both pumps. Each pump increases or decreases its flow rate based on its own
pump delivery pressure and the power shift pressure. When in power mode III, the main pumps work
independently of each other. One main pump can increase its output when the other main pump
decreases its output. The percentage of maximum available engine horsepower for single pump output
by this summation control is:

* About 90 percent when travel control is activated alone or together with implement and/or
swing controls.
* About 60 to 70 percent when any controls other than travel are activated.

The engine horsepower is used in an efficient manner for pump output even if there is a decrease in
load placed on either of the main pumps. If engine horsepower available for main pumps (15)
decreases due to an addition of an attachment pump or adverse conditions, the main pumps are
regulated as follows:

* The main pumps are designed to allow the addition of attachment pump. If an attachment
pump is added, the engine can maintain the target speed until a maximum of 30 percent of
available engine horsepower is used for the attachment pump. When the main pumps use the
other 70 percent or more, the target speed is maintained through main pump regulation by
power shift pressure (Ps).
* If the engine horsepower decreases due to engine wear, lower grade of fuel, high altitude
operation, etc. the main pumps are electronically regulated to allow the engine to run at the
target speed until the engine horsepower decreases 30 percent.

As the engine horsepower decreases, the engine can reach the target speed at a lower pump output
than that at maximum engine horsepower. This allows the engine to operate without stalling even if
there is a maximum of 30 percent reduction in engine horsepower.

Mode III (With Engine Speed Dial At "9" Or Below)

The power shift pressure remains almost constant at a selected engine speed dial position until the no-
load engine speed decreases 250 rpm or more. If decreased below this level, the power shift pressure
is increased to reduce pump output. This results in less engine horsepower being available to the
pump than at position "10". The pump is regulated by constant power shift pressure (Ps) and provides
its output based on a certain P-Q characteristic curve.

This power mode and engine speed dial settings are used for heavy duty truck loading or trenching
which need a slightly reduced machine operating speed. Power mode III with speed dial at "9"
provides slightly higher power shift pressure (Ps) than at dial position "10". This reduces pump output
about ten percent.

Mode II

Power mode II is used for ordinary work. Selection of this power mode slightly slows down machine
work speed but reduces noise level and fuel consumption, compared to mode III.
In power mode II, engine speed dial position "10" under no-load becomes the same as that of position
"9". Other engine speed dial positions are not affected. The power available for the travel circuits, is
equivalent to that of mode III, when travel control is used alone or simultaneous with other controls.

The power shift pressure remains almost constant at a selected engine speed dial position of "1 to 9",
until the no-load engine speed decreases 250 rpm or more. If decreased below this level, the power
shift pressure is increased to reduce pump output. The power shift pressure in mode II is higher than
in mode III, this causes the pump to destroke at point (8) (earlier than in mode III).

Mode I

Power mode I is used for light duty work which does not need high speed and power, such as
leveling. Selection of this power mode slows down work speed for improved fine control operation
and reduces noise and fuel consumption more than power mode II.

In power mode I, engine speed dial positions "8" to "10" become the same as that of position "7".
Other engine speed dial positions are not affected. The power available for the travel circuits is
equivalent to that of power mode II or III when travel control is used alone, or simultaneous with
other controls.

The power shift pressure remains almost constant at a selected engine speed dial position of "1 to 7",
until the no-load engine speed decreases 250 rpm or more. If decreased below this level, the power
shift pressure is increased to reduce pump output. The power shift pressure in mode I is higher than in
mode II, this causes the pump to destroke at point (7) (earlier than mode II).

Automatic Engine Speed Control (AEC)


Illustration Of Outputs From Controller (Partial)
(1) Monitor. (2) AEC switch. (3) Controller. (4) Speed sensor. (5) Engine. (6) Travel pressure switch. (7) Implement
swing pressure switch. (8) Governor actuator.

When there is little or no hydraulic load the AEC portion of the controller reduces the engine speed to
reduce the operating noise and conserve fuel. The AEC operates in two modes. The modes are
selected by turning the AEC ON or OFF using AEC switch (2). The two modes and their operation
are described below.

With AEC ON: When hydraulic load changes from heavy to continuous light for ten seconds and the
engine speed dial is at position "5" or higher, the AEC system reduces the engine speed by 100 rpm.
When hydraulic load changes from heavy or continuous light to none for three seconds and the engine
speed dial is at position "5" or higher, the AEC system reduces the engine speed to 1300 rpm. If the
hydraulic system is activated past a load level, the engine speed returns to the engine speed dial
setting.

With AEC OFF: When hydraulic load changes from heavy to continuous light for ten seconds or none
for three seconds and the engine speed dial is at position "5" or higher, the AEC system reduces the
engine speed by 100 rpm. When hydraulic load changes from continuous light to none for three
seconds and the engine speed dial is at position "5" through "8", the AEC system reduces the engine
speed to 100 rpm below the no load engine speed setting.
Reference: For more information on AEC operation, make reference to "Pilot Circuit" in the
Hydraulic System Systems Operation module for the machine being serviced.

Low Idle Control

Illustration Of Inputs To Outputs From Controller (Partial)


(1) Low idle switch. (2) Controller. (3) Engine. (4) Engine speed dial. (5) Travel pressure switch. (6) Implement swing
pressure switch. (7) Governor actuator.

The controller is always monitoring pressure switches (5) and (6) for signals. When low idle switch
(1) is pressed, the controller checks to verify there is no hydraulic demand. If there is no demand, the
controller activates the low idle system which adjusts the engine RPM to the equivalent of engine
speed dial position "2". The low idle system overrides the automatic engine speed control (AEC)
system.

When low idle switch (1) is pressed again, the engine speed recovers as follows:

* If engine speed dial (4) is at position "4" or below, the engine speed returns to the original
dial setting.
* If the engine speed dial is placed at position "5" or higher with automatic engine speed control
ON, the engine speed returns to 1300 rpm.
* If the engine speed dial is placed at position "5" or higher with automatic engine speed control
OFF, the engine speed returns to a speed 100 rpm lower than the original dial setting.
Activation of any hydraulic control, deactivates the low idle system and returns engine speed to the
original engine speed dial setting, or power mode setting if power mode I or II is selected. Once low
idle system is deactivated, it is necessary to press low idle switch (1) again to activate the system.

Other Controller Functions

Right Console
(1) Monitor. (2) Power mode selector switch. (3) Selection indicator. (4) Work mode selector switch. (5) AEC switch. (6)
Light switch. (7) Washer switch. (8) Wiper switch. (9) Travel speed switch. (10) Alarm cancel switch.

Pilot Oil Manifold Compartment


(11) Swing priority solenoid valve. (12) Travel speed solenoid valve. (13) Fine control solenoid valve.

Functions of the switches on monitor (1) are electronically controlled by the controller. See the
previous sections for details of power mode selector switch (2) and AEC switch (5). Description on
alarm cancel switch (10) will be given in Monitoring System section.

All of the switches are momentary push-on type. Each time a switch is pushed, the indicator lamp (3)
will change to indicate the status of the switch functions.

Work Mode

Work mode switch (4) selects one of three work modes; Boom Priority, Swing Priority and Fine
Control. Swing Priority and Fine Control modes function for sure trenching and leveling by
energizing respective solenoid valves (11) and (13). Boom Priority mode is not provided with an
exclusive solenoid valve, however, when the boom control lever is fully moved to the boom RAISE
position with switch (4) in the Boom Priority position, Fine Control solenoid valve (13) is energized
to assure faster boom speed during combined operation of boom and stick. The indicator lamp that
corresponds to the mode selected will be on.
Travel Speed

Travel speed switch (9) selects one of two travel speeds, HIGH and LOW. Selection of HIGH speed
energizes travel speed solenoid (12) which causes travel speed to change depending on the travel load.
Selection of LOW speed deactivates travel speed solenoid (12) keeping the travel speed at LOW. The
indicator lamp that corresponds to the speed selected will be on.

Reference: For more information, make reference to "Trenching Operation", "Leveling Operation",
"Pilot Circuit" and "Travel Control" in the Hydraulic System Systems Operation module for the
machine being serviced.

Lights

Light switch (6) selects one of three different lighting options. When indicator lamp 1 is on, the
chassis light is on. When indicator lamp 2 is on, the chassis and boom lights are on. When both
indicators 1 and 2 are off, no lights will be on.

Wipers

Wiper switch (8) selects one of three different wiper options. When indicator lamp 1 is on, the wiper
operates intermittently. When indicator lamp 2 is on, the wiper activates continuously. When both
indicators 1 and 2 are off, the wiper is stopped.

Washer

Washer switch (7) activates the washer pump and the wiper. Push the switch to spray. When the
switch is released, washer solution stops immediately and the wiper stops about three seconds later.

Monitoring System
Illustration Of Inputs To Outputs From Controller (Partial)
(1) Engine coolant temperature gauge. (2) Fuel gauge. (3) Character display. (4) Hydraulic oil temperature gauge. (5)
Charge alarm indicator. (6) Engine coolant temperature alarm indicator. (7) Hydraulic oil temperature alarm indicator. (8)
Engine oil pressure alarm indicator. (9) Controller alert indicator. (10) Monitor alert indicator. (11) Fuel level sensor. (12)
Engine coolant temperature sensor. (13) Hydraulic oil temperature sensor. (14) Engine oil pressure switch. (15) Starter
switch. (16) Alternator. (17) Engine speed dial. (18) Monitor panel. (19) Controller. (20) Monitor. (21) Action lamp. (22)
Action alarm. (23) Switch panel. (24) Alarm cancel switch. (26) Air heater indicator. (27) Air heater.
Controller Compartment (Rear Of Cab)
(19) Controller. (25) Indicator.

Introduction

The monitoring system:

* Alerts the operator of machine problem(s).


* Keeps the operator continually informed of the machine status, such as engine speed,
hydraulic oil temperature, power shift pressure, etc.
* Informs the operator of problem(s) in the electronic control system that are occurring or have
occurred at some time.
* Provides information for testing and/or adjusting the electronic control system.

The functions described above are indicated through the following means.

Monitor panel (18).Action lamp (21).Action alarm (22) in console.Indicator (25) in controller (19).

All of machine problems and some items of machine status monitored by the monitoring system are
automatically indicated on the monitor panel. The remaining items of machine status monitored by
the monitoring system are indicated by activating the Service Mode function. The description on the
Service Mode functions will be given later.

Description On Gauges And Indicators

Monitor Panel Self Test

To ensure proper operation of the monitoring system, the alarm buzzer and indicators are tested
whenever the monitor is powered up. When starter switch (15) is moved to ON, all indicators on
monitor (20) should come ON for about 2.5 seconds and action alarm (22) should sound for about 1.5
seconds.

Fuel Level

Fuel level gauge (2) receives input signal from fuel level sensor (11) and indicates the amount of fuel
in the fuel tank.

Engine Coolant Temperature


Engine coolant temperature gauge (1) receives input signal from engine coolant temperature sensor
(12) and indicates engine coolant temperature. When engine coolant temperature reaches the critical
point, 79°C (210°F), the red range will illuminate. Engine coolant temperature alert indicator (6) and
action lamp (21) will both be illuminated.

Hydraulic Oil Temperature

Hydraulic oil temperature gauge (4) receives input signal from hydraulic oil temperature sensor (13)
and indicates what the hydraulic oil temperature is. When hydraulic oil temperature reaches the
critical point, 95°C (203°F), the red range will illuminate and hydraulic oil temperature alert indicator
(7) and action lamp (21) will be illuminated.

Engine Oil Pressure

Engine oil pressure alarm indicator (8) receives input signal from engine oil pressure switch (14).
When engine oil pressure abnormally decreases, engine oil pressure alert indicator (8) and action
lamp (21) will be illuminated. At this time, action alarm (22) sounds.

Charging

Charge alert indicator (5) monitors charging frequency of alternator (16). When the system voltage is
abnormal, charging alert indicator (5) is illuminated.

Controller

When a problem occurs in the controller itself, controller alert indicator (9) is illuminated.

Indicator (25), located in the controller, gives three different indications. A different color is
illuminated depending on the type of problem. This helps locate the cause of controller problem(s).

* Yellow is illuminated when:

monitor gives no response to signal from controller.controller senses a signal of problems in the
data communication circuit.

* Red is illuminated (flashing or continuously) when controller is faulty.


* Green is illuminated when there is no problem in the controller.

Monitor

When a problem occurs in monitor itself, monitor alert indicator (10) is illuminated.

Air Heater Indicator

When starter switch (15) is placed in the PREHEAT position, air heater indicator (26) is illuminated.

Engine Speed Dial Position


During normal operation, the selected engine speed dial (17) position is indicated on character display
(3) portion of monitor panel (18).

Alarm Cancel

If action alarm (22) is sounding, push alarm cancel switch (24). The alarm stops one second later.

Service Function

The service function has the following two function levels that can be used for diagnostic and
calibration purposes.

* Level 0: Provides machine condition information to the service personnel. Information such
as power shift command pressure, engine oil temperature and current problems in electronic
controller, etc.
* Level 1: Provides troubleshooting, calibration and adjusting information for components of
the electronic control system.

Reference: For more details of Service Function, make reference to the Hydraulic And Electronic
Systems Testing And Adjusting module for the machine being serviced.

Backup System
Introduction

The electronic controller has an operator activated backup system to allow operation of the pump
and/or engine in case of electronic control system problems. The backup system consists of the
governor backup to control the engine and the pump backup for pump control. The governor backup
should be activated when a problem occurs in the electronic control system that controls the engine
governor. The pump backup should be activated when a problem occurs in the electronic control
system that controls the pump. During backup, pump output is equivalent to that of machine operation
in power mode I or II.

Operation
Backup Circuit Schematic (Controller In Normal Condition)
(1) Controller. (2) Governor backup switch. (3) Governor actuator. (4) Governor actuator drive circuit. (5) Speed change
switch. (6) Pump backup switch. (7) Proportional reducing valve. (8) Proportional reducing valve drive circuit.
Rear Of Right Console (Access Cover Removed)
(2) Governor backup switch. (5) Speed change switch.

Rear Of Left Console (Access Cover Removed)


(6) Pump backup switch.

Governor backup switch (2) and speed change switch (5) are located in the rear of the right console.
Pump backup switch is located in the rear of the left console. When the controller is normal, governor
backup switch (2) should be in AUT (OFF) position with speed change switch (5) upright. Pump
backup switch (6) should be in AUT (OFF) position.

Governor backup and pump backup can be controlled separately.


Governor Backup

Monitor
(9) Character display. (10) Controller alert indicator. (11) Monitor alert indicator.

If a problem occurs in the controller, which controls the engine governor, character display (9) will
not indicate the correct speed dial setting. When this happens, the governor backup switch should be
used to override the controller and the speed change switch should be used to set the desired engine
speed.

During governor backup operation, the character display will appear as shown:

A : when governor backup is used alone.U : when both governor and pump backups are used
simultaneously.

NOTE: The character display will show the same information when problems occur in the governor
actuator harness. Use extra care not to mistake this for a backup mode indication.
Backup Circuit Schematic (In Backup Operation)
(1) Controller. (2) Governor backup switch. (3) Governor actuator. (4) Governor actuator drive circuit. (5) Speed change
switch. (6) Pump backup switch. (7) Proportional reducing valve. (8) Proportional reducing valve drive circuit. (12)
Backup signal. (13) Backup signal. (14) Backup resistor.

Governor backup is activated by governor backup switch (2). With governor backup switch (2) in
MAN (backup) position, move speed change switch (5) backward (to rabbit sign position) to increase
rpm and move it forward (to tortoise sign position) to decrease rpm. Releasing switch (5) causes the
engine speed to remain as it was just before releasing switch (5). The governor backup overrides the
function of the engine speed dial.
The above schematic represents the backup condition with governor backup switch (2) in "backup"
position and speed change switch (5) in the acceleration position. Governor actuator (3) is
disconnected from drive circuit (4) of the controller, and directly activated by speed change switch
(5). Controller (1) receives only backup signal (12) of "backup status" from speed change switch (5).

Pump Backup

Controller Compartment (Rear Of Cab)


(1) Controller. (15) Controller indicator.

When a problem occurs in the pump control portion of the controller, controller alert indicator (10) or
monitor alert indicator (11) illuminate, or controller indicator (15) turns yellow or red. When this
happens, pump backup should be activated with pump backup switch (6). Move pump backup switch
(6) backward (to tortoise sign "backup" position). This disconnects proportional reducing valve (7)
from the controller circuit (8). Proportional reducing valve (7) is supplied a constant current flow
through backup resistor (14), and pump backup switch (6) which causes the constant power shift
pressure to regulate the pump. The controller receives only a backup signal (13) of backup status.

During pump backup operation the character display shows the following indication.

H : when pump backup is used alone.U : when both pump and governor backups are used
simultaneously.

Governor Lever Control By Engine Speed


Illustration Of Controller Inputs To Outputs For Engine Speed Control (Partial)
(1) Monitor. (2) Controller. (3) Speed sensor. (4) Engine. (5) Engine speed dial. (6) Travel pressure switch. (7) Implement
swing pressure switch. (8) Governor actuator. (9) Feedback sensor.

An exact engine speed control is performed by the combined operations of the components shown in
the above illustration. A failure in any one of them could result in improper engine speed control.

This section describes the engine speed control only when there is a problem in feedback sensor (9)
and/or its circuit. During a normal condition, the controller controls the engine speed by matching the
feedback sensor signal and the engine speed dial setting signal.

If a problem occurs in feedback sensor (9) and/or its circuit and there is no hydraulic demand, the
controller controls the engine speed by monitoring a signal from the engine speed sensor and moving
the governor actuator until the engine speed is close to the engine speed selected by the engine speed
dial. It will take five to ten seconds for correct adjustment to occur after the engine speed dial position
is changed.

Immediately after the feedback sensor problem has been corrected, the controller reverts back to
normal engine speed control using the feedback sensor. Control by this method overrides the
functions of the AEC and the low idle switch.

When this function is activated, the character display reads "L" and "A" on its first and third positions.

For more details, see the Testing And Adjusting module for the machine being serviced.
Pump Output Control With Low Hydraulic Oil Temperature
Introduction

Illustration Of Outputs To Controller


(1) Travel pressure switch. (2) Controller. (3) Engine. (4) Pump. (5) Implement/swing pressure switch. (6) Hydraulic oil
temperature sensor. (7) Proportional reducing valve.

In cold weather, machine operation may be sluggish due to low hydraulic oil temperature. In this
situation, controller (2) functions so that stable pump output is assured even when the hydraulic oil
working temperature is too low.

Under a normal hydraulic oil working temperature, the pump is regulated by target engine speed
(underspeed control). When the hydraulic oil cannot reach a certain temperature level, the controller
functions so the pump regulation is done by a certain constant power shift pressure, not by a target
engine speed. The pump output by this constant power shift pressure is slightly less than normal.

Operation

Implement/swing pressure switch (5) and travel pressure switch (1) are activated and send a signal to
the controller, when the travel control is used in power mode III or II and/or the implement/swing
controls are used in power mode III with the engine speed dial in position "10".

If the hydraulic oil temperature is 20°C (68°F) or below, the controller regulates the pump output by
maintaining a constant power shift pressure instead of maintaining the target engine speed. The
controller will regulate by target engine speed again when the oil temperature reaches 25°C (77°F).
The pump output under low hydraulic oil temperature constant power shift pressure control is
decreased almost ten percent. Under constant power shift pressure control, pump summation control
does not function.
Travel pressure switch (1) is activated and sends a signal to the controller, when the travel control is
used in power mode II or I and engine speed dial in positions "6" through "9". The pump is regulated
in the same manner as described above except the constant power shift pressure will be higher and the
pump output will be decreased from two to ten percent.

While the pump output is being controlled by a constant power shift pressure, the character display
will indicate "L" and "b" on its first and third positions. For more information, see the Testing And
Adjusting module for the machine being serviced.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 14:22:24 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE INFORMATION (DISASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY) F 2DL00001-UP (MACHINE)

Systems Operation
EquipmentManager Dealer Administrator Manual
Media Number -KENR6304-08 Publication Date -01/05/2010 Date Updated -18/05/2010

i03367182

Fault Codes
SMCS - 7600; 7606

Diagnostic codes are frequently referred to as fault codes or event codes. The fault codes that are provided
by the EquipmentManager software provide valuable information. This information can be used to make
decisions concerning the maintenance of your machine. Use the "Search Equipment" button in order to
access the fault codes for your . The "Search Equipment" button is located on the EquipmentManager home
screen. Select the check box (1) for the equipment from the "Equipment Summary" screen. Then, select
"Fault Codes" from the "View" drop-down menu.
Illustration 1 g01737838

"Fault Codes" screen

(1) Check box

(2) "Fault Codes" link

View "Fault Code History" (Event code and Diagnostic Code)


By using Health Watch, you can view a record of all previous fault codes that were recorded through
EquipmentManager software.

In order to view the "Fault Code History" screen, use the following procedure:

1. From the "Fault Codes" screen, click the "Fault Codes" link (2) or the "view history details" link in
the "Latest Fault Codes" column. The "Fault Code History" screen will be displayed.
Illustration 2 g01737839

"Fault Code History"

(3) "Start Date" field and "End Date" field

(4) "Fault Codes" column

(5) "Update Status" button

2. Click on the icon for the calendar next to the "Start Date" field and "End Date" field (3) . Select a
date in order to indicate a time period for the history of the fault code.

3. Click the "Change Date Range" button. The "Fault Code History" table will be updated to using the
new date range.

Note: The history of the fault code that is viewed in the EquipmentManager software will display all
faults that are reported by Product Link. A machine Electronic Control Module (ECM) will
automatically erase a diagnostic code after 100 hours of operation if the diagnostic code does not
reappear within that period of time. If the machine ECM erases a diagnostic code automatically, the
history of the fault code that is displayed by the EquipmentManager software may not match the
history that is displayed by Caterpillar Electronic Technician software.

"Service Information for Fault Codes (SIS Web)"


In order to view detailed information about a particular code, EquipmentManager software interfaces with
Service Information System (SIS). The link to SIS will provide troubleshooting procedures in order to
resolve fault codes. For this link to work, a valid subscription to SIS is required.

In order to obtain service information for specific fault codes, complete the following precedure:

1. On the "Fault Code History " screen, locate the "Fault Codes" column (4) . Click on the fault code in
order to view the service information for the fault code. The "Service Information for Fault Codes"
screen will now display the information for your specific fault code. The troubleshooting procedure
for the selected fault code will appear if there is a proper link in SIS.

Illustration 3 g01253373

"Service Information for Fault Codes" troubleshooting

2. The "Service Information for Fault Codes" screen for troubleshooting will display fault codes in the
left column. Click on the hyperlink that applies to your fault code. The "Service Information for Fault
Codes" will appear. This screen will display information about your fault code.

3. View the information in the "Information Types" and "Sections" columns. Click on the links that
apply to your fault code. Click the "Close" button in order to return to the "Fault Code History"
screen.
Illustration 4 g01253376

"Service Information for Fault Codes" information

"Update Status" for the Fault Code

EquipmentManager software enables you to update the status of a fault code. If the status of a fault code is
updated to "Resolved", the fault code will no longer appear in the "Event Summary". The "Event
Summary" screen is located on the home page. The home page may also be referred to as the Exception
Dashboard.

In order to update the status of a fault code, use the following procedure:

1. View the "Fault Code" screen, or the "Fault Code History" screen. Click in the check box (1) that is
next to the fault code in order to update the fault code. Then, click the "Update Status" button (5) .
The "Update Status" window will appear.
Illustration 5 g01737840

Fault code "Update Status"

(6) "Update Status" field

(7) "Comments" field

2. In the "Update Status" field (6) , select a new status. The following table displays the different
possible selections for "Update Status":

Table 1
Status Color Importance
Action RED Highest
Monitor YELLOW Medium
Normal GREEN Lowest
Resolved -- --

3. In the "Comments" field (7) , type your comments.

4. Click "Save". The status of the fault code is now updated.

Note: Once the status of an event is changed to "Resolved", the event will no longer be displayed in the
"Exception Dashboard".

S·O·S Service Manager Software


S·O·S alerts for fluid analysis may be provided in EquipmentManager if your dealership uses S·O·S
Service Manager software in the dealership's laboratory. S·O·S alerts will be displayed in the Exception
Dashboard in the "Event Summary" display.
The S·O·S Service Manager tool is a software program that is available through your dealer's web site. In
order to view S·O·S details or reports for a sample, use the tool for viewing the S·O·S application on the
web. Also, you may contact your Caterpillar dealer's S·O·S laboratory for your results. The report from the
S·O·S laboratory may be obtained from a fax or from e-mail. A paper copy of the report can be mailed as
well.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 17:05:57 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Systems Operation
3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5546-15 Publication Date -01/07/2013 Date Updated -30/07/2013

i01563658

Fuel System
SMCS - 1250

Fuel System Operation


Illustration 1 g00819371

Fuel system schematic of 3066 Engine

(1) Secondary fuel filter

(2) Fuel supply for fuel injection nozzle

(3) Fuel injection nozzle

(4) Supply line for the secondary fuel filter

(5) Fuel tank

(6) Valve for the fuel return

(7) Fuel injection pump

(8) Fuel transfer pump

(9) Fuel return line


Fuel transfer pump (8) is driven by the camshaft. Fuel transfer pump (8) pulls fuel from fuel tank (5).
The fuel transfer pump (8) supplies fuel to secondary fuel filter (1). Fuel is supplied to the fuel filter at
a pressure of 176 to 245 kPa (25.5 to 35.5 psi). The filtered fuel is sent to the fuel chamber in the fuel
injection pump housing.

The fuel pump plunger is raised by the rotation of the camshaft. The fuel injection pump (7) delivers
fuel through the supply line (4) to the secondary fuel filter (1). Fuel is then supplied to the fuel
injection nozzle (3). The fuel is then injected into the engine cylinder.

At least two times the quantity of fuel that is needed is delivered to the fuel injection pump (7) by the
fuel transfer pump (8). A valve for the fuel return (9) is installed in order to return the excess fuel to
fuel tank (5). The fuel pressure must exceed a set value in order for the fuel to return to the fuel tank.

Note: The fuel lubricates the inside of the holder for the fuel injection nozzle.

Fuel Injection Pump Operation


Illustration 2 g00534572

View of cross section of fuel injection pump

(1) Spring for delivery valve

(2) Delivery valve

(3) Plunger barrel

(4) Chamber for fuel

(5) Plunger
(6) Control pinion

(7) Control sleeve

(8) Injection control rack

(9) Upper spring seat

(10) Plunger spring

(11) Lower spring seat

(12) Adjusting bolt for tappet

(13) Tappet

(14) Camshaft

The plunger movement is constant. The plunger is raised by tappet (13) and returned by plunger
spring (10) through engine rotation. The chamber for fuel (4) of the housing for the pump is always
filled with fuel. The suction and the discharge port of plunger barrel (3) opens to the chamber for fuel.

Fuel is delivered to plunger barrel (3) when plunger (5) descends. The suction of fuel is complete
when plunger (5) reaches the lowest point. Plunger (5) then ascends. The suction and discharge ports
of plunger barrel (3) is closed by plunger (5). The fuel pressure then increases. When the fuel pressure
reaches approximately 820 kPa (119 psi) the delivery valve is forced upward. Fuel is then delivered to
the fuel injection nozzle through the pipe for the fuel injector.
Illustration 3 g00534776

Cutaway view of fuel injection pump

(1) Spring for delivery valve

(2) Delivery valve

(4) Chamber for fuel

(5) Plunger

(6) Control pinion

(7) Control sleeve

(8) Injection control rack

(10) Plunger spring


(13) Tappet

(14) Camshaft

(15) Delivery valve holder

(16) Suction and discharge port

Illustration 4 g00534857

Effective stroke of the plunger

(3) Plunger barrel

(5) Plunger

(16) Suction and discharge port

(17) Plunger helix

(A) Start of delivery

(B) End of delivery

Plunger (5) ascends further. The delivery of fuel and the spray of the fuel injector ends when the helix
of the plunger (17) meets the suction and discharge port (16) of the plunger barrel (3). The spring for
the delivery valve closes the delivery valve and fuel is no longer delivered. Plunger (5) ascends
further. The effective stroke is altered and the amount of fuel that is delivered is changed if plunger
(5) is rotated.

Mechanisms for Rotating Plunger


Illustration 5 g00534859

Mechanisms for rotating the Plunger

(A) No delivery

(B) Partial delivery

(C) Maximum delivery

The flange at the lower portion of the plunger is inserted into the groove of the control sleeve. The
teeth on the upper portion of the control sleeve are engaged with the teeth of the injection control
rack. The plunger is then rotated with the injection control rack. The quantity of fuel that is delivered
is dependent on movement of the injection control rack.

Assembly of Delivery Valve


Illustration 6 g00534860

Assembly of Delivery Valve

(1) Spring for delivery valve

(2) Delivery valve

(3) Seat

(4) Piston

(5) Retraction stroke

Delivery valve (2) delivers high pressure fuel to the fuel injection nozzle through the fuel injection
line. Delivery valve (2) prevents reverse flow of fuel from the fuel injection line to the plunger barrel.
The prevention of reverse flow occurs after the plunger finishes the delivery of fuel. The fuel pressure
inside the fuel injection line is reduced by the action of absorption of piston (4) when delivery valve
(2) descends. The fuel pressure is reduced in order to prevent leakage of fuel after the fuel injection
nozzle is closed.

Tappet Assembly
Illustration 7 g00534861

Tappet assembly

(1) Adjusting bolt

(2) Locknut

(3) Body of tappet

(4) Guide

(5) Roller

(6) Roller bushing

(7) Roller pin

The tappet assembly is designed to change rotary motion of the camshaft into reciprocating motion.
The plunger is lowered and the plunger is raised by the rotation of the camshaft. The timing of the
injection pump is also regulated by the rotation of the camshaft.

Fuel Transfer Pump


Illustration 8 g00534862

Fuel transfer pump

(1) Priming pump

(2) Check valve

(3) Check valve

(4) Piston

(5) Camshaft

(6) Tappet

(A) Suction

(B) Discharge

The movement of the camshaft is transmitted through the tappet and the pushrod to the piston. The
piston spring acts to return the piston of the supply pump. The reciprocating motion of the piston
creates a suction and a discharge cycle.
Supply Pump

Illustration 9 g00534863

Operation of supply pump

(A) Suction

(B) Discharge

(C) Regulating

(X) Position (X)

(Y) Position (Y)

(1) Camshaft

(2) Piston spring

(3) Piston

(4) Check valve

Fuel is drawn in through the check valve for the suction port when camshaft (1) is rotating in the
clockwise direction toward position (X). The fuel is compressed and the check valve for the suction
port is closed when the camshaft rotates away from position (X) toward position (Y). The fuel is also
discharged through the check valve for the discharge port when the camshaft rotates away from
position (X) toward position (Y) .

Piston spring (2) compresses the fuel in the lift pump chamber if the fuel pressure on the discharge
side increases abnormally. The check valve for the suction port closes and the further pickup of fuel is
prevented if the fuel pressure increases abnormally.
Priming Pump

Illustration 10 g00538008

(1) Priming pump

A priming pump may be installed on the fuel transfer pump in order to manually supply fuel to the
fuel injection system from the fuel tank.

Note: Ensure that the screw for the priming pump is secured tightly in order to prevent water and
foreign material from entering the fuel transfer pump after using the priming pump. A filter is
installed at the suction port in order to prevent foreign material from entering the fuel transfer pump.

Governor
Illustration 11 g00538138

RSV governor

(1) Injection control rack

(2) Governor spring

(3) Swivel lever

(4) Tension lever

(5) Spring for starting

(6) Control lever

(7) Camshaft

(8) Guide lever

(9) Idler subspring


(10) Torque control spring

(11) Roller for flyweight

(12) Bolt for stopping at full load

(13) Flyweight

(14) Sleeve

(15) Shifter

(16) Floating lever

Flyweight (13) is attached to camshaft (7) of the fuel injection pump on the RSV Governor. The roller
for the flyweight (11) pushes sleeve (14) in an axial direction when flyweight (13) opens outward.
Sleeve (14) is connected to shifter (15) via bearings. Sleeve (14) will move only in an axial direction.

Shifter (15) is connected to guide lever (8). Guide lever (8) is mounted on a pin. The pin is
incorporated with the governor cover. Floating lever (16) is attached to guide lever (8) by a pin at the
lower end of guide lever (8). The pin acts as a fulcrum. Floating lever (16) is connected to the
injection control rack by a link.

The spring for starting (5) is attached to the top of floating lever (16) so that injection control rack (1)
is always pulled toward the direction for increasing fuel. The shaft for the swivel lever is connected to
the governor cover by bushings. One end of governor spring (2) is connected to swivel lever (3). The
other end of governor spring (2) is connected to tension lever (4). The lower end of tension lever (4)
will contact the adjustable bolt for stopping at full load (12) when governor spring (2) is extended.
The swivel lever will contact the guide lever and the swivel lever will move guide lever (8) when the
engine is stopped. Floating lever (16) is attached to guide lever (8). Floating lever (16) will move and
floating lever (16) will place injection control rack (1) in a position for no injection.

The movement of the position of control lever (6) will alter the position of swivel lever (3) and the
tension of governor spring (2). This occurs when the following two items have eccentric motion: the
center of revolution of swivel lever (3) and the point of attachment of tension lever (4) on governor
spring (2)

An adjustment screw is attached to the opposite end of swivel lever (3). The tension of governor
spring (2) and the drop in speed can be adjusted by the adjustment screw.

Torque control spring (10) regulates the quantity of fuel injection within a specific range in order to
ensure the optimum quantity of fuel injection between idling speed and maximum speed.

Constant idling speed is maintained through the installation of idler subspring (9). Idler subspring (9)
is part of the governor cover. Idler subspring (9) contacts tension lever (4) at idle.

Mechanical Stop Lever


Illustration 12 g00544801

Mechanical stop lever

(1) Injection control rack

(16) Floating lever

(17) Spring for starting

(18) Mechanical stop lever

(19) Return spring

(20) Lever for supporting

(21) Pin

The governor may be equipped with a device for stopping in order to return injection control rack (1)
to the stop position regardless of the position of the control lever. Pin (21) in the bottom of floating
lever (16) is inserted into the slot of supporting lever (20). Injection control rack (1) is moved to the
position of no injection by floating lever (16) when mechanical stop lever (18) is moved to the stop
position.

Control of Starting the Engine


Illustration 13 g00544891

Control of starting the engine

(1) Start position

(2) Full load position

(3) Idling position

(4) Stop position

(5) Control lever

(6) Start spring

(7) Floating lever

(8) Injection control rack

(9) Tension lever

(10) Governor spring

(11) Swivel lever


(12) Flyweights

(13) Shifter and sleeve

(14) Bolt for stopping at full load

Swivel lever (11) is connected to the control lever. Prior to starting the engine, swivel lever (11)
extends governor spring (10) in order to move tension lever (9) when control lever (5) contacts the
stopper for maximum speed. Tension lever (9) moves until tension lever (9) contacts the bolt for
stopping at full load.

Start spring (6) holds floating lever (7) in the position for increasing of fuel as flyweights (12) are not
moving. The roller for the flyweights is held by the shifter and the sleeve (13) as flyweights (12) are
not moving. The distance between tension lever (9) and the shifter is greater than the distance at full
load operation as a result. A larger quantity of fuel injection and easier starting result.

Immediately after starting the engine, the centrifugal force of flyweights (12) exceeds the force of the
start spring. The shifter then contacts tension lever (9) and the quantity of fuel injection is reduced.

Idling Control
Illustration 14 g00836646

Idling control

(3) Idling position

(5) Control lever

(6) Start spring

(7) Floating lever

(8) Injection control rack

(9) Tension lever

(12) Flyweights

(15) Idler subspring

(16) Guide lever

Control lever (5) is moved to idling position (3) and governor control begins after starting the engine.
When control lever (5) is in idling position (3) the governor spring is compressed. Governor flyweight
(12) opens under low engine speed. Movement of the shifter and movement of the sleeve are
transmitted to tension lever (9). Tension lever (9) moves to the right in order to contact idler subspring
(15). Floating lever (7) moves to idling position (3). Injection control rack (8) moves to the position of
decreasing fuel. The decreased amount of fuel injection is suitable for idling.

The centrifugal force of the flyweights decreases when the engine rpm decreases. The force of the
idler subspring moves tension lever (9) and the shifter. The guide and floating lever (7) will move to
the left. Injection control rack (8) moves to the direction of increasing fuel in order to return the
engine to the required condition for idling. Start spring (6) moves floating lever (7) and start spring
(6) moves injection control rack (8) in the direction of increasing fuel if the engine rpm drops further.
The engine is prevented from stopping and the engine maintains constant idling.

Control of rpm
Illustration 15 g00544964

Control of rpm

(2) Full load position

(5) Control lever

(7) Floating lever

(8) Injection control rack

(9) Tension lever

(10) Governor spring

(12) Flyweights

(13) Shifter and sleeve

(14) Bolt for stopping at full load

(16) Guide lever

The control lever maintains constant engine rpm. The governor adjusts engine rpm if engine load
changes. The tension in the governor spring increases if the control lever contacts the bolt for
stopping at full load (14). Tension lever (9) contacts the bolt for stopping. The shifter and sleeve (13)
move to the left.

Injection control rack (8) moves in the direction of increasing fuel through guide lever (16) and
floating lever (7). When the quantity of fuel injection is increased, the rpm and the centrifugal force of
the flyweights increase until the centrifugal force of the flyweight is balanced with the force of the
governor spring. The required rpm will be maintained as a result.

Device for Torque Control

Illustration 16 g00545028

Device of torque control at low rpm

(5) Control lever

(7) Floating lever

(8) Injection control rack

(11) Swivel lever

(12) Flyweights
(13) Shifter and sleeve

(16) Guide lever

(17) Spring for torque control

(18) Stroke for torque control

Illustration 17 g00545029

Device for torque control at increased rpm

(5) Control lever

(7) Floating lever

(8) Injection control rack

(9) Tension lever

(12) Flyweights

(14) Bolt for stopping at full load

(16) Guide lever


The force of the spring for torque control is greater than the centrifugal force of the flyweights at low
rpm. The shifter and sleeve (13) move away from the spring for torque control. The movement is
transferred to guide lever (16) and the movement is transferred to floating lever (7). The movement is
called the stroke for torque control. Injection control rack (8) moves to the direction of increasing
fuel.

The centrifugal force of the flyweights increases as the engine rpm increases. The spring for torque
control is compressed when the centrifugal force of the flyweights is greater than the force of the
spring for torque control. The shifter then moves tension lever (9) to the direction of decreasing fuel
injection.

Operation at Maximum rpm Under No Load

Illustration 18 g00545040

Operation at maximum rpm under no load

(3) Idling position

(7) Floating lever


(8) Injection control rack

(9) Tension lever

(10) Governor spring

(12) Flyweights

(14) Bolt for stopping at full load

(15) Idler subspring

The centrifugal force of the flyweights increases in order to exceed the force of the governor spring if
the engine rpm exceeds the rated rpm. The shifter moves tension lever (9) to the right when the force
of the governor spring is exceeded. The quantity of fuel injection and rpm are decreased. Tension
lever (9) stops moving when the force of the governor spring and the centrifugal force of the
flyweights are balanced. The engine maintains the correct quantity of fuel injection when the forces
are balanced.

The centrifugal force of the flyweights increases when the engine rpm increases. Governor spring (10)
extends. Tension lever (9) moves to the right until tension lever (9) contacts idler subspring (15).
Injection control rack (8) moves to the direction of maximum rpm at no load in order to maintain
engine rpm.

Fuel Injection Nozzle


Illustration 19 g00545065

Fuel injection nozzle

(1) Fuel port

(2) Body for fuel injection nozzle

(3) Shim

(4) Pressure spring

(5) Pushrod
(6) Gasket

(7) Retaining nut

(8) Fuel injection nozzle

Fuel injection nozzle (8) is installed in the body for fuel injection nozzle (2) by retaining nut (7).
Pushrod (5) pushes the needle valve of fuel injection nozzle (8). Gasket (6) holds fuel injection nozzle
(8). Gasket (6) determines the maximum travel of the needle valve. Gasket (6) is assembled so
pressure spring (4) enters the side of the fuel injection nozzle at assembly. Gasket (6) is assembled so
pushrod (5) enters the side of the fuel injection nozzle at assembly. Pressure spring (4) holds pushrod
(5). Pressure spring (4) locates shim (3) in order to control the pressure at starting of the injection.

Pressure spring (4) sets the pressure of injection at starting. The needle valve of the fuel injection
nozzle is pushed upward and fuel is injected into the cylinder when the pressure of the fuel overcomes
the tension of pressure spring (4) of the fuel injection nozzle. The needle valve is pushed down and
fuel injection stops when the fuel pressure is overcome by the set tension of pressure spring (4) of the
fuel injection nozzle.

The remainder of the fuel travels to the holder of the fuel injection nozzle after cooling and
lubricating the sliding part between the fuel injection nozzle tip and the needle valve. The fuel then
returns to the fuel tank.
Illustration 20 g00545068

Orifices of Fuel injection nozzle

(9) Needle valve

(10) Body for fuel injection nozzle

(11) Fuel injection nozzle orifices

The fuel injection nozzle has several orifices. The tip of needle valve (9) is located in the body for
fuel injection nozzle (10). The shape of the tip is a cone. The spray angle is determined by the number
of the orifices and the angle of the orifices. The diameters of fuel injection nozzle orifices (11), the
number of orifices, and the angle of injection depend on the type of combustion chamber of the
engine.

Oil Flow for Fuel Injection Pump and Governor

Illustration 21 g00545071
Flow of engine oil

(A) Movement of oil to engine oil pan

(B) Movement of oil from engine oil pan

(1) Oil tube

Lubrication oil travels from the cylinder block to the fuel injection pump housing through oil tube (1).
The oil is then returned to the engine after lubricating the fuel injection pump camshaft and the
governor. The fuel injection pump and the components of the governor are lubricated by oil under
pressure.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 19:39:25 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Systems Operation
ZEXEL FUEL SYSTEM
Media Number -SENR6572-01 Publication Date -01/10/1995 Date Updated -17/01/2012

SENR65720001

Systems Operations
SMCS - 1250

Fuel Injection Pump

Fuel Injection Pump

The Zexel fuel system consists of the fuel injection pump, housing, timer, governor, feed pump, fuel
filter, delivery valves, and injection nozzles.

The feed pump draws fuel from the fuel tank and forces it through the fuel filter, into the fuel
injection pump. The delivery valves and injection nozzles deliver high-pressure fuel into the
combustion chambers.

If the fuel leakage occurs, the overflow pipe returns the excess fuel to the fuel tank. An overflow
valve is installed above the fuel filter. This valve prevents the fuel pressure of the injection nozzles
from exceeding the maximum allowable by opening and returning excess fuel to the fuel tank.

The engine lubricant system provides adequate lubrication for Zexel fuel system. A pressure line and
pump inlet port provides filtered engine oil to the cam chamber. The outlet port returns engine oil to
the chamber.
Feed Pump

Feed Pump

The feed pump is mounted on the side of the fuel system housing. The cam shaft drives the feed
pump. The feed pump draws fuel from the fuel tank and forces it through the fuel filter, into the fuel
injection pump. A priming pump allows manual operation when starting the engine or venting air.

While the cam is at its lowest position, suction pressure opens the suction check valve, filling the
suction chamber with fuel. When the chamber is full, the suction check valve closes. The cam then
moves to its highest position, pushing the plunger into the suction chamber and forcing fuel out into
the pressure chamber. As the cam moves back to its lowest position, the spring force on the piston
forces the piston to follow the cam. The compression of the pressure chamber pushes fuel out of the
pressure chamber into the delivery valve. Simultaneously, fuel enters the suction chamber through the
suction check valve.

When the fuel discharge pressure exceeds 245.5 kPa (35.6 psi), the piston remains in the intermediate
stroke position, compressing the piston spring and disabling the feed pump.

Delivery Valve
Delivery Valve

The delivery valve receives fuel from the pressure chamber and sprays it into the combustion
chamber.

Fuel is forced out of the pressure chamber into the delivery valve when the camshaft is at its lowest
point in its stroke. At this point, the delivery valve is open, allowing the fuel to enter the high pressure
pipe. This narrow pipe sprays the fuel into the combustion chamber.

During the highest point in the cam stroke, the delivery valve closes and a relief plunger slides into
the bore of the valve housing. The high pressure pipe is sealed from the pressure chamber, preventing
backflow.

RSV Governor
RSV Governor

The RSV-type mechanical governor has a flyweight attached to the camshaft of the injection pump.

When the flyweight opens outward, the flyweight roller pushes the sleeve in an axial direction.

The sleeve is connected to the shifter via bearings, and will move only in an axial direction.

The shifter is connected to the guide lever which is mounted on a pin incorporated with the governor
cover.

The floating lever is attached to the guide lever by a pin at the lower end of the guide lever, which
acts as a fulcrum.

The floating lever is connected to the control rack by a link.

The start spring is attached to the top of the floating lever so that the control rack is always pulled
towards the fuel-increase direction.

Speed Control Spring


Speed Control Spring

The governor spring for the RSV-type mechanical governor is attached to the tip of the swivel lever at
point B and to the tension lever at point A. When the control lever is operated, the swivel lever will
rotate around the control lever shaft. The full-load stopper bolt is installed at the lower end of the
tension lever to limit tension lever movement.

When the control lever is moved in the "speed increase" direction, distance A-B will increase, and
therefore the governor spring tension will also increase.

However, with an increase in speed, the centrifugal force of flyweights increases, moving the tension
lever further and increasing the tension of the governor spring. Therefore, the actual controlled
revolution range of the engine will increase, without a change of governor spring.

The RSV-type governor, then, enables changing of the controlled revolution range through control
lever movement only.
Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 19:40:33 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Testing and Adjusting


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5546-15 Publication Date -01/07/2013 Date Updated -30/07/2013

i02646340

Fuel Injection Nozzle - Test


SMCS - 1254-081

Perform the following procedures in order to determine if a fuel injection nozzle does not work
correctly.

Table 1
Required Tools
Part Number Part Name Qty
5P-4150 Nozzle Testing Group 1
5P-7448 Adapter 1
6V-2170 Tube As 1
8S-2270 Fuel Collector 1
1U-8857 Extension Tube 1
6V-6068 Calibration Fluid 1
8S-2245 Injector Cleaning Tool Gp 1
Illustration 1 g01328160

Fuel injection nozzle assembly

(1) Holder assembly

(2) Shim

(3) Pressure spring

(4) Pressure pin

(5) Gasket

(6) Pin

(7) Fuel injection nozzle

(8) Retaining nut


1. Start the engine and run the engine at low idle.

2. Loosen the nut for fuel supply line at each fuel injection nozzle. Listen for the low idle to
decrease at each cylinder. Also, listen for the low idle to become rough at each cylinder.

3. The fuel injection nozzle may be damaged if the items that follow occur:

◦ Engine rpm does not decrease.

◦ The engine continues to run properly.

Remove the fuel injection nozzle from the engine cylinder head for additional testing.

Note: If leakage at the nut for fuel supply line occurs, make sure that the fuel supply line and
the nut for the fuel supply line are correctly aligned with the inlet connection of the fuel
injection nozzle. Do not tighten the nut for the fuel supply line on the high pressure fuel line
more than the recommended torque. If the nut is tightened more, the fuel line may become
restricted or the threads of the fuel injection nozzle and the nut may be damaged.

Cleaning Of Fuel Injection Nozzles

Personal injury can result from improper handling of chemicals.

Make sure you use all the necessary protective equipment required to
do the job.

Make sure that you read and understand all directions and hazards
described on the labels and material safety data sheet of any product
used to clean the components.

Observe all safety precautions recommended by the chemical


manufacturer for handling, storage, and disposal of cleaning agents.

NOTICE

Do not use a steel brush or wire wheel to clean the nozzle body or the
nozzle tip. Use of these tools can cause a small reduction of orifice size,
and this will cause a large reduction in engine horsepower. Too much
use of a wire brush will also remove the coating that is on the fuel
injection nozzle for protection.
Illustration 2 g00570038

Remove carbon with the 8S-2258 Brass Wire Brush which is included in the 8S-2245 Injector Cleaning Tool Gp .

Before the fuel injection nozzle can be tested, remove all loose carbon around the tip of the fuel
injection nozzle. Use the 8S-2245 Injector Cleaning Tool Gp to clean the fuel injection nozzle. Refer
to Special Instruction , SEHS8627, "Use of 8S-2245 injection Nozzle Cleaning Tool Group"for more
information.

1. Remove retaining nut (8) from the holder assembly (1) . Remove the tip assembly of fuel
injection nozzle (7) . Wash the needle valve and the body.

Note: Do not mix the needle valve and bodies of different nozzles. The components of the
nozzle tip assembly are a precise fit. The components must not be exchanged with other
components. Do not touch the sliding surfaces of the needle valve.

2. Wash tip assembly of fuel injection nozzle (7) in clean kerosene. After washing, assemble the
needle valve and the body in clean fuel.

3. Tighten retaining nut (8) to a torque of 30 to 39 N·m (22 to 29 lb ft).


4. Replace the nozzle tip if the discharge pattern is still unacceptable.

Note: Extra care should be used in handling the fuel injection nozzle in order to prevent damage to
the nozzle tip. A scratch or a burr could cause needle leakage or spray distortion. Dirt that is in the
orifices of the nozzle tip can damage engine components. Dirt can also cause spray distortion.

Fuel Injection Lines


Fuel from the fuel injection pump goes to the fuel injection nozzle through the fuel injection lines.
When the fuel injection lines are disconnected or removed, always put caps or plugs on the ends of
the lines in order to keep dirt out of the lines. Ensure that all of the line clamps and all of the vibration
dampers are installed in the original locations when the fuel injection lines are installed.

Note: Fuel injection lines can leak if the fuel injection lines are bent or damaged. Fuel injection lines
can also leak if the fuel injection lines are rubbing. Leakage of fuel can also cause a fire. Replace any
lines which have damage or leaks that can not be corrected when the nuts are tightened to the correct
torque.

Note: Ensure that the fuel injection line clamps are installed in the correct location. Incorrectly
installed clamps may allow the fuel injection lines to vibrate. Incorrectly installed clamps may allow
the fuel injection lines to become damaged. The damaged lines may leak. Leakage of fuel can cause a
fire.

All nuts that hold a fuel injection line to the fuel injection nozzle or to the fuel injection pump must be
tightened to the correct torque. If the nut is loose, fuel will leak from the connection. If the nut is too
tight, the inside diameter of the fuel line will become smaller. This causes a restriction to the flow of
fuel in the fuel line. Use a torque wrench to tighten the nuts of the fuel injection lines to a torque of
26.5 to 32.4 N·m (20 to 24 lb ft).

Pressure Test

Ensure that you wear eye protection at all times during testing. When
fuel injection nozzles are tested, test fluids travel through the orifices of
the nozzle tip with high pressure. Under this amount of pressure, the
test fluid can pierce the skin and cause serious injury to the operator.
Always keep the tip of the fuel injection nozzle pointed away from the
operator and into the fuel collector and extension.

NOTICE
Do not use dirty test fluids when you test fuel injection nozzles. Also, do
not test fuel injection nozzles unless you have the correct service
tools.The use of dirty test fluids and the use of incorrect service tools
will result in damage to fuel injection nozzles.

Illustration 3 g01328191

Pressure test the fuel injection nozzle by using 5P-4150 Nozzle Testing Group .

(9) 5P-7448 Adapter

(10) Fuel injection nozzle

(11) 5P-4721 Tube

(12) 1U-8857 Extension Tube

(13) 8S-2270 Fuel Collector

(14) 8T-5313 Filter


Note: This procedure is a test of the first opening pressure of the fuel injection nozzle. The test for the
second opening pressure of the fuel injection nozzle can not be performed with this procedure. A test
of the second opening pressure requires the disassembly of the fuel injection nozzle and the use of
special shims. Disassembly of the fuel injection nozzles may invalidate the standards for emissions of
the engine.

1. Connect fuel injection nozzle (10) to the tooling that is shown in Illustration 3.

The spray from the fuel injection nozzle must be directed into 1U-8857 Extension Tube (12)
and 8S-2270 Fuel Collector (13) .

Refer to the table in the Specifications Module, "Fuel Injection Nozzles" topic for the correct
pressure settings. If the opening pressure is not within the range of the setting which is given in
the table, the fuel injection nozzle must be replaced.

Use clean 6V-6068 Calibration Fluid when the fuel injection nozzles are tested. The calibration
fluid is similar to SAE J-967 (ISO 4113) oil.

2. Close the gauge protector valve. Close the shutoff valve. Open the pump isolator valve. Flush
the fuel injection nozzle by operating the nozzle tester. Operate the nozzle tester for 10 to 15
strokes at a rate of approximately sixty strokes per minute.

3. Open the gauge protector valve. Slowly increase the pressure until the valve in the fuel injection
nozzle opens. Note the highest pressure indication on the dial indicator before the pointer
moves to 0 kPa (0 psi). This highest pressure indication is the opening pressure of the fuel
injection nozzle. The opening pressure will happen when valve needle rises from the nozzle
seat.

Refer to Specifications Module, "Fuel Injection Nozzles" for correct pressure settings. If the
opening pressure is not within the range of the setting that is given in the table, the fuel
injection nozzle must be replaced.

Back Leakage Test


1. Connect fuel injection nozzle (10) to the tooling that is shown in Illustration 3.

Position the fuel injection nozzle so that the direction of the fuel spray is into 1U-8857
Extension (12) and 8S-2270 Fuel Collector (13) .

2. Pump the pressure to about 1957 kPa (284 psi) below the opening pressure of the fuel injection
nozzle. Refer to the Specifications Module, "Fuel Injection Nozzles" topic for the correct
setting of the opening pressure. Release the handle. When the pressure begins to decrease, note
the time that is required for the pressure to decrease to approximately 0 kPa (0 psi). If the fuel
injection nozzle is not damaged, the time will not be less than 5 seconds or more than 45
seconds.

If the time that is required for the pressure to decrease to 0 kPa (0 psi) is less than 5 seconds,
too much fuel is leaking around the valve needle. Replace the fuel injection nozzle.
Illustration 4 g00570047

Leakage test after ten seconds

(A) Acceptable

(B) Unacceptable

3. Look for any leakage from the pressure faces of the holder and the retaining nut of the fuel
injection nozzle. If leakage is visible, make sure that the components are tightened to the
correct torque.

If leakage continues to occur, unscrew the retaining nut from the body. Inspect the threaded
surfaces for foreign particles and damage. If the faces are clean and undamaged, test the fuel
injection nozzle. Repeat Steps 1 and 2.

Fuel Injector Nozzle And Seat Test


1. Connect fuel injection nozzle (10) to the tooling that is shown in Illustration 3.

Position fuel injection nozzle so that the direction of the fuel spray is into 1U-8857 Extension
Tube (12) and 8S-2270 Fuel Collector (13) .
2. Pump the pressure of the nozzle tester to approximately 1957 kPa (284 psi) below the opening
pressure of the fuel injection nozzle. Fuel should not collect on the tip of the fuel injection
nozzle in a sufficient quantity in order to drip from the tip for at least ten seconds. A light
dampness is acceptable.

If the results of the tests are not acceptable, replace the fuel injection nozzle.

Test The Spray Pattern

Ensure that you wear eye protection at all times during testing. When
fuel injection nozzles are tested, test fluids travel through the orifices of
the nozzle tip with high pressure. Under this amount of pressure, the
test fluid can pierce the skin and cause serious injury to the operator.
Always keep the tip of the fuel injection nozzle pointed away from the
operator and into the fuel collector and extension.

The pressure adjustment must be correct before the spray pattern is tested.

Illustration 5 g00322083

Correct Spray Pattern For Fuel Injector Nozzles


1. Connect fuel injection nozzle (10) to tooling that is shown in Illustration 3.

Position the fuel injection nozzle so that the direction of fuel spray is into 1U-8857 Extension
Tube (12) and 8S-2270 Fuel Collector (13) .

2. Close the gauge protector valve and the shutoff valve. Open the pump isolator valve.

3. Quickly pump the nozzle tester and look at the spray pattern when the fluid begins to flow
through the orifices of the fuel injection nozzle.

The spray, which flows from all of the orifices, must have the same pattern. A difference in the
nozzle spray patterns indicates that fuel injection nozzle is damaged. Refer to the correct spray
pattern in Illustration 5.

Note: Be sure that the gauge protector valve is closed before fuel injection nozzle is removed
from the nozzle tester. Closing the gauge protector valve will prevent damage to the pressure
gauge.

Installation Of Fuel Injection Nozzles

Illustration 6 g01328217

Typical example of fuel injection nozzle

(1) Retainer for fuel injection nozzle

(2) Fuel injection nozzle

(3) Seat washer


1. When a fuel injection nozzle is removed from the cylinder head, replace the following
components:

◦ Retainer for fuel injection nozzle (1)

◦ Fuel injection nozzle (2)

◦ Seat washer (3)

Ensure that seat washer is 2.0 mm (0.08 inch) thick.

Ensure that all mating surfaces are clean.

Note: Ensure that all old gaskets are removed and that the new gasket is undamaged. If an old
gasket remains in the recess of the cylinder head for fuel injection nozzle, the depth of the
nozzle into the precombustion chamber will be incorrect.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 19:41:43 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Testing and Adjusting


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5546-15 Publication Date -01/07/2013 Date Updated -30/07/2013

i02959108

Fuel Injection Timing - Check


SMCS - 1251-036

Illustration 1 g01471339
Timing Gears

(1) Idler gear

(2) Camshaft gear

(3) Fuel injection pump drive gear

(4) Crankshaft gear

1. Improper fuel injection timing can cause poor engine performance. The engine timing gears
have a reference mark on each gear. The No. 1 cylinder is at the top center position when the
two numbers on the fuel injection pump gear, the camshaft gear and the crankshaft gear straddle
a tooth on the idler gear. The fuel injection pump drive gear turns the camshaft of the fuel
pump. Rotating the fuel pump relative to the pump gear changes the fuel injection timing.

Note: This engine is not timed with a pin and this engine has an idler gear with an odd number
of teeth. Do not rotate the engine if the fuel injection pump is removed. If you rotate the engine,
the engine should be timed by Step 7. The gears must be aligned by using the timing marks
once the front housing is removed. Mark the teeth with a paint stick. Reinstall the fuel injection
pump by meshing the marked teeth.

Illustration 2 g00569342

Fuel Injection Pump Timing Mark

(1) Timing marks

(2) Timing marks


2. Timing marks (1) and (2) on the fuel injection pump indicate the pump position relative to the
timing gear. Each mark on the scale represents a change in timing of six degrees.

Illustration 3 g00569356

Adjusting Fuel Injection Pump Timing

(X) Direction of advancing timing

(Y) Direction of retarding timing

3. Loosen the retaining bolts. Rotating the fuel pump toward the engine retards injection timing
while rotating the fuel pump away from the engine advances injection timing.

4. To check the fuel injection timing, disconnect the fuel injection line from the fuel injection
pump. Loosen the clamp and remove the delivery valve holder. Remove the valve spring and
the stopper from the delivery valve holder. Replace only the delivery valve holder. Install a new
fuel line to the delivery valve holder.

5. Turn the crankshaft until the No. 1 piston is approximately 60 degrees BTC on the compression
stroke.
Note: Check the valve lash with the No. 1 cylinder at the top center position. This ensures that
the cylinder is on the compression stroke and that the cylinder is not on the exhaust stroke.

Illustration 4 g00565561

Crankshaft Pulley Timing Marks

6. The crankshaft pulley contains a scale that has a range of 0 degrees to 40 degrees. Each mark
on the scale represents a 5 degree crankshaft rotation.

NOTICE

Use a suitable container to catch any fuel that might spill. Clean up any
spilled fuel immediately.
Illustration 5 g00836673

Checking for fuel flow (6 cylinder engine)

(3) Fuel priming pump

7. Operate the fuel priming pump. Rotate the engine crankshaft until the fuel stops flowing. Read
the number of the timing mark on the crankshaft pulley that is indicated. The fuel timing
advance should be 8 degrees BTC or the fuel timing advance should be 20 degrees BTC for the
3064 Engine. The fuel timing advance should be 10 degrees BTC or the fuel timing advance
should be 16 degrees BTC for the 3066 Engine. Refer to the Engine Information Plate on the
valve cover for fuel injection timing. Refer to the Technical Marketing Information (TMI) for
other technical data. To correct the fuel injection timing, rotate the fuel pump. Refer to Step 3.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 19:42:35 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Testing and Adjusting


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5546-15 Publication Date -01/07/2013 Date Updated -30/07/2013

i01562415

Low Idle RPM - Adjust


SMCS - 1250-025

Note: Refer to Special Instruction, NEHS0605 for the operating instructions of the 9U-7400
Multitach Tool Group and the instructions for the test procedure.
Illustration 1 g00569479

Points of Adjustment on Governor

(1) Set screw of governor

(2) Control lever

(3) Low idle set screw

(4) Idler subspring

(5) Bolt for stopping at full load

(6) Stop lever

Note: For any adjustments, ensure that the coolant and oil temperature are above 70 °C (158 °
F).

1. Operate the starting motor in order to crank the engine.

2. At approximately 150 rpm, the engine will begin to start and the engine will pick up speed.
Immediately after the engine is running, move the control lever (2) in order to hold the engine
rpm between 800 and 1000 rpm.
3. When the engine is running at a steady rpm, move the control lever (2) to the low idle position.

Illustration 2 g00569487

Adjusting Low Idle

(2) Control lever

(3) Low idle set screw (if equipped)

4. Hold control lever (2) at the position needed for no load minimum rpm, and set low idle set
screw (3) (if equipped). Low idle is 900 ± 20 rpm.

5. Turning the low idle set screw (3) clockwise raises the idle rpm.
Illustration 3 g00569488

Adjusting The Idler Subspring

(4) Idler subspring

6. If the engine rpm tends to fluctuate, turn idler subspring (4) clockwise. Allow the idler
subspring to come into slight contact with the tension lever. The engine rpm will rise slightly
and the engine rpm will stop fluctuating when the idler subspring is exerting some force upon
the tension lever.

Note: Tightening the idler subspring adjusting screw is likely to cause the engine to overspeed
when the load is dumped during heavy-duty operation. Tighten the idler subspring slowly until
the unstable condition is eliminated.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 19:44:29 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Testing and Adjusting


ZEXEL FUEL SYSTEM
Media Number -SENR6572-01 Publication Date -01/10/1995 Date Updated -17/01/2012

SENR65720002

Testing and Adjusting


SMCS - 1250-025

Introduction
This section provides the setup and adjustment procedures for testing and adjusting Fuel Injection
Pumps on 3046 and 3066 Engines. The fuel injection pumps are tested using the Fuel Injection
Equipment Test Stand. See Special Instruction SEHS8200, "Using the fuel Injection Equipment Test
Stand" for operating instructions.

These pumps can also be tested on earlier fuel injection test benches using the same tooling and
procedure. See Special Instruction SEHS7465.

Typical Fuel Injection Pump used on 3046 and 3066 Engines

Tooling
The tools listed are required to test the pump and governor assembly. These tools are not available in
a group and must be purchased separately.
Mounting Tools
Adjustment Tools
Calibration Fluid and Lube Line Tooling
Indicator Tools
Throttle Control Indicator Group
Fuel Injection Pump
Mount Pump To Test Stand
Base Plate Attached to Rails of Test Stand

(1) 6V9132 Base Plate.


(2) 6V9134 Lock Screw.

1. Attach 6V9132 Base Plate (1) to test stand rails using 6V9138 Mounting Assembly and 6V9134
Lock Screw (2).

Pump Mounting Plate Attached to Base Plate

(3) 0T0772 Bolt and 4S9191 Washer.


(4) 4C6609 Lube Oil Supply Fitting.
(5) 4C5706 Copper Washer.
(6) Nuts.
(7) 4C4909 Transfer Pump Cover.
(8) 9U7494 Pump Mounting Plate.

2. Attach 9U7494 Pump Mounting Plate (8) to base plate using four 0T0924 Bolts and 5M2894 Flat
Washers.

3. Mount pump to pump mounting plate (8) using four 0T0772 Bolts and 4S99191 Washers (3).

4. Remove transfer pump and install 4C4909 Transfer Pump Cover (7) using previously removed nuts
and washers (6). Tighten nuts to 5 N·m (45 lb in).

Install Calibration Fluid and Lube Lines


1. Install oil supply fitting into injection pump.

a. Remove original oil supply fitting.

b. Place 4C6609 Lube Oil Supply Fitting (4) and two 4C5706 Copper Washers (5) (one on each side
of fitting) on original lifting.
c. Install assembly and tighten to 12 ± 2 N·m (108 ± 18 lb in).

Calibration Supply and Return Fittings

(9) Fluid return fitting.


(10) Fluid supply fitting.

NOTE: Calibration fluid may also be referred to as test oil.

2. Install calibration fluid return fitting (9) using original fitting with a 4C5710 Calibration Fluid
Supply Fitting and two 4C5708 Copper Washers.

NOTE: The calibration fluid return fitting must have a check valve in the fitting.

3. Install calibration fluid supply fitting (10) using original fitting with a 4C5711 Calibration Fluid
Supply Fitting and two 4C5707 Copper Washers.

Injection Pump Lines

(11) Supply line.


(12) Return line.
(13) Lube oil line.

4. Install lines from injection pump to test stand ports.

a. Connect supply line (11) to "calibration fluid supply".

b. Connect return line (12) to "calibration fluid return".

c. Connect lube oil line (13) to "lube oil supply".

Connect Pump Drive Adapters to Test Bench


Pump Adapter

(1) 9U7493 Drive Adapter


(2) 118-1711 Nut.

1. Install drive adapters (1 and 3).

a. Install drive 9U7493 Drive Adapter (1) with 118-1713 Flat Washer and 118-1711 Nut (2). Torque
to 64 ± 5 N·m (47 ± 4 lb ft).

Drive Adapter

(3) 6V6048 Drive Adapter.


(4) 2A4639 Bolts and 5M2894 Flat Washers.

b. Install drive 6V6048 Drive Adapter (3) with two 2A4639 Bolts and 5M2894 Flat Washers (4).
Connect pump to test stand.

Pump Connected To Test Stand

(5) Bolts.

2. Connect pump drive to test stand drive.


a. Move base plate forward.

b. Align keyway and connect the drive adapter to the chuck. Insert shaft approximately one inch into
chuck.

c. Tighten two bolts (5) in chuck.

d. Tighten lock screw on base plate.

e. Install guards.

Fuel Injector Test Tube Assemblies

(6) 1274365 Fuel Injector Test Tube Assembly

3. Install six 127-4365 Fuel Injector Test Tube assemblies (6) from the top of fuel pump to manifold
block and tighten.

Filling Case With Oil

NOTE: The lube oil supply line can be used to fill the governor and housing. Fill the governor and
housing until lube oil comes out the front of the pump housing.

4. Remove plug from top of governor and fill housing with approximately 750 CC (25 oz) of test
stand lube oil. This amount of oil fills the camshaft and governor chambers. Install plug and tighten to
4 N·m (35 lb ft).

NOTE: Housing cannot be overfilled. Excess oil will run out drain hole at front of pump.

Attach Measurement and Control Tooling


Measurement Adapter and Indicator

(1) 9U6272 Nylon Screw.


(2) 4C5569 Measurement Adapter.
(3) 9U6272 Nylon Screw.
(4) 3P1567 Indicator.
(5) 4C2982 Indicator Collet.
(6) 5P4160 Indicator Tip.

1. Install the cap from the front of the rack bar on the front of the pump housing.

2. Install 4C5569 Measurement Adapter (2) with 9U6272 Nylon Screw (1). Install 4C2982 Indicator
Collet (5) and 9U6272 Nylon Screw (3) to hold indictor or probe.

3. Install indicator probe from 8T1001 Electronic Position Indicator or 3P1567 Indicator (4) with
5P4160 Tip (6). The 5P4160 Tip is part of 6V5042 indicator Contact Point Group.

NOTE: Be sure the rack will move to the full fuel position after the indicator is installed.

Governor Control Linkage

(7) Base assembly.


(8) Column assembly.
(9) Indicator assembly.
(10) Control linkage assembly.
(11) Lever.
(12) Pin.
(13) Degree wheel.
(14) Spring washer.

4. Install 4C8145 Throttle Control Indicator Group. See the "Throttle Control Indicator Group " chart
in the "Tooling" section for a complete listing of parts.

a. Attach a column assembly (8) to base assembly (7) and fasten the base to the rails of the test stand.
b. Attach indicator assembly (9).

c. Assemble and install control linkage assembly (10). The control linkage provides fine adjustment
for setting rack position.

d. Install lever (11) with two bolts (not shown).

e. Attach degree wheel (13) with bolt and spring washer (14).

f. Connect rod end yoke to handle with pin (12).

g. Use the control linkage to put lever (11) in the vertical position.

h. Position indicator assembly (9) to point to zero degrees on degree wheel (13). Tighten holder in
place with thumb screw.

Zero the Rack

Cover

(1) Cover.
(2) Bolt.

1. Remove two bolts (2) and cover (1).

Rack in Full Open Position

(3) Fuel shutoff lever.


(4) Gear segment.

2. Pull fuel shutoff lever (3) to fully closed position (shutoff position).
3. Push gear segment (4) on rack fully forward towards front of pump.

4. Zero the indicator or probe. Repeat Steps 2 and 3 twice to make sure indicator reading stays at zero.

NOTE: Before the test stand is started, be sure the calibration fluid and test oil controls are off.

5. Start the test stand. See SEHS8200, "Using the Fuel Injection Test Stand," for starting procedure.

a. Turn lube oil ON and adjust pressure to 70 kPa (10 psi).

b. Turn calibration fluid ON and adjust pressure to 150 kPa (22 psi).

c. Check TMI for direction of rotation. Select the correct rotation and turn main drive to ON.

d. Increase speed of rotation to 450 rpm.

6. Pull fuel shutoff lever (3) to the fully closed position. The indicator should read zero. If the
indicator does not read zero, repeat Steps 2 and 3.

When pushing on control pinion, never place finger in spring opening


when test stand is running. Failure to follow this warning may result in
bodily injury.

Test Procedure
Before starting any test or adjustment procedure refer to LEBQ0724, "Technical Marketing
Information" (TMI) and Tool Operating Manual NEHS0594, "Using the TMI System to Retrieve Off
Engine Injection Pump Test Specifications for the Fuel Injection Equipment Test Stand." These
manuals provide information on using TMI to obtain test and adjustment specifications.

There are four adjustment procedures that must be made on these fuel injection pumps. These
adjustments can be made in any order, but it is recommended that the adjustments be made in the
sequence that follows:

* Governor
* Fuel Injection Timing
* Check and Adjust Fuel Delivery
* Check Starting Delivery

Check Fuel Flow


This procedure is used only when the pump has not been disassembled (taken directly from engine).
1. Obtain fuel flow specifications (rack and speed) from TMI.

2. Check flow readings on test stand.

If the flow is acceptable, check governor and pump timing.

Governor
If the governor is only checked (no disassembly), place the pump and governor on the test stand and
check the governor specifications using TMI and the "Governor Performance Chart" in the "Governor
Performance Specifications" section. Follow the steps in the "Preparation" section to setup the pump
and governor.

If the governor is disassembled, adjustments will be required. This section provides the preparation
instructions and test procedures to completely adjust and check the governor specifications.

Setup for Checking Specifications


1. Mount the fuel injection pump on the test stand. See "Mount Pump to Test Stand" in the pump
section of this manual.

2. Add 200 cc (6.5 oz) of oil into the governor chamber and 90 cc (3 oz) into the injection pump cam
chamber.

Measurement Adapter and Indicator

(1) 9U6272 Nylon Screw.


(2) 4C5569 Measurement Adapter.
(3) 9U6272 Nylon Screw.
(4) 3P1567 Indicator.
(5) 4C2982 Indicator Collet.

3. Install 4C5569 Measurement Adapter (2) with 9U6272 Nylon Screw (1). Install 4C2982 Indicator
Collet (5) and 9U6272 Nylon Screw (3) to hold indicator or probe. Install indicator probe from
8T1001 Electronic Position Indicator or 3P1567 Indicator (4) with 5P4160 Tip. The 5P4160 Tip is
part of the 6V6042 Indicator Contract Point Group.

NOTE: Be sure the rack will move to the full fuel position after the indicator is installed.
4. Start the test stand. See Special Instruction SEHS8200, "Using the Fuel Injection Test Stand," for
startup procedures.

5. Set the control rack "zero" position.

a. Maintain pump speed at 450 rpm.

Control Pinion in Fully Forward Position

b. Push the control pinion fully forward using a screwdriver. The position where the control rack does
not move forward is the control rack's "zero" position.

When pushing on control pinion, never place finger in spring opening


when test stand is running. Failure to follow this warning may result in
bodily injury.

c. Set the dial of indicator (4) to zero.

NOTE: Check the operation and stroke of the rack, use a screwdriver to push the control pinion fully
to the rear. The full stroke of the control rack should be 14.00 mm (.551 in). If the control rack does
not move the full stroke, or does not move smoothly, reinspect the injection pump and governor and
correct the problem.

6. The performance of the governor depends on the engine specifications. See "Governor Performance
Data in TMI" for additional information

7. Stop test bench.

Preparation for Adjustment


Removing Cap

(1) Cap.

1. Remove Cap (1).

Removing Cover

(2) Locknut.
(3) Bolts (four).
(4) Cover

NOTE: Use a screwdriver to prevent the load stopper bolt from turning when loosening or removing
locknut.

2. Remove locknut (2) and four bolts (3) from cover (4).

Pipe Nipple Installed

(2) Locknut.
(5) Pipe Nipple. Check Injector Timing.

3. Install a 1/4x 11/4pipe nipple (5) over the full load stopper bolt and install and tighten locknut (2).
Torque Capsule

(6) Locknut.
(7) Torque Capsule.

Torque Capsule

(8) 4C5085 Wrench.


(9) 4C5567 Torque Adjusting Socket.

4. Remove torque capsule (7) and locknut (6) with 4C5085 Wrench (8) and 4C5567 Torque Adjusting
Socket (9).

Idling Subspring

(10) Idling subspring.

5. Remove idling subspring (10).

a. Remove cap.

b. Hold slotted adjusting screw and loosen locknut and remove idling subspring (10) and washer.
6. Loosen the Hi Idle and Low Idle adjustment screw locknuts. Back out the adjustment screws
several turns.

7. Verify the position of the speed droop adjustment screw. Compare this position to the
specifications in TMI. Each click is equal to 1/4 turn of the adjusting screw. The position of the speed
droop adjustment screw is referenced from the full clockwise position.

8. Adjust the angle of the control lever to 10° forward of the full speed angle specification in TMI.

Governor Adjustments
There are seven adjustment steps required when adjusting the governor. For correct governor
operation, make the adjustments in the sequence that follows:

* Full-Load Setting
* Full-Torque Setting
* Lever-Set Adjustment
* Low Idle Adjustment
* Full-Load Check
* Control Lever Angle Measurement
* Speed Droop Adjustment

Full-Load Setting
Pump Speed and Control Rack Position Diagram

1. Run the pump at the rpm specified for Full Load Setting in TMI.

Full-Load Stopper Bolt

(1) Full-load stopper bolt

2. Set the full-load stopper bolt (1) so the control rack is positioned at rack dimension specified in
TMI for Full Load RPM.

Full-Torque Setting
Torque Control Spring Adjustment Diagram

1. Adjust the injection pump rpm to the Full-Torque Setting speed in TMI.

Torque Control Spring

2. Install the torque control spring capsule and adjust to the rack dimension in TMI for Full-Torque
Setting.

3. Lock the torque control springs in place with locknut.


Pump Speed and Control Rack Position Diagram

4. Gradually increase pump speed to Full Load RPM. Confirm that the control rack position reaches
Full Load Rack Dimension.

5. Gradually decrease pump speed. Confirm that pump speed is at the correct rpm when the control
rack position reaches Full-Torque Rack Dimension.

NOTE: If the torque control stroke does not meet TMI specifications, adjust the torque control
spring. If it still does not meet TMI specifications, replace the torque control spring.

Lever-Set Adjustment
Maximum-Speed Stopper Bolt

1. Adjust pump speed to Lever Set RPM.

Pump Speed and Control Rack Position Diagram

2. Adjust High Idle screw to obtain Lever Set Rack Dimension.

3. Compare the position of the lever to the lever angle at "Full Load Speed Specification" in TMI

4. If the lever is not within specifications, an adjustment to the speed droop adjustment screw will be
required.

NOTE: Tightening the adjusting screw decreases speed droop and loosening increases speed droop.
Low Idle Adjustment
1. Stop operation of the pump.

Idling Adjustment

2. Move the control lever to the Low Idle position.

Idling Spring Locked in Position

3. Start the pump and adjust the idling subspring with a screwdriver to the Low Idle subspring
specification in Dimension in TMI. Lock this position with the locknut.
NOTICE

If the idling subspring is over-tightened, engine speed will exceed


specifications at no-load maximum speed, this can result in damage to
the engine.

4. Run the pump and run at Low Idle Lever Set RPM. Adjust low idle screw to the Low Idle Lever
Set Rack Dimension in TMI.

5. Replace cap on the idle speed spring and lock into position.

Full-Load Check

Full-Load Stopper Bolt

(1) Full-Load Stopper Bolt.


(2) Lock washer.
(3) Cover.

NOTE: Remove the 1/4x 11/4pipe nipple from the full load stopper bolt.

1. Install cover (3) on governor using bolts and lock washers (2) Use caution when installing the cover
to make sure the O-ring seal is the seal groove.

2. Position the control lever at maximum-speed position.

3. Run the pump at Full Load Setting RPM and adjust full-load stopper bolt (1) to the Full Load
Setting rack dimension. See TMI for specifications.

4. Install cap.

Control Lever Angle Measurement


Control Lever Angle at Idle Position and Full Speed Position

1. Adjust the angle of the control lever to 10° forward of the full speed angle specification in TMI.

2. If the lever angle at Full Speed Position is not within specification, an adjustment to the speed
droop adjustment screw should be made.

Speed Droop Adjustment


NOTE: An adjustment to speed droop is only required if the lever angle at Full Load does not meet
specifications.

Speed droop can be calculated using the formula:

NOTICE

Excessive speed droop increases the no-load maximum speed over a


specified value, this can be adjusted freely, corresponding to engine
use.

Too small a speed can result in high-speed hunting. Speed droop of the RSV type mechanical
governor can be adjusted freely, corresponding to engine use. See chart, No-Load Maximum Speed
Diagram.
No-Load Maximum Speed Diagram

1. Check the Full-Load Lever Angle. If the Lever Angle is not within TMI specifications, an
adjustment to the speed droop is needed.

Adjusting Screw

(1) Adjusting Screw.

2. If Full-Load Lever Angle is not within TMI specifications, adjust height of adjusting screw (1) on
swivel lever. Tightening the adjusting screw decreases speed droop and loosening increases speed
droop.
NOTICE

Adjusting screw (1) can be loosened a maximum of 20 notches (clicks)


or approximately five turns from a completely tightened position.
Loosening the screw further may disengage the adjusting screw from
the swivel lever, resulting in damage to the governor. Always tighten
adjusting screw until at least one click is heard.

Plug

(2) Plug.

3. Remove Plug (2).

Adjusting Screw

4. Adjust Speed. If Lever Angle exceeds TMI specifications, tighten the adjusting screw. If Lever
Angle is less than the specified value, loosen the adjusting screw.

Maximum-Speed Stopper Bolt


5. If an adjustment is made to the Speed Droop adjusting screw, then the Full Load, Full Torque and
Lever Set Adjustments should be checked.

Check Injection Timing


Setup
1. Lock the governor control lever in full open position (toward front of pump).

Injection Timing Setup

(1) Tube assembly.


(2) Delivery valve holder lock plate.
(3) Delivery valve holder.

2. Remove tube assembly (1).

3. Remove delivery valve holder lock plate (2).


Delivery Valve

(3) Delivery valve holder.


(4) Delivery valve stopper.
(5) Delivery valve spring.
(6) Gasket.
(7) Delivery valve assembly.

4. Remove delivery valve holder (3).

NOTE: When installing delivery valve holder, tighten to 39 ± 5 N·m (29 ± 4 lb ft).

Delivery Valve Stopper and Spring

(4) Delivery valve stopper.


(5) Delivery valve spring.
5. Remove delivery valve stopper (4) and delivery valve spring (5).

Delivery Valve and Gasket

6. Using 4C6605 Tweezers, remove gasket and delivery assembly (two pieces).

NOTICE

Use extreme caution when removing, handling, and storing delivery


valve assembly.

Indicator Holder Assembly

(8) 6V3075 Indicator and 5P4163 Indicator Tip.


(9) 4C2982 Indicator Collet.
(10) 4C4658 J-tube Fitting.
(11) 4C5604 Copper Washer.
(12) 4C4766 Plunger Adapter.
(14) 9Y6051 Fuel Locknut.

7. Install fuel flow drain and indicator holder assembly. Assemble the following parts to make up this
unit: 4C4766 Plunger Adapter (12), 4C4658 J-Tube Fitting (10), two 4C5604 Copper Washers (11),
4C2982 Indicator Collet (9), with 9U6272 Nylon Screw, 6V3075 Indicator and 5P4163 Indicator Tip
(8) and 9Y6051Locknut (14).

NOTE: The copper washers should be installed on each side of the J-tube fitting.
Cap Installation

(13) 8S4950 Cap.

8. Remove calibration fluid return line and install 8S4950 Cap (13).

Measure Pre-stroke
Pre-Stroke Measurement Chart

This procedure measures the lift or pre-stroke of number one injector plunger.

1. Rotate camshaft to bottom of stroke (BDC).

2. Zero the indicator.

3. Turn the test stand ON.

4. Adjust the test oil to 20 kPa (3 psi). Oil should be flowing from J-tube.
5. Rotate the camshaft, by hand, in direction of rotation until test oil stops flowing from J-tube (this is
the beginning of injection). Record indictor readings. See TMI for lift measurement specifications and
direction of rotation.

6. If indicator reading does not fall within TMI specifications, adjust the lift with shims (See adjust
Pre-Stroke).

Adjust Pre-Stroke
If indicator reading is not as specified in TMI, the lift of the plunger must be adjusted by adding or
removing shims.

1. Rotate camshaft to top center (TC).

Plunger Spring Retainer

(1) 4C6509 Plunger Spring Retainer.


(2) Shim.

2. Install 4C6509 Plunger Spring Retainer (1) (U-Shaped bracket) under spring.

3. Rotate camshaft until plunger drops away from spring.

NOTE: Increasing shim thickness decreases the pre-stroke dimension. Decreasing shim thickness will
increase the pre-stroke dimension.

4. Remove shim (2) and install appropriate shim to achieve the desired free stroke.

5. With shim in place, measure the pre-stroke again.

Set Timing of #1 Lobe


1. Rotate camshaft by hand, in direction of rotation, until test oil stops flowing from J-tube (this is the
beginning of injection).

2. Turn the test stand OFF.


Degree Wheel Settings

3. Move pointer or degree wheel to any number and lock the wheel in place. Record the number.

NOTE: Do not rotate camshaft or all settings will have to be reset.

Plunger Adapter and Indicator

4. Remove indicator and 4C4766 Plunger Adapter.

5. Install delivery valve assembly (two pieces), gasket, spring and stopper, and delivery valve adapter.
Tighten adapter to 39 ± 5 N·m (29 ± 4 lb ft).

6. Install delivery valve holder lock plate and install number one fuel line.

7. Install flow diverter valve in manifold. Position the diverter on the next injector in the firing
sequence. For example, the next firing order sequence on a 6-cylinder injection pump is #5 or #3 on a
4-cylinder engine.

a. Remove fuel injection tube from nozzle.

b. Install diverter.

c. Install fuel injection tube on flow diverter.

d. Open valve, two to three turns, and position it to drain on the table.

8. Turn the test stand ON.

9. Increase pressure to 345 kPa (50 psi).


Nozzle Overflow Assembly

10. Rotate camshaft until the fuel stops flowing from the nozzle overflow assembly.

11. Read the angle on the degree wheel.

12. Compare the actual reading to the specifications in TM. If the angle is incorrect, adjust the shim
pack using the 4C6509 Plunger Spring Retainer.

13. Turn the test stand OFF.

14. Reposition the overflow valve to the next injector in the firing sequence and repeat Steps 10
through 13. Check the angle of all plungers and barrels.

15. When all plungers and barrels have been adjusted, rotate the camshaft two or three complete
revolutions to be sure camshaft has smooth operation and is not binding.

16. Remove overflow valve assembly from manifold and connect fluid injector test tube assembly.

17. Remove cap from return line and install return line.

Check and Adjust Fuel Delivery


Preparation
1. Recheck zero rack position. See the "Zero the Rack " section.

Cover Installation

(1) Cover.
(2) Bolt.
2. Install cover (1) and tighten bolts (2) hand tight.

3. Start the test stand using the start button of "Test Oil System."

4. Adjust the test oil pressure to 150 kPa (22 psi) and lube oil pressure to 70 kPa (10 psi).

5. Set direction of rotation according to the TMI specifications and start "Main Drive."

6. Increase the speed to 700 rpm.

Lever Locked in Full Open Position

(3) Lever

7. Lock governor control lever (3) to full open position.

8. Allow the test stand to run until the test oil temperatures reach 40°C (104°F).

9. Use governor control lever and nylon screw to lock the rack in position according to TMI
specifications.

Check and Adjust


1. Compare the actual delivery specifications to TMI. If the delivery is correct, the pump must be
adjusted.

2. Shut the test stand OFF.

Removing Cover

(1) Cover.
(2) Bolt.
3. Remove bolts (2) and cover (1).

Adjust Injector to the Correct Delivery Rate

(3) Pinion clamp screw.


(4) Control sleeve.

4. Change the delivery by adjusting each control sleeve as follows:

a. Loosen pinion clamp screw (3).

b. Rotate control sleeve (4) and adjust the delivery. Rotate the control sleeve clockwise (toward
governor) to increase fuel flow.

5. Adjust all control sleeves until the delivery is correct. See TMI for specifications.

Check Starting Delivery

Measurement Adapter

(1) Measurement adapter

1. Remove measurement adapter (1).

2. Install cap (2). Move governor control lever to the low idle position.

3. Run pump at 100 rpm.


Install Cap to Check Delivery Rate

(2) Cap

4. Check delivery rate with specifications listed in TMI.

5. Stop pump rotation.

Adjusting Screw

(3) Screw

6. If delivery rate does not meet TMI specifications, remove cap (2), loosen lock nut, and adjusting
screw (3). Adjusting screw outward decreases fuel flow and inward increases fuel flow.

7. Install cap (2) and recheck delivery rate. Repeat Steps 2 Through 6 until delivery rate is at specified
value.

Lockwiring Caps of Adjustment Screws


All adjustment stops (screws) that directly affect engine performance should be lockwired after
adjustment. Do not readjust any stop without using the test stand. Adjusting the stops without the test
stand can adversely affect the engine and engine performance.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 19:45:31 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Disassembly and Assembly


ZEXEL FUEL SYSTEM
Media Number -SENR6572-01 Publication Date -01/10/1995 Date Updated -17/01/2012

SENR65720003

Governor
SMCS - 1286-076; 1286-077; 1286-015; 1286-016

Separate Governor From Fuel Injection Pump Housing


Start By:

a. Remove fuel injection pump housing and governor

NOTICE

Read and understand publication NEHS0622 prior to separation of the


governor from the fuel injection pump housing.

NOTE: Before separation of the governor from the fuel injection pump housing, remove all dirt and
grease from the governor and the fuel injection pump housing.
1. Mount the fuel injection pump housing and governor on Tools (B) and (C) as shown.
2. If equipped, remove tag wire seal (1) from the governor housing.

3. Remove threaded cap (2) from the full load stopper bolt.

4. Remove locknut (3) from full load stopper bolt.


5. Remove threaded cap (5).

6. Remove idling subspring (6).

7. Remove four bolts (8) and washers.

8. Remove cover (7).


9. Remove seal from cover (7)

10. Use Tool (H) to remove torque control spring (9).

11. Loosen two plugs (A) at top of governor cover. Loosen one bolt (B) on fuel shutoff lever, and
loosen on bolt on control lever (C).

NOTE: These items are to be loosened at this time for removal later.
12. Remove six screws (10).

NOTE: Top two screws are longer than the rest.

13. Lightly tap governor cover (11) with a wooden or plastic hammer to separate it from governor
housing (12).

14. Push link's leaf spring (13) from above with a screwdriver or similar tool a move the governor
cover to the left or right to separate the link from the control rack.

NOTICE

Take care not to bend link.

15. Using long nose pliers, remove starting spring (26) from the spring eye. Governor cover (24) can
now be removed. Remove the gasket between the governor cover and the governor housing.
16. Install Tool (D) to the drive side coupling and remove round nut (15) and spring washer (16) with
Tool (G).

17. Use Tools (L) and (K) to remove flyweight (17) and woodruff key (18).
NOTE: If the pump is to be disassembled, do not remove housing (12).

18. Remove six bolts (19) and one bolt (20).

19. Lightly tap governor housing (12) with a wooden or plastic hammer to separate it from the fuel
injection pump housing. Check the gasket between the governor housing and the fuel injection pump
housing. If the gasket is damaged, replace with a new part.

Connect Governor To Fuel Injection Pump Housing


NOTE: Before connecting the governor to the fuel injection pump housing, replace all gaskets, O-
ring seals, and oil seals with new parts.

1. Place a new gasket between the governor housing and the fuel injection pump housing. Put
governor housing (12) in position and secure with six bolts (19) and one bolt (20). Tighten bolts (19)
to a torque of 7 to 9 N·m (5 to 7 lb ft). Tighten bolt (20) to a torque of 15 to 18 N·m (11 to 13 lb ft).
2. Install woodruff key (18) in its original position on the camshaft.

3. Install flyweight (17), spring washer (16), and round nut (15). Use Tools (D) and (G) to tighten
round nut (15) to a torque of 49 to 59 N·m (36 to 44 lb ft).

4. Install a new gasket on the governor housing and place governor cover (11) in position.

5. Use long nose pliers to connect starting spring (14) to the spring eye.
6. Connect the link's leaf spring (13) to the control rack.

7. Install six screws (10) to secure the governor cover to the governor housing. Tighten screws (10) to
a torque of 7 to 9 N·m (5 to 7 lb ft).

8. Install torque control spring (9). Hand tighten until final adjustment is accomplished on a test
bench. After adjustment on test bench, use Tool (H) and tighten the torque control spring to a torque
of 18 to 21 N·m (13 to 15 lb ft).

9. Install seal on cover (7).


10. Install cover (7) with secure with four bolts. Tighten bolts to a torque of 7 to 9 N·m (5 to 7 lb ft).

11. Install idling subspring (6).

12. Install threaded cap (5).

13. Install locknut (3) on full-load stopper bolt (4).


14. Install threaded cap (2).

15. If necessary, install tag wire seal (1).

NOTE: Governor must be adjusted on test bench.

Disassemble Governor
Start By:

a. separate governor from fuel injection pump housing

1. Remove start spring (1).

2. Loosen nut (2).

3. Make sure threaded bolt (3) is not damaged.


4. Loosen bolt (4).

5. Remove control lever (5).

NOTE: Be careful not to lose any of the loosened components under the control lever.

6. Remove woodruff key (6), washer (7), collar (8), and shims (9).

7. Remove threaded plugs (10) and (11).


8. Remove tension lever shaft (12).

9. Pull tension lever (14) to the top of the governor cover as shown and disconnect it from governor
spring (13).

10. Remove tension lever (14).

11. Remove governor spring (13) from the swivel lever (15).

12. Use a screwdriver or similar tool to remove retaining rings (16 and 17).

13. Tap lightly with a hammer and punch to remove bushings (18 and 19). Remove swivel lever (16)
from the governor.
14. Check the condition of the O-ring seals (20) on bushings (18 and 19) for damage.

15. Remove swivel lever (21) from the governor.

16. Remove guide lever assembly (22) from the governor cover.

17. Check the face of screw (23) in governor cover. Remove if damaged.
18. Remove bolt (24) and lever assembly (25). Replace O-ring under lever.

NOTE: Watch for shims, washers and other small parts.

Assemble Governor

1. Install O-ring under lever assembly (25).

2. Install lever assembly (25) and bolt (24).

3. Install screw (23) in governor cover.

4. Install guide assembly (22) in the governor cover.


5. Install swivel lever (21) in the governor cover.

6. Install O-ring seals (20) on bushings (18 and 19).

7. Install bushings (18 and 19).

8. Install retaining rings (16 and 17).


9. Install governor spring (13) on swivel lever (15).

10. Install tension lever (14).

11. Connect governor spring (13) to tension lever (14).

12. Install tension lever shaft (12).

13. Install threaded plugs (10) and (11).

14. Install woodruff key (6), washer (7), collar (8), and shims (9).
15. Install control lever (5) and tighten bolt (4).

16. Tighten nut (2) on threaded bolt (3).

17. Install start spring (1).

End By:

a. connect the governor to the fuel injection pump housing

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 20:53:12 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Disassembly and Assembly


SUPPLEMENT FOR 320 & 320 L EXCAVATORS (3066 ENGINE)
Media Number -SENR5556-02 Publication Date -01/03/2004 Date Updated -19/09/2014

SENR55560022

Governor Control Motor


SMCS - 1265-010; 1265-017

Remove & Install Governor Control Motor

1. Open left access door.

2. Remove eight bolts (1).

3. Remove cover (2).

4. Remove three bolts (3).


5. Remove governor control motor guard (4).

Typical Example

6. Disconnect electrical connection (5).

7. Remove three bolts (6).

8. Aside governor control motor (7).

NOTE: At this point the accelerator and decelerator cables at the governor and the five clips on the
engine and the frame can be disconnected. Then the entire governor control motor assembly can be
removed.

NOTE: For installation of the governor control motor, reverse the removal steps.

Disassemble & Assemble Governor Control Motor


Start By:

a. remove governor control motor

NOTE: This disassembly and assembly procedure is shown only to show the disconnection of the
accelerator and decelerator at the governor control motor. Governor control motor assembly is now
serviced as a unit.

1. Remove two screws (1).

2. Remove cover (2).


3. Disconnect two wires (3). Mark or identify for later assembly.

4. Remove two screws (4).

5. Remove motor assembly (5).

6. Remove planetary (6).

7. Remove wheel ring (7).

8. Remove ring gear (8).


9. Turn assembly over.

10. Remove four screws (9).

11. Remove cover (10) and (11) with gasket.

12. Remove three screws (12).

13. Carefully remove two screws (13) (not shown) from micro switches (14). There are two micro
switches.

14. Slide rubber boots from cables (15) to expose spring cable tighteners at end of springs. Remove
spacers at the end of the springs.

15. Carefully lift out the electrical unit (16).

16. Remove two rubber isolators (18) for micro switches.

17. Remove planet carrier (19).

18. Remove three planet gears (17).


19. Disconnect cable ends (15) located in housing (21) from ring gear (20).

NOTE: The following steps are for the assembly of the governor control motor.

20. Install cables (15) into housing (21).

21. Attach the cables to ring gear (20).

22. Lightly grease planet gears (17) and space equally in ring gear as shown.

23. Install planet carrier (19).

24. Position isolators (18) in place.

25. Put screws (13) in both micro switches (14) and install electrical unit (16).

NOTE: Make sure isolators are in position.

26. Tighten four micro switch screws (13) very lightly.

27. Tighten three screws (12) very lightly.


28. Install spacers and rubber boots on cables (15).

29. Install rubber gasket, plate (11) and plate (10).

30. Tighten four screws (9).

31. Turn assembly over.

32. Housing (21) ready to assemble motor components.

33. Motor (5), carrier and planet gears (6), metal ring (7), and ring gear (8) shown before assembly.
34. Install ring gear (8). Mesh this gear with planet gears (17).

35. Install metal ring (7).

36. Install planetary (6).

37. Install motor (5). Mesh motor gear with planetary (6).

38. Install two screws (4).

39. Connect electrical wires (3).

40. Install new gasket and cover (2).

41. Install two screws (1).

End By:

a. install governor control motor

Fri Jul 21 20:59:39 UTC+0700 2017


Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Disassembly and Assembly


SUPPLEMENT FOR 320 & 320 L EXCAVATORS (3066 ENGINE)
Media Number -SENR5556-02 Publication Date -01/03/2004 Date Updated -19/09/2014

SENR55560022

Governor Control Motor


SMCS - 1265-010; 1265-017

Remove & Install Governor Control Motor

1. Open left access door.

2. Remove eight bolts (1).

3. Remove cover (2).

4. Remove three bolts (3).


5. Remove governor control motor guard (4).

Typical Example

6. Disconnect electrical connection (5).

7. Remove three bolts (6).

8. Aside governor control motor (7).

NOTE: At this point the accelerator and decelerator cables at the governor and the five clips on the
engine and the frame can be disconnected. Then the entire governor control motor assembly can be
removed.

NOTE: For installation of the governor control motor, reverse the removal steps.

Disassemble & Assemble Governor Control Motor


Start By:

a. remove governor control motor

NOTE: This disassembly and assembly procedure is shown only to show the disconnection of the
accelerator and decelerator at the governor control motor. Governor control motor assembly is now
serviced as a unit.

1. Remove two screws (1).

2. Remove cover (2).


3. Disconnect two wires (3). Mark or identify for later assembly.

4. Remove two screws (4).

5. Remove motor assembly (5).

6. Remove planetary (6).

7. Remove wheel ring (7).

8. Remove ring gear (8).


9. Turn assembly over.

10. Remove four screws (9).

11. Remove cover (10) and (11) with gasket.

12. Remove three screws (12).

13. Carefully remove two screws (13) (not shown) from micro switches (14). There are two micro
switches.

14. Slide rubber boots from cables (15) to expose spring cable tighteners at end of springs. Remove
spacers at the end of the springs.

15. Carefully lift out the electrical unit (16).

16. Remove two rubber isolators (18) for micro switches.

17. Remove planet carrier (19).

18. Remove three planet gears (17).


19. Disconnect cable ends (15) located in housing (21) from ring gear (20).

NOTE: The following steps are for the assembly of the governor control motor.

20. Install cables (15) into housing (21).

21. Attach the cables to ring gear (20).

22. Lightly grease planet gears (17) and space equally in ring gear as shown.

23. Install planet carrier (19).

24. Position isolators (18) in place.

25. Put screws (13) in both micro switches (14) and install electrical unit (16).

NOTE: Make sure isolators are in position.

26. Tighten four micro switch screws (13) very lightly.

27. Tighten three screws (12) very lightly.


28. Install spacers and rubber boots on cables (15).

29. Install rubber gasket, plate (11) and plate (10).

30. Tighten four screws (9).

31. Turn assembly over.

32. Housing (21) ready to assemble motor components.

33. Motor (5), carrier and planet gears (6), metal ring (7), and ring gear (8) shown before assembly.
34. Install ring gear (8). Mesh this gear with planet gears (17).

35. Install metal ring (7).

36. Install planetary (6).

37. Install motor (5). Mesh motor gear with planetary (6).

38. Install two screws (4).

39. Connect electrical wires (3).

40. Install new gasket and cover (2).

41. Install two screws (1).

End By:

a. install governor control motor

Fri Jul 21 21:01:28 UTC+0700 2017


Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Specifications
320 AND 320 L EXCAVATOR ATTACHMENTS
Media Number -SENR6090-00 Publication Date -01/09/1992 Date Updated -12/10/2001

Solenoid Valve Group


SMCS - 1252-010

7Y5005 (2 Speed Hammer)

(1) Torque screw on top of coil group to ... 0.45 ± 0.05 N·m (4.0 ± .5 lb in)

(2) Torque cap to ... 2.50 ± 0.25 N·m (22.0 ± 2.5 lb in)

(3) Torque housing to ... 25.0 ± 2.5 N·m (220 ± 22 lb in)

(4) 7Y8460 Spring

Length under test force ... 12.5 mm (.49 in)

Test force ... 7.69 ± 0.62 N (1.729 ± .139 lb)


Free length after test ... 17.0 mm (.67 in)

Outside diameter ... 10.0 mm (.39 in)

(5) Torque plug to ... 50 ± 5 N·m (37 ± 4 lb ft)

7I0124 (Fine Swing)

(1) Tighten plug to ... 19.6 ± 2.0 N·m (14.4 ± 1.5 lb ft)

(2) 7I7403 Spring

Length under test force ... 14.0 mm (.55 in)

Test force ... 7.8 ± 0.5 N (1.8 ± .1 lb)

Free length after test ... 16.2 mm (.64 in)

Outside diameter ... 5.6 ± 0.2 mm (.22 ± .01 in)

(3) Tighten coil bolts to ... 5.9 ± 1.0 N·m (52.2 ± 8.8 lb in)

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:03:30 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Specifications
3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5545-18 Publication Date -01/09/2012 Date Updated -14/09/2012

i02910133

Fuel Injection Nozzles


SMCS - 1254

Illustration 1 g01381489

(1) Seat washer

(2) Fuel injection nozzle

(3) Retainer for fuel injection nozzle

Tighten the retaining bolt to the following torque. ... 20 to 23 N·m (14 to 17 lb ft)
Illustration 2 g01381491

(4) Body for fuel injection nozzle

(5) Shims

Refer to Table 2 for the correct injector valve opening pressures.

Table 1
Engine Part Number of the Nozzle Injector Valve Opening Pressure
(22.1 to 23.1 MPa)
193-2749
(3205 to 3350 psi)
(22.1 to 23.1 MPa)
3064 212-8470
(3205 to 3350 psi)
(22.1 to 23.1 MPa)
5I-7706
(3200 to 3343 psi)
(22.1 to 23.1 MPa)
193-2749
(3205 to 3350 psi)
(22.1 to 23.1 MPa)
212-8470
(3205 to 3350 psi)
3066
(18.1 to 19.1 MPa)
233-1161
(2625 to 2770 psi)
(22.1 to 23.1 MPa)
5I-7706
(3200 to 3343 psi)

Increasing shims by 0.10 mm (0.004 inch) changes injection pressure by approximately 1375 kPa
(200 psi). Shims are available in nine sizes from 0.10 mm (0.004 inch) to 0.58 mm (0.023 inch).

(6) Pressure spring

(7) Pressure pin

(8) Gasket

(9) Pin

(10) Tip for fuel injection nozzle

(11) Retaining nut for fuel injection nozzle

Tighten the nut to the following torque. ... 30 to 39 N·m (22 to 29 lb ft)

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:04:32 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Disassembly and Assembly


ZEXEL FUEL SYSTEM
Media Number -SENR6572-01 Publication Date -01/10/1995 Date Updated -17/01/2012

SENR65720005

Fuel Priming and Transfer Pump


SMCS - 1256-015; 1256-016; 1258-015; 1258-016

Disassemble Fuel Priming and Transfer Pump

1. Remove priming pump (1).


2. Remove check valve (2), and spring (3) and O-ring seal (4).

3. Remove outlet fitting (5).

4. Remove check valve (6), spring (7) and O-ring seal (8).

5. Remove inlet fitting (9).

6. Remove inlet screen (10), gasket (11), banjo fitting (12) and gasket (13).
7. Remove plug (14), spring (15), piston (16) and gasket (17).

8. Remove snap ring (18) and remove roller follower (19).

9. Remove shaft (20).


10. Remove lip-type seal (21).

Assemble Fuel Priming and Transfer Pump

1. Install lip-type seal (21).

2. Install shaft (20).

3. Install roller follower (19) and snap ring (18).


4. Install gasket (17), piston (16), spring (15) and plug (14).

5. Install gasket (13), banjo fitting (12), gasket (11) and inlet screen (10).

6. Install inlet fitting (9).

7. Install O-ring seal (8), spring (7) and check valve (6).
8. Install outlet fitting (5).

9. Install O-ring seal (4), spring (3) and check valve (2).

10. Install priming pump (1).

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:06:01 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Disassembly and Assembly


ZEXEL FUEL SYSTEM
Media Number -SENR6572-01 Publication Date -01/10/1995 Date Updated -17/01/2012

SENR65720005

Fuel Priming and Transfer Pump


SMCS - 1256-015; 1256-016; 1258-015; 1258-016

Disassemble Fuel Priming and Transfer Pump

1. Remove priming pump (1).


2. Remove check valve (2), and spring (3) and O-ring seal (4).

3. Remove outlet fitting (5).

4. Remove check valve (6), spring (7) and O-ring seal (8).

5. Remove inlet fitting (9).

6. Remove inlet screen (10), gasket (11), banjo fitting (12) and gasket (13).
7. Remove plug (14), spring (15), piston (16) and gasket (17).

8. Remove snap ring (18) and remove roller follower (19).

9. Remove shaft (20).


10. Remove lip-type seal (21).

Assemble Fuel Priming and Transfer Pump

1. Install lip-type seal (21).

2. Install shaft (20).

3. Install roller follower (19) and snap ring (18).


4. Install gasket (17), piston (16), spring (15) and plug (14).

5. Install gasket (13), banjo fitting (12), gasket (11) and inlet screen (10).

6. Install inlet fitting (9).

7. Install O-ring seal (8), spring (7) and check valve (6).
8. Install outlet fitting (5).

9. Install O-ring seal (4), spring (3) and check valve (2).

10. Install priming pump (1).

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:07:13 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Systems Operation
320 AND 320 L EXCAVATORS HYDRAULIC SYSTEM
Media Number -SENR6043-00 Publication Date -01/12/1992 Date Updated -12/10/2001

Systems Operation
SMCS - 1259-010

Introduction
Reference: For Electric And Electronic Systems Operation, see Form No. SENR5404.

Reference: For Testing And Adjusting of the hydraulic and electronics systems, make reference to
Testing And Adjusting for 320 And 320 L Excavators Hydraulic And Electronic Systems, Form No.
SENR6044.

NOTE: For Specifications with illustrations make reference to the Specifications For 320 And 320 L
Excavators Hydraulic System, Form No. SENR6049. If the specifications in Form No. SENR6049 are
not the same as in the Systems Operation, look at the printing date on the front cover of each book.
Use the specifications in the book with the latest date.

NOTE: For Hydraulic schematics, make reference to the following: Hydraulic Schematic for 320
And 320 L Excavators, Form No. SENR5457.

NOTE: For Electrical schematics, make reference to Electrical Schematic for 320 And 320 L
Excavators, Form No. SENR6015.

Hydraulic Schematic
(1) Swing parking control valve.

(2) Travel motor (left).

(3) Travel motor (right).

(4) Stick cylinder.

(5) Swing motor.

(6) Travel brake valve (left).

(7) Travel brake valve (right).

(8) Bucket cylinder.

(9) Boom cylinders.

(10) Stick drift reduction valve.

(11) Swivel.
(12) Pressure switch (implement/swing).

(13) Pressure switch (travel).

(14) Main control valves.

(15) Boom drift reduction valve.

(16) Main relief valve.

(17) Pressure switch (BOOM RAISE).

(18) Pilot control valve.

(19) Pilot control valve.

(20) Pilot control valve.

(21) Proportional reducing valve.

(22) Pilot oil manifold.

(23) Pilot relief valve.

(24) Accumulator.

(25) Pilot control valve.

(26) Shock reducing valve.

(27) Solenoid valve (swing priority).

(28) Solenoid valve (fine control).

(29) Shock reducing valve.

(30) Hydraulic activation control valve.

(31) Upper pump.

(32) Lower pump.

(33) Solenoid valve (travel speed).

(34) Automatic travel speed change valve.

(35) Pilot filter.

(36) Pilot pump.

(37) Hydraulic tank.


(38) Bypass check valve.

(39) Slow return check valve.

(40) Oil cooler.

(41) Bypass check valve.

(A) Return passage.

Reference: For Hydraulic System Schematic 320 and 320 L see, Form No. SENR5457.

Pump Flow And Pressure Control


Introduction

Pump Compartment
(31) Upper pump. (32) Lower pump. (42) Outlet line (upper pump). (43) Housing. (44) Outlet line (lower pump).

This machine is driven and controlled by the following three systems:

1. The Main Hydraulic System (provides oil to the cylinders and motors of the machine).
2. The Pilot Hydraulic System (provides oil to the control circuits).
3. The Electronic Control System (controls outputs from the engine and pump).

The main hydraulic system is driven by main pumps (31) and (32). Pumps (31) and (32) are variable
displacement and bent axis piston type pumps. The pumps are identical in performance. Lower pump
(32) is directly connected to the engine by a flexible coupling. Pumps (31) and (32) are mechanically
connected in parallel through gears. Gear type pilot pump (36), installed in housing (43) is directly
connected to lower pump (32) and drives the pilot hydraulic system. All engine output is used for
driving these three pumps.

Each of the main pumps delivers approximately 185 liter/min (49 U.S. gpm) of hydraulic oil at no
load. When a load is placed on the machine, the hydraulic oil is forced into the hydraulic circuit. As
the load increases, the main pumps decrease their output. The system is designed to keep the
hydraulic horsepower approximately the same as the engine horsepower during system pressure
increase or decrease.
The pilot pump delivers approximately 22 liter/min (5.8 U.S. gpm) of hydraulic oil at 3450 kPa (500
psi) and 1800 rpm.

Main Control Valve Compartment


(16) Main relief valve. (42) Outlet line (upper pump). (44) Outlet line (lower pump). (45) Right control valve body
(operated by upper pump oil). (46) Left control valve body (operated by lower pump oil).

The oil delivered from upper and lower pumps (31) and (32) respectively enters right and left valve
bodies (45) and (46) of main control valves (14). If no work is being performed, pump oil flows
through the control valves and returns to hydraulic tank (37). Main control valves (14) now sends a
signal (negative flow control) to each pump causing the respective pump to destroke to minimum
output flow.

If an operation is being performed, main control valves (14) direct pump oil to the respective
cylinders (boom, bucket and stick) and/or motors (swing and travel). Main control valves (14) contain
various valve stems, passages, check valves and orifices which allow an operation to be done by itself
or in combination with other operations. The maximum working pressure of the main hydraulic
system is restricted to main relief valve (16) setting of 34 300 kPa (5000 psi) during travel operation
and 31 400 kPa (4500 psi) during implement/swing operation.

Cab
(47) Control lever (stick and swing). (48) Control lever (boom and bucket). (49) Travel pedal (left). (50) Travel pedal
(right).

Pilot pump (36) delivers a constant flow of pressure oil to the pilot circuit. The operating pilot
pressure increases to the pilot relief valve setting of 3450 kPa (500 psi).

The pilot circuit has the following three functions:

1. To operate main control valves (14): When control levers (47) and (48) or travel pedals (49)
and (50) are operated, pilot oil flows to the main control valves through pilot control valves
(20), (25), (18) and (19) respectively. This pilot pressure oil shifts the stems in the main control
valves allowing the main pump oil to flow to the required circuits of cylinders (4), (8) and (9)
and motors (5), (2) and (3).
2. To control pump output: Proportional reducing valve (21) receives an electronic signal and
uses the pilot system oil to develop a hydraulic signal pressure. The hydraulic signal pressure
goes to the regulators in the main pumps and controls the pump output flow.
3. To create pilot signal pressure in the pilot circuit so the following controls can be achieved:

A. Activate Automatic Engine Speed Control (AEC) system, causing functions to automatically
reduce the engine speed when no, or very small hydraulic operation is called for.

B. Change the main relief valve pressure setting for travel or implement/swing operation.

C. Release the swing motor parking brake.

D. Automatically change travel speed to HIGH or LOW, depending on the machine load.

E. Operate the straight travel control valve to keep the machine traveling straight during a
combined operation of travel and implement.

F. Control operations of valves required for easier loading or trenching.

NOTE: For details of the pilot control, see the section, "Pilot Circuit".

Cab
(51) Switch panel. (52) Engine speed dial.

Machine Left Side


(53) Controller.
The electronic control system controls the outputs from the engine and the pump through controller
(53). Controller (53) senses the position of the engine governor lever selected by engine speed dial
(52). Controller (53) also senses the power mode position selected by the power mode switch located
on switch panel (51). Controller (53) processes the information and sends a signal pressure to the
pump so the pump can provide optimum output depending on the machine load and engine speed.

The electronic control system has the following major functions:

1. When a large load is placed on the machine, the system allows the pump to destroke,
allowing the maximum horsepower available from the engine.
2. Depending on the load placed on the machine, the system controls the output of the pump at
an optimum power mode from three different power mode setting. This allows the machine to
operate at an optimum speed and helps to reduce the fuel consumption.
3. At a no or very small load condition, the system automatically decreases the engine speed to
improve the fuel consumption and noise level.
4. The system causes solenoid valves for fine control (28) and swing priority (27) to activate for
easier ground surface leveling or vertical finishing of ditch wall surfaces, respectively.

NOTE: For details of the electronic control system, see the separate module "Electric And Electronic
System, Systems Operation, Form No. SENR5454".

Main Pumps
Construction
Main Pumps
(1) Port (upper pump negative flow control pressure). (2) Outlet port (pilot pump). (3) Upper pump. (4) Outlet port (upper
pump). (5) Inlet port. (6) Port (power shift pressure). (7) Port (lower pump negative flow control pressure). (8) Lower
pump. (9) Outlet port (lower pump). (10) Housing. (11) Pilot pump.

The main pumps consist of upper pump (3) and lower pump (8), coupled in housing (10). The upper
and lower pumps are identical in construction, operation and control system.

Oil from the hydraulic tank enters inlet port (5) which is common to both pumps. Each pump delivers
oil through its respective outlet port (4) or (9). Pilot pump (11) draws oil through inlet port (5) and
delivers oil through outlet port (2).

The power shift pressure for the electronic controller enters the main pump through port (6). The
negative flow control pressure from the main control valves enters the main pumps through respective
ports (1) and (7).
Main Pumps
(4) Outlet port (upper pump). (5) Inlet port. (9) Outlet port (lower pump). (10) Housing. (11) Pilot pump. (12) Gear (pilot
pump). (13) Plate. (14) Pin. (15) Line (pilot pump). (16) Inlet port (pilot pump oil). (17) Regulator. (18) Drive shaft (lower
pump). (19) Center line. (20) Trunnion. (21) Housing. (22) Center line. (23) Gear (lower pump). (24) Piston. (25)
Cylinder. (26) Valve plate. (27) Piston. (28) Gear (upper pump). (29) Shaft (upper pump). (30) Cylinder passage. (31)
Inlet passage. (32) Inlet passage. (33) Center hole. (34) Outlet passage. (35) Outlet passage.

The pump is a bent-axis piston type pump. The term bent-axis refers to the angular movement of the
piston pump assembly about the point of intersection of center lines (19) and (22). The pump changes
its output depending on the angle of cylinder (25).
Drive shaft (18) of the lower pump is coupled with the engine flywheel. Gear (23) of drive shaft (18)
engages with gear (28) of shaft (29). When drive shaft (18) is driven by the engine flywheel, shaft
(29) of the upper pump is driven together through the mechanical linkage of gears (23) and (28).
Because the numbers of teeth of gears (23) and (28) are the same, the upper and lower pumps rotate at
the same rpm as the engine.

Because gear (23) engages with gear (12) of pilot pump (11), pilot pump (11) rotates with the main
pumps.

Pump Operation
The upper and lower pumps are identical in operation. Description is given to the lower pump as a
typical example.

Drive shaft (18) is driven by the engine. Drive shaft (18) turns seven pistons (24), causing cylinder
(25) to rotate. Cylinder (25) is in contact with valve plate (26). Cylinder (25) rotates on valve plate
(26). Cylinder (25) pivots on pin (14). Gear (23) has plate (13) that retains heads of pistons (24),
allowing them to swivel in their sockets.

Pump Cover And Valve Plate


(4) Outlet port (upper pump). (5) Inlet port. (9) Outlet port (lower pump). (20) Trunnion. (21) Housing. (26) Valve plate.
(31) Inlet passage. (33) Center hole. (35) Outlet passage. (36) Grooves.

Oil from the hydraulic tank goes into housing (21) through inlet port (5). The oil goes through inlet
passages (32) and (31) in valve plate (26), respectively. The oil then enters cylinder passages (30) of
cylinder (25) which are positioned over inlet passage (31). As the cylinder turns, openings of passages
(30) in the cylinder rotate to the position of inlet passage (31).

Piston (24) changes its stroke (displacement), depending on the angle of cylinder (25). As the piston
moves out of the bore of cylinder (25), it draws oil behind it. As the piston moves in the bore, it
pushes oil ahead of the piston. The oil that is pushed ahead of the piston goes through cylinder
passage (30) and then through outlet passage (35) in valve plate (26). The oil then leaves the lower
pump through outlet port (9) and goes to the hydraulic circuit.

Valve plate (26) moves on the machined grooves (36) of housing (21). Housing (21) has a circular
contour. Center hole (33) of valve plate (26) holds one end of trunnion (20). The other end of the
trunnion is held to piston (27) of regulator (17). As piston (27) moves in or out during regulator
operation (described later), the cylinder changes its angle because of the mechanical linkage of
trunnion (20) and valve plate (26). When valve plate (26) moves in radial direction (C), the cylinder
decreases its angle, decreasing the stroke of pistons (24), causing pump output to decrease. When
valve plate (26) moves in radial direction (D), the cylinder increases its angle, increasing the piston
stroke for an increase in pump output.

Inlet oil is sealed from the outlet oil by a metal-to-metal seal between the face of valve plate (26) and
the face of cylinder (25). On the other side of valve plate (26), the seal is made with the face of the
machined groove (36). The sealing faces are made with precision. Protection must be given to these
faces during disassembly and assembly.

Valve plate (26) in the lower pump is not the same as valve plate (37) in the upper pump. Use extra
care to install valve plates (26) and (37) in their correct position.

Valve Plates
(26) Valve plate (in lower pump). (37) Valve plate (in upper pump).

Pump Regulator
Regulator (Upper Pump)
(1) Passage. (2) Passage. (3) Passage. (4) Shuttle valve. (5) Passage. (6) Passage. (7) Passage. (8) Housing. (9) Outlet port
(upper pump). (10) Outlet passage. (11) Line (upper pump Pn). (12) Passage. (13) Piston. (14) Control piston. (15)
Passage. (16) Passage. (17) Passage. (18) Spring. (19) Bushing. (20) Passage. (21) Pin. (22) Spring. (23) Line (PS). (24)
Control piston. (25) Passage. (26) Spring chamber. (27) Spring. (28) Spring. (29) Spring spacer. (30) Spring. (31)
Trunnion. (32) Piston. (33) Bolt. (34) Ring. (35) Passage. (36) Cover chamber. (37) Piston chamber. (38) Bolt. (PD) Main
pump delivery pressure (upper pump). (PG) Pilot pump delivery pressure. (PN) Negative flow control pressure. (PS) Power
shift pressure.
Pump Compartment
(11) Line (upper pump Pn). (23) Line (PS). (39) Outlet line (PG). (40) Regulator (upper pump). (41) Port. (42) Regulator
(lower pump). (43) Line (lower pump Pn).

The pump regulator functions as follows:

1. Using the electronic control system, the regulator receives the hydraulic signal pressure
[power shift pressure (Ps)] and controls the pump output flow depending on the machine load
and engine speed.
2. To keep the horsepower from the engine to the pump constant, the regulator receives the
main pump delivery pressure (PD). This is called the constant horsepower flow control.
3. When the control levers are in NEUTRAL or in PARTIAL MOVEMENT position, the
regulator receives the negative flow control pressure (PN). Negative flow control pressure (PN)
controls the pump output flow. This is called the negative flow control.

The regulators of the upper and lower pumps are basically identical in construction and operation.
Description is given to the upper pump regulator.

Oil from the upper pump and pilot pump flows to regulator (40) as follows:

Oil from the upper pump goes through passages (10) and (7) in housing (8), passages (1) and (3), and
shuttle valve (4) to passage (2). Oil from the pilot pump goes through passages (16) and (5) and
shuttle valve (4) to passage (2). Only the higher pressure of main pump delivery pressure (PD) or pilot
pump delivery pressure (PG) can go through passage (2).

The pressure through passage (2) separates into the following three paths:

1. One path goes through passage (15) to control piston (14) in the regulator.
2. Another path goes through passage (17) to control piston (24) in the regulator.
3. The third path goes through passages (6) and (35) and cover chamber (36) to piston chamber
(37).

Power shift pressure (PS) goes through line (23) to port (41) which is common to upper and lower
pump regulators (40) and (42).

During constant horsepower flow control, the higher pressure of main pump delivery pressure (PD) or
pilot pump delivery pressure (PG) acts against the shoulder of control piston (14) while power shift
pressure (PS) is acting against the top end face of control piston (14). Control piston (14), pin (21) and
control piston (24) now shift to control the pump output.

NOTE: For further information, see the section, "Regulator Operation" in this module.
During negative flow control, negative flow control pressure (PN) from line (11) acts against the top
surface of piston (13). Control piston (14) shifts, allowing control piston (24) to move for pump flow
control.

Regulator Operation
Constant Horsepower Flow Control (Before Pump Destroke)

Regulator Operation (Before Pump Destroke)


(4) Shuttle valve. (14) Control piston. (15) Passage. (17) Passage. (20) Passage. (21) Pin. (22) Spring. (24) Control piston.
(25) Passage. (26) Spring chamber. (27) Spring. (30) Spring. (31) Trunnion. (32) Piston. (33) Bolt. (34) Ring. (35)
Passage. (37) Piston chamber. (38) Bolt. (44) Pilot pump. (45) Upper pump. (PD) Main pump delivery pressure. (PG) Pilot
pump delivery pressure. (PS) Power shift pressure.

Regulator Operation (Partial)


(14) Control piston. (15) Passage. (17) Passage. (20) Passage. (21) Pin. (22) Spring. (24) Control piston. (25) Passage. (26)
Spring chamber. (27) Spring. (46) Shoulder. (47) Top surface. (48) Passage. (49) Passage. (PD) Main pump delivery
pressure. (PG) Pilot pump delivery pressure. (PS) Power shift pressure.

When the machine is operating with a low load, the higher main pump delivery pressure (PD) or pilot
pump delivery pressure (PG) from passage (15) acts on shoulder (46) of control piston (14). Power
shift pressure (PS) from passage (20) acts on top surface (47) of control piston (14). Control piston
(14) pushes down against pin (21), trying to move control piston (24) down. Control piston (24) does
not move down because the total forces of main pump delivery pressures (PD), pilot pump delivery
pressure (PG) and power shift pressure (PS) are less than the combined forces of springs (22), (27) and
(30). The force of spring (30) is less than that of spring (27). Spring (30) is compressed before spring
(27) is compressed. Passage (48) closes and passage (49) opens making an open connection between
passage (25) and spring chamber (26). Tank pressure in spring chamber (26) acts on the bottom
surface of ring (34). Main pump delivery pressure (PD) or main pump delivery (PG) in piston chamber
(37) moves piston (32) and ring (34) down until bolt (33) comes in contact with bolt (38). Because of
the mechanical linkage of piston (32) and the cylinder through trunnion (31), the cylinder is held at
the maximum angle position, allowing the pump to maintain the maximum output flow.

Constant Horsepower Flow Control (After Start Of Pump Destroke)

Regulator Operation (After Start Of Pump Destroke)


(4) Shuttle valve. (14) Control piston. (15) Passage. (17) Passage. (20) Passage. (21) Pin. (22) Spring. (24) Control piston.
(25) Passage. (26) Spring chamber. (27) Spring. (28) Spring. (30) Spring. (31) Trunnion. (32) Piston. (34) Ring. (35)
Passage. (37) Piston chamber. (44) Pilot pump. (45) Upper pump. (50) Set screw. (PD) Main pump delivery pressure. (PS)
Power shift pressure.

Regulator Operation (Partial)


(14) Control piston. (15) Passage. (17) Passage. (20) Passage. (22) Spring. (24) Control piston. (25) Passage. (26) Spring
chamber. (27) Spring. (46) Shoulder. (47) Top surface. (48) Passage. (49) Passage. (50) Set screw. (PD) Main pump
delivery pressure. (PS) Power shift pressure.

An increased load on the main pump increases power shift pressures (PS) and main pump delivery
pressure (PD). (PD is held more than (PG)

The combined forces of increased power shift pressure (PS) and main pump delivery pressure (PD) act
on top surface (47) and shoulder (46) of control piston (14) to overcome the total forces of springs
(22) and (30). Control piston (14) pushes down on control piston (24) through pin (21). Passage (49)
closes and passage (48) opens, allowing main pump delivery pressure (PD) from passage (17) to go
through passage (25) to the bottom surface of ring (34).

Main pump delivery pressure (PD) acting on the top surfaces of ring (34), is now supplied to piston
chamber (37) through passage (35). Main pump delivery pressure (PD) is common to both top and
bottom surfaces of ring (34). Because the area of ring (34) bottom surface is larger than that of its top
surface, ring (34) pushes piston (32) up against the forces of springs (30) and (28). The mechanical
linkage of piston (32) and the cylinder through trunnion (31), causes the cylinder to move in its
smaller angular direction for pump destroke.

As control piston (32) moves up, spring (30) compresses and pushes piston (24) up. Passage (48)
closes and passage (49) partially opens, allowing oil to flow from passage (25) to spring chamber
(26). Because spring chamber (26) is open to tank pressure, the pressure on the bottom surface of ring
(34) becomes less than main pump delivery pressure (PD). Piston (32) starts to stop upward
movement. When the force of main pump delivery pressure (PD) on the top surface of the ring
becomes more than the force on its bottom surface, piston (32) starts to move down. Because of the
decreased compression force of spring (30), control piston (24) also starts to move down. Passage
(49) now closes and passage (48) partially opens. Piston (32) now starts to move up again because of
main pump delivery pressure (PD) through passage (25) to the bottom surface of the ring.

As main pump delivery pressure (PD) further increases and compresses spring (27), pistons (24) and
(32) operate in the same operating manner as that described above.

When main pump delivery pressure (PD) is equal to the combined force of springs (27), (28) and (30),
piston (32) is in a balanced position and the angle of the cylinder is held at this point. Control piston
(24) is now also held at a balanced position by keeping the openings of both passages (48) and (49)
slightly opened.

Turning set screw (50) changes the compression force of spring (22) which changes the pump output
flow. An increased compression force of the spring increases the pump output flow.

Negative Flow Control


Negative Flow Control Operation (Partial)
(11) Line [negative flow control pressure (PN)]. (12) Port. (13) Piston. (14) Control piston. (17) Passage. (18) Spring. (19)
Bushing. (21) Pin. (22) Spring. (24) Control piston. (25) Passage. (26) Spring chamber. (27) Spring. (28) Spring. (30)
Spring. (32) Piston. (45) Upper pump. (46) Shoulder. (47) Top surface. (48) Passage. (49) Passage. (51) Passage. (52)
Center bypass passage. (53) Negative flow control orifice. (54) Main control valves. (55) Spring spacer. (56) Spring
spacer. (PD) Main pump delivery pressure. (PG) Pilot pump delivery pressure. (PN) Negative flow control pressure. (PS)
Power shift pressure.

When all control levers are in NEUTRAL position, oil flow through the center passage (52) of main
control valve (54) is restricted by orifice (53). This results in an increase in negative flow pressure
(PN) in line (11). Negative flow pressure (PN) enters port (12) and acts on pin (13).
When negative flow pressure (PN) acting on pin (13) is greater than the combined forces acting on
bushings (19), pin (13) moves down. As pin (13) moves down, bushing (19) is pushed down, pushing
control piston (14) down against pin (21) moving control piston (24) down, opening passage (48).
Now main pump delivery pressure (PD) or pilot pump delivery pressure (PG) in passage (17) pushes
piston (32) up compressing springs (27), (28), and (30). When the top surface of spring spacer (56)
comes in contact with spring spacer (55), control piston (24) is pushed up with piston (32) by the
force of main pump delivery pressure (PD) or pilot pump delivery pressure (PG) until a balancing
condition occurs. Control piston (24) remains in the new balancing position to keep both openings of
passages (48) and (49) slightly opened in the same manner as that described for the constant
horsepower flow control. The cylinder is now held at the minimum angle position for minimum pump
output flow.

When the control levers are partially moved, oil flow through center passage (52) flows to implement
and return to the hydraulic tank. This decreases the flow through orifice (53) causing the negative
flow pressure to become lower. The negative flow pressure (PN) gradually decreases its force on pin
(13). As the forces of compressed springs (27) and (30) overcome the force of the decreased negative
flow pressure (PN), control piston (24) moves up before spring spacer (56) comes in contact with
spring spacer (55).

During a leveling operation, the pump output flow is controlled at any rate between minimum and
maximum depending on negative flow pressure (PN).

NOTE: For more information on the negative flow control pressure (PN), see "Control Valve" in this
module.

When main pump delivery pressure (PD) is very low [less than 3450 kPa (500 psi)] during a fine
control operation, piston (32) remains stationary because the low main pump delivery pressure (PD)
cannot overcome the resistance of the cylinder. Now passage (17) and piston chamber (37) are
supplied pilot pump delivery pressure (PG) so that piston (32) can shift.

Pressure/Flow (P-Q) Characteristic Curves


P-Q Characteristic Curves
(1) Point (start of pump destroke). (2) Horsepower characteristics.

The output characteristics of each pump depends on two pressures:

1. Pump output circuit pressure.


2. Power shift pressure.

After a pump starts to operate, each pump has a set of pressure/flow (P-Q) characteristic curves. The
P-Q curve represents a set of flow rates for different pump circuit pressures. Each point on curve (2)
represents the respective flow rate and pressure to maintain pump output horsepower constant.

Hydraulic Schematic Of Main Control Valves


(1) Line relief valve (stick cylinder rod end).

(2) Stick drift reduction valve.

(3) Return passage.

(4) Check valve.

(5) Boom II control valve.

(6) Line relief valve (stick cylinder head end).

(7) Stick I control valve.

(8) Load check valve.

(9) Logic valve.

(10) Swing control valve.

(11) Parallel feeder passage.

(12) Left travel control valve.

(13) Center bypass passage.


(14) Straight travel control valve.

(15) Pilot passage.

(16) Main control valves.

(17) Pressure control valve.

(18) Pilot passage.

(19) Pilot passage.

(20) Pressure switch (implement/swing).

(21) Pressure switch (travel).

(22) Pilot passage.

(23) Right travel control valve.

(24) Center bypass passage.

(25) Attachment control valve.

(26) Load check valve.

(27) Bucket control valve.

(28) Boom I control valve.

(29) Check valve.

(30) Stick II control valve.

(31) Passage.

(32) Passage (lower pump negative flow control).

(33) Orifice (lower pump negative flow control)

(34) Negative flow control relief valve (lower pump).

(35) Negative flow control line (lower pump).

(36) Return line.

(37) Passage (upper pump negative control).

(38) Orifice (upper pump negative flow control).

(39) Negative flow control line (upper pump).


(40) Line.

(41) Negative flow control relief valve (upper pump).

(42) Boom drift reduction valve.

(43) Line relief valve (boom cylinder head end).

(44) Return passage.

(45) Passage.

(46) Passage.

(47) Pressure control valve.

(48) Main relief valve.

(49) Parallel feeder passage.

(50) Line relief valve (bucket cylinder head end).

(51) Line relief valve (bucket cylinder rod end).

(52) Pilot passage.

(53) Line relief valve (boom cylinder rod end).

(54) Selector valve.

(55) Check valve.

(56) Return line.

(57) Upper pump.

(58) Lower pump.

(59) Pilot pump.

Main Control Valves


Introduction
Circuit Flow Illustration (Main Control Valves In Neutral Position)
(3) Return passage. (5) Boom II control valve. (13) Center bypass passage. (14) Straight travel control valve. (16) Main
control valves. (23) Right travel control valve. (24) Center bypass passage. (30) Stick II control valve. (36) Return line.
(44) Return passage. (56) Return line. (57) Upper pump. (58) Lower pump.

Main control valves (16) are located in the hydraulic system between the pumps and actuators
(cylinders and motors). Depending on the machine operation, components and passages in the valves
control oil flow and pressure in the circuits from the pumps to actuators.

In this section, a general circuit and component description is given for the following control valve
operations:

1. Main Control Valves In NEUTRAL position.


2. Individual Control Valve.
3. Negative flow control.
4. Pilot Control.
5. Combined Implements/Motors and combined pump flow of boom and stick circuits.

NOTE: Detailed information on the previous items 1, 2 and 3 is given in this section.

NOTE: For detailed information on items 4 and 5, see separate "Operation" sections involved.
Circuit Flow Illustration (Individual Control Valve Operation) (Bucket Cylinder Operation As A Typical Example)
(16) Main control valves. (24) Center bypass passage. (26) Load check valve. (27) Bucket control valve. (36) Return line.
(48) Main relief valve. (49) Parallel feeder passage. (50) Line relief valve. (51) Line relief valve. (56) Return line. (57)
Upper pump. (58) Lower pump.
Circuit Flow Illustration (Negative Flow Control Operation)
(13) Center bypass passage. (16) Main control valves. (24) Center bypass passage. (32) Passage. (33) Orifice. (34)
Negative flow control relief valve. (35) Negative flow control line. (37) Passage. (38) Orifice. (39) Negative flow control
line. (41) Negative flow control relief valve. (57) Upper pump. (58) Lower pump.
Circuit Flow Illustration (Pilot Control Operation)
(9) Logic valve. (14) Straight travel control valve. (15) Pilot passage. (16) Main control valves. (17) Pressure control
valve. (18) Pilot passage. (19) Pilot passage. (20) Pressure switch. (21) Pressure switch. (22) Pilot passage. (28) Boom I
control valve. (47) Pressure control valve. (48) Main relief valve. (52) Pilot passage. (59) Pilot pump. (60) Swing parking
brake control valve. (61) Pilot passage. (62) Pilot control valve.

NOTE: For further information, go to the referenced section.


Circuit Flow Illustration (Combined Operation And Pump Flow Combined Operation)
(4) Check valve. (5) Boom II control valve. (7) Stick I control valve. (9) Logic valve. (13) Center bypass passage. (14)
Straight travel control valve. (16) Main control valves. (24) Center bypass passage. (29) Check valve. (30) Stick II control
valve. (31) Passage. (40) Line. (46) Passage. (47) Pressure control valve. (49) Parallel feeder passage. (54) Selector valve.
(55) Check valve. (57) Upper pump. (58) Lower pump.

NOTE: For further information, go to the referenced section.


Control Valve Bodies

Main Control Valve (Outside View)


(1) Stick II control valve. (2) Boom I control valve. (3) Bucket control valve. (4) Attachment control valve. (5) Right
travel control valve. (6) Main relief valve. (7) Left travel control valve. (8) Swing control valve. (9) Stick I control valve.
(10) Boom II control valve. (11) Line relief valve (bucket cylinder head end). (12) Right body. (13) Line relief valve (stick
cylinder head end). (14) Left body. (15) Return port (see NOTE). (16) Line relief valve (boom cylinder rod end). (17) Line
relief valve (bucket cylinder rod end). (18) Inlet port (upper pump). (19) Inlet port (lower pump). (20) Line relief valve
(stick cylinder rod end). (21) Stick drift reduction valve. (22) Return port. (23) Straight control travel valve.

The main control valves consist of right and left bodies (12) and (14). In right body (12), the
following control valves are in parallel:

Stick II control valve (1)Boom I control valve (2).Bucket control valve (3)Attachment control valve
(4).Right travel control valve (5).

In left body (14), the following control valves are in parallel:

Straight travel control valve (23).Left travel control valve (7).Swing control valve (8).Stick I control
valve (9).Boom II control valve (10).

These two bodies are coupled with bolts to make one assembly.
The right body has return port (15). The left body has inlet ports (18) and (19) and return port (22).
Upper pump oil flows to port (18). Lower pump oil flows to port (19). Both pump oil flows are
controlled by the control valves and supplied to cylinder(s) and/or motor(s) selected for operation.

Return oil from cylinder(s) and/or motor(s) enters the control valves and flows out ports (15) and back
to the hydraulic tank through the return line.

The right body is provided with line relief valves (11), (16) and (17). The left body is provided with
main relief valve (6), line relief valves (13) and (20) and stick drift reduction valve (21). The line
relief valve on the stick cylinder rod end is installed on the stick drift reduction valve.

Swing Motor (Right Front)


(24) Boom drift reduction valve. (25) Line relief valve.

Line relief valve (25) on the boom cylinder head end is installed on boom drift reduction valve (24).
Boom drift reduction valve (24) is located between the main control valve and the boom cylinders.

Main Control Valves


(1) Stick II control valve. (2) Boom I control valve. (3) Bucket control valve. (4) Attachment control valve. (5) Right
travel control valve. (7) Left travel control valve. (8) Swing control valve. (9) Stick I control valve. (10) Boom II control
valve. (12) Right body. (14) Left body. (15) Return port. (18) Inlet port. (19) Inlet port. (22) Return port. (23) Straight
control travel valve. (26) Parallel feeder passage. (27) Parallel feeder passage. (28) Return passage. (29) Negative flow
control orifice. (30) Center bypass passage. (31) Center bypass passage. (32) Negative flow control orifice. (33) Return
passage.

The upper pump supplies oil to right body (12) through inlet port (18), center bypass passage (30) and
parallel feeder passage (26). The lower pump supplies oil to left body (14) through inlet port (19),
center bypass passage (31) and parallel feeder passage (27).

With the control levers in the NEUTRAL position (no load placed on the machine), upper pump oil
flows through center bypass passage (30), negative flow control orifice (29), return passage (28) and
out through return port (15).

With the control levers in the NEUTRAL position (no load placed on the machine), the upper pump
oil flows through center bypass passage (30), negative flow control orifice (29), return passage (28)
and out through return port (22).

The oil then flows back to the hydraulic tank. Lower pump oil flows through center bypass passage
(31), negative flow control orifice (32), return passage (33), return port (22) and back to the hydraulic
tank. Oil in parallel feeder passages (26) and (27) supplied from both pumps remains blocked.

Activation of any control levers provides two paths for upper pump oil. One path is from center
bypass passage (30) to right travel control valve (5). The other path is from parallel feeder passage
(26) to attachment control valve (4), bucket control valve (3) and boom I control valve (2). Activation
of any control lever also provides two paths for lower pump oil. One path is from center bypass
passage (31) to left travel control valve (7) and stick I control valve (9). The other path is from
parallel feeder passage (27) to swing control valve (8).

Individual Valve Operation


Bucket Control Valve (Neutral Position)
(1) Bucket control valve. (2) Spring. (3) Port. (4) Port. (5) Pilot port. (6) Pilot port. (7) Passage. (8) Center bypass passage.
(9) Load check valve. (10) Return passage. (11) Parallel feeder passage. (12) Line relief valve (bucket cylinder rod end).
(13) Line relief valve (bucket cylinder head end). (14) Stem.

The bucket control valve is used as a typical example for describing the operation of individual
control valves.

When all controls are in NEUTRAL position, there is no pilot oil sent to pilot ports (5) and (6) from
the pilot control valve. Stem (14) is centered in the NEUTRAL position by the force of spring (2).
The upper pump oil goes through center bypass passage (8) to the hydraulic tank.
Bucket Control Valve (Bucket Close Position)
(3) Port. (4) Port. (6) Pilot port. (7) Passage. (8) Center bypass passage. (9) Load check valve. (10) Return passage. (11)
Parallel feeder passage. (14) Stem. (15) Passage. (16) Passage.

When the bucket control valve is operated to the bucket close position, pilot oil is supplied to pilot
port (6) moving stem (14) to the left. This closes center bypass passage (8) and opens passage (16).
Passage (15) is now connected to return passage (10).

Upper pump oil in parallel feeder passage (11) flows through load check valve (9), passages (7) and
(16) to port (3). The bucket cylinder rod extends, allowing the displaced oil in the rod end to flow to
port (4).

Oil from port (4) flows through passage (15) to return passage (10) and back to the hydraulic tank.

Negative Flow Control Signal


Hydraulic Schematic (Partial) (Negative Flow Control)
(1) Center bypass passage. (2) Center bypass passage. (3) Passage. (4) Passage. (5) Orifice. (6) Negative flow control
relief valve. (7) negative flow control line. (8) Orifice. (9) Negative flow control line. (10) Negative flow control relief
valve. (11) Return passage. (12) Upper pump. (13) Lower pump.

Main Control Valves (Viewed From Rear)


(7) Negative flow control line. (9) Negative flow control line.

A negative flow control pressure signal from center bypass passages (1) and (2) occurs during the
following instances:

A. When cylinders or motors are not in operation.


B. When fine control of the pilot control valves is needed.
Cross Section Of Stick II Control Valve (Partial) (Negative Flow Control Relief Valve)
(3) Passage. (4) Passage. (8) Orifice. (10) Negative flow control relief valve. (11) Return passage. (14) Plug. (15) Spring.
(16) Body. (17) Valve. (PN) Negative flow control signal pressure.

Oil from upper pump (12) flows through center bypass passage (2), passage (3) and orifice (8) to
return passage (11). Oil flow through orifice (8) is restricted causing the pressure in passage (3) to
increase. A negative flow control signal pressure (PN) now goes through passage (4) and negative
flow control line (9) to the pump regulator. The negative flow control of the regulator causes the
pump to destroke.

Negative flow control relief valve (10) consists of body (16), plug (14), valve (17) and spring (15).

When the oil flow in a center bypass passage suddenly changes, there will be a sudden rise in the
negative flow control pressure. To prevent pressure shock to machine implements, negative flow
control relief valve (10) gives a cushion effect by allowing part of the oil to flow by valve (17) and
through return passage (11).

When all controls are in NEUTRAL position, all of the upper pump oil goes through center bypass
passage (2). The oil then goes through orifice (8), return passage (11), and back to the hydraulic tank.
Maximum negative flow control pressure (PN) in passage (3) now goes to the upper pump. The pump
cylinder rotates to its minimum angle, causing the upper pump to destroke to provide minimum oil
flow.

Typical Cross Section Of Bucket Control Valve (Fine Control Operation)


(2) Center bypass passage. (18) Parallel feeder passage. (19) Port. (20) Stem. (21) Passage. (P) Pilot pressure.

When partial implement operation is started, pilot pressure (P) shifts stem (20) slightly to the left.
Pilot pressure (P) partially opens passage (21) and partially closes center bypass passage (2). Part of
the upper pump oil from center bypass passage (2) goes to orifice (8). The remainder of the oil goes
through parallel feeder passage (18) and passage (21) to port (19). The oil flow in center bypass
passage (2) now decreases. The resistance to oil flow through orifice (8) decreases and the negative
flow control pressure (PN) in passage (3) decreases. The pump cylinder rotates to a larger angle,
causing the upper pump to upstroke increasing the oil flow.

Continuing to full operation moves stem (20) to the left closing center bypass passage (2). There is no
oil flow going through passage (3), causing no negative flow control pressure (PN). The upper pump
output is held maximum.

Modulation (increase or decrease) of exact pump output needed is done by inching the control levers.
This allows fine control operation of implements for precision work.

The negative flow control works in the same way for lower pump oil through orifice (5).

Load Check Valve


Boom I Control Valve (Boom Raise Position, Load Check Valve Open)
(1) Load check valve. (2) Center bypass passage.

Load check valve (1) performs two jobs. First, load check valve (1) prevents a high pressure circuit
that is in parallel and in operation at the same time with a lower pressure circuit, from losing oil to the
lower pressure circuit. For example, if the bucket cylinder, whose load is light, is moved while the
boom cylinders are going up, the high pressure oil of the boom cylinders would want to flow toward
the low pressure oil side of the bucket cylinder. If load check valve (1) was not in the circuit, the
boom would lower.

Second, load check valve (1) prevents the boom from coming down when started at a slow speed.
When the boom starts going up at a slow speed, center bypass passage (2) of the boom control valve
has partial flow to the hydraulic tank. Without load check valve (1), the pressure oil in the boom
cylinders would flow through center bypass passage (2) to the hydraulic tank, causing the boom to
come down. Load check valve (1) prevents flow of pressure oil from the head end of the boom
cylinders to the tank.

The stick and bucket cylinders also have a load check valve to prevent similar reverse oil flow.
Cross Section Of Straight Travel Control Valve And Main Relief Valve
(1) Straight travel control valve. (2) Main control valve. (3) Drain passage. (4) Pressure control valve. (5) Passage. (6)
Passage. (7) Right travel control valve. (8) Check valve. (9) Check valve. (10) Pilot passage. (11) Passage. (12) Main
relief valve. (13) Piston. (14) Line. (15) Line. (16) Line. (17) Upper pump. (18) Lower pump. (19) Pilot pump. (20)
Spring. (21) Passage. (22) Passage. (23) Passage. (24) Valve.

Oil from upper and lower pumps (17) and (18) enters main control valves (2) through lines (14) and
(15), respectively. Upper and lower pump oil then goes through check valves (8) and (9) to passage
(11).

Only the higher oil pressure from either the upper or lower pump can go through passage (11) to main
relief valve (12).

Oil from pilot pump (19) goes through line (16) to pilot passages (5) and (6). Activation of travel
control causes the pressure in passage (6) to increase. Activation of any of implements or swing
controls causes the pressure in passage (5) to increase. When travel control is operated alone, pilot oil
in passage (6) goes through pressure control valve (4) and pilot passage (10) to piston (13) of main
relief valve (12). When implement or swing controls are activated, valve (24) is shifted by the
increased pressure in passage (5). The oil acting on piston (13) goes through passage (10) to drain
passage (3) and becomes low pressure oil. Now, piston (13) can activate to limit the main relief
pressure to 34 300 kPa (4975 psi) when travel control is activated alone. When piston (13) is not
activated (during implement or swing operation), the main relief pressure is limited to 31 400 kPa
(4550 psi) for any implement operation.

Pressure control valve (4) is located on right travel control valve (7). During travel operation, the oil
pressure in passage (5) is less than the force of spring (20), causing valve (24) to move to the right
opening passage (23). This allows the pilot oil from passage (6) to flow through passages (23) and
(22) to pilot passage (10). When implements and swing controls are activated, the pressure in passage
(5) increases and moves valve (24) to the left. Passage (23) now closes and passage (21) opens. Oil in
pilot passage (10) now goes through passage (21), drain passage (3) to the pump suction line and
becomes low pressure oil.

Main Relief Valve (In Closed Position)


(11) Passage. (25) Valve. (26) Spring chamber. (27) Spring. (28) Valve. (29) Spring. (30) Passage. (31) Orifice. (32)
Return passage.

When main pump oil pressure in passage (11) is less than the main relief valve pressure setting, valve
(28) is closed by the force of spring (29). The oil in passage (11) goes through orifice (31) and enters
spring chamber (26). Because the pressures in passage (11) and spring chamber (26) are equal, valve
(25) shifts to the left by the force of spring (27) and closes passage (30). There is no oil flow from
passage (11) to return passage (32).
Main Relief Valve (During Travel Operation With Valve In Open Position)
(10) Pilot passage. (11) Passage. (13) Piston. (25) Valve. (26) Spring chamber. (27) Spring. (28) Valve. (29) Spring. (30)
Passage. (31) Orifice. (32) Return passage. (33) Passage. (34) Piston chamber. (35) Adjuster. (36) Passage. (37) Valve
chamber.

During travel operation, oil from pilot passage (10) goes through passage (33) to piston chamber (34).
Piston (13) moves to the left compressing spring (29). A higher system pressure is now required to
open valve (28).

As the oil pressure in passage (11) increases to the relief valve pressure setting for the travel circuit,
the oil pressure in passage (11) overcomes the force of spring (29) and opens valve (28). The oil in
valve chamber (37) goes through passage (36) to return passage (32) and becomes low pressure oil.
Now, the oil pressure from passage (11) is decreased at orifice (31). The oil then goes through spring
chamber (26) to valve chamber (37). Because of decreased oil pressure in spring chamber (26), the
pressure oil from passage (11) pushes valve (25) to the right against the force of spring (27). Passage
(30) now opens, allowing the high pressure oil flow from passage (11) to return passage (32). Pressure
adjustment can be made by turning adjuster (35).
Main Relief Valve (During Implement Or Swing Operation With Valve In Open Position)
(10) Pilot passage. (11) Passage. (13) Piston. (25) Valve. (28) Valve. (29) Spring. (32) Return passage. (34) Piston
chamber. (38) Plunger.

During an implement or swing operation, there is no oil flow from pilot passage (10) to piston
chamber (34). The oil pressure in piston chamber (34) is low. The low oil pressure in piston chamber
(34) allows spring (29) to move piston (13) to the right against plunger (38). As piston (13) moves to
the right during an implement operation, the force of spring (29) acting on valve (28) decreases. The
relief valve pressure for implements and swing circuits is now lower than that for travel circuit.

As the oil pressure in passage (11) increases to the relief valve pressure setting for implement or
swing circuit, valves (28) and (25) shift to the right allowing oil flow from passage (11) to return
passage (32). Pressure adjustments can be made by turning plunger (38).

Line Relief And Makeup Valves (Built in)


Line relief valve and makeup valves are in the passage between each cylinder and its control valve.
With an outside force acting against a cylinder (with the control valve in the NEUTRAL position), the
pressure in the cylinder and the circuit to the control valve increases. The line relief valve limits the
pressure to 33 300 kPa (4850 psi). The line relief valve also operates as a makeup valve.

When an outside force acts on the implement cylinder (with the control valve in the NEUTRAL
position), the implement cylinder piston will try to move. A vacuum will occur in the cylinder. The
makeup part of the valve sends part of the return oil to the cylinder, removing the vacuum condition.
Line Relief Valve (Closed Position)
(1) Passage. (2) Valve. (3) Valve. (4) Spring chamber. (5) Valve. (6) Spring. (7) Piston. (8) Return passage. (9) Passage.

High pressure oil from the line between each cylinder and its control valve goes through passage (1)
and enters the line relief valve. The oil then goes through passage (9) in piston (7), and into spring
chamber (4). As long as the oil pressure does not exceed the line relief valve pressure setting, valve
(5) is kept closed by the force of spring (6). This equalizes the pressure in passage (1) and spring
chamber (4). Because there is more surface area on the spring chamber side of valves (2) and (3) than
on the cylinder passage side, both valves are shifted all the way to the left and held in position. The oil
flow from passage (1) remains blocked to return passage (8).
Line Relief Valve (Open Position)
(1) Passage. (3) Valve. (4) Spring chamber. (5) Valve. (6) Spring. (7) Piston. (8) Return passage. (9) Passage. (10) Valve
chamber. (11) Passage. (12) Passage.

As oil pressure in passage (1) increases to the relief valve setting, valve (5) shifts to the right (open
position) against the force of spring (6). The oil from valve chamber (10) now goes through passage
(12) to return passage (8). The oil pressure in valve chamber (10) decreases. Oil pressure from
passage (1) moves piston (7) to the right coming in contact with the left end face of valve (5). The oil
from passage (1) now goes around piston (7), and through passage (9). The oil then goes through
spring chamber (4) and into valve chamber (10). Because the oil flow is restricted at the outer
circumference of piston (7), the oil pressure in spring chamber (4) is decreased. Valve (3) now moves
to the right opening passage (11). The oil will now flow from passage (1) to return passage (8).
Line Relief Valve (Make-up Valve In Operation)
(1) Passage. (2) Valve. (3) Valve. (4) Spring chamber. (8) Return passage. (9) Passage. (13) Shoulder.

When oil is lost through operation of the line relief valve for the rod end of a cylinder, the oil has to
be made up (replaced) in the head end to prevent a vacuum condition.

Because passage (1) is connected to spring chamber (4) through passage (9), a vacuum can occur in
passage (1) and spring chamber (4). With oil pressure from return passage (8) acting on shoulder (13)
and negative pressure from spring chamber (4) acting on its backside of shoulder (13), valve (2)
moves to the right. Oil then goes from return passage (8) to passage (1) as makeup oil which removes
the vacuum condition in passage (1).

Hydraulic Schematic For Pilot Oil


(1) Swing parking brake control valve.

(2) Swing parking brake.

(3) Displacement change valve (left travel).

(4) Displacement change valve (right travel).

(5) Pilot line.

(6) Pilot line.

(7) Stick drift reduction valve.

(8) Pilot line.

(9) Pressure switch (implement/swing).


(10) Pressure switch (travel).

(11) Parallel feeder passage.

(12) Main control valves.

(13) Pilot line.

(14) Boom drift reduction valve.

(15) Logic valve.

(16) Straight travel control valve.

(17) Main relief valve.

(18) Pressure control valve.

(19) Line.

(20) Pilot line.

(21) Pilot line.

(22) Pilot line.

(23) Pilot line.

(24) Pilot line.

(25) Pilot line.

(26) Pilot line.

(27) Pilot line.

(28) Pressure switch (boom raise).

(29) Pilot line.

(30) Pilot line.

(31) Pilot control valve (left travel).

(32) Pilot control valve (right travel).

(33) Pilot control valve (swing and stick).

(34) Line.

(35) Proportional reducing valve.


(36) Pilot relief valve.

(37) Passage.

(38) Pilot control valve (bucket and boom).

(39) Pilot line.

(40) Passage.

(41) Passage.

(42) Solenoid valve (swing priority).

(43) Pilot oil manifold.

(44) Solenoid valve (fine control).

(45) Upper pump.

(46) Lower pump.

(47) Line.

(48) Line.

(49) Hydraulic activation control valve.

(50) Line.

(51) Line.

(52) Solenoid valve (travel speed).

(53) Automatic travel speed change valve.

(54) Passage.

(55) Outlet line.

(56) Pilot filter.

(57) Pilot pump.

Pilot Oil Supply Circuit


Introduction
Pump Compartment
(35) Proportional reducing valve. (36) Pilot relief valve. (43) Pilot oil manifold. (55) Outlet line (pilot pump). (56) Pilot
filter.

Pilot system oil output from pilot pump (57) goes through outlet line (55). The pilot system oil flows
through pilot filter (56) and enters pilot oil manifold (43). The pressure of pilot system oil is limited to
3450 kPa (500 psi) by pilot relief valve (36). The oil then goes through passage (37) and separates
into the following circuits:

1. Pilot control valves (31), (32), (33) and (38).


2. Proportional reducing valve (35).
3. Automatic travel speed change valve (53) [with travel speed solenoid valve (52) activated].
4. Logic valve (15) [with pressure control valve (18) and swing priority solenoid valve (42)
activated].
5. Swing parking brake (2).
6. Pilot circuits in main control valves (12).

Pilot Control Valve Circuits

Cab (Pilot Control Valves)


(31) Pilot control valve (left travel). (32) Pilot control valve (right travel). (33) Pilot control valve (swing and stick). (38)
Pilot control valve (boom and bucket).
Viewed From Under Cab Floor
(49) Hydraulic activation control valve.

The pilot control valve is the main component in the pilot system. The pilot oil in passage (37) goes
through line (34) to hydraulic activation control valve (49). The pilot oil then goes through lines (47),
(48), (50) and (51) to pilot control valves (31), (32), (33) and (38), respectively. When any of pilot
control valves (31), (32), (33) and (38) are operated, pilot oil goes to the main control valves selected.
The pilot oil shifts the stem in the pilot control valve to operate a cylinder and/or motor. This provides
easier operation of the control levers.

Hydraulic Activation Control Lever (LOCK Position)


(58) Lever.

Hydraulic Activation Control Lever (UNLOCK Position)


(58) Lever.

Hydraulic activation control valve (49) is part of the pilot control valve circuit. When hydraulic
activation control lever (58) is placed in the LOCK position, hydraulic activation control valve (49) is
closed, blocking the pilot oil supply to any of the pilot control valves. The main control valve stems
can not be moved. Hydraulic activation control valve (49) is equipped with a limit switch that allows
the starting switch to operate only when lever (58) is in the LOCK position.
This prevents any possibility of a sudden movement of the machine due to unexpected operation of
the hydraulic controls.

When lever (58) is in the UNLOCK position, hydraulic activation control valve (49) is open and
allows the pilot oil to go through hydraulic activation control valve (49) to the respective pilot control
valves.

Pilot oil from the pilot control valves goes through the respective pilot lines to ports of control valve
(s) selected for operation(s). The pilot oil shifts the stems in the main control valves.

Right Front Of Swing Motor


(13) Pilot line. (14) Boom drift reduction valve.

Front Of Main Control Valves


(6) Pilot line. (7) Stick drift reduction valve.

When the control lever is moved to BOOM LOWER position, oil from pilot control valve (38) goes
through pilot line (13) to boom drift reduction valve (14). Boom drift reduction valve (14) shifts,
allowing the return oil from the boom cylinder head end to go through boom drift reduction valve (14)
to the boom control valve. The boom cylinder now operates for BOOM LOWER.

When the control lever is moved to STICK IN position, pilot oil flow from pilot line (6) activates
stick drift reduction valve (7) in the same manner as that described for boom drift reduction valve
(14). Now the stick cylinder operates for STICK IN.

For more information on boom and stick drift reduction valves, see the section "Boom And Stick
Control".
Main Control Valve Compartment
(28) Pressure switch (boom raise)

When the control lever is fully moved to BOOM RAISE position with the work mode switch at
BOOM PRIORITY MODE position, there is a pilot oil flow from pilot line (27) to pressure switch
(boom raise) (28). Pressure switch (boom raise) (28) activates causing fine control solenoid valve (44)
to energize. During a combined operation of the boom and stick, there is no upper pump oil sent to the
stick circuit but all of the upper pump oil is used for the boom circuit. Now the boom increases its
speed.

Proportional Reducing Valve Circuit

Pilot Oil Manifold Compartment


(35) Proportional reducing valve. (39) Pilot line (power shift pressure).

Part of the pilot pump oil in passage (37) goes through passage (40) to proportional reducing valve
(35). Proportional reducing valve (35) continuously receives an electrical signal from the electronic
controller. Proportional reducing valve (35) changes the pilot oil sent from passage (40) into a
hydraulic signal (power shift pressure). The hydraulic signal goes through pilot line (39) to the
regulator of the main pump, controlling the pump output flow.

NOTE: For more information, see the separate Systems Operation module, "Electric and Electronic
Systems, Form No. SENR6048".

Automatic Travel Speed Change Valve Circuit


Pilot Oil Manifold Compartment
(52) Solenoid valve (travel speed). (53) Automatic travel speed change valve.

Right Console
(59) Travel speed switch.

The automatic travel speed change valve circuit activates only when travel speed switch (59) is in the
AUTOMATIC TRAVEL SPEED MODE [HIGH (rabbit sign)] position. Moving travel speed switch
(59) to AUTOMATIC TRAVEL SPEED position energizes travel speed solenoid valve (52). Part of
the pilot oil in passage (37) goes through passage (54) to travel speed solenoid valve (52). With a
smaller travel load placed on the machine, automatic travel speed change valve (53) remains open.
The pilot oil now flows through automatic travel speed change valve (53) and pilot line (5) to
displacement change valves (3) and (4) in the left and right travel motors. The travel motors now
operate at HIGH speed. As the travel load increases to a certain range, automatic travel speed change
valve (53) automatically changes the travel speed to LOW.

NOTE: For more information, see the section, "Travel Control".

Logic Valve Circuit


Main Control Valve Compartment
(18) Pressure control valve. (22) Pilot line.

The logic valve circuit operates during combined loading operation involving boom, stick and swing.

Part of the pilot oil from passage (37) goes through passage (41), swing priority solenoid valve (42)
and pilot line (22) to pressure control valve (18). This opens logic valve (15), allowing the swing and
stick circuits to share the lower pump oil from parallel feeder passage (11) for adequate swing and
stick movements relative to boom movement.

NOTE: For more information, see the section, "Loading Operation".

Swing Parking Brake Release Circuit

Swing Motor
(1) Swing parking brake control valve. (8) Pilot line. (19) Line.

The swing parking brake release circuit functions to release the swing parking brake during
implements and/or swing operation. Part of the pilot oil in passage (37) goes through line (19) to
swing parking brake control valve (1). During operation, the pilot pressure oil in pilot line (8) keeps
swing parking brake control valve (1) open. The pilot pressure oil goes to swing parking brake (2) an
releases the parking brake.

NOTE: For more information, see the section, "Swing Control".

Pilot Oil Circuits In Main Control Valves


Hydraulic Schematic (Partial) (Pilot Oil Circuit in Main Control Valves)
(1) Swing control valve. (2) Left travel control valve. (3) Swing parking brake control valve. (4) Straight travel control
valve. (5) Main relief valve. (6) Pilot passage. (7) Pressure control valve. (8) Pressure switch (implement/swing). (9) Pilot
passage. (10) Pressure switch (travel). (11) Pilot passage. (12) Right travel control valve. (13) Main control valves. (14)
Boom I control valve. (15) Drain passage. (16) Orifice. (17) Orifice. (18) Passage. (19) Passage. (20) Passage. (21) Pilot
oil manifold. (22) Line. (23) Upper pump. (24) Pilot pump. (25) Suction line.

Cross Section Of Right Travel Control Valve


(7) Pressure control valve. (8) Pressure switch (implement/swing). (9) Pilot passage. (10) Pressure switch (travel). (11)
Pilot passage. (16) Orifice. (17) Orifice. (22) Line.
Main Control Valve Compartment
(4) Straight travel control valve. (8) Pressure switch (implement/swing). (10) Pressure switch (travel). (12) Right travel
control valve. (21) Line.

Pilot oil from pump (24) goes through pilot oil manifold (21) and enters main control valves (13)
through line (22). The oil flow then divides into tow paths. One path goes through orifice (17) to pilot
passage (11) which is connected to travel pressure switch (10) and pressure control valve (7).
Depending on operation (travel or implement) the oil can pass through pressure control valve (7) to
main relief valve (5).

The other path goes through orifice (16) and then divides into two paths. One path goes through
passage (9) to pressure control valve (7), to swing and implement pressure switch (8) and to the swing
parking brake control valve. The other path flows to passage (18). From there it goes through the
swing control valve (1) and stick I control valve to passage (19). From passage (19) the oil flows to
the attachment, bucket and boom I control valves (14) returning to pump suction line (25). Operating
travel valves (2) and/or (12) directs pilot oil in passage (18) to passage (6) to shift straight travel valve
(4) whenever travel and an implement are operated at the same time.

Pilot pressure oil is supplied to the following circuits in the main control valves as follows:

1. Operating travel valve (2) and/or (12) closes passage (20) to drain causing an increase in oil
pressure in passage (11). This closes switch (10) signaling the controller to increase engine
speed and to also activate the travel alarm. The increased pressure in passage (11) also goes
through pressure control valve (7) to main relief valve (5) causing it to increase to travel system
pressure.
2. When any valve other than travel is operated, pilot oil in passage (18) is closed to drain
causing oil pressure to increase in passage (9). This closes switch (8) signaling the controller to
increase engine speed. This increased pressure in passage (9) also goes to swing parking brake
(3) to release it. The pilot oil pressure in passage (9) shifts pressure control valve (7) preventing
pilot pressure in passage (11) from going to main relief valve (5). The main relief vale now
remains at the lower implement system pressure.
3. When the travel valves are operated, pilot oil in passages (18) and (6) are connected.
Operating any control function while traveling blocks passage (18) and (19) from returning to
drain and increases pressure in passage (6). This causes straight travel valve (4) to shift and the
machine will continue to travel in a straight line even though some pump flow is being used by
an implement.

NOTE: For more information on pressure control of main relief valve, swing parking brake release
and straight travel control valve operation, see sections, "Control Valves", "Swing Control" and
"Straight Travel Control", respectively.
Automatic Engine Speed Control (AEC) Circuit
When the travel control lever is in the NEUTRAL position, the oil in pilot passage (11) goes through
passage (20) which is open to right and left travel control valves (12) and (2), and then goes to drain
passage (15). When all the implement and swing controls are in the NEUTRAL position, the oil in
pilot passage (9) goes through passage (19) which is open to all of the implement and swing control
valves, and then goes to drain passage (15). Now, when there is no load placed on the machine, the
circuit pressure in both pilot passages (9) and (11) is kept low.

The AEC functions to reduce the engine speed approximately three seconds after a no load condition
occurs.

When a control valve(s) is operated, the operating control valve blocks oil flow through passage (20)
or (19). This increases the circuit pressure in pilot passage (11) or (9) and turns pressure switches (10)
or (8) ON. The electronic controller feels the ON signal and overrides the AEC function for an
increase in engine speed. When a load is placed on the machine, the engine increases its speed to the
governor lever setting.

However, as long as the load placed on the machine is very small, the AEC functions to reduce the
engine speed.

NOTE: For more information, see the separate module "Electric And Electronic Systems, Systems
Operation Form No. SENR6048".

Pilot Pump
The pilot pump is a gear type pump and is incorporated in the main pump housing. It is mechanically
connected to the main pump in parallel through gears. The pilot pump supplies pressure oil to the pilot
system. At full load rpm, the pilot pump output flow is approximately 20 liters/min (5.3 U.S. gal).

Pilot Filter
Pilot Filter
(1) Pilot filter. (2) Bypass relief valve. (3) Filter element.

Filter element (3) in pilot filter (1) removes contaminants from the pilot oil.

If the oil flow through filter element (3) becomes restricted due to the oil being too cold or too
contaminated, the oil bypasses the filter through bypass relief valve (2).

Pilot Manifold Components


Pilot Oil Manifold Compartment
(1) Accumulator. (2) Line (to hydraulic activation control valve). (3) Solenoid valve (swing priority). (4) Solenoid valve
(travel speed). (5) Automatic travel speed change valve. (6) Line (from pilot filter). (7) Pilot filter. (8) Pilot relief valve.
(9) Proportional reducing valve. (10) Solenoid valve (fine control). (11) Pilot oil manifold.

Pilot Oil Manifold (Partial)


(1) Accumulator. (2) Line (to hydraulic activation control valve). (6) Line (from pilot filter). (8) Pilot relief valve. (11)
Pilot oil manifold. (12) Passage. (13) Check valve. (14) Passage.

Pilot oil flowing through pilot filter (7) and line (6) enters pilot oil manifold (11) and flows through
passage (14). A portion of the pilot oil in passage (14) then flows through check valve (13), passage
(12) and line (2) to the hydraulic activation control valve. Pilot oil in passage (14) is supplied at both
inlets of pilot relief valve (8) and accumulator (1).

Pilot Relief Valve

Pilot relief valve (8) limits the pressure in the pilot circuit to 3450 kPa (500 psi). Since the flow of oil
in the pilot system is a minimal, most of the output from the pilot pump goes through the pilot relief
valve. Most of the oil needed by the pilot system is used to shift one or more of the stems in the main
control valves.

Accumulator

Accumulator
(15) Gas chamber. (16) Bladder. (17) Bowl. (18) Oil chamber. (19) Inlet port.

The accumulator provides oil to the pilot circuit as makeup oil. During combined operations, the pilot
system needs more oil because there is not enough pilot pump flow. When lowering implements
immediately after the engine has been stopped, pilot system makeup oil is provided by the
accumulator.

The accumulator stores hydraulic pressure oil by taking advantage of the compressibility of nitrogen
gas put in gas chamber (15).

The pilot pump oil goes through inlet port (19) and in oil chamber (18). The pilot pressure oil pushes
against bladder (16) compressing the nitrogen gas in gas chamber (15).
Check valve (13), located in the passage connected to inlet port (19), prevents pressure oil from the
accumulator from flowing back to line (6). Accumulator oil goes through line (2) and is used only to
shift the main control valve stems.

Proportional Reducing Valve

Proportional Reducing Valve


(9) Proportional reducing valve. (20) Solenoid. (21) Valve.

Proportional reducing valve (9) consists of solenoid (20) and valve (21). While the engine is
operating, an electrical signal from the electronic controller energizes the solenoid.

The solenoid controls valve (21). Valve (21) allows a certain amount of pilot pressure oil through to
the pump regulator to control pump output. This pilot pressure to the regulator is called power shift
pressure. A decrease in engine speed increases the power shift pressure for a decrease in pump output.

An increase in engine speed decreases the power shift pressure for an increase in pump output.
Cross Section Of Proportional Reducing Valve (Partial) (Signal Current Increase)
(22) Rod. (23) Spool. (24) Passage (power shift pressure). (25) Spring. (26) Passage. (27) Passage (pilot pressure).

A decrease in engine speed increases the signal current to solenoid (20), and increases the magnetic
force to rod (22). Rod (22) pushes spool (23) down, overcoming the force of spring (25). Now
passage (26) opens, allowing oil flow from passage (27) through passage (26). The oil then goes
through passage (24) to the pump regulator as power shift pressure.

When power shift pressure increases, it destrokes the pump.


Cross Section Of Proportional Reducing Valve (Partial) (Signal Current Decrease)
(22) Rod. (23) Spool. (24) Passage. (25) Spring. (26) Passage. (28) Passage (to pump suction line). (29) Passage.

An increase in engine speed decreases the signal current to solenoid (20). The magnetic force given to
rod (22) is smaller than the force of spring (25), causing rod (22) to move up. Spool (23) follows rod
(22) up opening passage (29) and closing passage (26). The power shift pressure in passage (24) then
vents through passage (29) and out through passage (28) to the pump suction line. The power shift
pressure decreases, allowing the pump to upstroke.

The power shift pressure is determined by the relationship between the force given to rod (22) and the
force of spring (25).

The power shift pressure decreases if the force on the rod is smaller than the force of the spring
(smaller signal current flow to the solenoid).

The power shift pressure increases if the force on the rod is larger than the force of the spring (greater
signal current flow to the solenoid).

Solenoid Operated Valves

There are three solenoid valves mounted on the pilot oil manifold.

When the solenoid of a valve receives an electrical signal, it energizes and operates the valve section.
For description of operation of each valve, see the section given separately.
Swing priority solenoid valve

Swing priority solenoid valve (3) activates for easier trenching operation.

NOTE: For more information, see the section in this module "Trenching Operation".

Travel speed solenoid valve

Travel speed solenoid valve (4) activates for automatically changing travel speed from LOW to
HIGH.

NOTE: For more information, see the section in this module "Travel Control".

Fine control solenoid valve

Fine control solenoid valve (10) activates for easier fine control operation.

NOTE: For more information, see the section in this module "Leveling Operation".

Hydraulic Activation Control Valve


Hydraulic Activation Control Valve (Unlock Position)
(1) Return port. (2) Port. (3) Limit switch. (4) Hydraulic activation control valve. (5) Port (pilot control valve for swing
and stick). (6) Port (pilot control valve for boom and bucket). (7) Port (pilot control valve for left travel). (8) Port (pilot
control valve for right travel). (9) Passage. (10) Passage. (11) Spool. (12) Passage. (13) Return passage.
Section A-A Of Hydraulic Activation Control Valve (4)
(2) Port. (3) Limit switch. (9) Passage. (10) Passage. (11) Spool. (14) Plunger. (15) Notch.

When hydraulic activation control valve (4) is placed in the unlock position, port (2) is open to
passage (9) through passage (10) of spool (11). Pilot pump oil enters hydraulic activation control
valve (4) through port (2). The oil then goes through passage (9) and out through ports (5), (6), (7)
and (8) to the pilot control valves. The pilot control valves operate the main control valves.

Limit switch (3) is located in hydraulic activation control valve (4). When hydraulic activation control
valve (4) is in the unlock position, spool (11) in hydraulic activation control valve (4) is held at the
position in the previous illustration (left side). In this position, plunger (14) of limit switch (3) moves
out to the left until its end seats in notch (15). Limit switch (3) is now in the OFF position.

When hydraulic activation control valve (4) is in the lock position, spool (11) turns to move plunger
(14) to the right, turning limit switch (3) ON. Now the pilot pump oil is blocked (held) between port
(2) and passage (10), and passage (12) is connected to return passage (13) of spool (11). With the flow
of pilot pump oil blocked to passage (9), return oil from each pilot control valve goes through
passages (9), (12) and (13), and out through return port (1) to the pump suction line. Now any
activation of the pilot control valve levers will not activate the main control valves.

The start switch can operate only when switch (3) is turned ON and hydraulic activation control valve
(4) is in the lock position.

Pilot Control Valves


Pilot Control Valve (Implements And Swing)
(1) Control lever. (2) Plate. (3) Rod. (4) Rod. (5) Seat. (6) Metering spring. (7) Spring. (8) Return chamber. (9) Return
passage. (10) Return passage. (11) Passage. (12) Passage. (13) Spool. (14) Spool. (15) Port. (16) Passage. (17) Port. (18)
Line (from control valve). (19) Line (to control valve). (20) Pilot pump.

Each pilot control valve has four valves that control two operations. For example, the left pilot control
valve has four valves, two for stick and two for swing.

When control lever (1) is moved to the left, plate (2) tilts to the left. Plate (2) pushes down on rod (3)
and seat (5) pushes against the force of metering spring (6) and spring (7). The force of metering
spring (6) moves spool (14) down, opening passage (11). The oil can now go through passages (16)
and (11), and out port (15) through line (19) to the main control valve. The pressure of the oil on the
end of the main control valve stem causes it to move for implement or swing operation.

The oil at the opposite end of the main control valve stem (for the operation) flows back through port
(17), through return passage (10) and into return chamber (8) back to the hydraulic tank.

As long as rod (4) is not pushed down, return passage (10) is open and passage (12) is closed.

Spring (7) provides the necessary force to allow the control levers to return to the NEUTRAL position
when released.
Modulated Pilot Pressure

Partial Cross Section of Pilot Control Valve


(3) Rod. (5) Seat. (6) Metering spring. (9) Return passage. (11) Passage. (14) Spool. (16) Passage. (21) Passage. (D)
Diameter [of spool (14) for return passage (9)]. (d) Diameter [of spool (14) for passage (11)]. (E) Shoulder [of spool (14)].
(F) Shoulder [of spool (14)]. (L) Length [of metering spring (6) under compression].

When the pilot control lever is moved to the left, rod (3) compresses metering spring (6) through seat
(5), moving spool (14) down. Any movement of spool (14), under this condition, controls the pressure
of the pilot oil that goes through passage (11) to the main control valves. This allows modulation (up
and down) of the pilot pressure to the stem of main control valve for inching operation of the
implement or swing.

(See Fig. A) When the force of metering spring (6) moves spool (14) down, passage (11) opens. Part
of the pilot oil can go through passage (21) and out to the main control valve, moving the stem only
part of its travel distance against the force of its spring. This causes a slight increase in pressure which
works against shoulders (E) and (F) of spool (14). Because the area of shoulder (E) is larger than that
of shoulder (F), spool (14) moves up a small amount of its travel distance against the force of
metering spring (6). Return passage (9) partially opens and passage (11) is closed (see Fig. B).

Part of the oil in passage (21) goes out through return passage (9) causing a slight decrease in pressure
in passage (21).

When the oil pressure acting on spool (14) is less than the force of metering spring (6), spool (14)
returns to its position in Fig. A.

Spool (14) modulates (shifts up and down) in a balanced condition between the pressure in passage
(21) and the force of metering spring (6).
During modulation (up-and-down movement) of spool (14), a condition can occur that both return
passage (9) and passage (11) are closed at the same time (see Fig. C). This condition provides a
certain length (L) of metering spring (6). At this point, the pressure in passage (21) and the force of
metering spring (6) are equal.

Further downward movement of rod (3) decreases length (L) of metering spring (6) and establishes a
new balance between the force of metering spring (6) and the pressure in passage (21). The pressure
in passage (21) increases with an increase in the force of metering spring (6).

Pilot oil pressure sent to the main control valves from the pilot control valves increases, directly
proportionally to the travel distance of the pilot control lever. Movement of the main control valve
stem causes an increased oil flow to cylinders and/or motors, proportional to an increased pilot
pressure. Fine movement of the pilot control valve lever allows fine control of operation of the
cylinders and/or motors.

The pilot valves for travel operate similar to the pilot valves for the implements and swing. There is a
combination control "lever/foot pedal" for each of the left and right travel pilot control valves.

NOTE: For more information on travel pilot control valve operation, see the section, "Travel
Control".

Hydraulic Schematic For Return Circuit


(1) Swing motor.

(2) Travel motor.

(3) Drain line.

(4) Makeup line.

(5) Drain line.

(6) Center bypass passage.


(7) Return passage.

(8) Main control valves.

(9) Center bypass passage.

(10) Orifice.

(11) Drain line.

(12) Return line.

(13) Orifice.

(14) Upper pump.

(15) Return line.

(16) Lower pump.

(17) Bypass check valve.

(18) Return line.

(19) Oil cooler.

(20) Bypass check valve.

(21) Hydraulic tank.

(22) Slow return check valve.

(23) Suction line.

Return Circuit
Introduction
The oil from upper and lower pumps (14) and (16) enters main control valves (8) and then flows as
follows.

1. With no load placed on the machine;

a. The upper pump oil goes through center bypass passage (9) and orifice (10) to return
passage (7).
b. The lower pump oil goes through center bypass passage (6) and orifice (13) to return
passage (7).

2. With a load placed on the machine;


a. Return oil from each control valve for travel, swing and implements goes to return
passage (7).

The oil in passage (7) then flows as follows:

1. When the oil temperature is very low, most of the return oil goes through return line (15),
bypass check valves (17) and (20) and back to hydraulic tank (21). The remainder of the oil
goes through return line (12), slow return check valve (22) and oil cooler (19) to hydraulic tank
(21).
2. As the oil temperature increases, the rate of oil flow through return line (15) decreases and
the rate of oil flow through return line (12) increases.

Case drain oil from swing motor (1) and travel motors (2) goes through respective drain lines (3) and
(5), and combines at drain line (11). The oil then returns to hydraulic tank (21).

If a vacuum occurs in the swing motor, makeup line (4) routes part of the oil from makeup line (4) to
the motor, eliminating the vacuum condition.

Slow Return Check Valve And Oil Cooler Circuit

Main Control Valve Compartment (Return Circuit)


(4) Makeup line. (8) Main control valves. (12) Return line. (22) Slow return check valve.

Slow return check valve (22) is provided in the downstream side of return line (12). Slow return check
valve (22) restricts oil flow, keeping the circuit pressure in return line (12) at approximately 290 kPa
(43 psi). This causes part of oil in return line (12) to go to makeup line (4) to remove the vacuum in
the swing motor.

NOTE: For more information on the makeup operation, see the section, "Swing Control".
Oil Cooler (Engine Viewed From Left Side) (Return Circuit)
(19) Oil cooler. (24) Line (inlet). (25) Return line (outlet).

Return oil flow from slow return check valve (22) goes through line (24) to oil cooler (19). The oil
cooler is bolted to the engine radiator. The oil is cooled and returns to hydraulic tank (21) through
return line (25).

Bypass Return Circuit

Rear Of Hydraulic Tank (Return Circuit)


(11) Drain line. (17) Bypass check valve. (18) Return line. (20) Bypass check valve. (21) Hydraulic tank. (25) Return line.
(26) Air breather.

Bypass Check Valve


(15) Return line. (17) Bypass check valve.

When return oil temperature is very low, resistance to oil flow in return line (15) is high and causes an
increase in oil pressure. When the pressure increases to approximately 490 kPa (72 psi), bypass check
valves (17) and (20) open.
Most of the return oil flows through return line (15) and bypass check valves (17) and (20) to
hydraulic tank (21). The remaining oil goes through return line (12), slow return check valve (22), oil
cooler (19) and return line (25) to hydraulic tank (21). This causes the oil temperature to increase,
minimizing the pressure loss.

As the oil temperature increases, the oil pressure decreases. Bypass check valves (17) and (20) begin
to close. Now there is less oil flow through return line (15) and more oil flow through return line (12).
When bypass check valve (17) closes, all of the return oil goes through return line (12).

Hydraulic Tank
Hydraulic Tank
(21) Hydraulic tank. (23) Suction line. (27) Filter. (28) Relief valve. (29) Suction filter. (30) Return chamber. (31) Tank
chamber. (R) Return oil.

Return oil (R) from return lines (15) and (25) and drain line (11) enters return chamber (30) of
hydraulic tank (21). The oil then goes through filter (27) before it enters tank chamber (31). Oil in
hydraulic tank (21) goes out through suction filter (29) and enters the pumps through suction line
(23).

Air breather (26) is located on the back side of hydraulic tank (21). Air breather (26) prevents an
increase or decrease in pressure in hydraulic tank (21) that could occur due to a change in oil level
and/or temperature.

Hydraulic Schematic For Boom Raise


(1) Boom cylinders.

(2) Line.

(3) Boom drift reduction valve.

(4) Line.

(5) Valve.

(6) Parallel feeder passage.


(7) Line.

(8) Main control valves.

(9) Port.

(10) Line.

(11) Check valve.

(12) Load check valve.

(13) Boom I control valve.

(14) Port.

(15) Boom II control valve.

(16) Parallel feeder passage.

(17) Return passage.

(18) Port.

(19) Port.

(20) Return line.

(21) Pilot line.

(22) Return line.

(23) Pilot line.

(24) Pilot control valve (bucket and boom).

(25) Pilot line.

(26) Shock reducing valve (boom raise).

(27) Upper pump.

(28) Lower pump.

(29) Pilot pump.

Boom, Bucket And Stick Control


Boom Raise Control
Boom raise operation uses boom I control valve (13) and boom II control valve (15). The boom
moves up in High speed when the oil is supplied to the head end of boom cylinders (1) from both
upper pump (27) and lower pump (28). The boom moves up in Low speed when oil is supplied only
from the upper pump.

Shock reducing valve (26) is provided to prevent sudden stopping of the boom by slowing down the
stem returning to the neutral position when the boom pilot control valve is returned to the HOLD or
NEUTRAL position.

NOTE: The operation of the shock reducing valves is described in the section of this module
"Components In Cylinder Circuits (Shock Reducing Valve)".

Boom drift reduction valve (3) is provided in the line between main control valves (8) and boom
cylinders (1). When all control levers are in the NEUTRAL position, boom drift reduction valve (3)
stops reverse oil flow from the head end of boom cylinders (1) to prevent a boom drift.

Boom Raise (High Speed)

Main Control Valve Compartment


(13) Boom I control valve. (15) Boom II control valve.

Oil from upper pump (27) flows through parallel feeder passage (16). Parallel feeder passage (16)
supplies oil to boom I control valve (13).

Oil from lower pump (28) flows through parallel feeder passage (6). Parallel feeder passage (6)
supplies oil to boom II control valve (15).

When the boom control lever is moved to FULL RAISE position, the pilot oil in pilot control valve
(24) goes through pilot line (25) and shock reducing valve (26) to pilot line (23). The pilot oil flow
then divides into two paths. One oil flows through port (19) into boom I control valve (13). The other
is through pilot line (21) to port (18) of boom II control valve (15).
Boom I Control Valve (Boom Raise Position)
(9) Port. (12) Load check valve. (16) Parallel feeder passage. (17) Return passage. (19) Port. (30) Passage. (31) Passage.
(32) Stem. (33) Passage. (34) Passage. (35) Passage. (36) Spring.

The pilot oil flow from port (19) moves stem (32) of boom I control valve (13) to the left against the
force of spring (36). The upper pump oil in parallel feeder passage (16) goes through load check valve
(12), passage (31) and (35), and out through port (9). The oil then goes through line (10), valve (5) of
boom drift reduction valve (3) and line (2) to the head end of boom cylinders (1).
Boom II Control Valve (Boom Raise Position)
(6) Parallel feeder passage. (11) Check valve. (14) Port. (18) Port. (37) Passage. (38) Passage. (39) Stem. (40) Spring.

Pilot oil at port (18) of boom II control valve (15), moves stem (39) to the left against the force of
spring (40). Lower pump oil from parallel feeder passage (6) now goes through passages (37), (38),
check valve (11) and out through port (14) to line (7). The oil then combines with the upper pump oil
in line (10). The combined pump oil then goes to the head end of boom cylinders (1).

Return oil from the rod end of boom cylinders (1) flows through line (4) to boom I control valve (13).
The oil then flows through passage (30), return passage (17) and return lines (20) and/or (22) to the
hydraulic tank.

Boom Raise (Low Speed)


When the boom control lever is moved less than half of the travel distance for a boom raise operation,
full pilot pressure will never be supplied to boom I control valve (13) and boom II control valve (15).

Boom I control valve (13) opens and boom II control valve (15) remains closed during a boom raise
(low speed) operation. The force of spring (36) in boom I control valve (13) is less than the force for
spring (40) in boom II control valve (15). Pilot oil pressure will open boom I control valve (13) before
boom II control valve (15).

Upper pump oil now goes to the head end of boom cylinders (1). Without lower pump oil being
supplied to the head end of boom cylinders (1), the cylinder rod movement for boom raise is slow.

Hydraulic Schematic For Boom Lower


(1) Boom cylinders.

(2) Line.

(3) Pilot line.

(4) Spool.

(5) Line.

(6) Passage.
(7) Valve.

(8) Boom drift reduction valve.

(9) Pilot line.

(10) Line.

(11) Pilot line.

(12) Port.

(13) Port.

(14) Load check valve.

(15) Center bypass passage.

(16) Boom I control valve.

(17) Check valve (regeneration circuit).

(18) Center bypass passage.

(19) Orifice.

(20) Parallel feeder passage.

(21) Return passage.

(22) Pilot control valve (bucket and boom).

(23) Line.

(24) Drain line.

(25) Upper pump.

(26) Pilot pump.

(27) Lower pump.

Boom Lower Control


Introduction
When the boom is lowered, only the oil from upper pump (25) is supplied to boom cylinders (1)
through boom I control valve (16).
Boom I control valve (16) contains a regeneration circuit for check valve (17). When the control lever
is moved to the BOOM LOWER position, check valve (17) causes the displaced oil from the head end
of boom cylinders (1) to go to the rod end of boom cylinders (1). During boom lower operation the
regeneration circuit allows the oil flow from upper pump (25) to be shared in other implement
functions.

Center bypass passage (15) in boom I control valve (16) partially opens, allowing upper pump oil to
go through center bypass passage (15) to center bypass passage (18). The oil then goes through line
(23) to the upper pump regulator. The negative flow control of upper pump (25) is activated for
destroking.

Boom Lower
When the control lever is moved to the BOOM LOWER position, pilot oil in pilot control valve (22)
goes through pilot line (9) and then separates into two paths. One path goes through pilot line (11) and
enters boom I control valve (16) through port (12). The other path goes through pilot line (3) to spool
(4) in boom drift reduction valve (8).

The force of spring (48) on stem (41) is greater than the spring force of spool (4) in boom drift
reduction valve (8). This allows spool (4) to shift and valve (7) to open before stem (41) has shifted to
boom lower.

Boom I Control Valve (Boom Lower Position)


(12) Port. (13) Port. (14) Load check valve. (15) Center bypass passage. (17) Check valve. (18) Center bypass passage.
(20) Parallel feeder passage. (21) Return passage. (28) Passage. (29) Passage. (30) Passage. (31) Passage. (32) Spring. (33)
Spring chamber. (34) Passage. (35) Valve. (36) Spring. (37) Passage. (38) Passage. (39) Passage. (40) Passage. (41) Stem.
(42) Passage. (43) Passage. (44) Passage. (45) Passage. (46) Return check valve. (47) Spring. (48) Spring.
The pilot oil from port (12) moves stem (41) to the right. Upper pump oil in parallel feeder passage
(20) now goes through load check valve (14), passage (30), and out through port (13). The oil then
goes to the rod end of boom cylinders (1) through line (5).

The return oil from the head end of boom cylinders (1) goes through line (2) and into boom drift
reduction valve (8). Because spool (4) is shifted by the pilot pressure from pilot line (3), passage (6) is
open to drain line (24). The oil pressure acting on the top of valve (7) becomes lower than the circuit
pressure in line (2). The lower circuit pressure causes valve (7) to move up, allowing the oil in line (2)
to go through line (10) and into boom I control valve (16). Part of the return oil goes through passages
(43) and (44) and back to the hydraulic tank through return passage (21). Now the boom starts
lowering.

Because the return oil flow is restricted at passage (44), movement of the boom cylinder rod is slowed
down.

Regeneration Circuit
The remainder of the return oil in passage (43) goes through passage (40) in stem (41) to check valve
(17). With stem (41) is moved to the right, passage (34) is open to return passage (21), causing oil to
flow from spring chamber (33) to return passage (21). As the oil pressure in spring chamber (33)
decreases, the oil pressure in passage (40) overcomes the forces of springs (32) and (36), and moves
valve (35) and check valve (17) to the left. Both valves are opened, allowing the oil in passage (40) to
go through passage (37) and out through passage (28). The oil then goes to the rod end of the boom
cylinders. The regeneration circuit of boom I control valve (16) functions to use the return oil from
the head end for make-up oil for the rod end of the boom cylinder to minimize the possibility of a
vacuum from forming in the boom cylinders.

When the boom control lever is returned to the NEUTRAL position, there is no oil supply to port
(12). Stem (41) is shifted to the left (neutral position) by spring (48). Passage (42) closes, blocking oil
flow from passage (43). Check valve (17) is now closed by the force of spring (36) and valve (35) is
moved to the right by the force of spring (32).

Negative Flow Control Circuit


When the boom control lever is moved to the full BOOM LOWER position upper pump oil in center
bypass passage (15) goes through partially open passage (31) and passage (39) to center bypass
passage (18). Return oil from the head end enters boom I control valve (16) through passage (43). The
return oil then goes through fully open passage (42) to passage (40). Part of the oil in passage (40)
goes through passages (38) and (39) to center bypass passage (18), and combines with the upper
pump oil.

The combined oil in center bypass passage (18) goes through line (23), developing a negative flow
control signal pressure. The negative flow control pressure acts on the upper pump regulator, causing
the upper pump to destroke. Now less oil is required for the cylinder rod end due to the function of the
regeneration circuit.

When the boom control lever is partially moved to BOOM LOWER position with stem (41) slightly
shifted to the right, passages (29) and (42) are partially open, and passage (44) is closed. Return oil in
passage (43) goes through passages (42) and (40) to return check valve (46). Return check valve (46)
is opened allowing oil flow through passage (45) to return passage (21).

Upper pump oil in center bypass passage (15) goes through partially open passage (31). [The opening
of passage (31), at this time, is larger than when the boom control lever is moved to FULL BOOM
LOWER position.] The oil then goes through passage (39) to center bypass passage (18). The return
oil in passage (43) goes through partially open passage (42), passages (40), (38) and (39) to center
bypass passage (18), and combines with the upper pump oil.

With the appropriate opening of passage (31), optimum amount of combined oil flows through center
bypass passage (18). Now the negative flow control pressure destrokes the pump for proper cylinder
operation.

Components In Cylinder Circuits


Shock Reducing Valve (For Boom)

Main Control Valve Compartment


(1) Shock reducing valve (boom lower). (2) Main control valve.
Shock Reducing Valve
(3) Flow control valve. (4) Port (pilot control valve). (5) Spring. (6) Spring. (7) Check valve. (8) Orifice. (9) Port (main
control valve). (10) Passage. (11) Passage. (12) Valve.

Shock reducing valve (1) is located on the top of main control valve (2). Shock reducing valve (1)
functions to prevent sudden stops of an implement by restricting the pilot oil flow from the boom
control valve to drain once the boom pilot control valve is returned to the NEUTRAL or HOLD
position.

When the control lever is moved to the BOOM RAISE position, the shock reducing valve gets pilot
oil from passage (11) through port (4). Pilot oil pressure moves valve (12) to the left against the force
of spring (6) opening passage (10). Pilot oil now goes out through port (9) to its control valve. Valve
(12) functions similar to that for check valve (7).

When the control lever is returned to the NEUTRAL position, the pilot oil in the main control valve
returns to port (9). Pilot return pressure oil moves valve (12) to the right against the force of spring
(5). Passage (10) now closes allowing the pilot return oil to go through orifice (8) and passage (11),
and out through port (4). Valve (12) functions similar to that for flow control valve (3). Because the
oil flow is restricted at orifice (8), the oil flows at a lower rate and the stem of the control valve slowly
returns to the closed position. The oil flow in the cylinder and its return line, slows down which
absorbs the shock loads at the end of an implement movement.

Cylinders (Boom, Stick, Bucket)

Cylinders
(1) Rod end port. (2) Head end port. (3) Boom cylinders. (4) Tube. (5) Rod. (6) Snubber. (7) Piston. (8) Stick cylinder. (9)
Snubber. (10) Bucket cylinder.
Snubber Operation (Rod Extending)
(6) Snubber. (11) Passage.

When boom cylinders (3) or stick cylinder (8) comes close to the end of their extension stroke,
passage (11) begins to be restricted by snubber (6). This restriction slows down the movement of the
piston rod just before the piston rod reaches the end of its extension stroke.

Snubber Operation (Rod Retracting)


(9) Snubber. (12) Passage.
When stick cylinder (8) comes close to the end of its retraction stroke, passage (12) is restricted by
snubber (9). In the same manner as that for extension stroke, the movement of the piston rod slows
down. This absorbs the shock load at the end of the rod movement.

Boom Drift Reduction Valve


Boom Raise

Boom Drift Reduction Valve (Boom Raise Position)


(1) Passage. (2) Passage. (3) Port. (4) Boom drift reduction valve. (5) Spring chamber. (6) Spring. (7) Valve. (8) Port. (9)
Spool. (10) Passage. (11) Passage. (12) Passage. (13) Spring chamber. (14) Drain line. (15) Port. (16) Pilot line. (17) Port.
(18) Passage.

Right Front Of Swing Motor (Boom Drift Reduction Valve)


(4) Boom drift reduction valve. (14) Drain line. (16) Pilot line.
When the boom control lever is moved to the BOOM RAISE position, the oil from boom I and II
control valves enters boom drift reduction valve (4) through port (8). The oil then acts on the right end
face of valve (7). Because no oil is sent to pilot line (16) from the pilot control valve, spool (9)
remains stationary.

With passage (1) connected to port (3), as the pressure of oil at port (8) is more than the force of
spring (6), valve (7) moves to the left, compressing spring (6). Oil through port (8) goes to port (3). At
the same time, the oil in spring chamber (5) goes through passages (1), (18) and (2) to port (3). Both
oil flows through port (3) then go to the head end of the boom cylinders.

Boom Lower

Boom Drift Reduction Valve (Boom Lower Position)


(1) Passage. (3) Port. (4) Boom drift reduction valve. (5) Spring chamber. (7) Valve. (8) Port. (9) Spool. (10) Passage. (11)
Passage. (12) Passage. (13) Spring chamber. (14) Drain line. (15) Port. (16) Pilot line. (17) Port. (18) Passage. (19) Cover.

When the control lever is moved to the BOOM LOWER position, pilot oil from the pilot control valve
goes through pilot line (16) and into boom drift reduction valve (4) through port (17). The oil then
moves spool (9) to the right until it comes in contact with the stop in the bottom of cover (19). The oil
in spring chamber (5) goes through passages (1), (10), (18) and (12) and into spring chamber (13).
The oil then goes out through port (15) and goes through drain line (14) to the pump suction line. The
oil pressure in spring chamber (5) now decreases.

Return oil from the boom cylinders head end enters boom drift reduction valve (4) through port (3).
Because the oil pressure in spring chamber (5) is low, valve (7) begins to open by moving to the left.
The return oil now goes out through port (8) to the boom I control valve.
Bucket Control
When the bucket is operated for both CLOSE and DUMP, only the upper pump oil is supplied to the
bucket cylinder. When the control lever is moved to the BUCKET CLOSE position, the return oil is
restricted by the stem in the bucket control valve. The bucket now operates at an appropriate speed
depending on the pump delivery flow.

Hydraulic Schematic For Stick Out

(1) Stick cylinder.

(2) Line.

(3) Pilot line.


(4) Stick drift reduction valve.

(5) Drain line.

(6) Line.

(7) Line.

(8) Valve.

(9) Main control valve.

(10) Line.

(11) Return line.

(12) Passage.

(13) Return passage.

(14) Center bypass passage.

(15) Stick II control valve.

(16) Passage.

(17) Check valve.

(18) Passage.

(19) Center bypass passage.

(20) Passage.

(21) Pilot line.

(22) Boom II control valve.

(23) Passage.

(24) Stick I control valve.

(25) Parallel feeder passage.

(26) Return passage.

(27) Check valve.

(28) Passage.

(29) Selector valve.


(30) Passage.

(31) Check valve.

(32) Pilot line.

(33) Pilot line.

(34) Return line.

(35) Pilot line.

(36) Pilot control valve (swing and stick).

(37) Pilot line.

(38) Pilot line.

(39) Pilot line.

(40) Pilot line.

(41) Upper pump.

(42) Shock reducing valve.

(43) Pilot line.

(44) Pilot line.

(45) Solenoid valve (fine control).

(46) Pilot pump.

(47) Lower pump.

Stick Control
Introduction
Main Control Valve Compartment
(15) Stick II control valve. (24) Stick I control valve.

Bottom Of Main Control Valve


(9) Main control valve. (42) Shock reducing valve (stick OUT).

Front Of Main Control Valve


(4) Stick drift reduction valve.

Both stick out and stick in operations use stick I control valve (24) and stick II control valve (15).
Stick I control valve (24) and stick II control valve (15) cause the combined oil to flow from upper
pump (41) and lower pump (47) to stick cylinder (1).

Shock reducing valve (42) (similar to that for the boom operation) functions to make a cushion for the
shock loads at a stop of a stick out operation.

Stick drift reduction valve (4) functions similar to that for the boom drift reduction valve. See the
section, "Boom Drift Reduction Valve".

Stick Out
When the control lever is moved to the STICK OUT position, pilot oil from pilot control valve (36)
goes through pilot line (43) and shock reducing valve (42) to pilot line (39). The oil flow then divides
into two paths. One path goes through pilot line (21) and enters stick I control valve (24) shifting its
stem. This allows the lower pump oil in center bypass passage (19) to go through load check valve
(17), passage (18) and stick I control valve (24) to passage (12). The oil then goes through line (7) and
enters stick drift reduction valve (4) opening valve (8). Now the oil leaves stick drift reduction valve
(4) and goes through line (2) to the rod end of the stick cylinder.
The other path from pilot line (39) goes through pilot line (35) and enters stick II control valve (15)
shifting its stem. Stick II control valve (15) closes, causing no oil flow from center bypass passage
(14) through passage (16) to return passage (26).

Upper pump oil in center bypass passage (14) now goes through check valve (27) and passage (20) to
line (10). Upper pump oil in parallel feeder passage (25) goes through selector valve (29) and check
valve (31) to line (10). All upper pump oil in line (10) goes through passage (23) and combines with
lower pump oil in passage (18). Now the cylinder increases its speed.

NOTE: The operation of selector valve (29) will be described later.

Return oil from the stick cylinder head end goes through line (6) and sick I control valve (24) to
return passage (13). The return oil then goes back to the hydraulic tank through return lines (11) and
(34).

Stick In
When the control lever is moved to the STICK IN position, pilot control valve (36) sends the pilot oil
to pilot line (40). The oil flow from pilot line (40) then separates into two oil paths. One path goes
through pilot line (33) to stick I control valve (24) shifting its stem. The other path goes through pilot
line (44), fine control solenoid valve (45) and pilot line (38), and enters stick II control valve (15)
shifting its stem.

In the same manner as that described for Stick Out, lower pump oil goes through center bypass
passage (19) to stick I control valve (24). The upper pump oil goes through center bypass passage (14)
and parallel feeder passage (25) to line (10) and combines with the lower pump oil in stick I control
valve (24). The combined oil then goes through line (6) to the head end of the stick cylinder.

The return oil from the rod end of the stick cylinder goes through line (2), stick drift reduction valve
(4) and line (7), and into stick I control valve (24). The oil then goes through return passage (13) and
return line (11) and back to hydraulic tank. Now the stick cylinder operates for Stick In.

NOTE: Operation of stick drift reduction valve (4) will be described in the section, "Boom Lower".

Selector Valve
Stick II Control Valve
(10) Line. (25) Parallel feeder passage. (27) Check valve. (28) Passage. (29) Selector valve. (30) Passage. (31) Check
valve. (48) Port. (49) Passage. (50) Passage. (51) Passage. (52) Stem. (53) Spring. (54) Passage. (55) Piston chamber.

Selector valve (29) is installed in stick II control valve (15).

NOTE: Operation of selector valve (29) is described in the section, "Stick Out".

When stem (52) is shifted to the right by the pilot oil flow from port (48), upper pump oil in parallel
feeder passage (25) goes through passages (28) and (50) to passage (30). The oil in passage (30) then
separates into two oil paths. One path goes through check valve (31) to line (10). The other path goes
through passages (51) and (54) and into piston chamber (55). The pressure of oil in piston chamber
(55) moves selector valve (29) to the left against the force of spring (53). Now the oil in passage (28)
goes through passages (49) and (51) and combines with oil flow from parallel feeder passage (25) in
passage (30). The combined oil then goes to line (10).

In stick in and stick out operations, selector valve (29) activates to cause the same oil flow from
parallel feeder passage (25) to line (10).

Hydraulic Schematic For Swing Right


(1) Swing parking brake control valve.

(2) Spool.

(3) Pressure reducing valve.

(4) Passage.

(5) Swing parking brake.

(6) Swing motor rotary group.


(7) Swing motor.

(8) Line.

(9) Line.

(10) Pilot line.

(11) Main control valves.

(12) Drain line.

(13) Line.

(14) Return passage.

(15) Load check valve.

(16) Parallel feeder passage.

(17) Pilot passage.

(18) Attachment control valve.

(19) Bucket control valve.

(20) Boom I control valve.

(21) Return line.

(22) Passage.

(23) Stick I control valve.

(24) Passage.

(25) Swing control valve.

(26) Passage.

(27) Orifice.

(28) Pilot passage.

(29) Line.

(30) Line.

(31) Pilot control valve (swing and stick).

(32) Line.
(33) Pilot oil manifold.

(34) Drain line.

(35) Passage.

(36) Upper pump.

(37) Lower pump.

(38) Pilot pump.

(39) Hydraulic tank.

(40) Slow return check valve.

Swing Control
Introduction
Swing motor (7) is driven by pressure oil from lower pump (37). When the swing control lever is
moved, swing parking brake (5) is first released, and then swing motor rotary group (6) starts to
rotate.

The swing drive reduces the motor speed into two stages and then rotates the upper structure.

Swing Right Operation

Main Control Valve Compartment


(7) Swing motor. (8) Line. (9) Line. (21) Return line. (25) Swing control valve.

When the control lever is moved to the SWING RIGHT position, pilot oil from pilot control valve
(31) goes through line (13) to swing control valve (25). The stem in swing control valve (25) shifts
and opens passages (26) and (24).

The lower pump oil goes through parallel feeder passage (16), load check valve (15), passage (26) and
enters swing control valve (25). The oil then goes through passage (24) and line (9) to swing motor
rotary group (6).
Return oil from swing motor rotary group (6) goes through line (8) and enters swing control valve
(25). The oil now goes through return passage (14) to return line (21). Swing motor rotary group (6)
rotates, causing the upper structure to swing to the right.

Swing Parking Brake


ON Position

Swing Motor Compartment


(1) Swing parking brake control valve. (7) Swing motor. (10) Pilot line. (12) Drain line. (30) Line.

Pilot oil from pilot pump (38) enters pilot oil manifold (33) and goes through passage (35). The pilot
oil then separates into two paths and leaves pilot oil manifold (33). One path goes through line (30)
and enters swing parking brake control valve (1). The other path goes through line (32) and enters
main control valves (11). The oil then goes through orifice (27) and to pilot passage (28).

NOTE: Part of the oil goes to pilot passage (17) which is a branch of pilot passage (28).

With main control valves (11) in NEUTRAL position (except travel control valve), the control valves
for swing (25), stick I (23), attachment (18), bucket (19) and boom I (20) are connected in series by
pilot passage (28). Pilot oil in pilot passage (28) goes through all of these valves and then goes
through drain line (34) to the pump suction line. Oil flow through pilot passage (28) is restricted at
orifice (27), causing the oil pressure in both pilot passages (28) and (17) to be lower than the oil
pressure in line (32).

Pilot passage (17) is open to swing parking brake control valve (1) through pilot line (10). Spool (2)
in swing parking brake control valve (1) cannot be shifted because of low pressure in passage (17).
There is no oil vented from passage (4) through pressure reducing valve (3) to drain line (12). Swing
parking brake (5) remains engaged.

OFF Position

Activation of any controls other than travel closes pilot passage (28) and increases the pilot oil
pressure in pilot passage (28). The pilot oil pressure in pilot passage (17) and pilot line (10) also
increase, causing spool (2) to shift. The oil now flows from line (30) through passage (4) to swing
parking brake (5), releasing the swing parking brake.

Activation of travel control does not close pilot passage (28). The parking brake remains ON.
Because pilot passage (28) is closed prior to the opening of swing control valve (25) the swing motor
operates only after swing parking brake (5) has been released by the pilot pressure oil from line (30).

When the swing and implements controls are in NEUTRAL position, pilot passage (28) is open to
drain line (34), allowing the pilot oil pressure in pilot passage (17) and pilot line (10) to decrease.
Spool (2) returns to neutral by its return spring. Now there is no pilot oil flow from line (30) to swing
parking brake (5). The oil in swing parking brake (5) flows through swing parking brake control valve
(1) through passage (4) and pressure reducing valve (3), and returns to hydraulic tank (39) through
drain line (12). Swing parking brake (5) begins to be applied. Because the oil flow from passage (4) is
restricted at pressure reducing valve (3), a delayed application of swing parking brake (5) results.
Swing parking brake (5) remains released until the swing motor comes to a stop.

Swing Left Operation


For a swing left operation, pilot oil is supplied through line (29) to swing control valve (25). The stem
in swing control valve (25) shifts (moves) up. The lower pump oil in parallel feeder passage (16) goes
through passages (26) and (22), line (8) and enters swing motor rotary group (6). For swing left
operation, the supply and return ports are reverse of swing right operation. This causes the upper
structure to swing to the left.

NOTE: For information on operation of the swing parking brake, see the section, "Swing Motor".

Swing Motor
Swing Motor
(1) Drive shaft. (2) Retainer plate. (3) Port. (4) Swing parking brake control valve. (5) Port. (6) Piston. (7) Passage. (8)
Passage. (9) Head. (10) Makeup port. (11) Drain port. (12) Plate. (13) Shoe. (14) Body. (15) Separator plate. (16) Friction
plate. (17) Barrel. (18) Brake piston. (19) Spring. (20) Valve plate. (21) Anti-reaction valve. (22) Passage. (23) Port. (24)
Port. (25) Passage. (26) Check valve. (27) Relief valve. (28) Check valve. (29) Relief valve.

Introduction

The swing motor may be divided into the following four groups:

1. Rotary group; consisting of barrel (17), pistons (6), shoes (13), retainer plate (2) and drive
shaft (1).
2. Parking brake group; consisting of swing parking brake control valve (4), separator plates
(15), friction plates (16), brake piston (18) and springs (19).
3. Relief and makeup valve group; consisting of relief valves (27) and (29), and check valves
(26) and (28).
4. Anti-reaction valve (21) group.

Operation
The oil from the lower pump passes through the swing control valve. The swing control valve directs
oil to port (23) or (24).

For a swing right operation, pump oil enters port (23) and goes through passage (22) in motor head
(9), passage (8) in valve plate (20) and through passage (7) in barrel (17).

Pump oil in barrel (17) acts against piston (6). The piston forces shoe (13) against plate (12). The
piston and shoe slide along the inclined surface of plate (12) from the top dead center to bottom dead
center.

Motor Passages (Viewed From Head Side)


(7) Passage (in barrel). (8) Passage (in plate). (22) Passage. (23) Port. (24) Port. (25) Passage. (30) Counterclockwise turn.
(31) Passage (in plate).
The force created by the shoe and the piston against plate (12) causes barrel (17) to rotate
counterclockwise. Passage (7) of each piston that has come to the bottom dead center position is open
to passage (31) in valve plate (20). Oil now returns to the hydraulic tank. The piston and the shoe
continue to move up on the inclined surface of plate (12) as barrel (17) continues to turn
counterclockwise.

For a swing left operation, pump oil is supplied to port (24). The supply and return ports are reversed.
Barrel (17) and drive shaft (1) turn clockwise.

The case drain oil returns through drain port (11) of motor head (9) to the hydraulic tank.

Swing Parking Brake

Parking Brake (Partial)


(1) Spool. (2) Port. (3) Port. (4) Swing parking brake control valve. (5) Body. (6) Spring. (7) Spool. (8) Passage. (9)
Passage. (10) Brake piston. (11) Spring. (12) Piston chamber. (13) Friction plate. (14) Separator plate. (15) Head. (16)
Barrel. (17) Piston.
The swing parking brake group is located between head (15) and body (5). It is made up of springs
(11), brake piston (10), separator plates (14), friction plates (13) and swing parking brake control
valve (4).

Teeth on the inner circumference of friction plate (13) engage with splines on barrel (16). Teeth on
the outer circumference of separator plates (14) engage with splines on the inner circumference of
body (5).

Swing Parking Brake Control Valve (Brake Off Position)


(1) Spool. (2) Port. (3) Port. (4) Swing parking brake control valve. (6) Spring. (7) Spool. (8) Passage. (9) Passage. (18)
Passage. (19) Passage. (20) Passage. (21) Passage.

When the swing control is activated, pilot pressure oil to port (3) in swing parking brake control valve
(4) is increased and lower pump oil is supplied to the swing motor. Before pump oil is supplied to the
motor, the increased pilot pressure at port (3) moves spool (1) down against the force of spring (6).
This opens passages (18) and (20) allowing pilot system oil at port (2) to flow through passages (18),
(20), (8) and (9) to piston chamber (12). The pilot pressure overcomes the force of the brake springs
(11) and moves the brake piston (10) to the right releasing the brake. The upper structure is now
released for swing operation.
Swing Parking Brake Control Valve (Brake On Position)
(1) Spool. (2) Port. (3) Port. (4) Swing parking brake control valve. (6) Spring. (7) Spool. (8) Passage. (9) Passage. (18)
Passage. (19) Passage. (21) Passage. (22) Filter. (23) Orifice. (24) Passage. (25) Spring chamber. (26) Spring.

When the swing pilot control valve is returned to the neutral position, the pilot pressure oil in port (3)
decreases. Spool (1) is pushed up by the force of spring (6), closing passage (18) and (19). Pilot oil
flow is now blocked from port (2) to passage (9) and piston chamber (12). Brake piston (10) starts
moving to the left by the force of springs (11). As brake piston (10) moves, the oil in piston chamber
(12) goes through passage (9) to spool (7). The oil flow is restricted at orifice (23) causing an increase
in oil pressure. The increased oil pressure moves spool (7) down against the force of spring (26) and
decreases the opening of passage (24). The oil flow is now restricted at orifice (23) and passage (24).
Oil flows slowly through spring chamber (25) and passage (21) to the motor case drain. The force of
springs (11) holds brake piston (10) together with friction plate (13) and separator plate (14) to body
(5). The upper structure is now locked to the lower structure, preventing rotation of the upper
structure.

The restricted oil flow delays application of the parking brake. If the oil flow was not restricted at
orifice (23) and passage (24), the parking brake would start to apply before a machine swing
operation stopped.
Relief/Makeup Operation

Swing Circuit Schematic (Partial)


(1) Passage. (2) Makeup port. (3) Relief valve. (4) Passage. (5) Motor rotary group. (6) Swing motor. (7) Passage. (8)
Relief valve. (9) Passage. (10) Makeup line. (11) Check valve. (12) Port. (13) Port. (14) Check valve. (15) Check valve.
(16) Return line. (17) Main control valves. (18) Slow return check valve. (19) Return line.
Swing Motor Compartment
(2) Makeup port. (3) Relief valve. (6) Swing motor. (8) Relief valve. (10) Makeup line.

Relief Valve

Relief Valve
(1) Passage. (4) Passage. (20) Spring. (21) Passage. (22) Piston. (23) Body. (24) Stem. (25) Passage. (26) Plug. (27)
Spring chamber. (28) Orifice. (29) Sleeve. (30) Piston chamber. (31) Piston. (32) Plug. (33) Spring. (34) Orifice.

Relief valves (3) and (8) are located in the top of swing motor (6). These valves limit the pressure in
the swing circuit to the relief valve setting. This provides a cushion effect at a start or stop of the
swing operation.

When the swing control lever is moved back to NEUTRAL position, during a swing right operation,
inlet and outlet ports of the swing control valve are closed. Oil flow is now blocked at port (12) and
port (13) of the swing motor.

The mass (weight and size) of the upper structure causes the swing motor to rotate after a stop
operation is made. The continued operation attempts to draw oil from port (13) and force it out port
(12). Since port (12) is closed, the pressure of the blocked oil in passage (1) increases. The increased
pressure oil in passage (1) forces stem (24) to open against the force of spring (33) in relief valve (3).
Oil now flows through passage (4) and check valve (14) to passage (7). From passage (7), oil enters
motor rotary group (5). The force of the rotating upper structure is now absorbed as the swing motor
comes to a stop.

The oil in passage (1) goes through orifice (34) of stem (24) to piston chamber (30). Because the force
of spring (33) is less than the relief valve pressure setting [23 000 kPa (3350 psi)], stem (24) opens
just before the pressure of the oil in passage (1) reaches the relief valve pressure setting. This allows
the oil to vent. The pressure oil in piston chamber (30) moves piston (22) to the left, compressing
spring (20) until its left end face comes in contact with plug (26). The oil in spring chamber (27) now
goes through orifice (28) of sleeve (29), passages (21) and (25) to passage (4). In approximately 0.1
second of piston movement, the pressure oil in piston chamber (30) increases, moving piston (31) to
the right compressing spring (33). When piston (31) comes in contact with the shoulder of plug (32),
the oil pressure in passage (1) increases to the relief setting [23 000 kPa (3350 psi)]. It is not until the
full relief valve pressure setting is reached that all of the oil is allowed to flow out of relief valve (3)
to passage (4).

Because of the two stage relief action, no peak pressure builds up when relief valve (3) opens. Less
shock load occurs when the swing motor stops.

At the start of a swing right operation, there is an oil pressure increase at port (13) because of the
mass (weight and size) of the upper structure. Part of the pressure oil flows past stem (24) in relief
valve (8) and through makeup port (2) to return line (19). This gives a smoother acceleration at the
start of a swing operation.

Oil Makeup

When rotation of the swing motor is stopped, all ports in the swing control valve are blocked. There is
no pump oil sent to swing motor (6). As the upper structure attempts to continue rotating, part of the
oil in swing motor (6) is lost in the form of internal leakage. Because of this oil loss, a vacuum occurs
at port (13). To prevent this vacuum condition, oil from return line (16) goes through makeup line
(10), makeup port (2), passage (9), check valve (14) and passage (7) into motor rotary group (5).

Slow Return Check Valve

Main Control Valve Compartment


(10) Makeup line. (18) Slow return check valve.
Slow Return Check Valve
(10) Makeup line. (15) Check valve. (16) Return line. (19) Return line. (35) Orifice.

Slow return check valve (18) is located downstream of return line (16). Slow return check valve (18)
makes it possible to makeup lost oil during a swing stop operation.

When all of main control valves (17) are in NEUTRAL position, the oil from the upper and lower
pumps goes through return line (16) to the hydraulic tank. Check valve (15) causes a resistance to the
oil flow in return line (16) maintaining the oil pressure at 290 kPa (43 psi).

When there is not enough oil flow supplied to the swing motor, this return line back pressure adds oil
flow to the swing motor rotary group through makeup port (2) and passage (9).

Orifice (35) in check valve (15) of slow return check valve (18) allows makeup oil from return line
(19) to go to makeup line (10). The oil then enters the swing motor.

When the swing motor speed is decreased during a high speed right swing operation, by moving the
swing control lever partially to NEUTRAL position, oil supply from port (13) decreases. Since the
swing control valve is partially open, the oil flow continues to flow through port (12) to return line
(16). On port (12) side, the pressure is lower than the setting of relief valve (3). Relief valve (3) is
kept closed and there is no makeup oil sent to passage (7) through check valve (14). A vacuum now
develops at port (13). Check valve (14) causes makeup oil flow from makeup line (10) to motor rotary
group (5), eliminating the vacuum condition.

If the swing motor is stopped or decelerated during a swing operation in the opposite direction and oil
is supplied through port (12), check valve (11) instead of check valve (14) operates to prevent a
vacuum condition in the swing motor.

Anti-Reaction Valve
Anti-Reaction Valve (Neutral Position)
(1) Passage. (2) Swing motor rotary group. (3) Passage. (4) Valve. (5) Spring. (6) Spring. (7) Anti-reaction valve. (8)
Passage. (9) Motor head. (10) Spring. (11) Passage. (12) Passage. (13) Valve. (14) Passage. (15) Passage. (16) Passage.
(17) Piston chamber. (18) Piston. (19) Passage. (20) Valve chamber.

At a stop of a swing operation, it is difficult to smoothly stop the upper structure and implements at a
desired position due to the mass (weight and size) of the upper structure. This is because the pressure
of the blocked oil in the swing motor outlet side goes back to the swing motor rotary group, causing
the upper structure to swing in the reverse direction. Anti-reaction valve (7) prevents the blocked oil
from flowing back to the swing motor rotary group. Anti-reaction valve (7) is located in the motor
head of the swing motor.

Swing motor rotary group (2) gets pump oil from passage (1) or (3) in motor head (9). Anti-reaction
valve (7) is open to both passages (1) and (3). Oil in passage (1) goes through passages (8), (11) and
(16) to piston chamber (17). Oil in passage (3) goes through passages (12), (14), (15) and (19) to
valve chamber (20).

When there is no pressure oil in both passages (1) and (3), valve (4) is moved to the right by the force
of springs (5) and (6) until stopped by piston (18). Valve (13) is moved to the right by the force of
spring (10) until its right end shoulder comes in contact with valve (4).
Anti-Reaction Valve (During Activation)
(1) Passage. (2) Motor rotary group. (3) Passage. (4) Valve. (5) Spring. (6) Spring. (8) Passage. (10) Spring. (11) Passage.
(13) Valve. (16) Passage. (17) Piston chamber.

When swing motor rotary group (2) gets pump oil from passage (3), it rotates counterclockwise.
When there is no oil supplied to passage (3), swing motor rotary group (2) continues to rotate
counterclockwise because of the mass (weight and size) of the upper structure. The oil pressure
blocked in passage (1) increases and the oil pressure in passage (3) decreases. The increased oil
pressure in passage (1) goes through passages (8), (11) and (16), and enters piston chamber (17). The
pressure oil in piston chamber (17) moves valve (4) and valve (13) to the left against the combined
forces of springs (5), (6) and (10).
Anti-Reaction Valve (Just Before The Motor Stops)
(1) Passage. (2) Swing motor rotary group. (3) Passage. (4) Valve. (5) Spring. (6) Spring. (10) Spring. (12) Passage. (13)
Valve. (14) Passage. (17) Piston chamber. (21) Valve chamber. (22) Orifice. (23) Passage. (24) Passage.

As the motor attempts to stop due to decreased force of the mass (weight and size) of the upper
structure, the oil pressure in passage (1) decreases. Now the oil pressure in piston chamber (17) is less
than the combined force of springs (5), (6) and (10), valve (4) moves to the right. Valve (13) slowly
moves to the right because the oil flow from valve chamber (21) is restricted at orifice (22). Now
valves (13) and (4) separate from each other. Passage (24) opens allowing oil flow from passage (1)
through passages (24), (23), (14) and (12) to passage (3). When the pressure oil in passages (1) and
(3) becomes the same, valve (13) stops closing passage (24). Now there is no oil flow going back
from passage (1) to swing motor rotary group (2). The upper structure and each implement can stop
smoothly at a desired position.

When swing motor rotary group (2) gets pump oil from passage (1), the oil pressure in passage (3)
increases at the stop of a swing operation. The increased oil pressure blocked in passage (3) goes
through passages (12), (14), (15) and (19), and into valve chamber (20). The pressure oil in valve
chamber (20) moves valves (4) and (13) to the left against the combined forces of springs (5), (6) and
(10).

As the oil pressure in valve chamber (20) decreases, valve (4) moves to the right and then valve (13)
slowly moves to the right.

In the same manner as described before, valves (4) and (13) separate from each other opening passage
(24). Now there is no oil flow going back from the swing motor outlet port to the swing motor rotary
group.

Swing Drive
Swing Drive
(1) First stage carrier. (2) First stage planet gear. (3) Second stage carrier. (4) Ring gear. (5) Second stage planet gear. (6)
Roller bearing. (7) Roller bearing. (8) Pinion shaft. (9) Swing motor. (10) Shaft (swing motor). (11) First stage sun gear.
(12) Second stage sun gear. (13) Housing. (14) Bearing gear (swing bearing).

The swing drive consists of a series of planet gears. The planet gears reduce the rotating speed of
swing motor (9). The swing motor is bolted on the swing drive. The swing drive is bolted to the upper
structure. The teeth of the swing drive output pinion shaft (8) engage with bearing gear (14) of the
swing bearing. Pinion shaft (8) provides motion to the upper structure by rotating around bearing gear
(14). Bearing gear (14) is attached to the lower structure.

The swing drive is divided into the following two groups:


1. The first group functions as a double reduction of motor speed. The first stage reduction
consists of first stage sun gear (11), first stage planet gears (2), first stage carrier (1) and ring
gear (4).

The second stage reduction consists of second stage sun gear (12), second stage planet gears
(5), second stage carrier (3) and ring gear (4).

2. The second group functions as the drive for reduced motor speed output. It consists of pinion
shaft (8) and roller bearings (6) and (7) in housing (13).

The planet reduction group functions to reduce the swing speed in a ratio of sun gear tooth numbers to
ring gear tooth numbers. The compact swing drive with the sun gear incorporated in the ring gear
housing provides a greater reduction ratio.

First Stage Planetary Gear Rotation


(1) First stage carrier. (2) First stage planet gear. (4) Ring gear. (11) First stage sun gear. (15) Shaft (first stage planet
gear).

Swing motor output shaft (10) is splined to first stage sun gear (11). First stage planet gears (2) of first
stage carrier (1) are in mesh with first stage sun gear (11). As shaft (10) rotates first stage sun gear
(11) counterclockwise, first stage planet gears (2) rotate clockwise on shafts (15), moving
counterclockwise around ring gear (4). Ring gear (4) is bolted to housing (14). First stage carrier (1)
now rotates counterclockwise.
Swing Drive (Partial)
(1) First stage carrier. (2) First stage planet gear. (3) Second stage carrier. (4) Ring gear. (5) Second stage planet gear. (6)
Roller bearing. (7) Roller bearing. (8) Pinion shaft. (11) First stage sun gear. (12) Second stage sun gear. (16) Inner
circumference.

Splines on inner circumference (16) of first stage carrier (1) engage with the splines on second stage
sun gear (12). This causes second stage sun gear (12) to rotate counterclockwise. Second stage planet
gears (5) now turn clockwise on their shafts, moving counterclockwise around ring gear (4) in the
same manner as in the first stage. This turns second stage carrier (3) counterclockwise. The splines of
pinion shaft (8) engage with splines on the inner circumference of second stage carrier (3), causing
pinion shaft (8) to rotate counterclockwise.
Pinion Shaft (8) Rotation
(8) Pinion shaft. (14) Bearing gear (swing bearing). (18) Location of moving pinion shaft.

Pinion shaft (8) engages with bearing gear (14) on the inner circumference of the swing bearing. As
pinion shaft (8) rotates counterclockwise, it moves clockwise around bearing gear (14). Bearing gear
(14) is bolted to the lower structure. This causes the upper structure to swing to the right (clockwise).

Hydraulic Schematic For Forward Travel


(1) Left travel motor.

(2) Cam plate.

(3) Motor rotary group.

(4) Piston (high speed).

(5) Passage.

(6) Brake pilot valve.


(7) Passage.

(8) Counterbalance valve.

(9) Piston (low speed).

(10) Parking brake.

(11) Passage.

(12) Displacement change valve.

(13) Passage.

(14) Line.

(15) Right travel motor.

(16) Cam plate.

(17) Piston (low speed).

(18) Passage.

(19) Passage.

(20) Displacement change valve.

(21) Passage.

(22) Piston (high speed).

(23) Passage.

(24) Passage.

(25) Passage.

(26) Passage.

(27) Line.

(28) Line.

(29) Line.

(30) Line.

(31) Swivel.

(32) Line.
(33) Line.

(34) Passage.

(35) Passage.

(36) Return passage.

(37) Return line.

(38) Left travel control valve.

(39) Passage.

(40) Center bypass passage.

(41) Right travel control valve.

(42) Pilot control valve (left travel).

(43) Pilot control valve (right travel).

(44) Line.

(45) Upper pump.

(46) Shuttle valve.

(47) Solenoid valve (travel speed).

(48) Passage.

(49) Lower pump.

(50) Pilot pump.

(51) Automatic travel speed change valve.

(52) Line.

(53) Implement/Swing pressure switch.

(54) Travel pressure switch.

(55) Pressure control valve.

(56) Main relief valve.

(57) Pilot line.

(58) Orifice.
(59) Orifice.

(60) Line.

(61) Line.

Travel Control
Introduction

Travel Motor
(1) Left travel motor. (62) Brake valve.

Travel Drive
(63) Left track. (64) Sprocket. (65) Left travel drive.

Left travel motor (1) and right travel motor (15) are supplied pump oil through swivel (31) from lower
pump (49) and upper pump (45). When left travel motor (1) is operated by the lower pump oil, the
motor torque is transmitted to left travel drive (65). Left travel drive (65) reduces the speed and
increases the torque of left travel motor (1). The increased torque turns left track (63). Left track (63)
is connected to left travel drive (65) through sprocket (64).
Console
(67) Travel speed switch.

Travel speed switch (67) provides a selection of HIGH or LOW travel speed. During partial
movements of the travel control lever, the travel speed varies with the travel distance of the lever.
When the switch is placed in the SLOW "TORTOISE" position, the machine travels at the LOW
speed mode. When the switch is placed in the FAST "RABBIT" position, the machine travels at the
HIGH speed mode. On a flat surface or moderate downward slope, select the HIGH speed for
increased mobility.

While travel speed switch (67) is in HIGH TRAVEL SPEED MODE position, automatic travel speed
change valve (51) operates to automatically change the travel speed depending on the load placed on
the machine. The machine travels at LOW speed when a larger load is placed on it and travels at
HIGH speed when a smaller load is placed.
Illustration Of Travel Operation
(1) Left travel motor. (15) Right travel motor. (68) Forward direction. (69) Control lever/pedal (left travel). (70) Idler
location. (71) Control lever/pedal (right travel). (72) Cab. (73) Reverse direction.

The direction of travel (forward or reverse) is relative to the position of the lower structure. For
normal travel, idler location (70) is positioned in front of cab (72) and travel motors (1) and (15) to
the rear of the cab. With the machine in the normal position of travel, move the control levers/pedals
(69) and (71) forward. The machine will travel in forward direction (58). This movement is called
forward travel. When levers/pedals (69) and (71) are moved to the rear, the machine travels in reverse
direction (73). This direction is called reverse travel.

When cab (72) is turned 180°, travel motors (1) and (15) will be positioned in front of the cab. The
direction of travel and operation of levers/pedals (69) and (71) are reverse to when the machine is in
the normal travel direction.

A pivot turn is made when the traveling direction of the machine is to be changed. When only one of
levers/pedals (69) or (71) is moved forward, the respective track travels forward. Since the opposite
track is stationary, the machine turns with the stationary track as its axis (pivot point). This is called a
pivot turn.

A spot turn is made when the traveling direction of the machine is to be changed in a narrow place.
To complete a spot turn operation, move one control lever/pedal to the rear and the other control
lever/pedal forward at the same time. The tracks will travel in the opposite direction of each other.
The machine makes a minimum radius (spot) turn with its center as its axis.

Forward Travel Operation

Main Control Valve Compartment


(38) Left travel control valve. (41) Right travel control valve.

When the travel control levers are operated, pilot oil from pilot control valves (42) and (43) shifts the
stems in travel control valves (38) and (41). Shifting left travel control valve (38) allows oil flow from
the lower pump (49) to go through swivel (31) to left travel motor (1). Shifting right travel control
valve (41) allows oil flow from the upper pump (45) to go through swivel (31) to right travel motor
(15).

When the travel valves are shifted, pilot oil pressure in line (60) increases as the travel stems block
the pilot oil in this line from returning to drain. The increased pilot oil pressure in line (60) closes
travel pressure switch (54) which signals the controller to increase engine speed and to also activate
the travel alarm. The increased pilot oil pressure also goes through pressure control valve (55) to main
relief valve (56) to cause it to raise from implement system pressure to travel system pressure.

Operation of an implement while traveling will cause an increase in pilot oil pressure in line (61).
This increased pressure will shift pressure control valve (55) blocking the pilot signal to main relief
valve (56). The main relief valve will then return to the implement pressure setting.

Low Speed

When travel speed switch (67) is placed in the LOW SPEED MODE position, part of the pilot oil in
passage (11) goes through passage (13) and displacement change valve (12) to piston (9). This causes
cam plate (2) to turn in the direction of an increased angle and to remain in its maximum angle
position. Now more oil is required to turn left travel motor (1), causing the motor to rotate at a lower
speed. The left track travels at a lower speed and increases its draw bar pull.

Return oil from motor rotary group (3) flows through passage (5), counterbalance valve (8) and line
(30) to swivel (31). Oil now goes through line (32) and passage (34) into left travel control valve (38).
The oil leaves left travel control valve (38) and goes through return passage (36) and back to the
hydraulic tank through return line (37).

Oil from the upper pump turns right travel motor (15). Operation of right travel is the same as that
described for left travel.

High Speed

Pilot Oil Manifold Compartment


(47) Solenoid valve (travel speed).

The explanation for forward travel in the HIGH SPEED MODE position is given relative to right
travel motor (15). Operation is the same for left travel motor (1).

When travel speed switch (67) is placed in the AUTOMATIC TRAVEL SPEED MODE position,
travel speed solenoid valve (47) is energized. If the pump delivery pressure does not increase to a
certain level due to smaller machine load, automatic travel speed change valve (51) remains open. Oil
from pilot pump (50) flows through solenoid valve (47), automatic travel speed change valve (51),
line (44), swivel (31) and line (14) to displacement change valve (20). The spool in displacement
change valve (20) shifts. As the spool shifts, oil from the upper pump flows through passages (24),
displacement change valve (20) and passage (23) to piston (22). Now the oil that is pushed by piston
(17) goes through passage (19), displacement change valve (20) and passage (25) to the motor case
drain.
The pressure oil in passage (23) pushes piston (22), decreasing the angle of cam plate (16) and holds
it in its minimum angle position. Less oil flow is now required to turn right travel motor (15). The
motor turns at a higher speed.

Automatic Travel Speed Change

Part of oil flow from upper and lower pumps (45) and (49) combines at shuttle valve (46). The
combined oil flow now goes through line (52) to automatic travel speed change valve (51). With
travel speed switch (67) in HIGH TRAVEL SPEED position, the travel motor runs at a smaller angle
position of its cam plate until the machine load increases to a certain level. The pump delivery
pressure increases as the load placed on the machine increases. As the delivery pressure increases to a
certain level, the pressure oil from line (52) shifts automatic travel speed change valve (51) to close
the connection of line (44) and passage (48). Now there is no pilot oil supplied to displacement
change valve (20). Displacement change valve (20) is shifted to off position, causing the cam plate of
the travel motor to turn in the increased angle for low speed mode. The machine travels at the low
speed.

If the machine travel load is decreased, the pump delivery pressure is decreased. As the circuit
pressure in line (52) decreases to an certain range, automatic travel speed change valve (51) is open
again, connecting line (44) and passage (48). Displacement change valve (20) is now supplied pilot
oil from line (44) and re-activates to turn the motor cam plate at a smaller angle for high speed mode.
Now, the machine again travels at the high speed.

Automatic travel speed change valve (51) functions so the machine travels at the high speed when a
smaller load is placed, and at low speed when a larger load is placed. This assures a higher mobility
and draw bar pull.

Straight Travel Control


Introduction

Control Valve Compartment


(1) Right travel. (2) Straight travel. (3) Left travel.
Hydraulic Schematic (Partial) (Only Right and Left Travel Activated)
(1) Right travel control valve. (2) Straight travel control valve. (3) Left travel control valve. (4) Main control valves. (5)
Line. (6) Line. (7) Upper pump. (8) Lower pump.

If the upper structure or implements are operated while the machine is traveling, straight travel control
valve (2) assures a straight travel of the machine. Straight travel control valve (2) also allows better
control of operations such as pipe laying or placement of timbers.

When the machine travels with no swing or implement operation, oil from upper pump (7) drives the
right travel motor and oil from lower pump (8) drives the left travel motor. Since both travel circuits
are separated, the machine continues to travel straight, unless a difference in travel resistance occurs
between the right and left tracks.

Without the straight travel system, a swing and/or implement operation (while performing a travel
operation) would cause upper pump (7) and lower pump (8) to supply varying amounts of pump oil to
the track motors. This would cause the machine to not travel straight.

The straight travel system assures the machine to travel straight when circuits other than the travel
circuits are simultaneously operated. When straight travel control valve (2) is activated by pilot
pressure, the following occurs:
1. Upper pump (7) supplies oil not only to the right travel circuit but also to the left travel
circuit to drive both motors in parallel.
2. The swing and implement circuits get their supply of pressure oil from lower pump (8).
When the machine is traveling, the swing and implement circuits do not require a large amount
of flow. They are operated at speeds low enough to keep the machine stable. The remainder of
the pressure oil is divided between the right and left travel circuits.

Implement And Travel Operation

Hydraulic Schematic (Partial) (Boom and Travel Activated)


(1) Parallel feeder passage. (2) Main control valves. (3) Stick I control valve. (4) Swing control valve. (5) Left travel
control valve. (6) Center bypass passage. (7) Right travel control valve. (8) Bucket control valve. (9) Boom I control
valve. (10) Center bypass passage. (11) Passage. (12) Passage. (13) Passage. (14) Passage. (15) Straight travel control
valve. (16) Passage. (17) Passage. (18) Pilot passage. (19) Pilot passage. (20) Pilot passage. (21) Passage. (22) Passage.
(23) Pilot passage. (24) Pilot passage. (25) Passage. (26) Parallel feeder passage. (27) Pilot oil manifold. (28) Upper pump.
(29) Drain line. (30) Line. (31) Line. (32) Pilot pump. (33) Lower pump.
When the boom control lever is activated during travel, there is pilot oil flow from the travel pilot
control valves through pilot passages (20) and (24) to right and left travel control valves (7) and (5).
For a boom operation, pilot oil flows from the boom pilot control valve through pilot passage (23) to
boom I control valve (9).

As the boom I control valve is operated, passage (22) is closed. There is an increase in pilot pressure
in passages (18) and (19). The increased pilot pressure operates straight travel control valve (15).

Passage (25) connects in series stick I control valve (3), swing control valve (4), bucket control valve
(8) and boom I control valve (9). If any of these valves is operated, the connection between passage
(25) and passage (13), (14) or (21) closes. The pilot pressure in passages (18) and (19) increases
enough to operate straight travel control valve (15).

As long as all of the control levers for stick I control valve (3), swing control valve (4), bucket control
valve (8) and boom I control valve (9) are in the NEUTRAL position, pilot passage (18) is connected
to the pump suction line through passage (25) and drain line (29). The pilot pressure in pilot passages
(18) and (19) is not enough to operate straight travel control valve (15).

When straight travel control valve (15) is operated, oil from both upper and lower pumps flow as
follows so that the machine can travel straight:

1. Oil from upper pump (28) flows through line (30) to passage (17) in main control valves (2).
Upper pump oil now flows in two paths. One path goes through center bypass passage (6) to
right travel control valve (7). The other path goes through passage (12), straight travel control
valve (15) and center bypass passage (10) to left travel control valve (5). The right and left
travel motors now get an equal amount of upper pump oil.
2. Oil from lower pump (33) flows through line (31) to passage (16) in main control valves (2).
Lower pump oil now flows in two paths. One path goes through parallel feeder passage (1) to
the valves for swing control (4) and stick I control (3). The other path goes through passage
(11) and straight travel control valve (15) to parallel feeder passage (26). The oil in parallel
feeder passage (26) then goes to bucket control valve (8) and boom I control valve (9).

A portion of the lower pump oil in passage (11) goes through the check valve and orifice in straight
travel control valve (15) combining with the upper pump oil at center bypass passage (10). This helps
drive both right and left travel motors.

Straight Travel Control Valve


Straight Travel Control Valve (Neutral Position)
(1) Parallel feeder passage. (2) Center bypass passage. (3) Center bypass passage. (4) Parallel feeder passage. (5) Pilot
passage. (6) Piston chamber. (7) Spring. (8) Passage. (9) Line. (10) Line. (11) Passage. (12) Stem. (13) Straight travel
control valve. (14) Upper pump. (15) Lower pump.

When there is only a travel operation, pilot pressure in pilot passage (5) is kept low. The oil pressure
in piston chamber (6) also remains low. Stem (12) is pushed all the way to the right by the force of
spring (7). Oil from both upper and lower pump flows as follows:

1. Oil from upper pump (14) flows through line (10) to passage (11) in straight travel control
valve (13). The upper pump oil flows in two directions. One path goes through center bypass
passage (3) and into the right travel control valve. The other path goes through parallel feeder
passage (4) and into the bucket, attachment and boom I control valves.
2. Oil from lower pump (15) goes through line (9) to passage (8) in straight travel control valve
(13). The lower pump oil then flows in two paths. One path goes through parallel feeder
passage (1) and into the swing, stick I and boom II control valves. The other path goes through
center bypass passage (2) and into the left travel control valve.
Straight Travel Control Valve (Activated Position)
(1) Parallel feeder passage. (2) Center bypass passage. (3) Center bypass passage. (4) Parallel feeder passage. (5) Pilot
passage. (6) Piston chamber. (7) Spring chamber. (8) Passage. (9) Line. (10) Line. (11) Passage. (12) Stem. (13) Straight
travel control valve. (14) Upper pump. (15) Lower pump. (16) Check valve. (17) Passage. (18) Passage. (19) Orifice.

When a travel and implement (or swing) operation occurs, pilot oil pressure in pilot passage (5)
increases. The oil pressure in piston chamber (6) increases enough to shift stem (12) to the left against
the force of spring (7). Pump oil now flows as follows:

1. The upper pump oil flows through passage (11) and then flows in two paths. One path goes
through center bypass passage (2) to the left travel control valve. The other path goes through
center bypass passage (3) to the right travel control valve.
2. The lower pump oil goes through passage (8) and flows in two paths. One path goes through
parallel feeder passage (1) and enters the swing, stick I and boom II control valves. The other
path goes through passage (17) and parallel feeder passage (4) to the bucket, attachment and
boom I control valves.

Part of the lower pump oil in passage (17) goes through orifice (19), check valve (16) in stem (12),
passage (18) and to center bypass passage (2). The lower pump oil then combines with the upper
pump oil. The combined upper and lower pump oil is used to help drive both the right and left travel
motors.

Pilot Control Valve (Travel)


Pilot Control Valve (Travel)
(1) Control lever/pedal. (2) Pedal. (3) Rod. (4) Seat. (5) Spring. (6) Spring. (7) Spool. (8) Passage. (9) Passage. (10)
Spring. (11) Spool. (12) Return port. (13) Return chamber. (14) Passage. (15) Passage. (16) Pilot port. (17) Passage. (18)
Port. (19) Passage. (20) Passage. (21) Passage. (22) Port.

When control lever/pedal (1) is moved to the FORWARD TRAVEL position, pedal (2) pushes down
on rod (3) and seat (4) against the force of springs (5) and (6). Spool (7) moves down and opens
passage (19) by compressing spring (6).
As passage (19) is opened, the oil from pilot port (16) goes through passages (21), (19), (20) and (9),
and out port (18) to the travel control valve. The pressure oil on the end of the travel control valve
stem causes the travel control valve stem to move into the forward position.

The oil from the chamber at the opposite end of the main control valve for travel comes back through
port (22), through passage (17), (15) and (14). The oil now flows into return chamber (13) and back to
the hydraulic tank through return port (12).

When control lever/pedal (1) is partially moved for fine travel operation, rod (3) moves down with
seat (4) causing spring (6) to push spool (7) down. Passage (19) opens and the oil pressure increases
at port (18). Since the oil pressure is more than the force of spring (6), spool (7) moves up opening
passage (8). The oil from port (18) goes through passages (9), (20) and (8) into return chamber (13).
The oil pressure slightly decreases. Spool (7) is now held in a pressure modulating position and
establishes a balance between the pressure in port (18) and the force of spring (6).

NOTE: For details of how the pressure at port (18) varies, see "Pilot Control Valve for Implements
and Swing" in the section, "Pilot Circuit".

When the control lever/pedal is released, spring (5) pushes up on seat (4) and rod (3). The pedal
returns the lever to the NEUTRAL position. The spool moves up. The oil in port (18) can now flow
through passage (9), (20), (8), return chamber (13) and back to the hydraulic tank.

When control lever/pedal (1) is moved to the REVERSE TRAVEL position, operation is the same as
that described for FORWARD TRAVEL position.

Travel Motor
Travel Motor
(1) Drive shaft. (2) Stopper. (3) Piston. (4) Cam plate. (5) Ball guide. (6) Spacer. (7) Spring. (8) Barrel. (9) Piston guide.
(10) Check valve. (11) Check valve. (12) Passage. (13) Brake pilot valve. (14) Port. (15) Valve plate. (16) Head. (17)
Stopper. (18) Piston. (19) Slipper. (20) Retainer. (21) Piston. (22) Friction plate. (23) Separator plate. (24) Passage. (25)
Passage. (26) Spring. (27) Brake piston. (28) Port. (29) Drain port. (30) Port. (31) Port. (32) Spool. (33) Spring. (34)
Displacement change valve.

The travel motor can be divided into the following three groups:

1. Rotary group; consisting of drive shaft (1), ball guide (5), spacer (6), spring (7), barrel (8),
slipper (19), retainer (20) and pistons (21).
2. Parking brake group; consisting of friction plates (22), separator plates (23), piston guide (9),
spring (26), brake piston (27) and brake pilot valve (13).
3. Displacement change group; consisting of displacement change valve (34), check valves (10)
and (11), pistons (3) and (18).

Depending on travel direction, pump oil goes into the travel motor through port (30) or (31) and is
forced out through port (31) or (30). The case drain oil that has leaked from the sliding surfaces and
clearances returns to the hydraulic tank through drain port (29) of head (16).

Pump supply oil from the lower pump goes in the left travel motor through port (31) during forward
travel. The pump oil from port (31) goes through passage (12) in head (16) to passage (25) of valve
plate (15). The pump oil now goes through passage (24) of barrel (8) and forces piston (21) to the left.

Motor Passages [Viewed From Head (16) Side]


(24) Passage (barrel). (25) Passage (valve plate). (35) Passage (valve plate).

Slipper (19) (coupled to the piston) slides on the surface of cam plate (4) from the top center to the
bottom center, and rotates with barrel (8). The pressure oil that is forced out by the pistons on the
outlet side goes through passages (24) and (35) of valve plate (15) and out through port (30). The
barrel turns counterclockwise.

Drive shaft (1) is splined to the barrel. The drive shaft and barrel rotate counterclockwise for forward
travel.

In REVERSE TRAVEL position, port (31) functions as an oil return port and port (30) functions as a
supply port. The left travel motor rotates clockwise.

As the right travel motor is supplied upper pump oil through port (30), the right travel motor turns
clockwise for forward travel. Pump oil through port (31) turns the motor counterclockwise for reverse
travel.
Parking Brake

Parking Brake (Partial)


(1) Brake pilot valve. (2) Port. (3) Drive shaft. (4) Head. (5) Passage. (6) Spring. (7) Body. (8) Barrel. (9) Friction plate.
(10) Separator plate. (11) Piston guide. (12) Piston chamber. (13) Brake piston. (14) Passage.

As pump oil is supplied to the travel motor, the parking brake is released and the motor starts rotation.
When there is no pump oil supplied to the motor, it stops rotation and the parking brake mechanically
engages.

In the parking brake section of the travel motor, friction plates (9) are splined to barrel (8). Separator
plates (10) are splined to body (7).
Brake Pilot Valve
(2) Port. (5) Passage. (15) Spring. (16) Valve. (17) Retainer. (18) Orifice.

When no pump oil is supplied to the travel motor, brake piston (13) is pushed to the left by the force
of spring (6). The oil in piston chamber (12) flows to passage (14). The oil now flows through passage
(5), and through orifice (18) of valve (16) in brake pilot valve (1) to the travel motor case drain.
Friction plates (9) and separator plates (10) are held together against body (7) by the force of spring
(6). Spring (6) is working against brake piston (13). The rotation of barrel (8) stops and drive shaft (3)
engages the parking brake.

Orifice (18) restricts return oil flow from piston chamber (12). The restriction of return oil flow delays
application of the parking brake. If the return oil was not restricted by orifice (18), the parking brake
would start to apply before travel of the machine is stopped. This would result in earlier wear and/or
damage.

Prior to the operation of the travel motor, a portion of the pressure oil goes to port (2) and opens valve
(16). The oil then flows through passages (5) and (14) to piston chamber (12). Brake piston (13)
moves to the right against the force of spring (6). The oil pressure holding plates (9) and (10) together
is released allowing barrel (8) and drive shaft (3) to turn.

Displacement Change Valve

Large Displacement Change Operation


Speed Change Valve
(1) Cam plate. (2) Piston. (3) Piston chamber. (4) Passage. (5) Piston. (6) Piston chamber. (7) Passage. (8) Displacement
change valve. (9) Port. (10) Passage. (11) Port. (12) Check valve. (13) Check valve. (14) Port. (15) Drive shaft.
Displacement Change Operation (Large Displacement)
(1) Cam plate. (2) Piston. (3) Piston chamber. (4) Passage. (5) Piston. (6) Piston chamber. (7) Passage. (8) Displacement
change valve. (9) Port. (10) Passage. (11) Port. (12) Check valve. (13) Check valve. (14) Port. (16) Passage. (17) Passage.
(18) Passage. (19) Adapter. (20) Spring. (21) Spool. (22) Passage.

When the travel speed switch is placed in the LOW SPEED MODE position, the travel speed solenoid
valve is not energized. There is no pilot oil supplied to port (9) of displacement change valve (8). The
force of spring (20) moves spool (21) to the left until it comes in contact with adapter (19).

The pump oil from port (14) flows through check valve (13), passages (10), (22) and (7) to piston
chamber (6). Piston (5) moves up. Cam plate (1) rotates for its increased angle direction.

The oil in piston chamber (3) drains to the hydraulic tank through passages (4), (16), (17) and (18).
The motor now holds the cam plate at its maximum angle position for large displacement.

Small Displacement Change Operation

Displacement Change Operation (Small Displacement)


(1) Cam plate. (2) Piston. (3) Piston chamber. (4) Passage. (5) Piston. (6) Piston chamber. (7) Passage. (8) Displacement
change valve. (9) Port. (10) Passage. (11) Port. (12) Check valve. (13) Check valve. (14) Port. (18) Passage. (20) Spring.
(21) Spool. (22) Passage. (23) Passage. (24) Passage.

When the travel speed switch is placed in the HIGH SPEED MODE position, the travel speed
solenoid valve is energized. If the pump delivery pressure is below a certain level due to a smaller
machine load, pilot oil flows to port (9) of displacement change valve (8). Pilot oil moves spool (21)
to the right against the force of spring (20). Passage (22) closes and passage (24) opens.
Pump oil flows through passages (10), (24) and (4) to piston chamber (3), moving piston (2) up. Cam
plate (1) turns to decrease the angle.

The oil in piston chamber (6) drains to the hydraulic tank through passages (7), (23) and (18).

The motor now holds the cam plate at its minimum angle position for small displacement.

Automatic Travel Speed Change Operation

Automatic Travel Speed Change Valve (In Small Displacement Position)


(1) Displacement change valve. (2) Port. (3) Line. (4) Line. (5) Swivel. (6) Solenoid valve (travel speed). (7) Line. (8)
Passage. (9) Passage. (10) Pilot pump. (11) Shuttle valve. (12) Automatic travel speed change valve. (13) Line. (14) Upper
pump. (15) Lower pump. (16) Passage. (17) Line. (18) Passage. (19) Passage. (20) Pin chamber. (21) Spring chamber.
(22) Spring. (23) Passage. (24) Spool. (25) Pin. (PD) Main pump delivery pressure. (PP) Pilot pump delivery pressure.

During the high travel speed mode, pilot pump delivery pressure (PP) goes through travel speed
solenoid valve (6) and passage (9) to automatic travel speed change valve (12). The upper and lower
main pump delivery pressure (PD) from passages (8) and (16) combines at shuttle valve (11) and then
goes through line (17) to pin chamber (20).

When main pump delivery pressure (PD) in pin chamber (20) is low with a smaller load on the
machine, spool (24) is pushed to the right by the force of spring (22) opening passage (19). Pilot
pump delivery pressure (PP) from passage (9) goes through passages (23) and (19). Part of pilot pump
delivery pressure (PP) from passage (19) goes through passage (18) to spring chamber (21) and acts
on spool (24). The remaining pilot pump delivery pressure (PP) leaves automatic travel speed change
valve (12) to line (4). Pilot pump delivery pressure (PP) goes through swivel (5) and line (3) to
displacement change valve (1). Displacement change valve (1) now activates to hold the cam plate of
the travel motor at the minimum angle position for the small displacement.

Automatic Travel Speed Change Valve (In Large Displacement Position)


(4) Line. (12) Automatic travel speed change valve. (13) Line. (17) Line. (19) Passage. (20) Pin chamber. (21) Spring
chamber. (22) Spring. (23) Passage. (24) Spool. (25) Pin. (26) Passage. (27) Passage. (PD) Main pump delivery pressure.
(PP) Pilot pump delivery pressure.

During travel under small displacement position, main pump delivery pressure (PD) in pin chamber
(20) increases with an increased load on the machine. As main pump delivery pressure (PD) increases
to a certain level, it starts to move spool (24) to the left against the combined forces of spring (22) and
pilot pump delivery pressure (PP) in spring chamber (21). Passage (19) closes and passage (26) opens.
Passage (27) is kept open to the hydraulic tank through line (13). Pilot pump delivery pressure (PP) is
blocked at passage (19), causing no open connection between passage (9) and line (4). Pilot pump
delivery pressure (PP) in line (3) goes through line (4) and passages (26) and (27), and returns to the
hydraulic tank through line (13).
Displacement change valve (1) now returns to the OFF position, causing the cam plate of the travel
motor to be held in its maximum angle position for large displacement.

During travel under large displacement of the travel motor, main pump delivery pressure (PD)
decreases to a certain level with a decreased load. Automatic travel speed change valve (12) operates
as described above for small displacement position.

Travel Brake Valve

Travel Brake Valve


(1) Crossover relief valve. (2) Orifice. (3) Spring. (4) Valve. (5) Valve. (6) Passage. (7) Passage. (8) Passage. (9) Passage.
(10) Throttling slots. (11) Valve. (12) Passage. (13) Spring. (14) Crossover relief valve. (15) Passage. (16) Spring. (17)
Ball. (18) Guide. (19) Plunger chamber. (20) Spring chamber. (21) Check valve. (22) Passage. (23) Port. (24) Port. (25)
Passage. (26) Passage. (27) Port. (28) Port. (29) Passage. (30) Check valve. (31) Spring. (32) Passage. (33)
Counterbalance valve. (34) Brake valve.
Each travel motor has a travel brake valve, consisting of counterbalance valve (33) and two crossover
relief valves (1) and (14).

The travel brake valve is bolted to the travel motor. It functions to prevent the occurrence of a shock
load at a travel stop operation, overrunning during traveling down a slope or cavitation. It also
functions to send oil to the parking brake for brake release just before the start of machine movement.

Counterbalance Valve
Level Travel

Travel Motor And Travel Brake Valve (Left Track)


(1) Crossover relief valve (reverse travel). (14) Crossover relief valve (forward travel). (24) Port. (27) Port. (33)
Counterbalance valve. (34) Brake valve. (35) Left travel motor.

Counterbalance valve (33) consists of valve (4), check valves (21) and (30) and spring (31).

Under normal operation, pump oil to port (24) flows through passage (25) to counterbalance valve
(33). Pressure oil forces check valve (21) to open, allowing oil flow from port (24) through passages
(25) and (6), through port (23) to the piston of the travel motor. Oil then drives the travel motor.

A portion of the pump oil in port (24) flows through passage (22) and into spring chamber (20). The
oil then flows through passage (15) around ball (17), and into plunger chamber (19). The pressure oil
in spring chamber (20) now pushes on the left shoulder of counterbalance valve (33) and left end face
of guide (18). Counterbalance valve (33) moves to the right against the force of spring (31), opening
throttling slots (10).

The motor return oil goes through port (28), passage (12), throttling slots (10), passage (26), and out
through port (27) to the hydraulic tank.

When oil flow from port (24) is blocked, there is a pressure decrease in both chambers (20) and (19).
Spring (31) forces counterbalance valve (33) to the left closing throttling slots (10). Return oil flow
from the motor is blocked and the motor rotation stops.

If the travel direction is reversed, pump oil flows to counterbalance valve (33) through port (27) and
goes out through port (24). The operation is the same as described above.

During normal travel operation, counterbalance valve (33) remains inoperable.

Slope Travel
When the machine moves down a slope, the travel motors rotate at a higher speed due to machine
mass (weight and size). The pumps cannot maintain the oil supply to the motors. The lack of pump oil
supply causes cavitation in the travel motors. A decrease in pressure (negative pressure) at port (24)
results, causing a decrease in pressure in spring chamber (20). Spring (31) now forces counterbalance
valve (33) to the left and begins to close throttling slots (10), blocking oil flow between passages (12)
and (26). Both return oil flow to the hydraulic tank and oil flow to the travel motor suction port are
restricted. Travel motor rotation slows down.

The lower pump oil pressure at port (24) now increases. Part of the oil goes to passage (22) and then
flows as described in the section of "Level Travel". Counterbalance valve (33) moves to the right,
opening throttling slots (10). The modulation of counterbalance valve (33) maintains the proper
opening of throttling slots (10) while the machine goes down a slope. The motor now begins to rotate
according to the amount of oil supplied from the pump and prevents the motor from cavitating.

When the machine moves down a slope, or stops, counterbalance valve (33) suddenly closes throttling
slots (10). A hydraulic pressure spike can occur. To prevent pressure spikes, a damper is provided at
both ends of counterbalance valve (33). As counterbalance valve (33) returns to the left from its full
open position, the oil in plunger chamber (19) is pressurized. Ball (17) moves to the left closing
passage (15) causing the oil in plunger chamber (19) to go out through orifice (2) and into spring
chamber (20). Movement of counterbalance valve (33) slows down, slowly closing throttling slots
(10).

Proper damper (cushion) effect is maintained by the size and position of orifice (2).

Crossover Relief Valve Operation

While the machine is slowing down and the travel control levers are moved back to the NEUTRAL
position to stop the movement of the machine, there is no oil supplied to the travel motors and travel
brake valves. A decrease in pressure now occurs at port (24) of the brake valve. Spring (31) returns
counterbalance valve (33) to the neutral position. The travel motor is still in rotation because of the
mass (weight and size) of the machine in motion. Throttling slots (10) are closed, blocking the return
oil. A sudden increase in pressure in passage (12) occurs. High pressure return oil in passage (12)
goes through passage (8), opening valve (5) of crossover relief valve (1). The pressure oil from valve
(5) goes to suction passage (6) of the travel motor.

Crossover relief valves (1) and (14) protect the travel motor against damage by allowing the high oil
pressure to escape.

Crossover relief valves (1) and (14) allow makeup oil flow from the return side to the inlet side. This
makeup oil helps to prevent a vacuum condition in the travel motor.

Crossover relief valve (1) opens just before a forward left travel operation stops and crossover relief
valve (14) opens just before a reverse left travel operation stops.

During an adjustment where the left travel control lever is moved to the FORWARD LEFT TRAVEL
position and the tracks are blocked, oil flow through passage (6) from port (24) is blocked. The oil
pressure in passage (6) increases, opening valve (11). Oil now flows from passage (6) to passage (12).
Crossover relief valve (14) opens and crossover relief valve (1) closes.
When the left travel control lever is moved to the REVERSE LEFT TRAVEL position, crossover
relief valve (1) is open with crossover relief valve (14) closed in the same manner as described above.

Crossover valves (1) and (14) should be designated by their functions relative to the control lever
movement during pressure adjustment. Call crossover relief valve (14) forward left travel and
crossover relief valve (1) reverse left travel.

Parking Brake

When the pump oil is supplied to port (24) to start the travel motor, valve (4) moves to the right to
open passage (9).

Part of the oil in passage (25) goes through passages (9) and (32) to the travel motor parking brake for
brake release. Since throttling slots (10) are opened only after passage (9) is opened, the travel motor
does not operate before the brake is released.

When the supply of pressure oil to port (24) is blocked to stop the travel motor, valve (4) moves back
to its neutral position, closing passage (9). Passage (9) is closed only after throttling slots (10) are
closed. This allows the machine to stop movement before the parking brake is activated.

As described earlier in the section, "Parking Brake" of the travel motor, the oil from the brake piston
chamber in the travel motor goes through the orifice in the brake pilot valve. Application of the brake
is delayed.

The above operation releases the parking brake just before the travel motor starts rotation and engages
the brake only after the travel motor has stopped. The parking brake is always kept released while the
motor is rotating.

Oil Makeup
Oil Makeup Circuit
(1) Motor rotary group. (2) Left travel motor. (3) Passage. (4) Check valve. (5) Line. (6) Swivel. (7) Line. (8) Passage. (9)
Left travel control valve. (10) Passage. (11) Return passage.

Return oil from the travel control valve is used as makeup oil to prevent a vacuum condition in the
travel motor when a travel operation is stopped.

The oil makeup operation is given with respect to left travel. Operation is the same for right travel.

If the left travel control lever is returned to the NEUTRAL position to stop left travel, supply of pump
oil to left travel motor (2) is blocked at passage (10). The motor continues to rotate because of the
mass (weight and size) of the machine. A negative pressure at passage (3) of motor rotary group (1)
opens check valve (4).

With left travel control valve (9) in neutral position, return oil from passage (11) flows to passage (8).
The return oil then goes through line (7), swivel (6), line (5) and enters left travel motor (2). The oil
passes through opened check valve (4), passage (3), and into motor rotary group (1) as makeup oil.
This makeup oil circuit eliminates the possibility of cavitation occurring in the travel motor.

Swivel

Swivel
(1) Retainer. (2) Cover. (3) Drain port. (4) Drain hole. (5) Port. (6) Seal. (7) Port. (8) Port. (9) Housing. (10) Port. (11)
Port. (12) Flange. (13) Seal. (14) Rotor. (15) Plate. (16) Port. (17) Port. (18) Port. (19) Port. (20) Port. (21) Port. (22)
Swivel. (23) Support. (24) Front direction.
Swivel (22) accomplishes two functions. One function is to supply pump oil from the upper structure
(which swings) to the travel motors of the lower structure (which do not swing). It also functions to
provide a means for oil from the motors (swing and travel) to return to the hydraulic tank.

Housing (9) is bolted to the upper structure through support (23). Rotor (14) is bolted to the lower
structure through plate (15). The ports of housing (9) are open to the ports of rotor (14) through
passages in housing (9) and rotor (14).

Seal (6) for high pressure and seal (13) for low pressure are provided between the sliding surfaces of
housing (9) and rotor (14). Seals (6) and (13) prevent oil leakage between the passages.

Travel Drive
Travel Drive
(1) Carrier (1st stage). (2) Bolt. (3) Sun gear (2nd stage). (4) Carrier (2nd stage). (5) Coupling gear. (6) Dowel. (7)
Bearing. (8) Motor housing. (9) Travel motor. (10) Cover. (11) Sun gear (1st stage). (12) Roller bearing. (13) Planet shaft
(1st stage). (14) Planet gear (1st stage). (15) Ring gear. (16) Roller bearing. (17) Planet gear (2nd stage). (18) Planet shaft.
(19) Bolt. (20) Output shaft (travel motor). (21) Sprocket housing.

The travel drive reduces the rotating speed of travel motor (9). Output shaft (20) is splined to first
stage sun gear (11) of the travel drive.

The travel drive consists of the following two groups:

1. Two-stage planetary gear reduction group:

First stage sun gear (11), first stage planet gears (14), first stage carrier (1) and ring gear (15)
makeup the first stage. Second stage sun gear (3), second stage planet gears (17), second stage
carrier (4) and ring gear (15) makeup the second stage.
2. Output group:

Rotation of sprocket housing (21) offers output torque for driving the track. The housing, ring
gear (15) and cover (10) are held together with bolts (2). This integrated unit which is supported
by ball bearings (7) turns with ring gear (15).

The planet reduction group functions to reduce the travel speed in a ratio of sun gear tooth numbers to
ring gear tooth numbers. The compact travel drive with the sun gear incorporated in the ring gear
housing provides a greater reduction ratio.

Planet Gear Operation


Rotation of travel motor output shaft (20) is transmitted to first stage sun gear (11). Sun gear (11) is
splined to output shaft (20). When first stage sun gear (11) rotates clockwise (viewed from motor
side), the travel drive assembly operates as described below.

First Stage Reduction Section


(1) Carrier (1st stage). (11) Sun gear (1st stage). (12) Roller bearing (1st stage). (13) Planet shaft (1st stage). (14) Planet
gear (1st stage). (15) Ring gear. (22) Rotating direction of first stage reduction group.

In the first stage reduction group, planet gears (14) are in mesh with first stage sun gear (11). First
stage planet gears (14) rotate counterclockwise as first stage sun gear (11) rotates clockwise. First
stage planet gears (14) are also in mesh with ring gear (15). First stage planet gears (14) "walk"
around the teeth of ring gear (15). As first stage planet gears (14) rotate, they circle around first stage
sun gear (11) clockwise. First stage planet gears (14) are mounted to first stage carrier (1) by first
stage planet shafts (13) and roller bearings (12). The assembly of first stage carrier (1) rotates
clockwise.
Splines In Engagement
(1) Carrier (1st stage). (3) Sun gear (2nd stage). (23) Splines in engagement.

Rotation of first stage carrier (1) is transmitted to second stage sun gear (3) which is splined to first
stage carrier (1).

Splines on second stage carrier (4) engage with teeth on the outer circumference of motor housing (8)
through coupling gear (5). With the housing held to the track frame, second stage carrier (4) cannot
rotate. Unlike the first stage planet gears turning around their sun gears, second stage planet gears (17)
turn on their own axes in the positions where they are mounted. This causes ring gear (15) to rotate
counterclockwise.

Ring gear (15) and sprocket housing (21) are held together with bolts (2). The sprocket wheel is
bolted to the housing. The torque of second stage sun gear (3) is transmitted to the housing, causing
the sprocket to rotate counterclockwise. The right track rotates in the forward direction.

Straight Travel Operation


Straight travel (tracking) can be maintained even though there is a swing or implement operation
during travel. Make reference to the section, "Straight Travel" for systems operation.

Loading Operation
Introduction
Combined Operations Of Boom Raise, Stick Out And Swing Right

Combined Operations Of Boom Lower, Stick Out and Swing Left

With the bucket loaded (or filled), it is moved to the dump location by a simultaneous (at the same
time) operation of boom raise, stick out and swing. After the bucket is unloaded at the dump location,
it is moved to the original excavating position by a simultaneous operation of boom lower, stick out
and swing. This is one cycle of the loading operation.

For loading operations, work mode selector switch (2) should be placed in BOOM PRIORITY
MODE (1) position. This activates the selector valve and logic valve. Depending on whether the
boom is raised or lowered, the flow rate of oil from both pumps to the implement and swing motors
varies.

During a boom raise operation, boom and stick circuits share upper pump oil. The lower pump oil is
supplied to stick, swing and boom circuits.
During a boom lower operation, all of the lower pump oil is supplied to the swing and stick circuits
and all of the upper pump oil is supplied to the boom and stick circuits.

Better loading operation is assured during a combined operation of boom, stick and swing.

Right Console (Switch Panel)


(1) BOOM PRIORITY MODE position. (2) Work mode selector switch.

Combined Loading Operations


Boom Raise, Stick Out And Swing Right

Schematic (Partial) (Boom Raise, Stick Out And Swing Right)


(1) Line. (2) Line. (3) Line. (4) Pilot line. (5) Pilot passage. (6) Parallel feeder passage. (7) Boom I control valve. (8) Stick
II control valve. (9) Boom II control valve. (10) Pilot passage. (11) Stick I control valve. (12) passage. (13) Logic valve.
(14) Passage. (15) Swing control valve. (16) Passage. (17) Pilot passage. (18) Passage. (19) Line. (20) Pilot passage. (21)
Drain passage. (22) Pressure control valve. (23) Parallel feeder passage. (24) Pilot passage. (25) Selector valve. (26) Pilot
passage. (27) Upper pump. (28) Lower pump. (29) Pilot pump.

In a loading operation involving boom raise, stick out and swing right, pilot pump (29) oil is used as
follows:

1. In boom raise, pilot oil is supplied to boom I control valve (7) and boom II control valve (9)
through pilot passages (24) and (10), respectively.
2. In stick out, pilot oil is supplied to stick I control valve (11) and stick II control valve (8)
through pilot passages (4) and (17), respectively.
3. In swing right, pilot oil is supplied through pilot passage (5) to swing control valve (15).

With the work mode selector switch in BOOM PRIORITY MODE position, pilot oil goes through
passage (20) to pressure control valve (22).

When pilot oil is supplied to the above valves, each valve activates as follows:

1. Pilot pressure oil from pilot passage (10) shifts boom II control valve (9) making an open
connection between parallel feeder passage (6) and line (1).
2. Pilot pressure oil from pilot passage (20) shifts pressure control valve (22) making an open
connection between passage (14) and drain passage (21). Because the pilot oil pressure from
parallel feeder passage (6) is greater than the pilot oil pressure in pilot line (4), logic valve (13)
shifts to the open position.
3. Pilot pressure oil from pilot passage (17) shifts stick II control valve (8) making an open
connection between passages (16) and (18). Pressure oil from pilot passage (26) opens selector
valve (25).

Now, oil from upper and lower pumps flows as follows:

The upper pump (27) oil goes through parallel feeder passage (23) and then separates into two oil
paths. One path goes through boom I control valve (7), line (3) and line (2) to the boom cylinders. The
other path goes through selector valve (25), line (19) and passage (12), and through stick I control
valve (11) to the stick cylinder.

The lower pump (28) oil flows through parallel feeder passage (6) and then separates into the
following three oil paths.

1. One path goes through swing control valve (15) to the swing motor.
2. Another path goes through logic valve (13) and then combines with the upper pump oil in
passage (12). The oil then goes through stick I control valve (11) to the stick cylinder.
3. The third path goes through boom II control valve (9) to line (1). The oil then combines with
the upper pump oil in line (2) and goes to the boom cylinders.

In this part of a loading operation, the boom and stick cylinders are always supplied both upper and
lower pump oil. This moves the boom up at a faster speed to clear the excavation site after digging.
The swing motor is supplied an appropriate amount of lower pump oil, assuring an optimum swing
speed. If swing movement is too fast, the bucket would reach the side of the dump unit before the
boom is raised high enough to clear the side.
Boom Lower, Stick Out And Swing Left

Schematic (Partial) (Boom Lower, Stick Out And Left Swing)


(6) Parallel feeder passage. (7) Boom I control valve. (8) Stick II control valve. (9) Boom II control valve. (11) Stick I
control valve. (12) Passage. (13) Logic valve. (15) Swing control valve. (19) Line. (23) Parallel feeder passage. (25)
Selector valve. (27) Upper pump. (28) Lower pump. (29) Pilot pump.

During a loading operation involving boom lower, stick out and swing left, the pilot oil operates stick
I control valve (11), swing control valve (15), boom I control valve (7) and stick II control valve (8).
Selector valve (25) and logic valve (13) are kept opened in the same manner as that described
previously.

With boom II control valve (9) in the neutral position, pilot oil flow through parallel feeder passage
(6) is blocked by boom II control valve (9).

Now, oil from upper and lower pumps flows as follows:

Upper pump (27) oil flows through parallel feeder passage (23) and then separates into two oil paths.
One path goes through boom I control valve (7) to the boom cylinders. The other path goes through
selector valve (25), line (19) and stick I control valve (11) to the stick cylinder.

Lower pump (28) oil flows through parallel feeder passage (6) and then separates into two oil paths.
One path goes through swing control valve (15) to the swing motor. The other path goes through logic
valve (13) and stick I control valve (11) to the stick cylinder.

Now, less upper pump oil is required for the boom cylinders because the regeneration circuit activates
during a boom lower operation. The remainder of the upper pump oil is used for a stick raise
operation. The lower pump oil is shared by the swing and stick circuits in an optimum manner. A
better loading operation is assured during a combined operation of boom lower, stick out and swing
left.

Leveling Operation
Introduction
The purpose of a leveling operation is to level a ground surface with high accuracy using the
combined movement of the boom and stick. During a leveling operation, the boom and stick make
fine movements to keep the tip of the bucket against the ground surface.

Stick In Leveling (Movement Of Boom And Stick)


Right Console (Switch Panel)
(1) Power mode selector switch. (2) Fine Control mode. (3) Work mode selector switch. (4) Power mode I.

Since leveling operations are slow speed work, power mode selector switch (1) is turned to MODE I
position (4) for light work. Also, work mode selector switch (3) is turned to FINE CONTROL MODE
position (2) to keep the boom and stick operating circuits separated at a reduced rate of flow.

For leveling operation, the movement of stick in and boom raise is combined. In this operation the
boom and stick circuits are supplied pump oil from the upper and lower pumps. Since the boom and
stick circuits now have an individual pump oil supply designated to their function, the operation of the
boom and stick cylinders will not have any affect on each other.

Fine Control Circuit


Schematic (Partial)
(1) Stick cylinder. (2) Boom cylinders. (3) Center bypass passage. (4) Boom I control valve. (5) Stick II control valve. (6)
Pilot line. (7) Pilot passage. (8) Boom II control valve. (9) Passage. (10) Center bypass passage. (11) Passage. (12) Check
valve. (13) Line. (14) Pilot passage. (15) Stick I control valve. (16) Pilot passage. (17) Parallel feeder s passage. (18) Pilot
passage. (19) Selector valve. (20) Pilot passage. (21) Pilot control valve (stick). (22) Line. (23) Solenoid valve (fine
control). (24) Upper pump. (25) Line. (26) Lower pump. (27) Pilot pump. (28) Hydraulic tank.

When the boom and stick control levers are slowly moved to the BOOM RAISE and STICK IN
positions, pilot pump (27) oil is used as follows:

1. In the BOOM RAISE position, pilot oil is supplied to boom I control valve (4) and boom II
control valve (8) through pilot passages (18) and (14), respectively.
2. In the STICK IN position, pilot oil is supplied to stick I control valve (15) and boom II
control valve (8) through pilot passages (16) and (7), respectively.

With the work mode selector switch in FINE CONTROL position, fine control solenoid valve (23) is
energized, causing no pilot oil flow to pilot line (6).
When pilot oil is supplied to the above valves, each valve activates as follows:

1. Boom II control valve (8) is in the neutral position because the pilot oil pressure in pilot
passages (7) and (14) are equal. A portion of the lower pump oil goes through center bypass
passage (10) and boom II control valve (8) and returns to hydraulic tank (28).
2. With fine control solenoid valve (23) energized, pilot oil flow from pilot control valve (21)
through line (25) is blocked at the inlet port of fine control solenoid valve (23). There is no pilot
oil sent from pilot line (6) to stick II control valve (5). Stick II control valve (5) is held in the
neutral position. A portion of the upper pump oil returns to hydraulic tank (28) through center
bypass passage (3).
3. When the boom control lever is partially moved to the BOOM RAISE position, the stem of
boom I control valve (4) partially shifts. In boom I control valve (4), the opening of passage
(11) is slightly opened while the opening of center bypass passage (3) is slightly closed. This
causes an appropriate amount of the upper pump oil to go to boom cylinders (2) and the
remainder of the oil to go back to the hydraulic tank (28). Depending on the travel distance of
the boom control lever, the upper pump oil is metered to boom cylinders (2) for fine control
operation of the boom cylinders.
4. When the stem of stick I control valve (15) is partially moved the lower pump oil is metered
to stick cylinder (1) for fine control operation of the stick cylinder.
5. Since center bypass passage (3) is open to hydraulic tank (28), the oil pressure in center
bypass passage (3) (during a fine control operation) does not increase enough to open check
valve (12). There is no upper pump oil flow through line (13) to stick I control valve (15).
6. With stick II control valve (5) in the neutral position, there is no oil flow from parallel feeder
passage (17) to pilot passage (20). Selector valve (19) remains closed, causing no oil flow from
parallel feeder passage (17) to line (13).

NOTE: Items 1, 2, 3 and 4 described above provide fine control operations of the boom and stick.
Items 5 and 6 describe how the boom and stick circuits are separated. Movement of one cylinder does
not affect the movement of the other during fine control operation of the boom and stick.

Trenching Operation
Introduction
Trenching Operation (Illustration Of Applied Swing Force)

When excavating a ditch, its cross section should be rectangular. The force of the ditch wall acting
against the bucket, causes the bucket to move away from the wall of the ditch.

Right Console (Switch Panel)


(1) Power mode selector switch. (2) SWING PRIORITY MODE position. (3) Work mode selector switch.

To get a straight (vertical) wall, it is necessary that an additional side force be used to hold the bucket
against the side wall. The operator does this by applying partial swing in the direction of the wall.

When work mode selector switch (3) is placed in SWING PRIORITY MODE position (2), the swing
priority solenoid valve is energized. Activating the selector valve and logic valve. Upper pump oil
goes to the circuits for the boom, stick and bucket. Lower pump oil goes to only the swing circuit.
Now, the pressure of the swing circuit remains high enough to provide a force against the side wall.

Place power mode selector switch (1) in either of positions I, II or III, depending on the work to be
done.
A trenching operation is done by a combined operation of boom raise, stick in, bucket close and
swing.

Trenching Operation (Swing Priority Solenoid Valve


Energized)

Hydraulic Schematic (Partial) (Swing Priority Operation)


(4) Pilot passage. (5) Pilot passage. (6) Line. (7) Pilot passage. (8) Bucket control valve. (9) Boom I control valve. (10)
Stick II control valve. (11) Stick I control valve. (12) Parallel feeder passage. (13) Logic valve. (14) Boom II control
valve. (15) Pilot passage. (16) Swing control valve. (17) Pilot passage. (18) Passage. (19) Parallel feeder passage. (20)
Pilot passage. (21) Pilot passage. (22) Selector valve. (23) Pilot passage. (24) Drain passage. (25) Pressure control valve.
(26) Pilot oil manifold. (27) Solenoid valve (swing priority). (28) Upper pump. (29) Drain passage. (30) Pilot pump. (31)
Lower pump.

When the control levers are moved to either the BOOM RAISE, STICK IN, BUCKET CLOSE or
SWING RIGHT positions, pilot pump (30) oil flows as follows:
1. In the BOOM RAISE position, pilot oil is supplied to boom I control valve (9) and boom II
control valve (14) through pilot passages (21) and (15), respectively.
2. In the STICK IN position, pilot oil is supplied to stick I control valve (11), stick II control
valve (10) and boom II control valve (14) through pilot passages (17), (7) and (4), respectively.
3. In the BUCKET CLOSE and SWING RIGHT positions, pilot oil is supplied to bucket
control valve (8) and swing control valve (16) through pilot passages (20) and (5), respectively.

With work mode selector switch (3) in SWING PRIORITY MODE position (2), solenoid valve (27)
is energized, making an open connection between pilot passage (23) and drain passage (29).

Now each valve activates as follows:

1. The pilot oil pressure in pilot passages (4) and (15) are equal. Boom II control valve (14)
remains in the neutral position, blocking oil flow from parallel feeder passage (12).
2. With pilot passage (23) open to drain passage (29), pressure control valve (25) shifts, closing
the connection between passage (18) and drain passage (24). The oil in passage (18) is blocked.
Now logic valve (13) remains closed, allowing no oil flow from parallel feeder passage (12) to
stick I control valve (11).
3. When stick II control valve (10) is shifted by pilot passage (7), selector valve (22) opens.

NOTE: See the section, "Loading Operation".

Now, all of lower pump (31) oil goes from parallel feeder passage (12) through swing control valve
(16) to the swing motor. The swing motor uses its torque only for holding the bucket against the side
wall and does not rotate. All of the oil supplied to the swing motor is vented through the relief valve
of the swing motor when the swing pressure reaches the relief valve setting of 27 500 kPa (4000 psi).
This increases the motor torque to securely hold the bucket against the side wall.

The upper pump (28) oil in parallel feeder passage (19) separates into three oil paths. One path goes
through bucket control valve (8) to the bucket cylinder. Another path goes through boom I control
valve (9) to the boom cylinders. The third path goes through selector valve (22), line (6) and stick I
control valve (11) to the stick cylinder.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:08:56 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Testing and Adjusting


320, 320 L AND 320 N, AND 320 S EXCAVATORS HYDRAULIC AND ELE
Media Number -SENR6044-02 Publication Date -09/09/1994 Date Updated -12/10/2001

Testing And Adjusting


SMCS - 1259-010

Introduction
This manual contains information on the troubleshooting procedures of the electronic control and
hydraulic systems in the 320, 320 L, 320 N, and 320 S Excavators. This manual is divided into the
following three main sections:

1. Electronic System Testing And Adjusting


2. Checking Procedures
3. Hydraulic System Testing And Adjusting

NOTE: As a general rule, if there is a doubt as to the cause of a problem, the electronic system should
be checked first.

Reference: For information on Electrical System Operation of the above, make reference to:
"Systems Operation, Electronic System", Form SENR6048 or Form SENR5404. For information on
Hydraulic System Operation of the above, make reference to: "Systems Operation, Hydraulic
System", Form SENR6043 or Form SENR5455.

For troubleshooting the engine components, refer to the module "Systems Operation, Testing And
Adjusting, Basic Engine Components 3306 Engine", Form SENR5546 or "Systems Operation,
Testing And Adjusting, Basic Engine Components 3114 And 3116 Engines", Form SENR3583.

Checking Procedures
In each checking procedure, it is assumed that the engine operation is normal unless otherwise
specified.

Electronic Control System


The monitor and electronic controller are the main components of the electronic control system. The
monitor and electronic controller have a self diagnostic function. Self diagnostic checks of the
monitor, electronic controller, and the communication line between them are the first steps when
troubleshooting the problem(s) in the electronic system.

Action alarm indicators on the monitor panel, alert an operator to a problem in the electronic system.
The controller service program "Data Mode" can also be used to identify the problems (see the section
of this module "Data Mode"). If the service program is activated during machine operation, problem
(s) that are monitored by the monitoring system are indicated on the character display. If the service
program is activated when the machine operation is stopped, all existing problems and past problems
(problems that have not been corrected) are indicated on the character display. To activate the
controller service program "Data Mode", refer to the "Data Mode" section in this module.

Operational Tests
If the electronic power unit control system display indicates it is operating correctly, then do
operational tests. Operate the machine, following the procedures described in the section "Hydraulic
System Testing And Adjusting". Compare the results of the operational tests with specifications to
determine the extent of the trouble. In operational tests, it is important to determine whether or not
enough hydraulic force or implement speed is a problem that extends over the entire machine or with
only a specific operation.

If there are any faults in the circuits between the main or pilot pumps and the control valves, the
overall performance of the machine will decrease. This type of problem in the hydraulic system is not
detected by the self diagnostic functions of the electronic control system described above (no action
alarm indication on character display.). To detect such a problem, it is necessary to check the flow
characteristics of the pumps, the main relief pressure, pilot pressure, etc.

Service Program
Electronic Monitor Panel
(1) Engine coolant temperature gauge. (2) Fuel gauge. (3) Action lamp. (4) Character display. (5) Monitor panel. (6)
Hydraulic oil temperature gauge. (7) Work mode selector switch. (8) Air heater indicator (2DL and 9KK machines only).
(9) Charge alarm indicator. (10) Engine coolant temperature alarm indicator. (11) Hydraulic oil temperature alarm
indicator. (12) Engine oil pressure alarm indicator. (13) Controller alarm indicator. (14) Monitor alarm indicator. (15)
Work mode boom priority indicator. (16) Work mode swing priority indicator. (17) Power mode selector switch. (18)
Power mode III indicator. (19) Power mode II indicator. (20) Power mode I indicator. (21) Work mode fine control
indicator. (22) Light switch. (23) Light 1 indicator. (24) Light 2 indicator. (25) Wiper 2 indicator. (26) Travel speed HIGH
(rabbit) indicator. (27) Travel speed LOW (tortoise) indicator. (28) Travel speed control switch. (29) AEC indicator. (30)
Switch panel. (31) AEC switch. (32) Wiper 1 indicator. (33) Washer indicator. (34) Washer switch. (35) Wiper switch.
(36) Alarm cancel switch. (37) Service switch. (38) Alarm cancel indicator.
Introduction
The electronic Monitor Panel activates and displays the output received from the Electronic
Controller. The Electronic Controller Service Program is divided into two program modes. Each
program mode has a particular function as follows:

1. Data Mode;

This program mode contains eight function modes and provides the necessary information for
the mechanic to determine the machine condition.

2. Calibration Mode;

This program mode contains ten function modes and provides information used to adjust and
confirm system/component functions after replacement of electronic control system
components. This program level is also used to help the mechanic troubleshoot machine
problems.

To activate the service program mode functions, use the control switches provided on the electronic
monitor panel.

NOTE: Unexpected character display readings due to random operation of switches should be
disregarded.

To select a desired function mode, first start a proper service program mode (see the section "Data
Mode Start-up" and/or "Calibration Mode Start-up"). Next, operate the control switch(es) as specified,
until the desired information is indicated on the character display.

When the selected service program function is no longer needed, use the proper procedure (see the
section "Data Mode Stop Procedure" and/or "Calibration Mode Stop Procedure") to cancel.

Data Mode
NOTE: Activation of service program "Data Mode" does not affect any machine controls and
operations except for the following:

The LED indicators for power mode switch, travel speed control switch, light switch, and wiper
switch come ON only in flashing mode during activation of service program "Data Mode".

The Data Mode contains the following function modes which provide eight categories of information.

1. Power shift pressure.


2. Engine speed.
3. Engine coolant temperature.
4. Hydraulic oil temperature.
5. A/D (Analog/Digital) conversion.
6. Real time error.
7. Digital input.
8. Output control display.
Data Mode Start-up

Electronic Monitor Panel (Data Mode Start-up)


(4) Character display. (17) Power mode selector switch. (18) Power mode III indicator. (36) Alarm cancel switch. (38)
Alarm cancel indicator.

NOTE: To access and view the eight available functions in the "Data Mode", the engine can either be
running or shut down. If the engine is running the eight Data Mode functions can be viewed as
operating values. If the engine is not running the starter switch must be in the "ON" position.

1. Depress and hold alarm cancel switch (36) until alarm cancel indicator (38) starts flashing.
2. While alarm cancel switch (36) is depressed, push power mode selector switch (17) until power
mode III indicator (18) begins to flash. Release alarm cancel switch (36) and power mode selector
switch (17).

3. The service program "Data Mode" is now activated and character display (4) will display the first
function mode (power shift pressure) value.

NOTE:

If switch (17) is held too long, the character display will sequence through the eight available function
modes in the "Data Mode" program.

Data Mode Function Selection


Electronic Monitor Panel (Data Mode Function Selection)
(4) Character display. (17) Power mode selector switch. (18) Power mode III indicator. (36) Alert cancel switch.

1. Repeatedly push first alarm cancel switch (36) and then power mode switch (17) until the desired
function mode is displayed on character display (4).

2. Each time both switches are pushed, the function mode changes in an increasing number sequence
of the eight function modes in a repetitious manner.

3. At the same time that the function mode character is displayed the corresponding switch indicator
comes on. To determine the function mode selected, look for the switch indicator which is flashing.

NOTE: If alarm cancel switch (36) is depressed for more than 2 seconds the Data Mode stops and
character display (4) displays the engine speed dial position.

NOTE: Accessing the "Data Mode Functions" must be performed in the sequence shown in the
following chart.

Each of the eight Data Mode functions has a designated indicator light. The following chart shows the
eight Data Mode functions and their designated indicator lights:

Power Shift Pressure


Electronic Monitor Panel (Power Shift Pressure)
(4) Character display. (17) Power mode selector switch. (18) Power mode III indicator. (36) Alarm cancel switch.

When this function mode is selected, power mode III indicator (18) flashes. The character display (4)
displays "P" in the first position and actual power shift pressure in the second and third positions. The
unit of power shift pressure is in kgf/cm2. 1 kgf/cm2 is approximately the same as 100 kPa (14 psi).

Engine Speed
Electronic Monitor Panel (Engine Speed)
(4) Character display. (19) Power mode II indicator.

When this function mode is selected, power mode II indicator (19) flashes. Character display (4) will
display the engine speed in rpm, regardless of the machine load. Multiply the rpm values in character
display (4) by 10 to determine actual rpm.

Engine Coolant Temperature


Electronic Monitor Panel (Engine Coolant Temperature)
(4) Character display. (20) Power mode I indicator.

When this function mode is selected, power mode I indicator (20) flashes. Character display (4)
displays the engine coolant temperature within a range of 14°C to 127°C (57°F to 260°F). The engine
coolant temperature units are displayed in 1°C (1.8°F) increments. If the character display reading is
below 0°C, the first position on the character display reads "-".

NOTE: Character display (4) displays the engine coolant temperature in degrees Celsius.

Hydraulic Oil Temperature


Electronic Monitor Panel (Hydraulic Oil Temperature)
(4) Character display. (23) Light 1 indicator.

When this function mode is selected, light 1 indicator (23) flashes. Character display (4) displays the
hydraulic oil temperature within a range of 14°C to 127°C (57.2°F to 260.6°F). The hydraulic oil
temperature units are displayed in 1°C (1.8°F) increments.

NOTE: Character display (4) displays the hydraulic oil temperature in degrees Celsius.

A/D (Analog/Digital) Conversion


Electronic Monitor Panel (A/D Conversion)
(4) Character display. (24) Light 2 indicator.

When the analog/digital conversion function mode is selected, light 2 indicator (24) flashes. Character
display (4) displays the analog information for eight machine functions. A conversion chart is needed
to understand the digital information indicated. Description of the eight machine functions omitted
since this information is not needed for service or diagnosis.

Real Time Error Codes


Electronic Monitor Panel (Real Time Error Codes)
(4) Character display. (26) Travel speed HIGH (rabbit) indicator.

When this mode is selected, travel speed HIGH (rabbit) indicator (26) flashes. Character display (4)
displays the codes for problems that have occurred. They are displayed in an increasing number
sequence according to "Problem List" shown below, in a repetitious manner. A character display code
remains displayed for 2 seconds with an interval of 1 second between codes.

NOTE: A display code of [E00] indicates that there are no system errors.
NOTE: Go to the appropriate "Electronic Sequence Chart" to troubleshoot the problem of [E33] in
accordance with the following:
Digital Input
Electronic Monitor Panel (Digital Input)
(4) Character display. (7) Work mode switch. (17) Power mode selector switch. (27) Travel speed LOW (tortoise)
indicator. (36) Alarm cancel switch.

When this mode is selected, travel speed LOW (tortoise) indicator (27) flashes. This mode displays 21
types of information on character display (4).

1. Depress and hold alarm cancel switch (36) and then depress power mode switch (17) until travel
speed LOW (tortoise) indicator (27) flashes. Release alarm cancel switch (36) and power mode switch
(17).

2. Character display (4) will display [0 9] or [010]. The first character position "0" indicates that this
is the first of 21 "ports" or additional types of information. The " 9" indicates the wiring harness code
for the 320 and 320 L Excavators with 3066 engine. The "10" indicates the wiring harness code for
the 320, 320 L, 320 N, and 320 S Excavators with 3116 engine.
3. To sequence through the 21 "ports", first depress and hold alarm cancel switch (36) and then work
mode switch (7) until the character display reads the desired "port".

NOTE: This mode is capable of providing a total of 21 types of information. Eight of the 21
"ports" (additional types of information) are spares.

The following chart gives a listing of the 21 "ports" and their components:

NOTE: Ports "0" and "1" give no indication of "[ O n] or [ o F] on the character display.

Typical Examples:
[0 9] : Indicates the machine model of "320" or "320 L" excavator with 3066 engine. If a different
code appears in the second and third positions, check the circuit for good grounding.

[010] : Indicates the machine model of "320", "320 L", "320 N", or "320 S" excavator with 3116
engine. If a different code appears in the second and third positions, check the circuit for good
grounding.

[1 1] : Engine speed dial is in position "1".

[110] : Engine speed dial is in position "10".

[1Er] : There is a problem in engine speed dial or circuit between speed dial and controller. (Er:error)

[2On] : Travel pressure switch is ON.

[2oF] : Travel pressure switch is OFF.

NOTE: To check the travel pressure switch, activate the travel control with the pressure switch in ON
position. If the character display does not read [2On], it is an indication of a possible problem in the
travel pressure switch and/or its circuit.

Output Control Display


Electronic Monitor Panel (Output Control Display)
(4) Character display. (32) Wiper 1 indicator.

When this function mode is selected, wiper 1 indicator (32) flashes. Character display (4) displays the
code that represents current pump output. The initial code displayed will be [L00] for a normal pump
output control. The character display code remains ON for 2 seconds with an interval of 0.5 seconds
between codes.

Typical Examples:

[L00] : Output control is normal.

[L A] : Pump output control when governor actuator feedback sensor is abnormal.

[L b] : Pump control under too low hydraulic oil temperature.


NOTE: [L b] is displayed only when one of the controls is activated.

NOTE: During "Output Control Display" function, the AEC system and one touch low idle do not
activate. The engine speed dial switch controls the engine speed only under a no load condition.

Reference: For more information on the pump output control, refer to module, "Systems Operation,
Electronic System", Form No. SENR6048 or Form No. SENR5404.

Data Mode Stop Procedure

Electronic Monitor Panel (Stop Procedure)


(4) Character display. (36) Alarm cancel switch.

Use either of the following two methods.


1. Turn the engine start switch to the OFF position.

2. Keep alarm cancel switch (36) depressed at least 2 seconds until character display (4) displays the
engine speed dial position.

Calibration Mode
NOTE: The procedures for each function in "Calibration Mode" are independent of each other. The
engine does not need to be running for all the functions listed in the following chart. The following
chart lists the functions in "Calibration Mode" and whether the engine must be running for each of the
functions:

Calibration Mode Start-up


Electronic Monitor Panel (Calibration Mode Start-up)
(1) Engine coolant temperature gauge. (2) Fuel gauge. (3) Action lamp. (4) Character display. (6) Hydraulic oil
temperature gauge. (8) Air heater indicator (2DL and 9KK machines only). (9) Charge alarm indicator. (10) Engine
coolant temperature alarm indicator. (11) Hydraulic oil temperature alarm indicator. (12) Engine oil pressure alarm
indicator. (13) Controller alarm indicator. (14) Monitor alarm indicator. (37) Service switch.

NOTICE

Before to starting the Calibration Mode, the engine speed dial switch
should be set at dial position "1" and the engine start switch must be in
the OFF position.
1. Depress service switch (37) and start the engine. As shown in the chart above, the engine does not
need to be started to obtain information for certain functions in the "Calibration Mode".

2. Continue to depress service switch (37) until action lamp (3) comes ON and character display (4)
displays [20H] or [20C]. All the alarm indicators except character display (4) will turn OFF.

3. The "Calibration Mode" is now accessed and character display (4) displays the first of the 10
functions (machine and engine model numbers) as shown in the chart above. Action lamp (3) remains
ON during all calibration function modes.

NOTE: Activation of the "Calibration Mode" overrides the function of engine coolant temperature
gauge (1), fuel gauge (2), action lamp (3), hydraulic oil temperature gauge (6), air heater indicator (8),
charge alarm indicator (9), engine coolant temperature alarm indicator (10), hydraulic oil temperature
alarm indicator (11), engine oil pressure alarm indicator (12), controller alarm indicator (13), and
monitor alarm indicator (14).

Calibration Mode Function Selection


Electronic Monitor Panel (Function Selection)
(3) Action lamp. (4) Character display. (17) Power mode selector switch. (22) Light switch. (28) Travel speed control
switch. (31) AEC switch. (35) Wiper switch.

Power mode selector switch (17), light switch (22), AEC switch (31), wiper switch (35), and travel
speed control switch (28) are pushed each time to obtain one of ten function modes.

Machine And Engine Model


Electronic Monitor Panel (Machine And Engine Model)
(4) Character display. (17) Power mode selector switch. (18) Power Mode III indicator.

1. Start "Calibration Mode". See the section, "Calibration Mode Start-up".

Upon accessing the "Calibration Mode", the machine and engine model is the first function accessed.
To obtain this function again after viewing or accessing any of the other functions, depress power
mode selector switch (17) until power Mode III indicator (18) comes ON.

2. Character display (4) displays [20H] for a "320" or "320 L" excavator with 3066 engine. Character
display (4) displays [20C] for a "320", "320 L", "320 N", or "320 S" excavator with 3116 engine.

The first and second positions of character display (4) shows the code for the model excavator. The
third position of character display (4) shows the code for the engine model.
3. Stop "Calibration Mode" (unless another function selection is desired). See the section, "Calibration
Mode Stop Procedure".

NOTE: Activation of the "Calibration Mode" overrides the AEC function and keeps the power shift
pressure constant at a pressure level equivalent to a no-load condition. The engine speed dial switch
works normally.

Controller/Monitor Software Version

Electronic Monitor Panel (Controller/Monitor Software Version)


(4) Character display. (17) Power mode selector switch. (19) Power Mode II indicator. (31) AEC switch.

1. Start "Calibration Mode". See the section, "Calibration Mode Start-up".


2. Depress power mode selector switch (17) until power Mode II indicator (19) comes ON.

3. Character display (4) displays [17C] for example. The "17" in the character display represents a
two digit numeral particular to the software for each machine mode. The "C" represents the controller.

4. To determine the software version for the monitor depress AEC switch (31). Character display (4)
displays [20P] for example. The "20" in the character display represents a two digit numeral particular
to the software for each machine mode. The "P" represents the software version.

NOTE: Each time AEC switch (31) is depressed, the character display will alternate between the two
software codes [17C] and [20P] for example.

5. Stop "Calibration Mode" (unless another function selection is desired). See the section, "Calibration
Mode Stop Procedure".

NOTE: Activation of the "Calibration Mode" overrides the AEC function and keeps the power shift
pressure constant at a pressure level equivalent to a no-load condition. The engine speed dial switch
works normally.

Error log
Electronic Monitor Panel (Error Log)
(4) Character display. (17) Power mode selector switch. (20) Power Mode I indicator. (28) Travel speed control switch.
(31) AEC switch. (34) Washer switch.

1. Start "Calibration Mode". See the section, "Calibration Mode Start-up".

2. Depress power mode selector switch (17) until power Mode I indicator (20) comes ON.

3. Character display (4) displays [Hd ]. This display indicates that the list of stored error codes can be
viewed. The controller has a continual self-diagnostic function during machine operation. The
controller will store error codes if a fault is detected, even an intermittent fault. The list of error codes
is stored in the error history on important systems until the memory is cleared.
4. The error codes are viewed on the character display either in ascending or descending order. Each
time AEC switch (31) is depressed, the ascending sequential list of stored error codes are displayed as
shown in the following example:

[Hd]

[F6]

[F10]

[F40]

[F41]

[End]

5. Each time washer switch (34) is depressed, the descending sequential list of stored error codes are
displayed as shown in the following example:

[End]

[F41]

[F40]

[F10]

[F6]

[Hd]

NOTE: A "F" in the first position of character display (4) represents a stored error code (error
history). An "E" in the first position of character display (4) represents a real time error code.

6. To clear the error codes and error history, push and hold in sequence for approximately three
seconds the following three buttons:

* AEC switch (31)


* Power mode selector switch (17)
* Travel speed control switch (28)

7. The error codes are cleared from the error history memory when character display (4) displays
[CLr] and then returns to display [Hd].

Reference: For a listing of error codes, see the section in this module "Data Mode, Real Time Errors
Codes".

NOTE: Information about a problem is stored by this function mode until the correct clearing
procedure is completed. Always clear the error history after the problem has been corrected.

NOTE: Activation of the error log mode overrides the function of the AEC system and keeps the
power shift pressure constant at the no load pressure level. The engine speed dial works normally.
8. Stop "Calibration Mode" (unless another function selection is desired). See the section, "Calibration
Mode Stop Procedure".

NOTE: The following error log codes are not displayed on the character display during activation of
this calibration mode.

F1 to F5, F7, F9, F12, F15, F32, F34, F37, F38, F39, and F48.

NOTE: Activation of the "Calibration Mode" overrides the AEC function and keeps the power shift
pressure constant at a pressure level equivalent to a no-load condition. The engine speed dial switch
works normally.

Digital Output Test


Electronic Monitor Panel (Digital Output Test)
(4) Character display. (22) Light switch. (23) Light 1 indicator. (29) AEC indicator. (31) AEC switch. (33) Washer
indicator. (34) Washer switch. (36) Alarm cancel switch.

1. Start "Calibration Mode". See the section, "Calibration Mode Start-up".

2. Depress light switch (22) until light 1 indicator (23) comes ON.

3. Character display (4) displays [0oF] which represents the first of 10 components that can be tested.
There are 16 "ports" available of the electrical connections for various controller output components
(similar to the "Digital Input" information accessed in "Data Mode"). Six of the "ports" are spares.
The code in the first position of the character display represents the particular "port" of each
component.

The "ports" and their components are shown in the following chart:

4. Each time AEC switch (31) is pushed, a different port code appears in character display (4) in an
ascending order. Press washer switch (34) to view the ports in descending order.
5. Press alarm cancel switch (36) to turn the component for each port, either ON or OFF. Character
display (4) displays as shown in the chart above as each port is turned ON or OFF. If an over current
occurs at a component, the character display (4) displays [0Er].

6. Stop "Calibration Mode" (unless another function selection is desired). See the section, "Calibration
Mode Stop Procedure".

Proportional Reducing Valve Sweep Test

Pilot Oil Manifold Compartment


(39) Connector.

1. Stop the engine and disconnect connector (39) from the proportional reducing valve.

2. Connect the test harness to connector (39).

Main Pump Compartment


(40) Power shift pressure tap.

3. Install a 4900 kPa (700 psi) pressure gauge at power shift pressure tap (40).
4. The pump backup switch must be in the "AUT" position.

5. Start "Calibration Mode". See the section, "Calibration Mode Start-up".

NOTE: The engine must be running to obtain accurate information for this test.

6. Warm the hydraulic oil to normal operating temperature.

7. Run the engine at maximum no-load rpm.

8. All controls must be in the NEUTRAL position.

Electronic Monitor Panel (Proportional Reducing Valve Sweep Test)


(4) Character display. (22) Light switch. (24) Light 2 indicator.
9. Start the "Proportional Reducing Valve Sweep Test" as follows:

a. Depress light switch (22) until light 2 indicator (24) comes ON.
b. The left column of character display (4) displays the letter "P". The "P" in the first column
indicates that the proportional reducing valve is being tested.

NOTE: The purpose of this function is to check whether the proportional reducing valve is activating
with a current signal from the controller. When this function is selected, the second and third column
in character display (4) changes in an ascending number sequence from of 0 to 32. One cycle range
from 0 to 32 takes about five seconds. The character display (4) sequences form [P 0] to [P32].

10. As the "PRV Sweep Test" is being performed, monitor the multimeter and the 4900 kPa (700 psi)
pressure gauge.

The multimeter reading changes within a range of 0.16 to 0.63 amps in approximately five seconds.
The pressure gauge at power shift pressure tap (40) simultaneously ranges from 0 to 3150 kPa (0 to
455 psi).

NOTE: During the "PRV Sweep Test" the multimeter and pressure gauge readings should cycle at a
uniform rate of increase or decrease (no "spike" or quick changes). Also, during activation of this
function mode, AEC functions do not activate, but speed dial activates as normal.

11. Stop "Calibration Mode" (unless another function selection is desired). See the section,
"Calibration Mode Stop Procedure".

Engine Speed Change

NOTE: This test is useful to measure no load engine speeds in increments of 20 to 30 rpm, from the
factory present LOW IDLE to HIGH IDLE positions of the governor speed dial switch. This test is
suitable for noise level measurement tests.
Electronic Monitor Panel (Engine Speed Change)
(4) Character display. (29) AEC indicator. (31) AEC switch. (32) Wiper 1 indicator. (33) Washer indicator. (34) Washer
switch. (35) Wiper switch.

1. Start "Calibration Mode". See the section, "Calibration Mode Start-up".

2. Depress wiper switch (35) until wiper 1 indicator (32) comes ON.

3. Put the governor speed dial switch in the best position for the test requirement (the position that
comes closest to the desired engine rpm setting).

4. Depress AEC switch (31) to increase the engine rpm, and depress washer switch (34) to decrease
engine rpm. Each time AEC switch (31) is depressed, AEC indicator (29) comes ON. Each time
washer switch (34) is depressed, washer indicator (33) comes ON.
5. Character display (4) will increment by 1 (10 rpm).

6. Stop "Calibration Mode" (unless another function selection is desired). See the section, "Calibration
Mode Stop Procedure".

NOTE: This test allows the power shift pressure command signal to remain constant at a desired
pressure level. The constant power shift pressure command signal is necessary to allow testing and
adjusting procedures to be performed to line relief valves and also perform pump "P-Q" tests.

Fixed Power Shift Pressure

NOTE: This test allows the power shift pressure command signal to remain constant at a desired
pressure level. The constant power shift pressure command signal is necessary to allow testing and
adjusting procedures to be performed to line relief valves and also perform pump "P-Q" tests.
Electronic Monitor Panel (Fixed Power Shift Pressure)
(4) Character display. (25) Wiper 2 indicator. (31) AEC switch. (34) Washer switch. (35) Wiper switch. (36) Alarm cancel
switch.

1. Start "Calibration Mode". See the section, "Calibration Mode Start-up".

2. Depress wiper switch (35) until wiper 2 indicator (25) comes ON.

3. Character display (4) will display "P" in the first position and the selected power shift pressure in
the second and third positions. As a example the value shown in character display (4) of [P25] is in
kgf/cm2. To convert kgf/cm2 to kPa, multiply the value shown in character display (4) by 100. The
resultant power shift pressure is 2450 kPa (355 psi).
4. Depress AEC switch (31) to increase the power shift pressure command signal by 1 kgf/cm2 within
a range of 3 to 30 kgf/cm2 [290 to 2950 kPa (42 to 430 psi)].

5. Depress washer switch (34) to decrease the power shift pressure command signal by 1 kgf/cm2
within a range of 3 to 30 kgf/cm2 [290 to 2950 kPa (42 to 430 psi)].

NOTE: Depressing alarm cancel switch (36) causes character display (4) to display alternately
between the power shift pressure and the engine rpm.

NOTE: Refer to "Engine Speed Change" to determine the value of engine speed displayed on
character display (4).

6. Stop "Calibration Mode" (unless another function selection is desired). See the section, "Calibration
Mode Stop Procedure".

NOTE: Activation of the "Calibration Mode" overrides the AEC function and keeps the power shift
pressure constant at a pressure level equivalent to a no-load condition. The engine speed dial switch
works normally.

Engine Speed Dial Setting Check

NOTE: This test is used to verify that the selected engine speed dial switch position value is meeting
the factory engine speed setting value.
Electronic Monitor Panel (Engine Speed Dial Setting Check)
(4) Character display. (26) Travel speed HIGH (Rabbit) indicator. (28) Travel speed control switch.

1. Start "Calibration Mode". See the section, "Calibration Mode Start-up".

2. Depress travel speed control switch (28) until travel speed HIGH (Rabbit) indicator (26) comes
ON.

3. Character display (4) displays the engine rpm value characteristic to the setting of the engine speed
dial switch position.

4. Stop "Calibration Mode" (unless another function selection is desired). See the section, "Calibration
Mode Stop Procedure".
NOTE: Activation of the "Calibration Mode" overrides the AEC function and keeps the power shift
pressure constant at a pressure level equivalent to a no-load condition. The engine speed dial switch
works normally.

Automatic Governor Actuator (G/A) Calibration

NOTICE

The hydraulic oil temperature must be at the normal operating


temperature before this calibration procedure is performed.

NOTE: This procedure must be performed any time the governor actuator or controller has been
replaced or reinstalled.

NOTE: Activation of this mode overrides the AEC system function, and keeps the power shift
pressure constant at the no load pressure level. The engine speed dial can be placed at any position
since it cannot activate until the governor actuator calibration has been completed. The governor
backup switch must be in AUT (not backup) position.
Electronic Monitor Panel (Automatic Governor Actuator Calibration)
(4) Character display. (26) Travel speed HIGH (Rabbit) indicator. (28) Travel speed control switch. (31) AEC switch. (34)
Washer switch. (36) Alarm cancel switch.

1. Start "Calibration Mode". See the section, "Calibration Mode Start-up".

2. Depress travel speed control switch (28) until travel speed HIGH (Rabbit) indicator (26) comes
ON.

3. Depress and hold AEC switch (31) then depress and hold washer switch (34). Character display (4)
displays [AC] in a flashing mode.

4. While still depressing AEC switch (31) and washer switch (34), depress alarm cancel switch (36)
until character display (4) stops flashing and changes to [ACP]. The automatic calibration mode is
now started and the governor actuator motor has moved to the initial high idle stop position. The
governor actuator is now calibrated to the factory engine rpm setting designated for position "10" of
the engine speed dial switch.

5. Once character display (4) displays [ACt], the calibration procedure can be completed.

6. Depress AEC switch (31) and washer switch (34) in sequence until character display (4) displays
[AC1]. The calibration procedure for the factory engine rpm setting designated for positions "1"
through "10" of the engine speed dial switch is now started. The calibration procedure from this point
takes approximately two minutes. Character display (4) will change as follows:

NOTE: After initial setting has been completed, check to be sure that the governor lever is correctly
positioned (in contact with the high idle stopper) by rotating the pulley by hand.

* [AC1]
* [AC2]
* [AC3]
* [AC4]
* [AC5]
* [AC6]
* [AC7]
* [AC8]
* [AC0]

When [AC0] appears in character display (4), the calibration procedure is complete.

NOTE: If the data is not correct or within specified limits, character display (4) will indicate an error
code as shown in the following chart:

NOTE: If character display (4) displays [AC2] and [ -*] (*: error code shown in the following chart)
alternately during Automatic G/A Calibration procedure, it is an indication of the following possible
problems. Have necessary repairs made. If character display (4) displays [AC0] after taking corrective
action, it indicates that the automatic governor actuator calibration has been completed correctly.
NOTE: If the error code [- 1], [- 2], [- 3], [-15], or [-16] is indicated on character display (4), readjust
the accelerator/decelerator cables. See the section "Adjustment After Replacement Of Major
Components".

NOTE: If the error code [- 4] through [-12] or [-14] is indicated on character display (4), check the
corresponding checking procedure in the section "Checking Procedures (Electronic Control System)".

NOTE: When character display (4) displays [-13], return all controls to the NEUTRAL position. If
the problem code still exists, check the pressure switches and circuits.

NOTE: Even if any of error code [-51], [-52], or [-53] appears after character display (4) has
displayed [AC0], the machine does not need to be stopped, but can continue to be operated. Since the
three codes indicates that the accelerator cable needs further adjustment, readjustment can be
performed later using the following procedure.

a. If [-51] is displayed for two seconds, readjust the accelerator cable. See the section,
"Adjustment After Replacement Of Major Components".
b. If character display (4) alternates between [-52] and [ 10], every two seconds for example,
decrease the tension in the cable by loosening the adjusting nut of the accelerator cable by one
turn. (If [ 15] is indicated, then loosen the nut one and a half turns.)
c. If character display (4) alternates between [-53] and [ 10], every two seconds for example,
increase the tension in the cable by tightening the adjusting nut of the accelerator cable by one
turn.

7. Stop "Calibration Mode" (unless another function selection is desired). See the section, "Calibration
Mode Stop Procedure".

Calibration Of Proportional Reducing Valve


NOTE: This calibration procedure must be performed when either the proportional reducing valve
and/or the controller has been replaced. This procedure is made at two power shift pressure points of 5
kgf/cm2 [490 kPa (72 psi)] and 25 kgf/cm2 [2450 kPa (355 psi).

Main Pump Compartment


(40) Power shift pressure tap.

1. Stop the engine and install a 4900 kPa (700 psi) pressure gauge to power shift pressure tap (40).

2. Make sure that the pump control backup switch is in the "AUT" position.

3. Start the "Calibration Mode". Refer to the section "Calibration Mode Start-up".

NOTE: The engine must be running and have a hydraulic oil temperature of approximately 50°C
(122°F) to perform this calibration procedure.

4. Run the engine with engine speed dial switch at position "10".

NOTE: Activation of this calibration mode overrides the AEC function. If the engine speed dial
switch is not at position "10" character display (4) will show an "E" in the first column. The engine
speed must be corrected within specifications to continue the calibration procedure.
Electronic Monitor Panel (Calibration Of Proportional Reducing Valve)
(4) Character display. (27) Travel speed LOW (tortoise) indicator. (28) Travel speed control switch. (31) AEC switch. (34)
Washer switch. (36) Alarm cancel switch.

5. Depress travel speed control switch (28) until travel speed LOW (tortoise) indicator (27) comes
ON.

6. Character display (4) now displays [1 0]. The "1" indicates that the first calibration point has been
accessed and the "0" indicates that the middle step of the 19 individual calibration steps has been
accessed. Each step will change the power shift pressure by approximately 50 kPa (7.5 psi).

7. To change the power shift pressure:

a. To increase the power shift pressure, depress AEC switch (31) once. This will change
character display (4) to [1 1]. Each time AEC switch (31) is depressed, character display (4)
increases by one until character display (4) displays [1 9]. Also, the pressure reading at power
shift pressure tap (40) increases by approximately 50 kPa (7.5 psi) for each increase. The
following is an example of character display (4) readings in increasing order:

* [1-9]
* [1-8]
* [1-7]
* [1-6]
* [1-5]
* [1-4]
* [1-3]
* [1-2]
* [1-1]
* [1 0] = Middle Step
* [1 1]
* [1 2]
* [1 3]
* [1 4]
* [1 5]
* [1 6]
* [1 7]
* [1 8]
* [1 9]

b. To decrease the power shift pressure, depress washer switch (34) once to lower the value
displayed in character display (4). Each time washer switch (34) is depressed, character display
(4) decreases by one in descending order until character display (4) displays [1-9]. Also, the
pressure reading at power shift pressure tap (40) decreases by 50 kPa (7 psi) for each decrease.
The following is an example of character display (4) readings in decreasing order:

* [1 9]
* [1 8]
* [1 7]
* [1 6]
* [1 5]
* [1 4]
* [1 3]
* [1 2]
* [1 1]
* [1 0] = Middle Step
* [1-1]
* [1-2]
* [1-3]
* [1-4]
* [1-5]
* [1-6]
* [1-7]
* [1-8]
* [1-9]
8. To set "Calibration Point No. 1", perform the following steps:

a. Depress washer switch (34) until the pressure reading at tap (40) is less than 490 kPa (72 psi).

b. Depress AEC switch (31) until the pressure reading at tap (40) increases to approximately 490 kPa
(72 psi).

NOTE: Pressure adjustments must always be made as the pressure is being increased.

c. Depress alarm cancel switch (36) to store the data in the controller.

d. Once the data is stored in the controller, display (4) changes to [2 0], which indicates that the first
calibration point has been accepted and the second calibration point can be performed. At this time,
the character display flashing light mode will change to a continuous lighting mode.

9. To set "Calibration Point No. 2", perform the following steps:

a. Depress washer switch (34) until the pressure reading at tap (40) is less than 2450 kPa (355 psi).

b. Depress AEC switch (31) until the pressure reading at tap (40) increases to approximately 2450
kPa (355 psi).

NOTE: Pressure adjustments must always be made as the pressure is being increased.

c. Depress alarm cancel switch (36) to store the data in the controller.

d. Once the data is stored in the controller, display (4) will change to [1 0], which indicates that the
second calibration point has been accepted and the controller has reset to the first calibration point.

10. Stop "Calibration Mode" (unless another function selection is desired). See the section,
"Calibration Mode Stop Procedure".

Calibration Mode Stop Procedure


Electronic Monitor Panel (Stopping Calibration Mode)
(4) Character display. (37) Service switch.

Use either of the following two methods:

1. Place engine in low idle position and turn the engine start switch to the OFF position.

2. Depress service switch (37) for a minimum of two seconds until character display (4) changes from
"Calibration Mode" to engine speed dial position.

Adjustment After Replacement Of Major


Components
When major components of the electronic control system have been replaced, adjustment is required.

The major components include:

* Governor actuator
* Proportional reducing valve
* Engine speed sensor
* Controller

Governor Actuator (Machines With Decelerator Cable)

Pump Compartment
(1) Accelerator cable. (2) Governor actuator. (3) Decelerator cable.

Engine Compartment
(4) Pulley. (5) Outer cable wire (decelerator). (6) Inner cable wire (accelerator).
Installation Of Accelerator And Decelerator Cables
(1) Accelerator cable. (3) Decelerator cable. (4) Pulley. (5) Outer cable wire (decelerator). (6) Inner cable wire
(accelerator). (7) Slot. (8) Locknut. (9) Support. (10) Nut. (11) Nut. (12) Locknut.

Initial Setting Of Governor Actuator

NOTE: This procedure is not necessary for a new governor actuator that is correctly calibrated for the
initial (factory) dial setting position "10".

1. Connect the harness of governor actuator (2) to the connector.

2. Determine the high idle position "10" (initial setting) by activating the automatic actuator
calibration mode. See the section in this module "Calibration Mode", Automatic Governor Actuator
(G/A) Calibration"

Adjustment Of Accelerator Cable

1. Accelerator cable (1) is identified by its indentification seal. Turn nut (10) and locknut (8) of
accelerator cable (1) counterclockwise until they are as far apart as possible.

NOTE: If the identification seal is missing, accelerator cable (1) is the upper cable when viewed from
the governor actuator (2).

2. Place inner wire (6) into the inner groove (bottom groove, closest to the engine) of pulley (4).

3. Wrap inner wire (6) around (clockwise as viewed from the top of the machine) pulley (4).
4. Put the "T" end of inner wire (6) into slot (7). Make sure the "T" end of inner wire (6) is in line
with the inner groove (bottom groove, closest to the engine) after installation.

5. Put the threaded portion of accelerator cable (1) in the upper notch of support (9).

6. Turn pulley (4) counterclockwise (as viewed from the rear of the machine) to the high idle stop
position (full rotation position).

7. Hold pulley (4) against the high idle stop position and turn nut (10) clockwise until the slack is
removed from inner wire (6). Tighten nut (10) approximately an additional two turns by hand.

8. Torque (standard torque) locknut (8) against support (9).

Adjustment Of Decelerator Cable

1. Turn nut (11) and locknut (12) of decelerator cable (3) counterclockwise until they are as far apart
as possible.

2. Place outer wire (5) into the outer groove (top groove, farthest from the engine) of pulley (4).

3. Wrap outer wire (5) around (counterclockwise as viewed from the top of the machine) pulley (4).

4. Put the "T" end of outer wire (5) into slot (7). Make certain the "T" end of outer wire (5) is in line
with outer groove (top groove, farthest from the engine) after installation.

5. Put the threaded portion of decelerator cable (3) in the upper notch of support (9). Make certain
outer wire (5) remains in outer groove of pulley (4).

6. Finger tighten nut (11) against support (9).

7. Loosen nut (11) approximately two turns to provide slack in outer wire (5).

8. Torque (standard torque) locknut (12) against support (9). Make certain nut (11) remains in
position of threaded portion of decelerator cable (3) and tighten locknut (12) against support (9).

9. Reinstall clamps to decelerator cable (3) and accelerator cable (1). Do not allow the cables to twist.

NOTE: Check to be sure that the governor lever is in contact with the high idle stop lever. Also make
sure nuts (11) and (10) are correctly tightened so that accelerator cable (1) is under tension and
decelerator cable (3) has a small amount of slack. Failure to do so could result in incorrect engine
speed setting, or overload the governor actuator. Governor actuator (2) must not be operated until the
calibration procedure is complete. If actuator (2) is operated before the calibration procedure is
complete, recalibrate.

Calibration Of Governor Actuator

Reference: Make reference to the section in this module, "Calibration Mode", "Automatic Governor
Actuator Calibration".
1. Start the engine and perform the "Automatic Governor Actuator Calibration" by activating
"Calibration Mode Start-up".

2. After correctly calibrated, clear the error log information.

Reference: Make reference to the section in this module, "Calibration Mode", "Error Log".

Governor Actuator (Machines With Decelerator Cable) (2DL


And 9KK Machines Only)

Pump Compartment
(1) Accelerator cable. (2) Governor actuator. (3) Decelerator cable.

Engine Compartment
(4) Pulley. (5) Outer cable wire (decelerator). (6) Inner cable wire (accelerator).
Installation Of Accelerator And Decelerator Cables
(1) Accelerator cable. (3) Decelerator cable. (4) Pulley. (5) Outer cable wire (decelerator). (6) Inner cable wire
(accelerator). (7) Locknut. (8) Nut. (9) Support. (10) Nut. (11) Slot. (12) Locknut.

Initial Setting Of Governor Actuator

NOTE: This procedure is not necessary for a new governor actuator that is correctly calibrated for the
initial (factory) dial setting position "10".

1. Connect the harness of governor actuator (2) to the connector.

2. Determine the high idle position "10" (initial setting) by activating the automatic actuator
calibration mode. See the section in this module "Calibration Mode", Automatic Governor Actuator
(G/A) Calibration"

Adjustment Of Accelerator Cable

1. Accelerator cable (1) is identified by its identification seal. Turn nut (6) and locknut (8) of
accelerator cable (1) counterclockwise until they are as far apart as possible.

NOTE: If the identification seal is missing, accelerator cable (1) is the upper cable when viewed from
the governor actuator (2).

2. Place inner wire (6) into the inner groove (groove closest to the engine) of pulley (4).

3. Wrap inner wire (6) around (counterclockwise as viewed from the front of the machine) pulley (4).

4. Put the "T" end of inner wire (6) into slot (11). Make sure the "T" end of inner wire (6) is in line
with the inner groove (groove closest to the engine) after installation.
5. Put the threaded portion of accelerator cable (1) in the upper notch of support (9).

6. Turn pulley (4) clockwise (as viewed from the front of the machine) to the high idle stop position
(full rotation position).

7. Hold pulley (4) against the high idle stop position and turn nut (8) clockwise until the slack is
removed from inner wire (6). Tighten nut (8) approximately an additional two turns by hand.

8. Torque (standard torque) locknut (7) against support (9).

Adjustment Of Decelerator Cable

1. Turn nut (10) and locknut (12) of decelerator cable (3) counterclockwise until they are as far apart
as possible.

2. Place outer wire (5) into the outer groove (groove farthest from the engine) of pulley (4).

3. Wrap outer wire (5) around (clockwise as viewed from the front of the machine) pulley (4).

4. Put the "T" end of outer wire (5) into slot (11). Make certain the "T" end of outer wire (5) is in line
with outer groove (groove farthest from the engine) after installation.

5. Put the threaded portion of decelerator cable (3) in the upper notch of support (9). Make certain
outer wire (5) remains in outer groove of pulley (4).

6. Finger tighten nut (10) against support (9).

7. Loosen nut (10) approximately two turns to provide slack in outer wire (5).

8. Torque (standard torque) locknut (12) against support (9). Make certain nut (10) remains in
position of threaded portion of decelerator cable (3) while tightening locknut (12) against support (9).

9. Reinstall clamps to decelerator cable (3) and accelerator cable (1). Do not allow the cables to twist.

NOTE: Check to be sure that the governor lever is in contact with the high idle stop lever. Also make
sure nuts (8) and (10) are correctly tightened so that accelerator cable (1) is under tension and
decelerator cable (3) has a small amount of slack. Failure to do so could result in incorrect engine
speed setting, or overload the governor actuator. Governor actuator (2) must not be operated until the
calibration procedure is complete. If actuator (2) is operated before the calibration procedure is
complete, recalibrate.

Calibration Of Governor Actuator

Reference: Make reference to the section in this module, "Calibration Mode", "Automatic Governor
Actuator Calibration".

1. Start the engine and perform the "Automatic Governor Actuator Calibration" by activating
"Calibration Mode Start-up".

2. After correctly calibrated, clear the error log information.


Reference: Make reference to the section in this module, "Calibration Mode", "Error Log".

Governor Actuator (Machines Without Decelerator Cable)

Controller Compartment (Behind Cab)(Typical)


(1) Governor actuator. (2) Accelerator cable.

Engine Compartment (Viewed From Top)(Typical)


(2) Accelerator cable. (3) Support. (4) Nut (5) Locknut. (6) Bellows. (7) Lever.

Adjustment Of Accelerator Cable

NOTE: An accelerator cable is a part of the governor actuator assembly. When installing a new
governor actuator and accelerator cable, the initial setting of the governor actuator is not necessary.
However, if the accelerator cable end position is changed from the factory setting by activating the
engine speed dial, for example, before the new governor actuator and accelerator cable are installed
correctly, the governor actuator needs to be calibrated to the initial (factory) engine rpm setting
designated for dial position "10". If the current accelerator cable was disconnected from the governor
lever, the initial calibration procedure is required. See the section in this module, "Calibration Mode,
Automatic Governor Actuator Calibration".

1. Turn nut (4) and locknut (5) of accelerator cable (2) counterclockwise until they are as far apart as
possible.

2. Put the threaded "L" end of accelerator cable (2) through the hole in lever (7) and install a nut to
hold it in position.

3. Put the other threaded portion of accelerator cable (2) in the notch of support (3).
4. Turn lever (7) counterclockwise (as viewed from the rear of the machine) to the high idle stop
position (full rotated position).

5. While holding lever (7) against the high idle stop, turn nut (4) clockwise until the slack is removed
from bellows (6). Tighten nit (4) approximately two additional turns.

6. Tighten locknut (5) against support (3). Make certain nut (4) remains in position of threaded
portion of accelerator cable (2) while tightening locknut (5) against support (3).

7. Reinstall two clamps to accelerator cable (2). Do not allow cable (2) to twist.

NOTE: Check to be sure that the governor lever is in contact with the high idle stopper. Also make
sure nut (4) is correctly tightened so that accelerator cable (2) is under correct tension. Failure to
correctly tighten the cable could result in incorrect engine speed setting or overload of the governor
actuator.

Calibration Of Governor Actuator

Reference: Make reference to the section in this module, "Calibration Mode", "Automatic Governor
Actuator Calibration".

1. Start the engine and perform the "Automatic Governor Actuator Calibration" by activating
"Calibration Mode Start-up".

2. After correctly calibrated, clear the error log information.

Reference: Make reference to the section in this module, "Calibration Mode", "Error Log".

Proportional Reducing Valve


1. Calibrate the proportional reducing valve.

Reference: See the section of this module, "Calibration Of Proportional Reducing Valve" in
"Calibration Mode".

2. After the proportional reducing valve is correctly calibrated, clear the error log information.

Reference: See the section of this module, "Error Log" in "Calibration Mode".

Engine Speed Sensor (Magnetic Pickup)


Installation Of Engine Speed Sensor
(1) Speed sensor. (2) Locknut. (3) Magnetic core. (4) Gear. (5) Flywheel housing.

NOTICE

The engine must not be running prior to adjustment of the engine


speed sensor.

1. With the engine stopped, slowly tighten speed sensor (1) into flywheel housing (5) until magnetic
core (3) is in contact with gear (4).

2. Back out speed sensor 1/2 turn and temporarily tighten locknut (2).

3. With the engine speed dial switch set at position "1" (LOW IDLE position) start the engine.

4. Start service program "Data Mode" and select the engine speed display function.

Reference: Make reference to the section in this module, "Data Mode"-Engine Speed.

5. The character display should read a speed of approximately 800 rpm.

6. If the character display does not read correct rpm, gradually tighten speed sensor (1). Do not turn
more than 120°.

7. If satisfactory, stop the engine and tighten locknut (2) to a torque of 44 N·m (32 lb ft).
8. After the speed sensor calibration is correct, clear the error log information.

Reference: See the section in this module, "Error Log" in "Calibration Mode".

Engine Speed Sensor (Magnetic Pickup) (2DL And 9KK


Machines Only)

Installation Of Engine Speed Sensor


(1) Speed sensor. (2) Locknut. (3) Magnetic core. (4) Gear. (5) Flywheel housing.

NOTICE

The engine must not be running prior to adjustment of the engine


speed sensor.

1. With the engine stopped, slowly tighten speed sensor (1) into flywheel housing (5) until magnetic
core (3) is in contact with gear (4).

2. Back out speed sensor 3/4 turn and temporarily tighten locknut (2).

3. With the engine speed dial switch set at position "1" (LOW IDLE position) start the engine.

4. Start service program "Data Mode" and select the engine speed display function.
Reference: Make reference to the section in this module, "Data Mode"-Engine Speed.

5. The character display should read a speed of approximately 800 rpm.

6. If the character display does not read correct rpm, gradually tighten speed sensor (1). Do not turn
more than 120°.

7. If satisfactory, stop the engine and tighten locknut (2) to a torque of 44 N·m (32 lb ft).

8. After the speed sensor calibration is correct, clear the error log information.

Reference: See the section in this module, "Error Log" in "Calibration Mode".

Controller
1. Before removal/installation of the controller, be sure to turn the disconnect switch to the OFF
position.

2. Perform the automatic governor calibration procedure.

Reference: See the section in this module, "Automatic Governor Actuator Calibration" in
"Calibration Mode".

3. Perform the proportional reducing valve calibration procedure.

Reference: See the section in this module, "Calibration Of Proportional Reducing Valve" in
"Calibration Mode".

Controller Input And Output Schematic (Voltage Signals In


Normal Operating Condition)
Controller Input And Output Schematic (Voltage Signals In
Normal Operating Condition) (2DL And 9KK Machines Only)
Terminal (Pin) Numbers Of Controller Connection And
Voltage Specifications
Voltage Specifications
Checking Procedures
Harness And Wire Identification
The colors and sizes of wires shown in the Electric Circuit Diagram are identified as described in the
following chart:
Example; [308] - BK - (18)

[308] = Circuit identification code.

BK = Wire color.

(18) = Wire size specified by AWG (American Wiring Gauge). If not indicated, wire size is AWG
No. 16.

Electrical Components, Connectors, And Harness Location


This section includes information on how to use the separate "Electric Schematic" modules, Form No.
SENR6015, Form No. SENR6014, and Form No. SENR5459 to determine location of the electric
components, connectors, and harnesses.

The location charts are made up of electric components, connectors, and harnesses. The views contain
general views and area views. Area views include the following:

* Area A: Cab
* Area B: Right console
* Area C: Left console
* Area D: Relay panel
* Area E: Main control valve compartment

Below is a guide to read components and harness/connector location charts.

* Component location chart:


The component location chart uses white circles as location labels in the general and area
views. Alphabetical letters in the connector and vehicle location column indicate location in the
area views.

* Harness and connector location chart:

The harness and connector location charts use black circles as location labels in the general and
area views. Alphabetical letters in the connector and vehicle location column indicate the area
views where they are located. the "*" indicates that it is connected to the component in its
harness and/or components column.

NOTE: Harnesses in partial electric schematics given in the "Checking Procedures" are identified by
A, B, and C, which are also indicated in the general and area views.

NOTE: The material in this module is intended to be used with one of the separate "Electrical
Schematic" modules, Form No. SENR6015, Form No. SENR6014, or Form No. SENR5459.

Checking Procedures (Electronic Control System)


Introduction

Problem Description

The problem description indicates problems represented by the character display on the monitor
panel.

Solution

The solution provides two types of information;

* Connector check provides information on the connectors that have to be checked before
troubleshooting using the checking procedure chart. Check the connectors specified for
improper connections. A loose contact between two connectors can be caused by water in the
connectors. Check the connectors before troubleshooting.
* Checking procedure chart provides information on troubleshooting problems indicated by the
error code on the character display on the monitor panel.

Example Chart
Electronic Control System Checking Procedure Chart
(1) Preparations. (2) Problem description. (3) Error code on character display (Ch.D.). (4) Check items. (5) Probable
causes. (6) Solution.

NOTE: The character display on the monitor panel indicates error code on character display (3)
assigned for the real time errors and error log, if problem(s) occurs. The charts that follow should be
used to troubleshoot problems indicated by error code on character display (3).

Preparations (1) provide information on the preliminary arrangements that must be made before
troubleshooting.

Problem description (2) indicates problems shown by the character display on the monitor panel.
Error code on character display (3) indicates specific codes for real time errors and error log. Service
Program selection determines the pattern of the character display.

Check items (4) list items that must be checked with a multimeter.

a. In the check items (4), "0Ohms" means "there is continuity", whereas "infinite Delta " means
that "there is no continuity".
b. Connector check - [other than()]: 0Ohms.

NOTE: [other than()] means all the terminals and pins except the one specified in ().

The following is an explanation of the terms in "Check items (4)":

Example; (1) - (2) of CONN46M

(1) = Pin number.

- = Short circuit indication.

CONN46 = Connector number.

M = The male (M) or female (F) half of the connector.

Probable causes (5) shows probable cause(s) of a problem.

Solution (6) shows the corrective action that should be taken to solve a particular problem. The
statement "Replace" includes "Repair if possible".

When a continuity check is to be performed, "turn the starter switch to the OFF position". This stops
the power supply to prevent damage to the tester or short-circuiting the power supply.

When a voltage check is to be made, "turn the starter switch to the ON position" to allow power
supply. The engine should be in operation unless otherwise specified. Stable inputs and outputs of
controller cannot be obtained without the engine running.

NOTICE

To avoid damage to electrical components when the power supply is


ON, make sure disconnected connectors and wires do not come in
contact with the machine.

[Elec #1] Controller Self-Diagnostic LED Display


Controller Compartment
(1) LED lamp. (2) Controller.

[Elec #1-1] Normal

Normal: Green LED lamp (1) comes ON.

[Elec #1-2] Yellow And Green LED Lamp ON

Problem:

Problem in communication line between controller and monitor causes the yellow and green LED
lamps to come ON.

Solution:

Check problem according to [Elec #10-1] and [Elec #10-2].

[Elec #1-3] Green And Red LED Lamp ON

Problem:

Problem in controller causes the green LED lamp to come ON in continuous lighting mode and red
LED lamp to come ON in continuous lighting mode or flashing mode. In some cases, yellow LED
lamp may come ON.

Solution:

Replace the controller.

[Elec #1-4] No Power To Controller And LED Lamps ON

Problem:

No power supply to controller causing LED lamp (1) to not come ON.

Solution:

Check problem according to [Elec #1-5].


[Elec #1-5] No Power To Controller

Problem:

No power supply to controller.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN1, 3, and 24 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.
Partial Electric Schematic

Partial Electric Schematic (2DL And 9KK Machines Only)

[Elec #2-1] PRV Circuit Is Open

Problem:

Proportional reducing valve circuit is open.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN56, 8, 1, and 17 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.
[Elec #2-2] PRV Circuit Is Shorted To Body Ground

Problem:

Proportional reducing valve circuit is shorted to body ground.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN56, 8, 1, and 17 are properly connected. If problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.
[Elec #2-3] PRV Circuit Is Shorted To Battery Voltage

Problem:

Proportional reducing valve circuit is shorted to battery voltage.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN56, 8, 1, and 17 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.
[Elec #3A] Engine Speed Sensor Is Open Or Not Installed Correctly

Problem:

Engine speed sensor (magnetic pickup) circuit is open or speed sensor is not installed correctly
(engine speed problem).

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN42, 60, 9, and 2 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.
[Elec #3B] Engine Speed Sensor Is Open Or Not Installed Correctly (2DL And
9KK Machines Only)
Problem:

Engine speed sensor (magnetic pickup) circuit is open or speed sensor is not installed correctly
(engine speed problem).

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN42, 9, and 2 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.
[Elec #4-1A] Travel Pressure Switch Circuit Is Open Or Shorted To Body
Ground

Problem:

Travel pressure switch circuit is open or shorted to body ground.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN51, 10, and 2 are properly connected. Check to ensure orifice in signal
passage to pressure switch is not blocked. If the problem still exists, troubleshoot according to the
following checking procedure chart.
[Elec #4-1B] Travel Pressure Switch Circuit Is Open Or Shorted To Body Ground
(2DL And 9KK Machines Only)

Problem:

Travel pressure switch circuit is open or shorted to body ground.

Solution:
Check to ensure that CONN52, 10, and 2 are properly connected. Check to ensure orifice in signal
passage to pressure switch is not blocked. If the problem still exists, troubleshoot according to the
following checking procedure chart.

[Elec #4-2A] Implement/Swing Pressure Switch Circuit Is Open Or Shorted To


Body Ground

Problem:

Implement/swing pressure switch circuit is open or shorted to body ground.


Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN52, 10, and 2 are properly connected. Check to ensure orifice in signal
passage to pressure switch is not blocked. If the problem still exists, troubleshoot according to the
following checking procedure chart.

[Elec #4-2B] Implement/Swing Pressure Switch Circuit Is Open Or Shorted To


Body Ground (2DL And 9KK Machines Only)

Problem:

Implement/swing pressure switch circuit is open or shorted to body ground.


Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN51, 10, and 2 are properly connected. Check to ensure orifice in signal
passage to pressure switch is not blocked. If the problem still exists, troubleshoot according to the
following checking procedure chart.

[Elec #4-3] Boom Raise Pressure Switch Circuit Is Open Or Shorted To Body
Ground

Problem:

Boom raise pressure switch circuit is open or shorted to body ground.


Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN50, 10, and 2 are properly connected. Check to ensure orifice in signal
passage to pressure switch is not blocked. If the problem still exists, troubleshoot according to the
following checking procedure chart.
[Elec #5] Controller Receives Signal Of Engine Speed Other Than Specified "10"

Problem:

Controller receives signal of engine speed other than specified "10" from engine speed dial.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN27, 24, and 1 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.
[Elec #6-1] Governor Actuator Feedback Sensor Circuit Is Open Or Shorted To
Battery Voltage

Problem:

Governor actuator feedback sensor circuit is open or shorted to battery voltage.

Solution:
Check to ensure that CONN44, 3, and 2 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.

[Elec #6-2] Governor Actuator Feedback Sensor Circuit Is Shorted To Body


Ground

Problem:

Governor actuator feedback sensor circuit is shorted to body ground.

Solution:
Check to ensure that CONN44, 3, and 2 are properly connected. If the problem still exits, troubleshoot
according to the following checking procedure chart.

[Elec #6-3] Governor Actuator Motor Circuit Is Shorted To Body Ground.

Problem:

Governor actuator motor circuit is shorted to body ground.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN44, 3, 1, and 18 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.
[Elec #6-4] Governor Actuator Motor Does Not Rotate Or Governor Actuator
Motor Circuit Is Shorted To Battery Voltage

Problem:

Governor actuator motor does not rotate or governor actuator motor circuit is shorted to battery
voltage.

Solution:
Check to ensure that CONN44, 3, 1, and 18, and the circuits of speed change switch and governor
backup switch are properly connected. If the problem still exists, troubleshoot according to the
following checking procedure chart.

[Elec #6-5] Governor Actuator Motor Circuit Is Open Or Governor Backup


Switch Is In "MAN" Position.

Problem:

Governor actuator motor circuit is open or governor backup switch is in "MAN" position.
Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN44, 3, 1, and 18 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.

[Elec #6-6] Governor Actuator Remains Deactivated An Elapse Time Of 2.5


Seconds After Engine Speed Dial Setting

Problem:
Governor actuator remains deactivated an elapse time of 2.5 seconds after engine speed dial has been
activated.

Solution:

Troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.


Partial Electrical Schematic
Partial Electrical Schematic (2DL And 9KK Machines Only)

[Elec #7A] Low Idle Switch Circuit Is Open Or Shorted To Body Ground

Problem:

Low idle switch circuit is open or shorted to body ground.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN28, 25 and 1 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.
[Elec #7B] Low Idle Switch Circuit Is Open Or Shorted To Body Ground (2DL
And 9KK Machines Only)

Problem:

Low idle switch circuit is open or shorted to body ground.


Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN26, 25 and 1 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.
[Elec #8-1] Fine Solenoid Valve Return Circuit Is Shorted To Battery Voltage

Problem:

Fine solenoid valve return circuit is shorted to battery voltage.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN53, 10, and 2 are properly connected. If the problem still exists even with
the correct connections, troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.

[Elec #8-2] Battery Voltage Cable Of Fine Control Solenoid Valve Circuit Is
Shorted To Body Ground

Problem:

Battery voltage cable of fine control solenoid valve circuit is shorted to body ground.

Solution:
Check to ensure that CONN53, 10, 4, and 2 are properly connected. If the problem still exists even
with the correct connections, troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.

[Elec #8-3] Fine Control Solenoid Valve Circuit Is Open

Problem:

Fine control solenoid valve circuit is open.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN53, 10, 4, and 2 are properly connected. If the problem still exists even
with the correct connections, troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.
[Elec #8-4] Swing Priority Solenoid Return Circuit Is Shorted To Battery Voltage

Problem:

Swing priority solenoid return circuit is shorted to battery voltage.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN54, 10, and 2 are properly connected. If the problem still exists even with
the correct connections, troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.
[Elec #8-5] Battery Voltage Cable Of Swing Priority Solenoid Valve Circuit Is
Shorted To Body Ground

Problem:

Battery voltage cable of swing priority solenoid valve circuit is shorted to body ground.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN54, 10, 4, and 2 are properly connected. If the problem still exists even
with the correct connections, troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.
[Elec #8-6] Swing Priority Solenoid Valve Circuit Is Open

Problem:

Swing priority solenoid valve circuit is open.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN54, 10, 4, and 2 are properly connected. If the problem still exists even
with the correct connections, troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.
[Elec #9-1] Travel Speed Solenoid Valve Return Circuit Is Shorted To Battery
Voltage

Problem:

Travel speed solenoid valve return circuit is shorted to battery voltage.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN55, 4, 9, and 2 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.
[Elec #9-2] Battery Voltage Cable Of Travel Speed Solenoid Valve Circuit Is
Shorted To Body Ground

Problem:

Battery voltage cable of travel speed solenoid valve circuit is shorted to body ground.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN55, 4, 9, and 2 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.
[Elec #9-3] Travel Speed Solenoid Valve Circuit Is Open

Problem:

Travel speed solenoid valve circuit is open.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN55, 4, 9, and 2 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.
[Elec #10-1A] No Power Supply To Monitor

Problem:

No power supply to monitor.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN6, 14, and 30 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.
[Elec #10-1B] No Power Supply To Monitor (2DL And 9KK Machines Only)

Problem:

No power supply to monitor.


Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN6, 14, and 30 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.
[Elec #10-2] Communication Line Between Controller And Monitor Is Abnormal

Problem:

Communication line between controller and monitor is abnormal.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN30, 14, and 1 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following checking procedure chart.
[Elec #11-1] Chassis Light System Problem

Problem:

Chassis light system problem.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN4, 3, and 1 are properly connected. If the problem still exists, troubleshoot
according to the following sequence chart.
[Elec #11-2] Chassis Light Return Circuit Is Shorted To Battery Voltage

Problem:

Chassis light return circuit is shorted to battery voltage.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN3 and 1 are properly connected. If the problem still exists, troubleshoot
according to the following sequence chart.

[Elec #11-3] Boom Light System Problem


Problem:

Boom light system problem.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN38, 4, 3, and 1 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following sequence chart.

[Elec #11-4] Boom Light Return Circuit Is Shorted To Battery Voltage


Problem:

Boom light return circuit is shorted to battery voltage.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN3 and 1 are properly connected. If the problem still exists, troubleshoot
according to the following sequence chart.

[Elec #12-1A] Wiper System Problem

Problem:
Wiper system problem.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN32, 34, 13, 6, 3, and 1 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following sequence chart.
[Elec #12-1B] Wiper System Problem (2DL And 9KK Machines Only)

Problem:

Wiper system problem.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN32, 28, 13, 6, 3, and 1 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following sequence chart.
[Elec #12-2] Wiper Return Circuit Is Shorted To Battery Voltage

Problem:

Wiper return circuit is shorted to battery voltage.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN3 and 1 are properly connected. If the problem still exists, troubleshoot
according to the following sequence chart.
[Elec #12-3] Washer System Problem

Problem:

Washer system problem.

Solution:
Check to ensure that CONN3, 4, and 1 are properly connected. If the problem still exists, troubleshoot
according to the following sequence chart.

[Elec #12-4] Washer Return Circuit Is Shorted To Battery Voltage

Problem:

Washer return circuit is shorted to battery voltage.

Solution:
Check to ensure that CONN3 and 1 are properly connected. If the problem still exists, troubleshoot
according to the following sequence chart.

[Elec #13A] Engine Oil Pressure Switch Circuit Is Open

Problem:

Engine oil pressure switch circuit is open.

Solution:
Check to ensure that CONN41, 60, 9, and 2 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following sequence chart.

[Elec #13B] Engine Oil Pressure Switch Circuit Is Open (2DL And 9KK Machines
Only)

Problem:
Engine oil pressure switch circuit is open.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN9 and 2 are properly connected. If the problem still exists, troubleshoot
according to the following sequence chart.

[Elec #14-1] Action Alarm Buzzer Circuit Is Open

Problem:
Action alarm buzzer circuit is open.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN31, 14, and 1 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following sequence chart.

[Elec #14-2] Action Alarm Buzzer Circuit Is Shorted To Body Ground

Problem:

Action alarm buzzer circuit is shorted to body ground.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN31, 14, and 1 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following sequence chart.
[Elec #14-3] Action Alarm Buzzer Return Circuit Is Shorted To Battery Voltage

Problem:

Action alarm buzzer return circuit is shorted to battery voltage.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN31, 14, and 1 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following sequence chart.
[Elec #15-1] Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor Circuit Is Open Or Shorted To
Battery Voltage

Problem:
Engine coolant temperature sensor circuit is open or shorted to battery voltage.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN9 and 2 are properly connected. If the problem still exists, troubleshoot
according to the following sequence chart.

[Elec #15-2] Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor Circuit Is Shorted To Body


Ground

Problem:

Engine coolant temperature sensor circuit is shorted to body ground.

Solution:
Check to ensure that CONN9 and 2 are properly connected. If the problem still exists, troubleshoot
according to the following sequence chart.

[Elec #16-1] Hydraulic Oil Temperature Sensor Circuit Is Open Or Shorted To


Battery Voltage

Problem:

Hydraulic oil temperature sensor circuit is open or shorted to battery voltage.

Solution:
Check to ensure that CONN9 and 2 are properly connected. If the problem still exists, troubleshoot
according to the following sequence chart.

[Elec #16-2] Hydraulic Oil Temperature Sensor Circuit Is Shorted To Body


Ground

Problem:

Hydraulic oil temperature sensor circuit is shorted to body ground.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN9 and 2 are properly connected. If the problem still exists, troubleshoot
according to the following sequence chart.
[Elec #17-1] Fuel Level Sensor Circuit Is Open Or Shorted To Battery Voltage

Problem:

Fuel level sensor circuit is open or shorted to battery voltage.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN49, 10, 9, and 2 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following sequence chart.
[Elec #17-2] Fuel Level Sensor Circuit Is Shorted To Body Ground

Problem:

Fuel level sensor circuit is shorted to body ground.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN49, 10, 9, and 2 are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following sequence chart.
Partial Electrical Schematic
Partial Electrical Schematic (2DL And 9KK Machines Only)

[Elec #18-1] Battery Voltage Is Abnormal

Problem:

Battery voltage is abnormal (not within 23 to 32V).

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN24, 11, 9, 5, 2, and 1, and terminals of alternator, breaker and terminal
block are properly connected. If the problem still exists, troubleshoot according to the following
sequence chart.
[Elec #18-2A] Alternator Terminal W Circuit Is Open

Problem:

Alternator terminal W circuit is open.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN9, 2, and terminal W are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following sequence chart.
[Elec #18-2B] Alternator Terminal P Circuit Is Open (2DL And 9KK Machines
Only)

Problem:

Alternator terminal P circuit is open.

Solution:
Check to ensure that CONN9, 2, and terminal P are properly connected. If the problem still exists,
troubleshoot according to the following sequence chart.

[Elec #19] Diagnosis Of Backup Switches And Starter Switch.


Disconnect all harnesses from backup switches and starter switch. Check for continuity across
terminals of each of the above switches. Any results other than given below indicate that the switch
has loose contacts.

[Elec #19-1] Pump Backup Switch

[Elec #19-2] Governor Backup Switch

[Elec #19-3] Engine Speed Change Switch

[Elec #19-4A] Starter Switch


[Elec #19-4B] Starter Switch (2DL And 9KK Machines Only)

[Elec #20] Heater Signal Is Shorted To Battery Voltage (2DL And 9KK Machines
Only)

Problem:

Heater signal is shorted to battery voltage.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN1 and 3, and terminals of heater relay, terminal block and air heater are
properly connected. If the problem still exists, troubleshoot according to the following sequence chart.
[Elec #21] Governor Actuator Feedback Sensor Voltage Is Too Low Or Not
Stable
Problem:

Governor actuator feedback sensor voltage is too low ([E 9]) or not stable ([E12]).

Solution:

With the AEC switch in the OFF position, place the engine speed dial at position "10". Check to see if
the voltage between terminal 21 of controller connector B and ground is 6.3 to 6.7 V. If the voltage is
within 6.3 to 6.7, it is normal. If not, check or replace the governor actuator, as necessary.

NOTE: To check voltages, see in this module, "Controller Connector Terminal Voltage".

[Elec #22] Engine Coolant Temperature Is Too High

Problem:

Engine coolant temperature is too high.

Solution:

Troubleshoot according to the following sequence chart.

[Elec #23] Engine Oil Pressure Is Too Low

Problem:

Engine oil pressure is too low.

Solution:
Troubleshoot according to the following sequence chart.

[Elec #24] Hydraulic Oil Temperature Is Too High

Problem:

Hydraulic oil temperature is too high.

Solution:

Troubleshoot according to the following sequence chart.


[Elec #25] There Is More Than 100 rpm Difference Between Engine Speed Dial
Setting And Actual Speed

Problem:

There is more than 100 rpm difference between engine speed dial setting (speed calculated from
governor actuator feedback signal) and actual speed.

Solution:

Troubleshoot according to the following sequence chart.


[Elec #26] Monitor Takes At Least One Second To Respond To Controller's
Signal

Problem:

Monitor takes at least one second to respond to controller's signal.

Solution:

Troubleshoot according to the following sequence chart.


[Elec #27] Monitor RAM Is Not Normal

Problem:

Monitor RAM (Random Access Memory) is not normal.

Solution:

Troubleshoot according to the following sequence chart.


[Elec #28] Controller Is Informed Of Its Error Signal By Monitor

Problem:

Controller is informed of its error signal by monitor.

Solution:

Troubleshoot according to the following sequence chart.


[Elec #29] Controller Detects Its Error Signal By Itself

Problem:

Controller detects its error signal by itself.

Solution:

Troubleshoot according to the following sequence chart.


[Elec #30] Error In Controller Memory

Problem:

Error in controller memory.

Solution:

Troubleshoot according to the following sequence chart.


[Elec #31A] A Controller For A Different Machine Is Installed Or Harness Code
Problem

Problem:

A controller for a different machine is installed or harness code problem.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN1 and 58 are properly connected. If the problem still exists, troubleshoot
according to the following sequence chart.
[Elec #31B] A Controller For A Different Machine Is Installed Or Harness Code
Problem (2DL And 9KK Machines Only)

Problem:

A controller for a different machine is installed or harness code problem.

Solution:

Check to ensure that CONN1 and 58 are properly connected. If the problem still exists, troubleshoot
according to the following sequence chart.
[Elec #32] Engine Stalls

Problem:

Engine stalls.

Solution:

Troubleshoot according to the following sequence chart.

Checking Procedures (Hydraulic System)


(Hyd #1) Hydraulic Oil Supply

Reference: Refer to the section, "Hydraulic Oil Tank" in the "Operation and Maintenance Manual".

(Hyd #2) Suction Filter Clean Up

Reference: Refer to the section, "Service Screen And Filters" in the "Operation and Maintenance
Manual", for filter cleaning procedures.

(Hyd #3) Adjustment Of Pressure And Flow

Reference: See the section in this module, "Hydraulic System Testing And Adjusting".

(Hyd #3-1) Check And Adjustment Of Main Relief Valve Pressure

Reference: See the section in this module, "Hydraulic System Testing And Adjusting".

(Hyd #3-2) Check And Adjustment Of Line Relief Valve Pressure

Reference: See the section in this module, "Hydraulic System Testing And Adjusting".

(Hyd #3-3) Check And Adjustment Of Swing Relief Valve Pressure

Reference: See the section in this module, "Hydraulic System Testing And Adjusting".

(Hyd #3-4) Check And Adjustment Of Travel Crossover Relief Valve Pressure

Reference: See the section in this module, "Hydraulic System Testing And Adjusting".

(Hyd #3-5) Check And Adjustment Of Pilot Relief Valve Pressure

Reference: See the section in this module, "Hydraulic System Testing And Adjusting".

(Hyd #3-6) Adjustment Of Main Pump Flow

Reference: See the section in this module, "Hydraulic System Testing And Adjusting".

(Hyd #4) Check Of Pilot Pressure At Main Control Valve Inlet


Main Control Valve Compartment (Viewed From Machine Rear)
(1) Pilot line (boom RAISE). (2) Pilot line (bucket CLOSE). (3) Pilot line (REVERSE RIGHT travel). (4) Pilot line
(REVERSE LEFT travel). (5) Pilot line (swing LEFT). (6) Pilot line (stick IN).

Main Control Valves (Viewed From The Front Of The Machine)


(7) Pilot line (boom LOWER). (8) Pilot line (bucket OPEN). (9) Pilot line (FORWARD RIGHT travel). (10) Pilot line
(FORWARD LEFT travel). (11) Pilot line (swing RIGHT). (12) Pilot line (stick OUT).

1. To check the pilot pressure at each inlet port of the main control valves, connect a tee between each
pilot line and its control valve.
2. Attach a 4900 kPa (700 psi) pressure gauge to the tee.

3. With the hydraulic activation control lever in the UNLOCKED position, operate the pilot control
lever for each function.

(Hyd #5) Swing Motor Performance Problem (Measurement Of Case Drain Oil)
(Machines With Swing Lock Pin)

Swing Motor Compartment


(1) Case drain hose. (2) Tee. (3) Case drain hose.

To check the swing motor performance, measure the amount of swing motor case drain oil as follows:

1. Disconnect case drain hose (3) from tee (2) on the swing motor.

2. Install a plug in the end of case drain hose (3) and a cap in the open end of tee (2).

3. Disconnect case drain hose (1) from the swivel.

4. Install a cap in the open port of the swivel.

5. Put the open end of case drain hose (1) into a suitable measuring container.

6. With the swing pin in the LOCKED position, operate the swing control for one minute.

7. Measure the amount of swing motor case drain oil.

NOTE: The maximum acceptable case drain oil with a swing relief pressure setting of 24 000 ± 490
kPa (3500 ± 72 psi) must be:

For a New swing motor ... 20 liter/min (5.3 U.S. gpm)


For a Rebuilt swing motor ... 23 liter/min (6.1 U.S. gpm)

(Hyd #5) Swing Motor Performance Problem (Measurement Of Case Drain Oil)
(Machines Without Swing Lock Pin)

Swing Motor Compartment


(1) Case drain hose. (2) Tee. (3) Case drain hose.

In Front Of Main Control Valves


(4) Elbow. (5) Pilot line. (6) Cap.

To check the swing motor performance, measure the amount of swing motor case drain oil as follows:

1. Stop the engine. Release the pressure in the hydraulic system. See the section, "Release Of Pressure
In The Hydraulic System".

2. Disconnect case drain hose (3) from tee (2) on the swing motor.
3. Install a plug (3/4-16UN) in the end of case drain hose (3) and a cap (3/4-16UN) in the open end of
tee (2).

4. Disconnect case drain hose (1) from the swivel. Put the open end of case drain hose (1) into a
suitable measuring container.

5. Install a cap (3/4-16UN) in the open port of the swivel.

6. Engage the swing parking brake as follows;

a. Disconnect pilot line (5) from elbow (4).

b. Install a cap (9/16-18HD)(6) on elbow (4). Leave the end of pilot line (5) open to the air.

7. Start and run the engine at no-load high idle speed of 1860 ± 50 rpm with the power mode selector
switch at Mode III position.

8. Increase the hydraulic oil temperature to 55 ± 5°C (131 ± 9°F).

9. Operate the swing control for one minute. Measure the amount of swing motor case drain oil and
record the measurement.

NOTE: Check to be sure that the swing parking brake is correctly being engaged while the swing
control is activated.

10. Release the swing parking brake as follows:

a. Stop the engine and release the pressure in the hydraulic system. See the section, "Release Of
Pressure In The Hydraulic System".

b. Remove cap (9/16-18HD)(8S4950)(6) from elbow (4).

c. Connect pilot hose (5) to elbow (4).

11. Operate the swing control to place the swing motor barrel in a new position.

12. Repeat Steps 1 through 9. Take three measurements.

NOTE: The maximum acceptable case drain oil with a swing relief pressure setting of 24 000 ± 490
kPa (3500 ± 72 psi) must be:

For a New swing motor ... 20 liter/min (5.3 U.S. gpm)

For a Rebuilt swing motor ... 23 liter/min (6.1 U.S. gpm)

(Hyd #6) Travel Motor Performance Problem (Measurement Of Case Drain)


Travel Motor
(1) Connector. (2) Drain hose.

To check the travel motor performance, measure the amount of case drain oil as follows:

1. Disconnect drain hose (2) from connector (1). Install a plug in the open end of drain hose (2).

2. Connect one end of the vinyl hose to connector (1) and put the other end of the vinyl hose into a
suitable measuring container.

3. With the track blocked, operate the travel control for one minute.

4. Measure the amount of case drain oil.

5. Remove the track block, and move the machine forward to place the travel motor barrel in a new
position.

6. Repeat steps 1 through 4.

NOTE: The maximum acceptable case drain oil at each measuring point with a main relief pressure
of 34 300 ± 490 kPa (4950 ± 72 psi) must be:

For a New travel motor ... 15 liter/min (4.0 U.S. gpm)

For a Rebuilt travel motor ... 18 liter/min (4.8 U.S. gpm)

Testing And Adjusting


Introduction
Machines With Swing Lock Pin

Hydraulic oil pressure can remain in the hydraulic systems on this


machine after the engine and pump have been stopped. Serious injury
can be caused if this pressure is not released before any service is done
on the hydraulic systems. To prevent possible injury, refer to section,
Release Of Pressure In The Hydraulic System, before any fitting, hose
or component is loosened, tightened, removed or adjusted.

When possible, the bucket must always be lowered to the ground before
service is started. When it is necessary for the boom to be in the raised
position while tests or adjustments are done, be sure that boom, stick
and bucket have correct support.

Swing lock must be engaged before service is started.

Always move the machine to a location away from the travel of other
machines. Be sure that other personnel are not near the machine when
the engine is running and tests or adjustments are being made.

During diagnosis of the hydraulic system, remember that correct oil temperature, flow, and pressure
are necessary for correct operation. Pump output (oil flow) is a function of engine speed (rpm). Oil
pressure is caused by resistance to the flow of oil.

Machines Without Swing Lock Pin

Hydraulic oil pressure can remain in the hydraulic systems on this


machine after the engine and pump have been stopped. Serious injury
can be caused if this pressure is not released before any service is done
on the hydraulic systems. To prevent possible injury, refer to section,
Release Of Pressure In The Hydraulic System, before any fitting, hose
or component is loosened, tightened, removed or adjusted.

When possible, the bucket must always be lowered to the ground before
service is started. When it is necessary for the boom to be in the raised
position while tests or adjustments are done, be sure that boom, stick
and bucket have correct support.

Always move the machine to a location away from the travel of other
machines. Be sure that other personnel are not near the machine when
the engine is running and tests or adjustments are being made.

During diagnosis of the hydraulic system, remember that correct oil temperature, flow, and pressure
are necessary for correct operation. Pump output (oil flow) is a function of engine speed (rpm). Oil
pressure is caused by resistance to the flow of oil.

Visual Checks
A visual inspection of the system is the first step when troubleshooting a problem. Make the
inspection with the engine off and the implements lowered to the ground.

1. Check the level of the oil in the hydraulic tank. Slowly loosen the hydraulic tank air vent plug and
release the pressure before the filler cap is removed.

2. Remove the filter element and check it for material that would give an indication of damage to a
component.

3. Inspect all lines and connections for damage or leaks.

4. Inspect control linkage for bent, broken, or damaged components.

Checks During Operation


The checks during operation can be used to find leakage in the system. They can also be used to find a
valve, pump, motor, or cylinder that is not working correctly. The speed of rod movement or the
torque on a motor can be used to check the condition of the cylinders, motors, and pumps.

Operational Tests
NOTE: For specifications given in "Operational Tests", a "NEW" specification is the performance
that can be expected for a new machine. A "REBUILD" specification is the performance target to use
after rebuilding the components of a system. A machine that performs beyond "SERVICE LIMIT"
specifications should be checked for improper maintenance or adjustment, component wear, or
failure.

Specifications given in charts for a machine equipped with 5700 mm (18 ft 8 in) boom, 2900 mm (9 ft
6 in) stick, and SAE 0.82 m3 (1 yd3) bucket.
NOTE: The power mode selector switch must be placed at Mode III position, unless otherwise
specified, during tests.

Operational Test Preparations

1. Engine speed:

Excavator with no load at high idle, 1860 ± 50 rpm

2. Hydraulic oil temperature: 55 ± 5°C (130 ± 9°F)

NOTE: Fully move the stick in and out several times until the normal hydraulic oil temperature is
reached.

3. Relief valve pressure settings are set according to specification.

Reference: Make reference to the section in this module "Relief Valves", "Specifications".

Travel Test On Level Ground


Test Preparation:

1. Set engine speed and increase the hydraulic oil to normal operating temperature.

Reference: Make reference to the section "Operation Tests Preparation"

2. Travel test ground must be hard and as level as possible, and at least 25 m (82.5 ft) long.

3. Draw a 25 m (82.5 ft) straight line on travel test ground as a reference line.

4. Position the machine so that one track is in line (parallel) with the reference line. Put the machine
in the travel test position as shown in the illustration.

5. The bucket must be empty.

Test Procedure:

1. Start the engine and place the power mode selector switch in mode III position. Place the engine
speed dial at position "10" and the travel speed switch in HIGH (rabbit) position. Move the machine
by operating both travel levers at the same time.

2. The first 5 m (16.5 ft) are for a preliminary run. Measure the time required for the machine to travel
the remaining 20 m (66 ft) in each direction (FORWARD and REVERSE).

3. Measure the travel deviation from the reference line.

4. Repeat the above procedure with the travel speed switch in LOW (turtle) position.
NOTE: The following chart represents the time (in seconds) it should take to complete the 20 m (66
ft) test run:

NOTE: The following chart represents the travel deviation from the reference line:

Travel On Level Ground (Optional Test)


NOTE: If suitable ground (as stated in Step No. 2 in "Test Preparation" for "Travel On Level
Ground") cannot be found, the following test should be done as a substitute.

Test Preparation:

1. Set engine speed and increase the hydraulic oil to normal operating temperature.

Reference: Make reference to the section "Operation Tests Preparation"

2. Place the machine on level ground.

3. Raise a track for the test as shown in the illustration.

4. Put a mark on a shoe of the raised track.


Test Procedure:

1. Start the engine and place the power mode selector switch in power Mode III position. Run the
raised track with the engine speed dial at position "10" (high idle) and the travel speed switch in
HIGH (rabbit) position.

2. Measure the time required for the track to make three complete turns (revolutions) in each direction
(FORWARD and REVERSE).

3. Repeat the above procedure with the travel speed switch in LOW (turtle) position.
Drift On Slope

Measuring the amount of drift of the machine on a slope will determine if there is a need to check the
travel brake.

Test Preparation:

1. Place the machine on a slope of 12°. The slope surface must be hard and smooth.

2. Put the implements in the position shown in the illustration.

3. Bucket should be empty.

Test Procedure:
1. Put marks on both track and ground to indicate its relative position to the slope.

2. Stop the engine and time three minutes (using a stopwatch).

3. Measure (with a scale) the distance the tracks have moved on the slope.

Swing Speed And Over Swing (On Level Ground)

Measuring the swing speed and over swing of the machine will determine if there is a need to check
the swing motor and/or anti-reaction valve.

Test Preparation:

1. Set engine speed and increase the hydraulic oil to normal operating temperature.

Reference: Make reference to the section "Operation Tests Preparation"

2. Place the machine on level ground as shown in the illustration.


3. Put marks on both inner and outer races of the swing bearing to indicate relation of two positions.

4. The bucket should be empty.

Test Procedure (Over Swing):

1. Start the engine and place the power mode selector switch in power Mode III position. Place the
engine speed dial at position "10" (high idle).

2. Move the swing control lever to the RIGHT or LEFT until the machine completes a 180° swing
operation. Return the swing control lever to the NEUTRAL position at the end of the 180° swing
operation and measure the amount of over swing by measuring the distance between the marks on the
swing bearing.

NOTE: Use a reference point that is visible from the operator's seat as a indicator of when to stop the
180° rotation.
Test Procedure (Speed):

1. Move the swing control lever to the LEFT or RIGHT and measure the time it takes to complete a
180° swing operation.

Swing Speed And Drift (On A Slope)

Measuring the swing speed on a slope will determine if there is a need to check the swing motor
and/or anti-reaction valve. Measuring the swing drift on a slope will determine if there is a need to
check the swing parking brake.

Test Preparation:

1. Place the machine on a 12° slope.


2. Place the implements at maximum reach and fill the bucket with soil. The bucket should be
positioned above the ground to clear any obstructions.

Test Procedure (Speed):

1. Stop the machine on a slope of 12°. Place the upper structure at a 90° angle to the lower structure as
shown in the illustration.

2. Measure the time needed to swing the upper structure 90° counterclockwise. Do the same for a 90°
swing clockwise.
Test Procedure (Drift):

1. Stop the machine on a slope of 12°.

2. Place the upper structure at a 90° angle to the tracks as shown in the illustration.

3. Put marks on the inner and outer races of the swing bearing.
4. Stop the engine.

5. Leave the machine in this position for three minutes, and measure swing drift on the circumference
of the swing bearing.

6. Rotate the upper structure 180° from the original position as described in Step 1.

7. Repeat Steps 2 through 5.

Test Procedure (Drift):

1. Stop the machine on a slope of 12°.

2. Place the upper structure at a 90° angle to the tracks as shown in the illustration.

3. Put marks on the inner and outer races of the swing bearing.
4. Stop the engine.

5. Leave the machine in this position for three minutes, and measure swing drift on the circumference
of the swing bearing.

6. Rotate the upper structure 180° from the original position as described in Step 1.

7. Repeat Steps 2 through 5.

Cylinder Drift

Test Preparation:

1. Set engine speed and increase the hydraulic oil to normal operating temperature.

Reference: Make reference to the section "Operation Tests Preparation"


2. Place the machine on level ground as shown in the illustration.

3. Fill the bucket with soil.

Test Procedure (For Boom And Stick Cylinders):

1. Fully extend the bucket cylinder.

2. Fully retract the stick cylinder.

3. Raise the boom until its upper surface becomes parallel to the ground.

4. Measure each cylinder's length from pin to pin.

5. Stop the engine.

6. Leave the machine in this position for three minutes, then measure each cylinder's length from pin
to pin for drift.

Test Procedure (For Bucket Cylinder):

1. Fully extend the bucket cylinder.

2. Raise the boom high enough until the stick is perpendicular to the ground.

3. Measure each cylinder's length from pin to pin.

4. Stop the engine.

5. Leave the machine in this position for three minutes, then measure each cylinder's length from pin
to pin for drift.
Cylinder Operating Speed

Test Preparation:

1. Place the machine on level ground.

2. Bucket must be empty.

Test Procedure (Boom Cylinders):

1. Fully retract bucket and stick cylinders.

Extension test;

Measure the time required for the boom cylinders to reach full extension position starting with the
bucket on the ground.
Retraction test;

Measure the time required for the bucket to come in contact with the ground from the full extension
position of the boom cylinders.

Test Procedure (Stick Cylinder):

1. Position the upper surface of the boom parallel to the ground and fully extend the bucket cylinder.

Extension test;

Measure the time required for the stick cylinder to reach full extension position from full retraction
position.
Retraction test;

Measure the time required for the stick cylinder to reach full retraction position from full extension
position.

Test Procedure (Bucket Cylinder):

1. Position the upper surface of the boom parallel and the stick perpendicular to the ground.

Extension test;

Measure the time required for the bucket cylinder to reach full extension position from full retraction
position.
Retraction test;

Measure the time required for the bucket cylinder to reach full retraction position from full extension
position.

Release Of Pressure In The Hydraulic System


Release the pressure in the implement hydraulic circuits (boom, stick, and bucket) before any
hydraulic lines or components are disconnected or removed.

1. Fully retract the stick cylinder rod.

2. Adjust the position of the bucket so that it will be flat on the ground when the boom is lowered.
3. Lower the boom until the bucket is flat on the ground.

4. Shut off the engine and put the hydraulic activation control lever in the UNLOCK position.

5. Move the control levers for boom, stick, and swing to all full stroke positions. This will release any
pressure that might be present in the pilot system.

6. Slowly loosen the air vent plug on the hydraulic tank and release the pressure.

7. Tighten the air vent plug on the hydraulic tank.

8. The pressure in the hydraulic system has been released and lines and components can be removed.

Release Of Air From Main Pumps


When the main pumps have been serviced or the hydraulic oil replaced, remove air from the hydraulic
system as follows;

NOTICE

No attempt should be made to start the engine until the main pumps
have been filled with hydraulic oil, or serious damage can be caused to
hydraulic components.

Pump Compartment
(1) Hose.

1. With the engine stopped, disconnect hose (1) from the top of the main pump. Leave the hose
disconnected for several minutes until the main pumps are filled with oil. Connect hose (1) to the top
of the main pumps and start the engine in low idle and fully raise the boom and hold it in this position.

2. Stop the engine and slowly lower the boom until the bucket is on the ground. This pressurizes the
hydraulic tank.

3. Slowly loosen hose (1) until oil flows out of the hose opening. This is an indication that the air has
been released from the pump.
4. Tighten hose (1).

Pressure Adjustment
Specifications
NOTE: A new or rebuilt machine must perform according to NEW or REBUILD specifications. A
machine that performs beyond SERVICE LIMIT specifications must be checked for improper
adjustment, wear, or damage of relief valves or pumps.
Adjustment Procedures
NOTE: Values given above are approximate. Use a pressure gauge for adjustment.

Relief Valve Adjustment Preparation

Pump Compartment
(1) Tap (power shift pressure). (2) Tap (upper pump). (3) Tap (lower pump).

1. Place the machine on level ground and stop the engine.

2. Release the pressure in the hydraulic system. See the section, "Release Of Pressure In The
Hydraulic System".

3. Connect a 49 000 kPa (7100 psi) pressure gauge to either the main pump tap (2) or tap (3).

4. Connect a 4900 kPa (700 psi) pressure gauge to tap (1)

5. Start the engine and move the stick IN and OUT to its full travel position. Do this operation several
times until the hydraulic oil temperature reaches 55 ± 5°C (131 ± 9°F).

6. Place the power mode selector switch in Mode III position.

7. Place the engine speed dial at position "10". Check that engine speed under no load is at specified
rpm with AEC switch in the OFF position. (Read rpm 3 seconds after the speed dial switch has been
placed in position "10".)
NOTE: See the section, "Operational Test Preparations" for the specified engine rpm for dial position
"10".

NOTE: Normal operations (see characteristic curve) of the engine and pumps are necessary for the
pressure adjustment. If the results of the pressure adjustment are not correct, then the engine and
pump characteristic curve needs to be checked.

Temporary Setting Of The Main Relief Valve Pressure

NOTE: The purpose for "Temporary Setting Of The Main Relief Pressure" is done so implement line
relief valves and travel relief valves can be adjusted.

Top Of Main Control Valves


(4) Plunger. (5) Locknut. (6) Adjuster. (7) Locknut. (8) Main relief valve.

1. Place the machine on level ground and stop the engine. Release the pressure in the hydraulic
system. See the section in this module, "Release Of Pressure In The Hydraulic System".

2. Slowly move the bucket control lever to the bucket open position (full cylinder rod retraction).

3. Check to be sure the main relief valve pressure setting is 31 400 ± 490 kPa (4550 ± 72 psi).

NOTE: Always make final pressure adjustments on pressure rise.

4. Loosen locknut (5) and turn plunger (4) clockwise until it bottoms out. Tighten locknut (5).

5. Loosen locknut (7) and turn adjuster (6) clockwise a quarter turn. Tighten locknut (7).

Adjustment Of Line Relief Valve Pressure

Preparation

1. Start the service program "Calibration Mode" and keep the power shift pressure constant at 2250
kPa (330 psi). Read the pressure gauge attached at tap (1) to monitor the power shift pressure.

NOTE: For further information of "Calibration Mode", see the section in this module "Calibration
Mode".

NOTE: During line relief adjustment, do not turn the engine OFF to prevent a change in power shift
pressure.
2. Use the pressure gauge at tap (2) to read the line relief pressure for boom and bucket circuits. Use
the pressure gauge at tap (3) to read the line relief pressure for stick circuit. For line relief pressure
settings for the implement circuits see the section, "Pressure Adjustment, Specifications".

NOTE: After adjustment of the line relief valves, return the main relief pressure to its normal setting.

Main Control Valve Compartment (Viewed From Machine Front)


(9) Line relief valve (bucket cylinder head end). (10) Line relief valve (stick cylinder head end).

NOTE: Rod end line relief valves of boom, stick, and bucket are located under the main control
valves.

Right Front Of Swing Motor


(11) Boom drift reduction valve. (12) Line relief valve (boom cylinder head end).
Line Relief Valve (typical all cylinders)
(13) Locknut. (14) Screw.

Adjustment (Stick Cylinder)

1. To adjust the pressure in the stick cylinder rod end, move the stick control lever to full stick OUT
(rod retracted) position. Check the pressure in the stick cylinder rod end at tap (3).

2. Return the stick control lever to the NEUTRAL position. Loosen locknut (13) and turn screw (14)
until line relief valve pressure at tap (3) reads 33 800 ± 1470 kPa (4900 ± 215 psi). Turning screw
(14) clockwise increases the pressure and turning screw (14) counterclockwise decreases the pressure.

3. To adjust the pressure in the stick cylinder head end, move the stick control lever to full stick IN
(rod extended) position. Check the pressure at tap (3).

4. Return the stick control lever to the NEUTRAL position. Adjust the line relief valve pressure in the
same manner as the stick rod end.

NOTE: Always make final pressure adjustment on pressure rise.

Adjustment (Bucket Cylinder)

1. To adjust the pressure in the bucket cylinder head end, move the bucket control lever to full bucket
CLOSE (rod extended) position. Check the pressure in the bucket cylinder head end at tap (2).

2. Return the bucket control lever to the NEUTRAL position. Adjust the line relief valve pressure in
the same manner as described for the stick cylinder.

3. To adjust the pressure in the bucket cylinder rod end, move the bucket control lever to full bucket
OPEN (rod retracted) position. Check the pressure at tap (2).
4. Return the bucket control lever to the NEUTRAL position. Adjust the line relief valve pressure to
33 800 ± 1470 kPa (4900 ± 215 psi) using the same procedure as that described for the stick cylinder.

Adjustment (Boom Cylinder)

1. To adjust the pressure in the boom cylinder head end, move the boom control lever to full boom
RAISE (rod extended) position. Check the pressure in the boom cylinder head end at tap (2).

2. Return the boom control lever to the NEUTRAL position. Adjust the line relief valve pressure in
the same manner as described for the stick cylinder.

3. To adjust the pressure in the boom cylinder rod end, move the boom control lever to full boom
DOWN (rod retracted) position. Check the pressure at tap (2).

4. Return the boom control lever to the NEUTRAL position. Adjust the line relief valve pressure to 33
800 ± 1470 kPa (4900 ± 215 psi) using the same procedure as that described for the stick cylinder.

NOTE: If an appropriate location is not available for full retraction of the boom cylinder, reverse the
line relief valves of the head end and rod end by switching the valves. Adjust the pressure of the line
relief valve now attached in the head end. Once adjusted, return the respective relief valves to their
original positions and cancel the function of the service program "Calibration Mode". Refer to the
section in this module, "Calibration Mode Stop Procedure".

Travel Crossover Relief Valve Adjustment

Sprocket (Left Track)


(15) Sprocket. (16) Stopper.

Travel Brake Valve (Left Track)


(18) Screw. (19) Locknut. (20) Crossover relief valve (forward left travel). (21) Crossover relief valve (reverse left travel).
Pump Compartment
(1) Tap (power shift pressure). (2) Tap (upper pump). (3) Tap (lower pump).

Preparation

1. Start Service Program "Calibration Mode" and maintain power shift pressure at 2250 kPa (330 psi).
Read the pressure gauge at tap (1) for the power shift pressure settings.

NOTE: During this test, to prevent a change in power shift pressure do not turn the engine start
switch to OFF position.

2. Block forward left travel, by putting stopper (16) in position on the gear of sprocket (15), as shown
above.

Adjustment Procedure

1. Slowly move the left travel control lever to full FORWARD position and check the pressure of
crossover relief valve (20) at tap (3).

2. Return the control lever to the NEUTRAL position and adjust relief valve pressure. To adjust
crossover relief valve (20), loosen locknut (19) and turn screw (18) until the pressure gauge at tap (3)
reads 36 800 ± 1470 kPa (5350 ± 215 psi).

3. Tighten locknut (19) to a torque of 44 ± 5 N·m (32 ± 4 lb ft).

NOTE: Always make final pressure adjustments on pressure rise.

4. Position stopper (16) to block reverse left travel.

5. Slowly move the left travel control lever to full REVERSE position and check the pressure of
crossover relief valve (21) at tap (3). Adjust the pressure of crossover relief valve (21) in the same
manner as described for crossover relief valve (20).

6. Adjust the pressure of crossover relief valves of right travel motor in the same manner as described
for the left travel motor. Use the pressure gauge at tap (3) to read the pressure.

7. After completion of adjustment, stop the function of the service program "Calibration Mode". Refer
to the section "Calibration Mode Stop Procedure".

Swing Motor Relief Valve Pressure Adjustment (Machines With Swing Lock Pin)
Swing Motor Compartment
(22) Relief valve (right swing). (23) Relief valve (left swing). (24) Locknut. (25) Plug.

Preparation

1. Release the pressure in the hydraulic system. See the section, "Release Of Pressure In The
Hydraulic System".

2. Attach a 49 000 kPa (7100 psi) pressure gauge to tap (3).

3. Start the engine and place the engine speed dial at position "10" with the power mode selector
switch at Mode III position.

4. Increase the hydraulic oil temperature to 55 ± 5°C (131 ± 9°F).

5. Place the swing lock pin in the LOCKED position.

Adjustment Procedure

1. Slowly move the swing control lever for a full RIGHT swing operation and check the pressure of
relief valve (22) at tap (3).

2. Return the swing control lever to the NEUTRAL position. Loosen locknut (24) and turn plug (25)
until line relief valve pressure at tap (3) reads 24 000 ± 490 kPa (3500 ± 72 psi). Turning plug (25)
clockwise increases the pressure and turning plug (25) counterclockwise decreases the pressure.

3. To adjust the relief pressure for left swing, slowly move the control lever to a full LEFT swing
operation and check the pressure of crossover relief valve (23) at tap (3).

4. Return the swing control lever to the NEUTRAL position. Adjust the relief valve pressure in the
same manner as the swing right relief valve.

NOTE: Always make final pressure adjustment on the pressure rise.

Swing Motor Relief Valve Pressure Adjustment (Machines Without Swing Lock
Pin)
Swing Motor Compartment
(22) Relief valve (right swing). (23) Relief valve (left swing). (24) Locknut. (25) Plug.

Main Control Valve Compartment


(26) Elbow. (27) Pilot line (swing parking brake).

Preparation

1. Place the machine on level ground and stop the engine.

2. Release the pressure in the hydraulic system. See the section, "Release Of Pressure In The
Hydraulic System".

3. Attach a 49 000 kPa (7100 psi) pressure gauge to tap (3).

4. Start and run the engine at a no-load high idle speed of 1860 ± 50 rpm with the power mode
selector switch at Mode III position.

5. Increase the hydraulic oil temperature to 55 ± 5°C (131 ± 9°F).

6. Engage the swing parking brake as follows;

a. Disconnect pilot line (27) from elbow (26).

b. Install a cap (9/16-18HD)(8S4950) on elbow (26). Leave the end of pilot line (27) open to the air.

NOTE: Check to be sure that the swing parking brake is correctly being engaged while the swing
control is activated.

Adjustment Procedure
1. Slowly move the swing control lever for a full RIGHT swing operation and check the pressure of
relief valve (22).

2. Return the swing control lever to the NEUTRAL position. Loosen locknut (24) and turn plug (25)
until line relief valve pressure at tap (3) reads 24 000 ± 490 kPa (3500 ± 72 psi). Turning plug (25)
clockwise increases the pressure and turning plug (25) counterclockwise decreases the pressure.

3. To adjust the relief pressure for left swing, slowly move the control lever to a full LEFT swing
operation and check the pressure of crossover relief valve (23).

4. Return the swing control lever to the NEUTRAL position. Adjust the relief valve pressure in the
same manner as the swing right relief valve.

NOTE: Always make final pressure adjustment on the pressure rise.

5. After adjustment, disengage the swing parking brake as follows;

a. Stop the engine and release the pressure in the hydraulic system. See the section in this module,
"Release Of Pressure In The Hydraulic System".

b. Remove the cap (9/16-18HD)(8S4950) from elbow (26).

c. Connect pilot line (27) to elbow (26).

Main Relief Valve Adjustment

NOTE: Pressure adjustments to the main relief valve should be done by first adjusting the travel
operation of the main relief valve and then adjusting the implement operation of the main relief valve.
Any adjustment to the travel operation of the main relief valve will change the pressure setting to the
implement operation of the main relief valve.

NOTE: Always make final pressure adjustments on pressure rise.

Top Of Main Control Valves


(4) Plunger. (5) Locknut. (6) Adjuster. (7) Locknut. (8) Main relief valve.

Preparation

1. Release the pressure in the hydraulic system. See the section, "Release Of Pressure In The
Hydraulic System".
2. Attach a 49 000 kPa (7100 psi) pressure gauge to tap (3).

3. Start the engine and place the engine speed dial at position "10" with the power mode selector
switch at Mode III position.

4. Increase the hydraulic oil temperature to 55 ± 5°C (131 ± 9°F).

Adjustment Procedure (In Travel Operation)

Sprocket (Left Track)


(15) Sprocket. (16) Stopper.

1. Block forward left travel by putting stopper (16) in position on the gear of sprocket (15).

Pump Compartment
(1) Tap (power shift pressure). (2) Tap (upper pump). (3) Tap (lower pump).

2. Slowly move the left travel control lever to full FORWARD position and check main relief valve
pressure at tap (3).

3. Return the control lever to the NEUTRAL position.

4. Loosen locknut (7) and turn adjuster (6) until the pressure gauge at tap (3) reads 34 300 ± 490 kPa
(4950 ± 72 psi). Tighten locknut (7) to a torque of 59 ± 10 N·m (44 ± 7 lb ft).

Reference: Turning adjuster (6) clockwise increases the pressure. Turning adjuster (6)
counterclockwise decreases the pressure.

NOTE: Always make final pressure adjustments on pressure rise.

Adjustment Procedure (Implement Operation)


1. Slowly move the control lever to full bucket OPEN (bucket cylinder full retraction) position and
check the main relief valve pressure at tap (2).

2. Return the control lever to the NEUTRAL position and adjust main relief valve pressure to 31 400
± 490 kPa (4550 ± 72 psi).

3. To adjust, loosen locknut (5) and turn plunger (4) until the pressure gauge at tap (2) reads 31 400 ±
490 kPa (4550 ± 72 psi). Tighten locknut (5) to a torque of 50 ± 10 N·m (37 ± 7 lb ft).

Reference: Turning plunger (4) clockwise increases the pressure. Turning plunger (4)
counterclockwise decreases the pressure.

NOTE: Always make final pressure adjustments on pressure rise.

Pilot Relief Valve Adjustment

Preparation

Pilot Oil Manifold Compartment


(28) Pilot relief valve. (29) Tap. (30) Locknut. (31) Screw.

1. Place the machine on level ground and stop the engine.

2. Release the pressure in the hydraulic system. See the section, "Release Of Pressure In The
Hydraulic System".

3. Connect a 49 000 kPa (7100 psi) pressure gauge to either the main pump tap (2) or tap (3).

4. Connect a 4900 kPa (700 psi) pressure gauge to tap (1) and tap (29).

5. Start the engine and move the stick IN and OUT to its full travel position. Do this operation several
times until the hydraulic oil temperature reaches 55 ± 5°C (131 ± 9°F).

6. Place the power mode selector switch in Mode III position.

7. Place the engine speed dial at position "10". Check that engine speed under no load is at specified
rpm with AEC switch in the OFF position. (Read rpm 3 seconds after the speed dial switch has been
placed in position "10".)

NOTE: See the section, "Operational Test Preparations" for the specified engine rpm for dial position
"10".
NOTE: Normal operations (see characteristic curve) of the engine and pumps are necessary for the
pressure adjustment. If the results of the pressure adjustment are not correct, then the engine and
pump characteristic curve needs to be checked.

Adjustment Procedure

1. Loosen locknut (30) of pilot relief valve (28).

2. Turn screw (31) until the pressure gauge reads 3450 ± 200 kPa (500 ± 30 psi).

Reference: Turning screw (31) clockwise increases the pressure and turning screw (31)
counterclockwise decreases the pressure.

3. Tighten locknut (30) to a torque of 16 ± 1 N·m (12 ± 1 lb ft).

NOTE: Always make final pressure adjustments on pressure rise.

Adjustment Of Automatic Travel Speed Travel Change Valve

Preparation

1. Reset main relief valves. Refer to the section, "Main Relief Valve Adjustment".

2. Release the pressure in the hydraulic system. See the section, "Release Of Pressure In The
Hydraulic System".
Pump Compartment
(1) Tap (lower pump).

3. Install pressure gauge (8T0861)[60 000 kPa (8700 psi)] at tap (1) of the lower pump with two
coupler assemblies (6V4143) and hose assembly (6V3014).

Pilot Oil Manifold Compartment


(28) Pilot relief valve. (29) Tap. (30) Locknut. (31) Screw.

4. Install pressure gauge (8T0856)[6000 kPa (870 psi)] into coupler assembly (6V4143). Connect
coupler assembly to hose assembly (6V3014) and install at tap (29) of pilot oil manifold using second
coupler assembly.

Travel Motor (Left Track)


(32) Signal line (two speed travel).

5. Disconnect signal line (32) from the travel motor. Attach a swivel tee (9U7845 or 8T8902) to
signal line port on travel motor. Install a nipple (6V3965) and o-ring seal (3J1907) to tee. Connect
pressure gauge (8T0856)[6000 kPa (870 psi)] to hose assembly and install on tee. Reconnect signal
line (32) to tee on travel motor signal line port.

6. Start the engine and raise the hydraulic oil temperature to 55 ± 5°C (131 ± 9°F).
7. Place the power mode selector switch in power Mode III position and maintain the maximum no
load speed of 1860 ± 50 rpm with AEC switch OFF.

Sprocket (Left Track)


(4) Sprocket. (5) Stopper.

8. Block the forward left travel by putting stopper (5) in position on the gear of sprocket (4), as shown
above.

9. Place the travel speed control switch in HIGH (rabbit) position.

10. The pressure gauge at tap (2) should read 3450 kPa (500 psi).

Adjustment Procedure

Pilot Oil Manifold Compartment


(6) Automatic travel speed change valve. (7) Screw. (8) Locknut.

1. While reading the pressure gauges connected to the signal pressure line (32) and to tap (1), slowly
move the left travel control lever/pedal to the FORWARD position. When the pressure at tap (1) reads
30 600 ± 1180 kPa (4450 ± 170 psi), the pressure gauge connected to signal line (32) should reduce to
0 kPa (0 psi).

NOTE: These pressures indicate that the automatic travel speed change valve has caused the travel
motor to shift to LOW (tortoise) speed.

2. Slowly return the left travel control lever/pedal to the NEUTRAL position.

3. If the pressure gauge connected to signal line (32) does not read 0 kPa (0 psi) at the time the system
pressure at tap (1) reads 30 600 ± 1180 kPa (4450 ± 170 psi), then adjust automatic travel speed
change valve (6) as follows:
NOTE: Always make final pressure adjustments on pressure rise.

a. Loosen locknut (8) and turn screw (7) until the pressure gauge connected to line (30) reads 0 kPa (0
psi) when the pressure gauge at tap (1) reads 30 600 ± 1180 kPa (4450 ± 170 psi).

b. Tighten locknut (8) to a torque of 16 ± 1 N·m (12 ± 1 lb ft).

NOTE: Turning screw (7) clockwise increases the pressure. Turning screw (7) counterclockwise
decreases the pressure.

4. Repeat Step 1.

5. Slowly move the travel control lever/pedal towards the NEUTRAL position until the pressure
gauge at tap (1) decreases to 15 300 ± 490 kPa (2200 ± 72 psi). Now the pressure gauge connected to
signal line (32) will read 3450 kPa (500 psi).

NOTE: These pressures indicate when the automatic travel speed change valve causes the travel
motor to shift to HIGH (rabbit) speed.

Pump Flow Tests

Controller Compartment
(1) Controller alarm lamp. (2) Controller.

Right Console
(3) Monitor. (4) Monitor panel.

NOTE: Before starting pump flow tests, check the action alarm indicators on controller (2) and
monitor panel (4). If they indicate normal, then perform the operational tests.
NOTE: If operational tests (for example, cycle times) indicates that a slow implement problem is
common to the circuits of one pump, then the problem is most likely in the hydraulic system. Then
perform the "Pump Flow Tests".

NOTE: If the operational tests indicate a implement speed problem common to both pump circuits,
then the engine, fuel, or working altitude may be the problem.

Main Pump Constant Horsepower Control Test


Illustration Of Flow Meter Tool Layout (Constant Horsepower Control Test) (Main Pump)
(1) Portable hydraulic tester. (2) O-ring. (3) Adapter. (4) O-ring. (5) Nipple assembly. (6) Coupler assembly. (7) Reusable
coupling. (8) Sleeve. (9) Hose. (10) Fitting. (11) Plug. (12) O-ring. (13) Bolt. (14) Washer. (15) Flange. (16) Adapter. (17)
Rectangular seal. (18) Cover. (19) Coupling assembly. (20) O-ring. (21) Tee. (22) Upper pump. (23) Lower pump. (24)
Delivery line (upper pump). (25) Delivery line (lower pump). (26) Return line. (27) Swing motor.

Preparation (Upper Pump)


Circuit Diagram For Flow Test (Under Constant Horsepower Control)(Upper Pump)
(1) Portable hydraulic tester (flow meter). (9) Hose. (18) Cover. (22) Upper pump. (23) Lower pump. (24) Delivery line
(upper pump). (25) Delivery line (lower pump). (27) Swing motor. (28) Multitach. (29) Main control valves. (30) Gauge.
(31) Tap (upper pump). (32) Gauge. (33) Tap (power shift pressure). (34) Tap (lower pump). (35) Engine.

Pump Compartment
(9) Hose (upper pump charge line). (22) Upper pump. (23) Lower pump. (24) Delivery line (upper pump). (31) Tap (upper
pump). (33) Tap (power shift pressure). (34) Tap (lower pump).
Portable Hydraulic Tester (Flow Meter)
(1) Portable hydraulic tester (flow meter). (9) Hose. (28) Multitach. (36) Valve (flow meter).

Swing Motor Compartment


(9) Hose (return line from flow meter). (21) Tee. (26) Return line. (27) Swing motor.

To prevent personal injury or equipment damage from failure of the


flow meter or associated circuit components because of blocked pump
flow, make sure before starting the engine that the flow meter valve is
fully open (turned counterclockwise).

1. Position the machine on level ground and stop the engine.

2. Release the pressure in the hydraulic system. See the section, "Release Of Pressure In The
Hydraulic System".

NOTE: The bolts that retain the gaurd between the pumps and engine may require loosening to
provide sufficient clearance to install tooling.

3. Install the following tools in accordance with flow meter tool layout illustration and circuit
diagram.

a. Disconnect delivery line (24) from upper pump (22).


b. Install cover (18), O-ring seal (17), flange (15), bolt (14), and washer (13) to the end of delivery
line (24).

c. Disconnect return line (26) from swing motor (27).

d. Install tee (21) and two O-ring seals (20) to the swing motor (27) return port. Connect return line
(26) to tee (21).

e. Connect portable hydraulic tester (1) between upper pump (22) and tee (21) with two hoses (9).

f. Install pressure gauge (32) at power shift pressure tap (33). Install pressure gauge (30) at upper
pump tap (31). [A 49 000 kPa (7100 psi) pressure gauge can be used in place of pressure gauge (32)
and (30).] Tap (33) is used to measure the power shift pressure. Taps (31) and (34) are used to
measure the upper pump and lower pump delivery pressure.

g. Install multitach group (28) on engine (35). This is used to read engine speed.

4. Start the engine and place the power mode selector switch in Mode III position.

5. Place the engine speed dial at position "10" and maintain the maximum no load speed at 1860 ± 50
rpm with the AEC switch OFF. (Read the rpm three seconds elapsed time after the engine speed dial
has been placed in position "10").

6. Increase the hydraulic oil temperature to 55 ± 5°C (131 ± 9°F). To increase the oil temperature,
move the stick IN and OUT its full travel several times.

Preparation (Lower Pump)

Pump Compartment
(9) Hose (lower pump charge line). (23) Lower pump. (25) Delivery line (lower pump). (33) Tap (power shift pressure).
(34) Tap (lower pump).

Perform the same preparation as that described for the upper pump flow test under constant
horsepower control except Step 3. Use the following procedure in replacement for Step 3, for the
lower pump (23).

a. Disconnect delivery line (25) from lower pump (23).

b. Install cover (18), O-ring seal (17), flange (15), bolt (14), and washer (13) to the end of delivery
line (25).
c. Disconnect return line (26) from swing motor (27).

d. Install tee (21) and two O-ring seals (20) to the swing motor (27) return port. Connect return line
(26) to tee (21).

e. Connect portable hydraulic tester (1) between lower pump (23) and tee (21) with two hoses (9).

f. Install pressure gauge (32) at power shift pressure tap (33). Install pressure gauge (30) at lower
pump tap (34). [A 49 000 kPa (7100 psi) pressure gauge can be used in place of pressure gauge (32)
and (30).] Tap (33) is used to measure the power shift pressure. Taps (31) and (34) are used to
measure the upper pump and lower pump delivery pressure.

g. Install multitach group (28) on engine (35). This is used to read engine speed.

Test Procedure

NOTE: Perform the upper and lower pump flow tests one at a time.

To prevent personal injury or equipment damage from failure of the


flow meter or associated circuit components because of blocked pump
flow, make sure before starting the engine that the flow meter valve (36)
is fully open (turned counterclockwise).

To prevent personal injury and/or equipment damage from failed lines


or components while the flow meter is returned to the open flow
position after a flow test, slowly open the flow meter valve and monitor
pump flow at the same time to make sure flow increases. If pump flow
does not increase as the flow meter is opened, shut the engine off and
determine what is causing the pump not to upstroke.

1. With the engine running, start the service program "Calibration Mode" and maintain the power shift
pressure at a constant pressure of 1770 ± 50 kPa (255 ± 7 psi). The power shift pressure is read at tap
(33), using pressure gauge (32).

NOTE: During this test, do not turn the starter switch to the OFF position to prevent any change in
power shift pressure. See the section in this module "Calibration Mode Stop Procedure".
NOTE: To start service program "Calibration Mode" see the section in this module "Calibration
Mode Start-up".

2. Slowly turn valve (36) of portable hydraulic tester (1) clockwise and record pump flow at each of
the following pressure points. Use pressure gauge (32) at tap (33) for this pressure reading.

P-Q Characteristic Curve

NOTE: Flow specifications given above are based on an engine speed of 1800 rpm. To get more
accurate test results, each of measurements should be corrected by calculating as follows.
Flow corrected = (Flow measured × 1800) ÷ RPM measured

3. Any flow readings must be done only in upstroke (pressure rise).

4. The pump flow changes approximately 10 liter/min. (2.6 U.S. gpm) for each 100 kPa (14 psi) of
power shift pressure.

Negative Flow Control Test


Illustration Of Flow Meter Tool Layout 1 (Negative Flow Control Test) (Main Pump)
(1) Portable hydraulic tester. (2) O-ring. (3) Adapter. (4) O-ring. (5) Nipple assembly. (6) Coupler assembly. (7) Reusable
coupling. (8) Sleeve. (9) Hose. (10) Fitting. (11) Plug. (12) O-ring. (13) Bolt. (14) Washer. (15) Flange. (16) Adapter. (17)
Rectangular seal. (18) Cover. (19) Coupling assembly. (20) O-ring. (21) Tee. (22) Upper pump. (23) Lower pump. (24)
Delivery line (upper pump). (25) Delivery line (lower pump). (26) Return line. (27) Swing motor.

Preparation (Upper Pump)


Circuit Diagram For Negative Flow Control Test (Upper Pump)
(1) Portable hydraulic tester. (9) Hose. (18) Cover. (22) Upper pump. (23) Lower pump. (24) Delivery line (upper pump).
(25) Delivery line (lower pump). (27) Swing motor. (28) Multitach. (29) Main control valves. (30) Gauge. (31) Tap (upper
pump). (32) Gauge. (33) Tee. (34) Tap (lower pump). (35) Tap. (36) Pilot oil manifold. (37) Negative flow control line.
(38) Test hose. (39) Plug. (40) Negative flow control line.

Pump Compartment
(9) Hose (upper pump charge line). (22) Upper pump. (23) Lower pump. (24) Delivery line (upper pump). (31) Tap (upper
pump). (37) Negative flow control line (upper pump).
Pilot Oil Manifold Compartment
(35) Tap.

Portable Hydraulic Tester (Flow Meter)


(1) Portable hydraulic tester (flow meter). (9) Hose. (28) Multitach. (41) Valve (flow meter).

Swing Motor Compartment


(9) Hose (return line from flow meter). (21) Tee. (27) Swing motor. (26) Return line.
Illustration Of Flow Meter Tool Layout 2 (Negative Flow Control Test) (Main Pump)
(12) O-ring seal. (22) Upper pump. (23) Lower pump. (32) Gauge. (33) Tee. (35) Tap. (36) Pilot oil manifold. (37)
Negative flow control line. (38) Hose assembly. (40) Negative flow control line. (42) Coupler assembly. (43) Nipple. (44)
O-ring seal. (45) Cap. (46) Plug.

1. Position the machine on level ground and stop the engine.

2. Release the pressure in the hydraulic system. See the section in this module "Release Of Pressure In
The Hydraulic System".

3. Install the following tools in accordance with flow meter tool layout illustration 1, flow meter tool
layout illustration 2, and circuit diagram.

a. Disconnect delivery line (24) from upper pump (22).

b. Install cover (18), O-ring seal (17), flange (15), bolt (14), and washer (13) to the end of delivery
line (24).

c. Disconnect return line (42) from swing motor (27).


d. Install tee (21) and two O-ring seals (20) to the swing motor (27) return port. Connect return line
(26) to tee (21).

e. Connect portable hydraulic tester (1) between upper pump (22) and tee (21) with two hoses (9).

f. Remove negative flow control line (37) from upper pump (22) and install plug (46) in open end of
negative flow control line (37). Install tee (33) and o-ring seal (44) to negative flow control line (37)
port of upper pump (22). Install nipple (43) and o-ring seal (12) to tee (33).

g. Install two couplers (42) to test hose assembly (38) and connect hose to nipple (43).

h. Connect hose (38) to tap (35) of pilot oil manifold (36).

i. Install second tee (33) to first tee with o-ring seal (44). Install nipple (43) and o-ring seal (12) in tee
(33).

j. Install pressure gauge (32) to second tee (33). Install pressure gauge (30) at upper pump tap (31). [A
49 000 kPa (7100 psi) pressure gauge can be used in place of pressure gauge (32) and (30).] Tap (35)
is used to measure the negative control flow. Taps (31) and (34) are used to measure the upper pump
and lower pump delivery pressure.

k. Install o-ring seal (44) and cap (45) on open end of tee (33).

l. Install multitach group (28) on to the engine. This is used to read engine speed.

4. Start the engine and place the power mode selector switch in Mode III position.

5. Place the engine speed dial at position "10" and maintain the maximum no load speed at 1860 ± 50
rpm with the AEC switch OFF. (Read the rpm three seconds elapsed time after the engine speed dial
has been placed in position "10").

6. Increase the hydraulic oil temperature to 55 ± 5°C (131 ± 9°F). To increase the oil temperature,
move the stick IN and OUT its full travel several times.

Preparation (Lower Pump)

Pump Compartment
(9) Hose (lower pump charge line). (23) Lower pump. (25) Delivery line (lower pump). (34) Tap (lower pump). (40)
Negative flow control line (lower pump).
Perform the same preparation as that described for the upper pump negative pump flow control test
except Step 3. Use the following procedure in replacement for Step 3, for the lower pump (23).

a. Disconnect delivery line (25) from lower pump (23).

b. Install cover (18), O-ring seal (17), flange (15), bolt (14), and washer (13) to the end of delivery
line (25).

c. Disconnect return line (26) from swing motor (27).

d. Install tee (21) and two O-ring seals (20) to the swing motor (27) return port. Connect return line
(26) to tee (21).

e. Connect portable hydraulic tester (1) between lower pump (23) and tee (21) with two hoses (9).

f. Remove negative flow control line (40) from lower pump (23) and install plug (46) in open end of
negative flow control line (40). Install tee (33) and o-ring seal (44) to negative flow control line (40)
port of lower pump (23). Install nipple (43) and o-ring seal (12) to tee (33).

g. Install two couplers (42) to test hose assembly (38) and connect hose to nipple (43).

h. Connect hose (38) to tap (35) of pilot oil manifold (36).

i. Install second tee (33) to first tee with o-ring seal (44). Install nipple (43) and o-ring seal (12) in tee
(33).

j. Install pressure gauge (32) to second tee (33). Install pressure gauge (30) at lower pump tap (34). [A
49 000 kPa (7100 psi) pressure gauge can be used in place of pressure gauge (32) and (30).] Tap (35)
is used to measure the negative control flow. Taps (31) and (34) are used to measure the upper pump
and lower pump delivery pressure.

k. Install o-ring seal (44) and cap (45) on open end of tee (33).

l. Install multitach group (28) on to the engine. This is used to read engine speed.

Test Procedure

NOTE: Perform the upper and lower pump negative flow control tests one at a time.

To prevent personal injury or equipment damage from failure of the


flow meter or associated circuit components because of blocked pump
flow, make sure before starting the engine that the flow meter valve (41)
is fully open (turned counterclockwise).
To prevent personal injury and/or equipment damage from failed lines
or components while the flow meter is returned to the open flow
position after a flow test, slowly open the flow meter valve and monitor
pump flow at the same time to make sure flow increases. If pump flow
does not increase as the flow meter is opened, shut the engine off and
determine what is causing the pump not to upstroke.

1. Place the power mode selector switch in the Mode III position.

2. Negative flow control test for the upper and lower pumps must be done one at a time.

3. Slowly turn valve (41) of portable hydraulic tester (1) clockwise until the pump delivery pressure
setting is 6850 kPa (1000 psi).

4. Adjust pilot relief valve of pilot oil manifold (36) until pressure gauge (32) connected to tee (33)
reads 2550 kPa (370 psi).

5. Record the negative control flow at the following pressure point.


P-Q Characteristic Curve [Negative Flow Control at 6850 kPa (1000 psi) Pump Delivery Pressure]
NOTE: Flow specifications given above are based on an engine speed of 1800 rpm. To get more
accurate test results, measured flow should be corrected by calculating as follows:

Flow corrected = (Flow measured × 1800) ÷ rpm measured

NOTE: Flow measurements must be taken only in pressure rise.

Pump Output Flow Adjustment

Pump Compartment
(1) Locknut. (2) Setscrew. (3) Locknut. (4) Setscrew.

Output flow adjustment procedure for the upper and lower pumps is the same. Setscrew (2) and
locknut (1) are for the upper pump and setscrew (4) and locknut (3) are for the lower pump.

Upper Pump Adjustment

1. Loosen locknut (1).

2. Turn setscrew (2) until adjusted to the correct specification.

Turning setscrew (2) 1/4 turn clockwise increases the flow rate approximately 18 liter/min (4.8
U.S.gpm) at a system pressure of 14 700 kPa (2150 psi) or 17 700 kPa (2550 psi) where the first stage
spring activates.

Turning setscrew (2) 1/4 turn clockwise increases the flow rate approximately 7 liter/min (1.9
U.S.gpm) at a system pressure of 23 500 kPa (3400 psi) or 34 300 kPa (5000 psi) where the second
stage spring activates.

Turning setscrew (2) counterclockwise decreases the flow rate by the same amount as shown in the
clockwise rotation.

3. Tighten locknut (1) to a torque of 12 ± 3 N·m (9 ± 2 lb ft).

Lower Pump Adjustment

To adjust the lower pump output flow do the same as that described above using setscrew (4) and
locknut (3) in place of setscrew (2) and locknut (1).
Maximum Pump Flow Adjustment

Pump Compartment
(5) Locknut. (6) Setscrew. (7) Setscrew. (8) Locknut.

Maximum pump flow adjustment procedure for the upper and lower pumps is the same. Setscrew (6)
and locknut (5) are for the upper pump and setscrew (7) and locknut (8) are for the lower pump.

Upper Pump Adjustment

1. Loosen locknut (5).

2. Turn setscrew (6) until adjusted to the correct specification.

Turning setscrew (6) 1/4 turn clockwise increases the flow rate approximately 1.3 liter/min (0.3
U.S.gpm).

Turning setscrew (6) 1/4 turn counterclockwise decreases the flow rate approximately 1.3 liter/min
(0.3 U.S.gpm).

3. Tighten locknut (5) to a torque of 55 ± 10 N·m (41 ± 7 lb ft).

Lower Pump Adjustment

To adjust the lower pump maximum flow do the same as that described above using setscrew (7) and
locknut (8) in place of setscrew (6) and locknut (5).

Negative Flow Control Adjustment


Pump Compartment
(9) Setscrew. (10) Locknut. (11) Setscrew. (12) Locknut.

Upper Pump Adjustment

Negative flow control adjustment procedure for upper and lower pumps is the same. Use setscrew (9)
for the upper pump and setscrew (11) for the lower pump.

1. Loosen locknut (10).

2. Turn setscrew (9) until adjusted to the correct specification.

Turning the setscrew 1/4 turn clockwise decreases the flow rate approximately 4 liter/min (1.1
U.S.gpm) at a system pressure of 2550 kPa (370 psi).

Turning the setscrew 1/4 turn counterclockwise increases the flow rate approximately 4 liter/min (1.1
U.S.gpm) at a system pressure of 2550 kPa (370 psi).

3. Tighten locknut (10) to a torque of 12 ± 3 N·m (9 ± 2 lb ft).

Lower Pump Adjustment

To adjust the lower pump negative flow control do the same as that described above using setscrew
(11) and locknut (12) in place of setscrew (9) and locknut (10).

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:13:36 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Disassembly and Assembly


320, 320 L & 320 N EXCAVATORS VEHICLE SYSTEMS
Media Number -SENR5458-02 Publication Date -01/11/2004 Date Updated -06/10/2009

SENR54580031

Main Hydraulic Pump & Pump Drive Coupling


SMCS - 5070-010

Remove & Install Main Hydraulic Pump & Pump Drive


Coupling

At operating temperature, the hydraulic oil tank is hot and under


pressure. Hot oil can cause burns. To prevent possible personal injury,
release the pressure in the implement hydraulic circuits (boom, stick
and bucket) before any hydraulic lines or components are disconnected
or removed.

1. Release the pressure in the hydraulic system as follows:

a. Fully retract the rod in the stick cylinder.


b. Adjust the position of the bucket so it will be flat on the ground when the boom is lowered.
c. Lower the boom until the bucket is flat on the ground.
d. Shut off the engine, and put the hydraulic activation control lever in the "Lock" position.
e. Move the control levers for the boom, bucket, stick and swing through their full travel
strokes. This will relieve any pressure that may be present in the pilot system.
f. Slowly loosen the air breather cap on the hydraulic oil tank to release the pressure.
g. Tighten the air breather cap on the hydraulic oil tank.
h. The pressure in the hydraulic system has now been released. Lines and components can now
be removed.
2. Remove the hood from the machine. The weight of the hood is 48 kg (105 lb).

3. Remove nine bolts (1) and the washers that hold cover assembly (2) in position. Remove the cover
assembly.

4. Remove two bolts (3) and support (4) from the machine.

5. Remove eleven bolts (5) and the washers that hold upper plate (6) and lower plate (7) in position.
Remove the upper and lower plates.

6. Remove clamp (8) that holds the muffler to the turbocharger.


7. Remove four nuts (9) from the clamps that hold the muffler in position. Remove muffler (10) from
the machine.

8. Disconnect pipe assembly (13) from the main hydraulic pump.

9. Put identification marks on the seven hydraulic hose assemblies that are connected to the main
hydraulic pump for installation purposes.

10. Disconnect five hose assemblies (11) and two hose assemblies (12) from the main hydraulic
pump.

NOTICE

The main hydraulic pump must be held level during removal and
installation to prevent binding of the pump drive coupling in the engine
flywheel.

11. Fasten a lifting strap and a hoist to main hydraulic pump (15) as shown. Remove twelve bolts (14)
and the washers that hold the main hydraulic pump to the flywheel housing.

12. While keeping the main hydraulic pump level, remove it and the drive coupling from the engine
flywheel and flywheel housing. The combined weight of the main hydraulic pump and the pump drive
coupling is 145 kg (320 lb).
13. Remove four socket head bolts (16) and coupling (17) from the flywheel.

14. Remove insert (18) from element (19).

15. Loosen two setscrews (21), and remove coupling assembly (20) from the main hydraulic pump.

16. Remove socket head bolt (22) and coupling assembly (23) from hub (25).

17. If necessary, remove two locating pins (24) from the hub.

18. Remove the other two coupling assemblies from the hub as in Steps 16 and 17.
NOTE: The following steps are for the installation of the main hydraulic pump and pump drive
coupling.

19. Assemble the coupling assembly. Install two locating pins (24) in hub (25).

20. Put coupling assembly (23) in position on hub (25). Install socket head bolt (22) that holds it.

21. Install the other two coupling assemblies on the hub as in Steps 19 and 20.

22. Be sure the splined shaft of the main hydraulic pump is clean and free of dirt and debris. Put a thin
coat of 5P0960 Multipurpose Grease on the splined shaft.

23. Install coupling assembly (20) on the splined shaft of the main hydraulic pump. Install the
coupling assembly until it is flush with the end of the splined shaft. If necessary, use a soft faced
hammer to locate the coupling assembly on the splined shaft. Use a straight edge to be sure the end of
the coupling assembly is even with the end of the splined shaft. Tighten two setscrews (21) that hold
the coupling assembly in position to a torque of 110 ± 10 N·m (80 ± 7 lb ft).
24. Install insert (18) in element (19).

25. Put coupling (17) in position on the engine flywheel. Install four socket head bolts (16) that hold
it. Tighten the socket head bolts to a torque of 215 ± 10 N·m (159 ± 7 lb ft).

26. Fasten a lifting strap and a hoist to main hydraulic pump (14). While holding the main hydraulic
pump level, put it in position on the engine flywheel housing. Be sure the coupling assemblies are in
alignment with each other. Push the main hydraulic pump against the engine flywheel housing.

27. Install twelve bolts (15) and the washers that hold the main hydraulic pump to the engine flywheel
housing.
28. Check the condition of the O-ring seals used in the ends of the hose assemblies and pipe assembly
that connect to the main hydraulic pump. If any of the seals are worn or damaged, use new parts for
replacement.

29. Connect two hose assemblies (12) and five hose assemblies (11) to the main hydraulic pump.
Connect pipe assembly (13) to the main hydraulic pump.

30. Reinstall muffler (10). Install the two clamps and four nuts (9) that hold the muffler.

31. Install clamp (8) that holds the muffler to the turbocharger.

32. Install lower plate (7) and upper plate (6). Install eleven bolts (5) and the washers that hold the
plates in position.

33. Reinstall support (4) and two bolts (3) that hold it.
34. Reinstall cover assembly (2) and nine bolts (1) and the washers that hold it.

35. Fill the hydraulic oil tank with oil to the correct level. See the Operation & Maintenance Manual
for the correct filling procedure.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:16:04 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Disassembly and Assembly


320, 320 L & 320 N EXCAVATORS VEHICLE SYSTEMS
Media Number -SENR5458-02 Publication Date -01/11/2004 Date Updated -06/10/2009

SENR54580027

Swing Drive
SMCS - 5459-010; 5459-017

Remove & Install Swing Drive

Start By:

a. remove swing motor

1. Thoroughly clean around the mounting area of the swing drive prior to removal.

2. Drain the oil from the swing drive into a suitable container. The capacity of the swing drive is 8
liters (2.1 U.S. gal).

3. Remove twelve bolts (2) and the washers that hold swing drive (1) in position.

4. Fasten tool (A) and a hoist to the swing drive as shown.


5. Remove two plugs (4) from the swing drive housing. Install two suitable size forcing screws in the
swing drive housing at the locations of plugs (4). Tighten the forcing screws evenly to separate the
swing drive from the main frame.

6. Remove swing drive (1) from the machine. The weight of the swing drive is 226 kg (495 lb).

NOTE: The following steps are for the installation of the swing drive.

7. Thoroughly clean the mating surfaces of the main frame and the swing drive housing.

8. Put 5P3931 Anti-Seize Compound on locating pin (3) in the main frame.

9. Put 1U8846 Gasket Maker on the mating surface of the main frame and the swing drive housing.

NOTE: During installation, the locating pin for the swing drive may come out of the swing drive
housing.

10. Fasten tool (A) and a hoist to swing drive (1). Put the swing drive in its original position on the
main frame. If locating pin (3) comes out of the swing drive housing, it can be reinstalled with a
hammer after the swing drive is in place.

11. Put 9S3263 Thread Lock on the threads of twelve bolts (2). Install the twelve bolts and washers
that hold the swing drive in place.

12. After installation of the swing motor, fill the hydraulic oil tank and the swing drive with oil to the
correct level. See the Operation & Maintenance Manual for the correct filling procedure.

End By:

a. install swing motor.

Disassemble & Assemble Swing Drive

Start By:

a. remove swing drive


1. Drain the oil from the swing drive. The capacity of the swing drive is approximately 8 liters (2.1
U.S. gal). Be sure the swing drive is thoroughly clean prior to disassembly. Fasten the swing drive to
tool (A). The weight of the swing drive is 223 kg (492 lb).

2. Remove sun gear (1) from the swing drive.

3. Put an alignment mark on the housing and the ring gear for assembly purposes. Remove sixteen
bolts (2) and the washers that hold the housing to the ring gear.

NOTE: It may be necessary to use a screwdriver to separate the housing from the ring gear.

4. Fasten tool (B) and a hoist to housing (3) as shown. Remove the housing. The weight of the
housing is approximately 14 kg (30 lb).
5. Use two persons to remove carrier assembly (4) from the ring gear. The weight of the carrier
assembly is approximately 22 kg (48 lb).

NOTE: Prior to disassembling carrier assembly (4), note the position of identification grooves (M) in
planetary gears (5).

6. Disassemble carrier assembly (4). Drive spring pin (6) into planetary shaft (7) with a hammer and a
punch.

7. Remove planetary shaft (7), two thrust washers (8), and planetary gear (5) from the carrier. Remove
bearing (9) from the planetary gear. Remove spring pin (6) from planetary shaft (7) with a hammer
and a punch.

8. Remove the other two planetary gears from the carrier as in Steps 6 and 7.
9. Remove snap ring (11), and slide sun gear (10) out of the carrier.

10. Remove snap ring (12) from sun gear (10).

11. Fasten tool (B) and a hoist to ring gear (13) as shown. Remove the ring gear from the lower carrier
assembly. The weight of the ring gear is 39 kg (85 lb).

12. Bend lock washer (15) straight, and remove bolt (14) from the end of the pinion shaft. Use two
persons to remove carrier assembly (16). The weight of the carrier assembly is 36 kg (80 lb).
NOTE: Prior to disassembling carrier assembly (16), note the position of identification grooves (N)
in planetary gears (19).

13. Disassemble carrier assembly (16). Drive spring pin (18) into planetary shaft (17).

14. Remove planetary shaft (17), two thrust washers (20) and planetary gear (19) from the carrier.
Remove two bearings (21) from the planetary gear. Drive spring pin (18) out of planetary shaft (17)
with a hammer and a punch.

15. Remove the other two planetary gears from the carrier as in Steps 13 and 14.

16. Remove retainer (22) and the two shims from the carrier. Remove the spring pin from retainer
(22). Put identification marks on the shims as to their location in the swing drive.
17. Remove outer race (23) from the carrier by hand.

18. Remove the swing housing and the pinion shaft from tool (A). Put the swing housing and pinion
shaft on its side as shown. The weight of the unit is 111 kg (245 lb).

19. Put an alignment mark on the cage and swing housing for assembly purposes. Remove six bolts
(24) and the washers that hold the cage with the pinion shaft to the swing housing.

NOTICE

To prevent damage to the pinion shaft during removal with a press,


put wood blocks under the component as shown in Photo C28709P1.

20. Put the swing casing and pinion shaft in a press as shown. Put wood blocks under the pinion shaft.
Press the pinion shaft and cage out of the swing housing as a unit.
21. Remove spacer (25) from the pinion shaft by hand.

22. Remove pinion shaft (28) from bearing (26) and cage (27) with a press as shown.

23. Remove bearing (26) from cage (27) with tool (C) and a press as shown.

24. Remove two oil seals (29) from the cage.


25. Remove bearing (30) from the swing housing.

NOTE: The following steps are for the assembly of the swing drive.

26. Be sure all parts of the swing drive are thoroughly clean and free of dirt and debris prior to
assembly. Reassemble the swing drive on tool (A).

27. Install two oil seals (29) in cage (27) as shown in Illustration C29993P1. Put a thin coat of 5P0960
Multipurpose Grease between the lips of the seals.

28. Install bearing (26) in cage (27) with tool (C) and a press. Install the bearing until it makes contact
with the counterbore in the seal cover.
NOTICE

Do not damage oil seals (29) during installation of pinion shaft (28) in
the cage. Also, be sure to support bearing (26) as shown in Photo
C29994P1.

29. Put a thin coat of 5P0960 Multipurpose Grease on surface (F) of the pinion shaft. Install pinion
shaft (28) cage cover (27) and bearing (26) with a press as shown. Install the pinion shaft until it seats
against the bearing in the seal cover.

30. Be sure the mating surfaces of the cage and the swing housing are clean and free of dirt and
debris. Put a bead of 1U8846 Gasket Maker on the mating surface of the cage. Install the cage with
the pinion shaft in the swing housing. Be sure the alignment marks made on each component during
disassembly line up with each other. Put a thin coat of 9S3263 Thread Lock on the threads of six
bolts (24). Install six bolts (24) and the washers that hold the cage and pinion shaft to the swing
housing.

31. Install spacer (25) over the pinion shaft.

32. Put a thin coat of clean SAE 30 oil on bearing (30). Install bearing (30) in the swing housing with
a plastic hammer. Be sure the bearing is seated against the counterbore in the swing casing.

33. Put a thin coat of 5P3931 Anti-Seize Compound on the inside diameter of outer race (23). Install
the outer race on carrier (16). Be sure the race is seated against the shoulder on the carrier.

NOTICE

Identification grooves (N) in planetary gears (19) must be facing the


side opposite outer race (23) after installation on carrier (16). See
Photo C28705P1 and Step 14 in the disassembly procedure.
NOTE: In the following step, only two of the planetary gears are installed in the carrier. The third
planetary gear will be installed after final installation of carrier assembly (16).

34. Assemble carrier assembly (16). Put clean SAE 30 oil on bearings (21). Install two bearings (21)
in planetary gear (19). Install a thrust washer (20) on each side of the planetary gear. Install the
planetary gear and thrust washers in the carrier. Be sure identification grooves (N) are facing in the
correct direction as noted. Install planetary shaft (17) in carrier (16) and through planetary gear (19).
Be sure the spring pin hole in the planetary shaft is in alignment with the spring pin hole in the carrier.
Install spring pin (18) in the carrier and into the planetary shaft. Install the spring pin until it is 2 to 3
mm (.078 to .118 in) below the outside surface of the carrier, and with the split in the spring pin
facing toward the top or bottom of the carrier. To prevent the spring pin from falling out, make a stake
mark on each side of the spring pin hole in the carrier. Each stake mark should be approximately 1.5
mm (0.10 in) from the spring pin hole.

35. Install another planetary gear in carrier (16) as in Step 34. Do not install the third planetary gear at
this time.

36. Use two persons to install carrier assembly (16) over the end of the pinion shaft. Be sure the
carrier assembly in completely seated. It may be necessary to use a press to seat the carrier assembly.

37. Measure the distance [dimension (X)] between the top surface of pinion shaft (27) to the end of
the splines in carrier assembly (16). Dimension (X) must be 0.100 to 0.300 mm (.0039 to .0118 in).

Determine the correct thickness of shims necessary to obtain this dimension.

NOTICE

Do not scratch the gear surface on retainer (22) when lock washer (15)
is bent over the head of bolt (14).
38. Install the spring pin in retainer (22). Install the correct thickness of shims determined in Step 37
and retainer (22) on the end of the pinion shaft. Put a thin coat of 9S3263 Thread Lock on the threads
of bolt (14). Install lock washer (15) and bolt (14) in the end of the pinion shaft. Use a hammer and
punch to install the spring pin just below the outside surface of retainer (22). Tighten bolt (14) to a
torque of 185 ± 25 N·m (137 ± 19 lb ft). Bend lock washer (15) against one of the flats on the bolt
head. Be sure there are no loose gaps between the lock washer and the head of the bolt.

39. Install the third planetary gear (19) in carrier assembly (16) as in Step 34.

40. Put 1U8846 Gasket Maker on the mating surface of ring gear (13). Fasten tool (B) and a hoist to
ring gear (13), and install it over carrier assembly (16).

41. Install snap ring (12) on sun gear (10).

42. Install sun gear (10) in carrier (4). Install snap ring (11) that hold the sun gear in place in the
carrier.

NOTICE

Identification grooves (M) in planetary gears (5) must be facing away


from sun gear (10), after installation in carrier (4). See Photo
C28699P1 and Step 7 in the disassembly procedure.

43. Assemble carrier assembly (4). Put clean SAE 30 oil on bearing (9). Install bearing (9) in
planetary gear (5). Install a thrust washer (8) on each side of the planetary gear. Install the planetary
gear and thrust washers in carrier (4). Be sure identification grooves (M) are facing in the correct
direction.

Install planetary shaft (7) in carrier (4) and through planetary gear (5). Be sure the spring pin hole in
the planetary shaft (7) is in alignment with the spring pin hole in the carrier. Install spring pin (6) in
the carrier and into the planetary shaft. Install the spring pin until it is 2 to 3 mm (.078 to .118 in)
below the outside surface of the carrier, and with the split in the spring pin facing toward the top or
bottom of the carrier. To prevent the spring pin from falling out, make a stake mark on each side of
the spring pin hole in the carrier. Each stake mark should be approximately 1.5 mm (0.10 in) from the
spring pin hole.

44. Install the other two planetary gears in carrier (4) as in Step 43.

45. Use two persons to install carrier assembly (4) in the ring gear. Be sure the carrier assembly is not
tilted after installation.

46. Put 1U8846 Gasket Maker on the flange of the ring gear.

47. Fasten tool (B) and a hoist to housing (3) as shown. Install the housing in its original position on
the ring gear.
48. Put a thin coat of 9S3263 Thread Lock on the threads of bolts (2). Install bolts (2) and the
washers that hold the housing to the ring gear. Tighten the bolts to a torque of 255 ± 25 N·m (189 ±
19 lb ft).

49. Install sun gear (1) in carrier assembly (4).

50. Fill the swing drive with clean oil prior to installation of the swing motor. See the Operation &
Maintenance Manual.

End By:

a. install swing drive

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:17:12 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Specifications
320, 320L, 320N AND 320S EXCAVATOR HYDRAULIC SYSTEM
Media Number -SENR5453-03 Publication Date -01/01/2000 Date Updated -11/10/2001

Travel Motor
SMCS - 5459-010; 5459-017

NOTICE
To prevent damage to the motor, the case must be filled with hydraulic
oil at least to the fill port before operation.

(1) Tighten two stoppers to a torque of ... 140 ± 15 N·m (105 ± 11 lb ft)

Apply a small amount of hydraulic oil on sliding surfaces of piston (2), guide (3), barrel (5) and
pistons (11) before assembly.

(4) 964389 Spring:

Free length ... 33.7 mm (1.33 in)

Outside diameter ... 7.5 mm (.30 in)

(6) Torque for bolts ... 175 ± 20 N·m (120 ± 15 lb ft)

Quantity ... nine

(9) 957380 Spring:

Length under test force ... 13 mm (.5 in)

Test force ... 14.3 N (3.21 lb)

Free length ... 15 mm (.6 in)

Outside diameter ... 11.7 mm (.50 in)

To insure;

a. The motor output shaft does not rotate with a torque of 325 N·m (240.5 lb ft) or less with
parking brake release port (8) open to the air.
b. The motor output shaft rotates with a torque of 29 N·m (21.5 lb ft) or below, when parking
release port is pressurized to 780 kPa (115 psi) with both inlet and outlet ports open to the
hydraulic tank.

Use the following shims (7) as required.

NOTE: During this test, turn the output shaft clockwise.

(7) 961521 Shim:

Thickness of one shim ... 1.0 mm (.04 in)

(7) 963785 Shim:

Thickness of one shim ... 1.2 mm (.05 in)

(7) 963786 Shim:


Thickness of one shim ... 1.4 mm (.06 in)

(7) 963787 Shim:

Thickness of one shim ... 1.6 mm (.06 in)

(7) 963788 Shim:

Thickness of one shim ... 1.8 mm (.07 in)

(7) 961522 Shim:

Thickness of one shim ... 2.0 mm (.08 in)

(10) Apply 5P3413 Sealant on lip seal before assembly.

Torque for plugs ... 14.7 ± 1.5 N·m (11 ± 1 lb ft)

Quantity ... 10

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:18:20 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Specifications
320, 320L, 320N AND 320S EXCAVATOR HYDRAULIC SYSTEM
Media Number -SENR5453-03 Publication Date -01/01/2000 Date Updated -11/10/2001

Swing Motor
SMCS - 5459-010; 5459-017

NOTICE

To prevent damage to the motor, the case must be filled with hydraulic
oil at least to the fill port before operation.
(1) Torque for relief valve ... 177 ± 17.7 N·m (130 ± 13 lb ft)

Quantity ... two

Relief valve pressure setting ... 24 000 ± 490 kPa (3500 ± 72 psi)

(2) Torque for nut ... 160 ± 30 N·m (120 ± 22 lb ft)

Quantity ... two

(3) Torque for plug ... 120 ± 10 N·m (85 ± 7 lb ft)

Quantity ... two

(4) 4I7792 Spring:

Free length ... 36 mm (1.4 in)

Outside diameter ... 10.9 mm (.43 in)

Quantity ... two

(5) 7I7965 Spring:

Free length ... 47.8 mm (1.88 in)

Outside diameter ... 21.5 mm (.85 in)

Quantity ... two

(6) 5I8622 Spring:

Free length ... 36.6 mm (1.44 in)

Outside diameter ... 17.9 mm (.70 in)

Quantity ... 20

(7) 5I8422 Spring:

Free length ... 67.8 mm (2.67 in)

Outside diameter ... 51.0 mm (2.01 in)

(8) Torque for plug ... 220 ± 22 N·m (165 ± 16 lb ft)

Quantity ... two

(9) 7Y4268 Spring:

Free length ... 48.5 mm (1.91 in)


Outside diameter ... 18.7 mm (.74 in)

Quantity ... two

(10) 5I8739 Spring:

Free length ... 17.2 mm (.68 in)

Outside diameter ... 12.4 mm (.49 in)

(11) 5I8738 Spring:

Free length ... 34.9 mm (1.37 in)

Outside diameter ... 17.8 mm (.70 in)

(12) 5I8747 Spring:

Free length ... 38.4 mm (1.51 in)

Outside diameter ... 25.7 mm (1.01 in)

(13) Torque for valve ... 70 ± 7 N·m (50 ± 5 lb ft)

(14) Torque for plug ... 16.7 ± 1.7 N·m (12 ± 1 lb ft)

Quantity ... two

(15) 4I5809 Spring:

Free length ... 20.8 mm (.82 in)

Outside diameter ... 5.6 mm (.22 in)

(16) 4I5808 Spring:

Free length ... 32.3 mm (1.27 in)

Outside diameter ... 9.6 mm (.38 in)

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:19:04 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Disassembly and Assembly


320, 320 L & 320 N EXCAVATORS VEHICLE SYSTEMS
Media Number -SENR5458-02 Publication Date -01/11/2004 Date Updated -06/10/2009

SENR54580022

Travel Brake Valves


SMCS - 4112-010; 4112-017

Remove & Install Travel Brake Valves

At operating temperature, the hydraulic oil tank is hot and under


pressure. Hot oil can cause burns. To prevent possible personal injury,
release the pressure in the implement hydraulic circuits (boom, stick
and bucket) before any hydraulic lines or components are disconnected
or removed.

1. Release the pressure in the hydraulic system as follows:

a. Fully retract the rod in the stick cylinder.


b. Adjust the position of the bucket so it will be flat on the ground when the boom is lowered.
c. Lower the boom until the bucket is flat on the ground.
d. Shut off the engine, and put the hydraulic activation control lever in the "Lock" position.
e. Move the control levers for the boom, bucket, stick and swing through their full travel
strokes. This will relieve any pressure that may be present in the pilot system.
f. Slowly loosen the air breather cap on the hydraulic oil tank to release the pressure.
g. Tighten the air breather cap on the hydraulic oil tank.
h. The pressure in the hydraulic system has now been released. Lines and components can now
be removed.
2. Remove six bolts (1) and the washers that hold cover assembly (2). Remove cover assembly (2)
from the inside rear of the undercarriage frame assembly.

3. Disconnect pipes (5) and (6) from the travel brake valve. Put plugs in the pipes to keep dirt and
debris out of the hydraulic system.

4. Remove six socket head bolts (3) that hold travel brake valve (4) to the travel motor. Using two
persons, remove the travel brake valve. The weight of the travel brake valve is 24 kg (54 lb). Remove
the three O-ring seals from the travel motor.

NOTE: The following steps are for the installation of the travel brake valve.

5. Thoroughly clean the travel brake valve and the mating surface on the travel motor.

6. Check the condition of the three O-ring seals used between the travel brake valve and the travel
motor. If the seals are worn or damaged, use new parts for replacement. Install the three O-ring seals
in the travel motor. Put clean hydraulic oil on the seals.

7. Install travel brake valve (4) and six socket head bolts (3) that hold it. Tighten the bolts to a torque
of 80 ± 8 N·m (60 ± 6 lb ft).

8. Check the condition of the O-ring seals in two pipes (5) and (6). If the seals are worn or damaged,
use new parts for replacement. Install the O-ring seals in the pipes. Connect them to the travel brake
valve in their original locations.

9. Fill the hydraulic oil tank with oil to the correct level. See the Operation & Maintenance Manual
for the correct filling procedure.

10. Start the machine, and check for leaks. Reinstall cover assembly (2) and bolts (1) and the washers
that hold it.
Disassemble & Assemble Travel Brake Valves
Start By:

a. remove travel brake valves

1. Thoroughly clean the outside of the travel brake valve prior to disassembly.

NOTICE

During disassembly of the travel brake valve, mark all components as


to their location in the valve assembly. Do not mix the parts.

There is spring pressure behind caps (2) which may cause the assembly
to fly apart when cap mounting bolts (1) are removed. To prevent
possible personal injury, remove only two cap mounting bolts (1) that
are diagonal to each other. Then, alternating between the two
remaining cap mounting bolts, slowly loosen them a small amount at a
time, until the spring pressure is completely released.

2. Remove two cap mounting bolts (1) that are diagonal to each other. Then, alternating between the
two remaining cap mounting bolts, slowly loosen them a small amount at a time, until the spring
pressure is released.

3. Remove the other cap (2) as in Step 2.


NOTE: Plunger assemblies (3) and spool assembly (9) should not be disassembled. Each component
is serviced as an assembly.

4. Remove plunger assemblies (3), springs (4) and washers (5) from the valve body. Remove spool
assembly (9) from the valve body.

5. Remove O-ring seals (6) from the valve body and O-ring seals (7) from the connectors on the valve
body.

6. Remove relief valve assemblies (8) from the valve body.

NOTE: Spacers (13) may have remained in the valve body during removal of relief valve assemblies
(8).

7. Disassemble the relief valve assemblies. Remove spacers (13) from the valve body. Remove back-
up rings (10), O-ring seal (14), O-ring seal (11) and back-up ring (12) from the relief valves.

8. Loosen nut (15). Remove screw (16), plug (17), spring (20) and retainer (21) from body (22).
Remove back-up ring (18) and O-ring seal (19) from plug (17).

9. Remove seat (27) and valve (23) from body (22). Remove back-up rings (24) and (26) and O-ring
seal (25) from seat (27).
NOTE: The following steps are for the assembly of the travel brake valve.

10. Thoroughly clean all parts of the travel brake valve prior to assembly.

11. Assemble relief valves (8) as indicated in Steps 12 through 14.

12. Check the condition of back-up rings (24) and (26) and O-ring seal (25). If the rings and seal are
worn, use new parts for replacement. Install back-up rings (24) and (26) and O-ring seal (25) on seat
(27). Put a thin coat of 1U6396 Assembly Compound on the back-up rings and O-ring seal. Install
valve (23) and seat (27) in body (22).

13. Check the condition of back-up ring (18) and O-ring seal (19). If the ring and seal are worn or
damaged, use new parts for replacement. Install back-up ring (18) and O-ring seal (19) on plug (17).
Put a thin coat of 1U6396 Assembly Compound on the back-up ring and O-ring seal. Install retainer
(21), spring (20) and plug (17) in body (22). Install screw (16) and nut (15). Tighten nut (15) to a
torque of 70 ± 7 N·m (50 ± 5 lb ft).

14. Check the condition of back-up rings (10) and (12) and O-ring seals (11) and (14). If the rings and
seals are worn or damaged, use new parts for replacement. Install back-up ring (12) and O-ring seal
(11) on the relief valve. Install back-up rings (10) and O-ring seal (14) on the relief valve as shown.

15. Put a thin coat of 1U6396 Assembly Compound on the back-up rings and O-ring seals of the
relief valves. Install spacers (13) and relief valves (8) in their original location in the valve body.
Tighten the relief valves to a torque of 195 ± 20 N·m (145 ± 15 lb ft).

NOTICE

Be sure the outer surface and the spool guides in each end of spool
assembly (9) are thoroughly clean prior to installation in the valve
body.

16. Put a thin coat of clean hydraulic oil on spool assembly (9), and install it in the valve body.

17. Check the condition of O-ring seals (6). If the seals are worn or damaged, use new parts for
replacement. Install O-ring seals (6) in the valve body.

18. Be sure plungers (3) are thoroughly clean prior to installation in the valve body. Put a thin coat of
clean hydraulic oil on plungers (3). Install washers (5), springs (4) and plungers (3) in their original
locations in the valve body.

NOTE: To compress springs (4) during installation of covers (2), longer cover mounting bolts must
temporarily be used. Two travel brake valve mounting bolts are suitable in length and can be used in
this application.

19. Temporarily install caps (2) with two longer mounting bolts. Tighten the two bolts evenly until the
spring is compressed and the cap is against the valve body. Install two original cap mounting bolts (1)
to hold the cap; then replace the temporary bolts with the original cap mounting bolts. Tighten cap
mounting bolts (1) to a torque of 80 ± 8 N·m (60 ± 6 lb ft).

20. Install the other cap (2) as in Step 19.

NOTE: After installation of the travel brake valve, relief valves (8) can be adjusted. See the "Testing
And Adjusting" module for the correct adjustment procedure.

End By:

a. install travel brake valves

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:19:48 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Disassembly and Assembly


320, 320 L & 320 N EXCAVATORS VEHICLE SYSTEMS
Media Number -SENR5458-02 Publication Date -01/11/2004 Date Updated -06/10/2009

SENR54580023

Travel Motors
SMCS - 4351-010; 4351-017

Remove & Install Travel Motors


NOTE: Prior to removing the travel brake valve for removal of the travel motor, drain the oil from
the final drive into a suitable container. To drain the oil, put the drain plug in the final drive at the
bottom position by moving the machine. Remove the drain plug to drain the oil. The capacity of the
final drive is 16 liters (4.2 U.S. gal).

Start By:

a. remove travel brake valves

View From Right Rear Side Of Undercarriage Frame Assembly

NOTE: Six socket head bolts (2) hold the travel motor to the final drive.

1. Remove two upper socket head bolts (2) that hold the travel motor to the final drive. Install two
guide bolts, that are slightly longer than the original mounting bolts, in the upper two mounting bolt
holes.
2. Disconnect hose assemblies (1) and (5) from the travel motor. Put plugs in the hose assemblies to
keep dirt and debris out of the hydraulic system.

3. Move hose assemblies (1) and (5) and two pipes (4) clear of the travel motor.

4. Remove the four remaining socket head bolts (2) that hold travel motor (3) to the final drive. Using
two persons, slide travel motor (3) out on the guide bolts. Fasten a hoist to travel motor (3), and
remove it from the final drive. The weight of the travel motor is 66 kg (145 lb).

5. Remove the O-ring seal from the body of the travel motor.

NOTE: The following steps are for the installation of the travel motor.

6. Thoroughly clean the mating surfaces of the travel motor and final drive prior to installation of the
travel motor.

7. Check the condition of the O-ring seal used on the body of the travel motor. If the seal is worn or
damaged, use a new part for replacement. Install the O-ring seal on the body of the travel motor. Put a
thin coat of clean hydraulic oil on the O-ring seal.

8. Fasten a hoist to travel motor (3). Position the travel motor on the two guide bolts. Use two persons
to slide travel motor (3) into position in the final drive. Install the four lower socket head bolts (2) that
hold the travel motor. Remove the guide bolts from the upper mounting bolt holes, and install two
upper socket head bolts (2). Tighten the six socket head bolts (2) evenly.

9. Check the condition of the O-ring seal used in the ends of hose assemblies (1) and (5) and two
pipes (4). If the seals are worn or damaged, use new parts for replacement. Install the O-ring seals in
the hose assemblies and pipes. Connect hose assemblies (1) and (5) and two pipes (4) to the travel
motor in their original locations.

10. Fill the final drive with oil to the correct level. See the Operation & Maintenance Manual for the
correct filling procedure.

End By:

a. install travel brake valves

Disassemble & Assemble Travel Motors


Start By:

a. remove travel motors

1. Thoroughly clean the outside of the travel motor prior to disassembly. Fasten the travel motor to a
suitable holding fixture in a vertical position. The weight of the travel motor is 66 kg (145 lb).
2. Put an alignment mark across the head and body of the travel motor for assembly purposes. The
head must be reinstalled in its original position on the travel motor body.

NOTICE

During removal of head (2) from the travel motor body, do not scratch
or damage the mating surfaces of the components.

3. Remove nine socket head bolts (1) and head (2) from the travel motor body.

4. Turn head (2) over, and remove O-ring seal (6), shims (5), port plate (4) and bearing (3) from the
head. Remove the two check valve assemblies from the head.

NOTE: There is a retainer located under spring (9). This retainer is a press fit in head (2). Do not
remove the retainer.

5. Install a small diameter rod in hole (X). Tap the rod with a plastic hammer to remove spring (9),
poppet (8) and seat (7) from the head.
6. Remove three fittings (10) and four plugs (11) from the head. Remove the O-ring seal from each
fitting.

7. Remove three O-ring seals (12) and washer set (13) from the travel motor body.

8. Place a shop towel over brake piston (14). While retaining brake piston (14) by hand, apply shop
air pressure (free of water) of approximately 525 kPa (75 psi) to brake release port (Y). Brake piston
(14) will move up and out of the piston guide. Remove brake piston (14) from the travel motor body.

9. Remove O-ring seals (15) and (17) and back-up rings (16) and (18) from the brake piston.

10. Remove piston guide (19) and three friction plates and three steel plates (20) from the travel motor
body.
11. Remove O-ring seal (21) and back-up ring (22) from the piston guide.

NOTICE

Do not let the components of barrel assembly (23) come apart during
removal from the travel motor body. All components in the barrel
assembly must be reinstalled in their original locations.

12. Using two large screwdrivers as shown, slowly remove barrel assembly (23) from the travel motor
body so the components do not fall apart.

13. Shoe retainer (24) and piston shoe assemblies (25) are not serviced separately. Prior to removal of
the shoe retainer and piston shoe assemblies from barrel (26), put identification marks on piston shoe
assemblies (25) as to their location in shoe retainer (24) and barrel (26). The piston shoe assemblies
must be reinstalled in their original bores in the shoe retainer and the barrel.

14. Remove shoe retainer (24) and piston shoe assemblies (25) from barrel (26). Separate the piston
shoe assemblies from the shoe retainer.
15. Remove guide (27), spacer (28) and nine springs (29) from the barrel.

16. Remove cam plate (30) from the travel motor body.

17. Put identification marks on two balls (31) and two keys (32) as to their location in the travel motor
body. Remove two balls (31) and two keys (32) from the travel motor body.

18. Remove O-ring seal (33) from the travel motor body.

19. Using a soft faced hammer, remove shaft (34) from the travel motor body in the direction shown.
20. Remove retaining rings (35) from each side of bearing (36). Push shaft (34) out of bearing (36)
with a press.

21. Remove inner race (37) from shaft (34).

22. Remove lip-type seal (38) from the travel motor body.
23. Measure the amount that each cam plate tension adjuster protrudes above the outside of the travel
motor body. Record these dimensions for installation purposes. Remove the two cam plate tension
adjusters from the travel motor body. Loosen two nuts (39), and remove two adjusters (40), two
springs (43) and two pistons (44) from the travel motor body. Remove O-ring seal (42) and back-up
ring (41) from each adjuster (40).

NOTE: The following steps are for assembly of the travel motor.

24. Be sure all parts of the travel motor are thoroughly clean and free of dirt and debris prior to
assembly.

25. Install retaining ring (35) in the groove on shaft (34). Install bearing (36) on shaft (34) with a
press. Install the bearing until it makes contact with the retaining ring. Install the other retaining ring
(35) on the other side of bearing (36).

26. Install inner race (37) on the end of shaft (34) until it is seated against the shoulder on the shaft.
27. Put a thin coat of 5P3413 Pipe Sealant on surfaces (Y) of the travel motor body. Install lip-type
seal (38) in the body with the lip of the seal facing in as shown. Be sure the seal makes contact with
the counterbore in the body after installation.

NOTICE

During installation of shaft (34) in the travel motor body, rotate the
shaft slowly to be sure it does not bind.

28. Put clean hydraulic oil on the lip of lip-type seal (38). Install shaft (34) in the travel motor body
with a press. Rotate the shaft slowly during installation, making sure it does not bind. Be sure the
bearing on the shaft makes contact with the counterbore in the body.
NOTICE

The locating pin on each key (32) is not centered. To prevent damage to
barrel assembly (23) during assembly of the travel motor, the keys
must be installed as shown in the illustration. Also, the keys must be
installed in their original locations in the travel motor body.

29. Install two keys (32) in the travel motor body as shown.

30. Install cam plate (30) in the travel motor body in its original position. Be sure the machined
cutouts in the cam plate engage with the keys.
31. Install nine springs (29) in the barrel. Install spacer (28) and guide (27) on the barrel.

32. Install piston shoe assemblies (25) in their original bores in shoe retainer (24).

33. Put clean hydraulic oil in the bores of the barrel and on piston shoe assemblies (25). Install the
piston shoe assemblies with the shoe retainer in their original bores in barrel (26).

NOTICE

Prior to installing barrel assembly (23), be sure cam plate (30) is


correctly engaged on keys (32). When the travel motor body is tilted to
allow installation of barrel assembly (23), cam plate (30) can slide off of
keys (32). The remainder of the travel motor can be assembled with the
cam plate out of position, however extensive parts damaged will occur
during the remaining assembly procedure. Use the procedure which
follows to prevent parts damage.

34. Put clean hydraulic oil on the sliding surfaces of the cam plate, the piston shoe assemblies and on
the splined shaft of the motor.
35. Route a piece of strong string through one of the openings for the cam plate tension adjusters, over
the sliding surface of cam plate (30), and out the other opening for the cam plate tension adjusters.
Hold the string tight to keep cam plate (30) properly engaged with keys (32). While keeping the string
tight, put the travel motor body on its side. Do not release the tension on the string at this time. Install
barrel assembly (23) on the shaft as a unit. Pull the string out of the travel motor body. It may be
necessary to pull the barrel assembly and piston shoe assemblies away from the cam plate a small
amount to release the string.

36. Check the condition of the O-ring seal and the back-up ring used on piston guide (19). If the seal
or ring are worn or damaged, use new parts for replacement. Install O-ring seal (21) and back-up ring
(22) on piston guide (19) as shown.

37. Put the travel motor body in a vertical position.

38. Put clean hydraulic oil on three friction plates and three steel plates (20). Install the plates in
alternating order in the travel motor body. Start with a friction plate and end with a steel plate.

39. Put 1U6396 O-ring Assembly Compound on the O-ring seal and the back-up ring on piston
guide (19). Install the piston guide in the travel motor body until it makes contact with the
counterbore in the body.
40. Be sure brake piston (14) is thoroughly clean and free of dirt and debris. Check the condition of
back-up rings (16) and (18) and O-ring seals (15) and (17). If the rings or seals are worn or damaged,
use new parts for replacement. Install back-up rings (16) and (18) and O-ring seals (15) and (17) on
brake piston (14) as shown. Put a coat of 1U6396 Assembly Compound on the back-up rings and O-
ring seals.

41. Put a thin coat of clean hydraulic oil on the surface of the travel motor body which makes contact
with piston (14). Install piston (14) in the travel motor body by hand. It may be necessary to use a soft
faced hammer to seat the piston properly.
42. Install washer set (13) in the piston (14) as shown.

43. Check the condition of three O-ring seals (12). If the seals are worn or damaged, use new parts for
replacement. Install three O-ring seals (12) in the travel motor body as shown.

44. Check the condition of the O-ring seals used on fittings (10). If the seals are worn or damaged, use
a new parts for replacement. Install the O-ring seals on fittings (10). Put 5P3413 Pipe Sealant on the
threads of fittings (10). Install the fitting in the head as shown.

45. Reinstall four plugs (11) in the head.

46. Put a thin coat of 9S3263 Thread Lock on the threads of the two check valves that fit in the head.
Install the check valves in the head, and tighten them.
47. Install seat (7), poppet (8) and spring (9) in the head at location (X).

48. Check the condition of O-ring seal (6). If the seal is worn or damaged, use a new part for
replacement. Install O-ring seal (6) in the head as shown.

49. Install bearing (3) in the head until it makes contact with the counterbore in the cover. Put 1U6396
O-ring Assembly Compound on port plate (4). Install the port plate in its original position on the
motor cover.

50. Shims (5) are available in several different thicknesses. Use the correct thickness of shims (5) so
that:

a. The motor output shaft does not rotate with a torque of 325 N·m (240 lb ft) or more with the
parking brake release port open the air.
b. The motor output shaft rotates with a torque of 29 N·m (21 lb ft) or below, when the parking
brake release port is pressurized to 790 kPa (114.5 psi) with both inlet and outlet ports open to
the hydraulic tank.

51. Put a thin layer of 5P0960 Multipurpose Grease on shims (5). Install the shims on the head. The
grease will hold the shims in place during installation of the head on the travel motor body.

52. Put head (2) in its original position on the travel motor body. Install nine socket head bolts (1) that
hold the head in place. Tighten the socket head bolts to a torque of 177 ± 18 N·m (131 ± 13 lb ft).
53. Check the condition of O-ring seals (42) and back-up rings (41) used on adjusters (40). If the seals
or rings are worn or damaged, use new parts for replacement. Install the O-ring seals and back-up
rings on adjusters (40) in the positions shown.

54. Reinstall the two cam plate tension adjusters in the travel motor body. Install two balls (31), two
pistons (44), two springs (43) and two adjuster (40) in the travel motor body. Install two nuts (39), but
do not tighten them at this time.

55. Tighten adjusters (40) until each one protrudes above the outside surface of the travel motor body
as measured in Step 23. Use a depth micrometer to check each dimension. After adjusting the height
of the each adjuster (40), tighten nuts (39) to a torque of 140 ± 14 N·m (105 ± 10 lb ft).

56. Check the condition of O-ring seal (37). If the seal is worn or damaged, use a new part for
replacement. Install the O-ring seal on the travel motor body as shown.

NOTICE

To prevent possible damage to the travel motor, the unit should be


filled with oil at least up to the fill port prior to operation. See the
Operation & Maintenance Manual for the correct oil specification.

End By:

a. install travel motors

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:20:35 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Disassembly and Assembly


320, 320 L & 320 N EXCAVATORS VEHICLE SYSTEMS
Media Number -SENR5458-02 Publication Date -01/11/2004 Date Updated -06/10/2009

SENR54580026

Swing Motor
SMCS - 5058-010; 5058-017

Remove & Install Swing Motor


1. Prior to removing the swing motor, clean the swing motor and the area around it.

At operating temperature, the hydraulic oil tank is hot and under


pressure. Hot oil can cause burns. To prevent possible personal injury,
release the pressure in the implement hydraulic circuits (boom, stick
and bucket) before any hydraulic lines or components are disconnected
or removed.

2. Release the pressure in the hydraulic system as follows:

a. Fully retract the rod in the stick cylinder.


b. Adjust the position of the bucket so it will be flat on the ground when the boom is lowered.
c. Lower the boom until the bucket is flat on the ground.
d. Shut off the engine, and put the hydraulic activation control lever in the "Lock" position.
e. Move the control levers for the boom, bucket, stick and swing through their full travel
strokes. This will relieve any pressure that may be present in the pilot system.
f. Slowly loosen the air breather cap on the hydraulic oil tank to release the pressure.
g. Tighten the air breather cap on the hydraulic oil tank.
h. The pressure in the hydraulic system has now been released. Lines and components can now
be removed.
3. Mark the position of the swing motor in relation to the swing drive so it can be reinstalled in its
original position.

4. Drain the oil from the swing drive into a suitable container. The capacity of the swing drive is 8
liters (2.1 U.S. gal).

5. Put identification marks on all hose assemblies connected to the swing motor for installation
purposes.

6. Disconnect hose assemblies (1) and (2) from the swing motor.

7. Disconnect hose assemblies (3) and (4) from the swing motor.

8. Fasten a lifting strap and a hoist to swing motor (5) as shown.

9. Remove sixteen bolts (6) and the washers that hold the swing motor to the swing drive. Remove the
swing motor from the swing drive. The weight of the swing motor is 57 kg (125 lb).

NOTICE
The O-ring seal used between the swing motor and swing drive may
stay with either component during removal of the swing motor. Do not
loose this O-ring seal.

NOTE: The following steps are for the installation of the swing motor.

10. Be sure the mating surfaces of the swing motor and swing drive are thoroughly clean and dry.

11. Check the condition of the O-ring seal used between the swing motor and swing drive. Also,
check the condition of the O-ring seals used in the ends of all hose assemblies that are connected to
the swing motor. If any of the seals are worn or damaged, use new parts for replacement.

12. Install the O-ring seal on the swing motor. Put clean oil on the O-ring seal.

13. Fasten a hoist to swing motor (5), and put it in its original position in the swing drive. Install
sixteen bolts (6) and the washers that hold it.

14. Reconnect hose assemblies (1), (2), (3) and (4) in their original locations on the swing motor.

NOTICE

To prevent damage to the swing motor, the case must be filled with
hydraulic oil at least to the fill port prior to operation.

15. Fill the hydraulic oil tank and swing drive with oil to the correct level. See the Operation &
Maintenance Manual for the correct filling procedures.

16. Start the machine, and check the operation of the swing drive. Also, check for leaks.

17. Reinstall the cover assembly over the swing motor.

Disassemble & Assemble Swing Motor

Start By:
a. remove swing motor

NOTE: The disassembly and assembly procedure which follows is for a swing motor which has a
swing parking brake attachment.

1. Be sure the swing motor is clean and free of dirt and debris prior to disassembly.

2. Put the swing motor on wood blocks as shown. Put identification marks on each relief valve
assembly (1) as to its location in the swing motor. Remove two relief valves (1).

3. Disassemble relief valve assemblies (1) as follows:

a. Remove O-ring seal (2) and back-up ring (3) from each relief valve assembly.

b. Remove plug (4).


c. Remove O-ring seal (6) and back-up ring (5) from the plug.

d. Remove spring (7).

e. Remove seat (8).

f. Remove locknut (9).


g. Remove body (10).

h. Remove retainer (11).

i. Remove insert (12) and insert (13) from the body.


j. Remove O-ring seal (14) and back-up ring (15) from the body.

k. Remove spring (16) from the body.


l. Remove retainer (17) from the body.
m. Remove valve spool (18) from the body.

NOTICE

Put identification marks on the components of each make-up valve (19)


as they are removed from the head of the swing motor. The
components of each make-up valve must be reinstalled in their original
locations.

4. Remove two make-up valve (19) from the head of the swing motor. Remove plugs (20), springs
(21) and valves (22). Remove O-ring seal (23) from each plug.
5. Put an alignment mark on head (25) so it can be reinstalled in its original position on the swing
motor body.

6. Remove four socket head bolts (24) and head (25) from the swing motor body.

7. Remove O-ring seal (26) and plate (27) from the head.

8. Remove bearing (28) from the head. If necessary, remove two pins (29) from the head.

9. Remove twenty springs (30) from the piston.


NOTICE

During removal of the barrel assembly (31) from the swing motor, do
not let the components come apart. All parts in the barrel assembly
must be reinstalled in their original locations.

10. Put the swing motor on its side as shown. Remove barrel assembly (31) from the shaft in the body.

11. Disassemble barrel assembly (31) as follows:

a. Put identification marks on nine piston assemblies (33), as to their location in plate (34) and
barrel (32). Remove nine pistons (33) and plate (34), as a unit, from barrel (32). Separate the
piston assemblies from the plate.

b. Remove bushing (35) from the barrel. Remove spacer (36).


NOTE: There are twelve pins (37) in barrel (32). Two pins are used in each hole location.

c. Remove twelve pins (37) from the barrel.

There is spring force against spacer (38). When retaining ring (39) is
removed, the spring force will be released. To prevent possible personal
injury, removal of the internal components in barrel (32) should be
performed in a press in order to retain spring (40) and spacer (38).

d. Put barrel (32) in a press. Install a suitable size drive plate that is slightly smaller in diameter
then spacer (38), on spacer (38). Put a slight amount of compression on spacer (38) with the
press. Remove retaining ring (39) with tool (A), and slowly release the spring compression.
Remove spacer (38), spring (40) and spacer (41) from barrel (32).
NOTICE

Plate (42) has beveled edges only on one side as shown. To prevent
damage to the swing motor, the plate must be reinstalled in its original
position.

12. Note the position of plate (42) in the swing motor body. Remove plate (42) from the swing motor
body.

13. Place a shop towel over piston (43). While retaining piston (43) by hand, apply shop air pressure
(free of water) of approximately 525 kPa (75 psi) to the brake release port as shown.

Piston (43) will move up and out of the swing motor body.

14. Remove three separator plates and two friction plates (44).
15. Use tool (B) to remove retaining ring (45).

16. Using a soft faced hammer, remove shaft assembly (46) from the swing motor body.

17. Remove two O-ring seals (48) from the swing motor body.

18. Remove bearing (47) from the swing motor body.

19. Turn the swing motor body over. Use tool (C) to remove retaining ring (49). Remove plate (50)
from the swing motor body.

20. Remove seal (51) from the swing motor body.


21. Remove three bolts (52) and brake valve (53) from the swing motor body.

22. Disassemble brake valve (53) as follows:

a. Put identification marks on all internal components of brake valve (53) for assembly
purposes.
b. Remove three O-ring seals (54) from valve body (57).
c. Remove spring (55), spool (56), spring (58) and spool assembly (59) from valve body (57).

NOTE: The following steps are for the assembly of the swing motor.

23. Be sure all parts of the swing motor are clean and free of dirt and debris prior to assembly. Check
the condition of all parts in the swing motor. Guideline For Reusable Parts "Pistons Pumps And
Motors", Form No. SEBF8032-01 can be used as a guide for reconditioning and determining the
reusability of some parts.

24. Check the condition of all O-ring seals and back-up rings used in the swing motor and relief
valves. If any of the seals or rings are worn or damaged, use new parts for replacement.

25. Assembly brake valve (53) as follows:

a. Put clean hydraulic oil on the internal parts of the brake valve. Install spool (56), spool
assembly (59), spring (58) and spring (55) in valve body (57).
b. Install three O-ring seals (54) in valve body (57).

26. Install brake valve (53) on the swing motor body. Install bolts (52) that hold it in place.

27. Using tool (C), install retaining ring (49) in the swing motor body. Install plate (50) until it makes
contact with the retaining ring.

28. Install seal (51) in the swing motor body. Install the seal with the sealing lip facing in toward the
inside of the swing motor body and until it makes contact with plate (50). Lubricate the lip of the seal
with clean hydraulic oil.
29. Install bearing (47) in the swing motor body until it makes contact with the counterbore in the
body.

30. Install two O-ring seals (48) in the swing motor body. Lubricate the O-ring seals with clean
hydraulic oil.

31. Install shaft assembly (46) in the swing motor body. Using tool (B), install retaining ring (45).

NOTICE

The four tooth cut locations of each friction plate must be in alignment.
Also, the four tooth cut locations of each separator plate must be in
alignment in the swing motor body.

32. Put clean hydraulic oil on three separator plates and two friction plates (44). Install the plates in
alternating order in the body. Start with a separator plate, and end with a separator plate.

33. Install piston (43) in the swing motor body. The threaded holes in the piston can be used as a
guide during installation. If the piston is hard to install because of O-ring seal resistance, a soft faced
hammer can be used as an aid in installation.
34. Put a thin coat of 5P0960 Multipurpose Grease on the back side of plate (42). Install plate (42)
in the swing motor body. Install the plate with the beveled sides facing toward the inside of the swing
motor body.

35. Assemble barrel assemble (31) as follows:

a. Install spacer (41), spring (40) and spacer (38) in barrel (32). Put the barrel in a press. Install
a suitable size drive plate on spacer (38), and compress spring (40) until retaining ring (39) can
be installed. Use tool (A) to install retaining ring (39).

b. Install twelve pins (37) in the barrel.


c. Remove spacer (36) and bushing (35) on the barrel.

d. Put clean hydraulic oil on nine piston assemblies (33). Install the piston assemblies in their
original bores in plate (34). Install the plate with the piston assemblies in their original bores in
barrel (32).

NOTICE

Do not let the barrel assembly fall apart when ti is installed in the
body.

36. Put the swing motor body on its side. Install barrel assembly (31) in the body.
37. Install twenty springs (30) in the piston.

38. Install two pins (29) in the head. Install bearing (28).

39. Put 5P0960 Multipurpose Grease on the face of plate (27) that makes contact with the head.
Install plate (27) in its original position on the head. Install O-ring seal (26) in the head.

40. Put head (25) in its original position on the body. Install four socket head bolts (24) that hold it.
41. install two make-up valves (19) in the head. Install O-ring seal (23) on each plug (20). Install
valves (22), springs (21) and plugs (20) in the head. Tighten plugs (20) to a torque of 220 ± 20 N·m
(165 ± 15 lb ft).

42. Assemble relief valve assemblies (1) as follows:

a. Install valve spool (18) in the body.

b. Install retainer (17) in the body.


c. Install spring (16) in the body.
d. Install O-ring seal (14) and back-up ring (15) on the body as shown.
e. Install inserts (13) and (12) in the body.

f. Install retainer (11) in the body.

g. Install body (10).

h. Install locknut (9). Tighten the locknut to a torque of 155 ± 10 N·m (115 ± 7 lb ft) after
adjustment of each relief valve.
i. Install seat (8).

j. Install spring (7).

k. Install O-ring seal (6) and back-up ring (5) on plug (4).
l. Install plug (4) in the end of the relief valve assembly. Tighten the plug to a torque of 120 ±
10 N·m (85 ± 7 lb ft).
m. Install O-ring seal (2) and back-up ring (3) the relief valve assembly.

n. Install relief valve assemblies (1) in the head. Tighten the relief valve assemblies to a torque
of 175 ± 10 N·m (130 ± 7 lb ft).

NOTICE

To prevent damage to the swing motor, the unit must be filled with
hydraulic oil at least to the fill port before operation.

End By:

a. install swing motor

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:21:20 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Specifications
320, 320L, 320N AND 320S EXCAVATOR HYDRAULIC SYSTEM
Media Number -SENR5453-03 Publication Date -01/01/2000 Date Updated -11/10/2001

Main Pump
SMCS - 5058-010; 5058-017
Rotation is clockwise when seen from drive end.

NOTICE

The main pumps must be filled with hydraulic oil before operation or
damage will result. Add hydraulic oil through the fill port of each of
the main pumps.
Type of pump: Variable displacement, Bent-axis piston pump Bench test with SAE10W oil at 55 ± 5°
C (131 ± 12°F).

Output ... 179 ± 3 liter/min (47 ± .8 U.S. gpm)

At a delivery pressure of ... 9800 kPa (1425 psi)

With the power mode setting at ... Mode 3

At a power shift pressure of ... 1770 ± 50 kPa (255 ± 7 psi)

With pump at ... 1800 rpm

Output ... 167 ± 9 liter/min (44 ± 2.4 U.S. gpm)

At a delivery pressure of ... 13 700 kPa (2000 psi)

With the power mode setting at ... Mode 3

At a power shift pressure of ... 1770 ± 50 kPa (255 ± 7 psi)

With pump at ... 1800 rpm

(1) 995736 Spring:

Free length ... 21 mm (.8 in)

Outside diameter ... 11.3 mm (.44 in)

(2) 874758 Spring:

Free length ... 23 mm (.9 in)

Outside diameter ... 16.6 mm (.65 in)

(3) 995837 Spring:

Free length ... 126 mm (5.0 in)

Outside diameter ... 46 mm (1.8 in)

(4) 4I7868 Spring:

Free length ... 61 mm (2.4 in)

Outside diameter ... 31.4 mm (1.24 in)

(5) 4I7869 Spring:

Free length ... 37 mm (1.5 in)

Outside diameter ... 30.2 mm (1.19 in)


NOTE: Use as required the combination of the following shims (6) to acquire dimension (A) of ... 76
+ 0 - 0.05 mm (3.0 + 0 - .002 in):

(6) 9T3376 Shim:

Thickness of one shim ... 2.1 mm (.08 in)

(6) 9T3377 Shim:

Thickness of one shim ... 2.8 mm (.11 in)

(6) 9T3378 Shim:

Thickness of one shim ... 2.9 mm (.11 in)

(6) 9T3379 Shim:

Thickness of one shim ... 3.0 mm (.12 in)

(6) 9T3380 Shim:

Thickness of one shim ... 3.1 mm (.12 in)

NOTE: Use as required the combination of the following spacers (7) to acquire dimension (B) of ...
4.7 ± 0.05 mm (.19 ± .002 in):

(7) 9T3391 Spacer:

Thickness of one spacer ... 5.3 mm (.21 in)

(7) 9T3392 Spacer:

Thickness of one spacer ... 5.4 mm (.21 in)

(7) 9T3393 Spacer:

Thickness of one spacer ... 5.5 mm (.22 in)

(7) 9T3394 Spacer:

Thickness of one spacer ... 5.6 mm (.22 in)

(7) 9T3395 Spacer:

Thickness of one spacer ... 5.7 mm (.22 in)

(7) 9T3396 Spacer:

Thickness of one spacer ... 5.8 mm (.23 in)

(7) 9T3397 Spacer:


Thickness of one spacer ... 5.9 mm (.23 in)

Pilot Pump (Part Of Main Pump)


Type of pump ... Gear (pilot system)

Bench test with SAE 10W Oil at 55 ± 5°C (131 ± 12°F)

Rotation is clockwise when seen from drive end.

Output of pilot pump ... 22 ± 2 liter/min (5.8 ± .5 U.S. gpm)

At a pressure of ... 3450 kPa (500 psi)

With pump at ... 1800 rpm

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:22:08 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Disassembly and Assembly


320, 320 L & 320 N EXCAVATORS VEHICLE SYSTEMS
Media Number -SENR5458-02 Publication Date -01/11/2004 Date Updated -06/10/2009

SENR54580031

Main Hydraulic Pump & Pump Drive Coupling


SMCS - 5070-010

Remove & Install Main Hydraulic Pump & Pump Drive


Coupling

At operating temperature, the hydraulic oil tank is hot and under


pressure. Hot oil can cause burns. To prevent possible personal injury,
release the pressure in the implement hydraulic circuits (boom, stick
and bucket) before any hydraulic lines or components are disconnected
or removed.

1. Release the pressure in the hydraulic system as follows:

a. Fully retract the rod in the stick cylinder.


b. Adjust the position of the bucket so it will be flat on the ground when the boom is lowered.
c. Lower the boom until the bucket is flat on the ground.
d. Shut off the engine, and put the hydraulic activation control lever in the "Lock" position.
e. Move the control levers for the boom, bucket, stick and swing through their full travel
strokes. This will relieve any pressure that may be present in the pilot system.
f. Slowly loosen the air breather cap on the hydraulic oil tank to release the pressure.
g. Tighten the air breather cap on the hydraulic oil tank.
h. The pressure in the hydraulic system has now been released. Lines and components can now
be removed.
2. Remove the hood from the machine. The weight of the hood is 48 kg (105 lb).

3. Remove nine bolts (1) and the washers that hold cover assembly (2) in position. Remove the cover
assembly.

4. Remove two bolts (3) and support (4) from the machine.

5. Remove eleven bolts (5) and the washers that hold upper plate (6) and lower plate (7) in position.
Remove the upper and lower plates.

6. Remove clamp (8) that holds the muffler to the turbocharger.


7. Remove four nuts (9) from the clamps that hold the muffler in position. Remove muffler (10) from
the machine.

8. Disconnect pipe assembly (13) from the main hydraulic pump.

9. Put identification marks on the seven hydraulic hose assemblies that are connected to the main
hydraulic pump for installation purposes.

10. Disconnect five hose assemblies (11) and two hose assemblies (12) from the main hydraulic
pump.

NOTICE

The main hydraulic pump must be held level during removal and
installation to prevent binding of the pump drive coupling in the engine
flywheel.

11. Fasten a lifting strap and a hoist to main hydraulic pump (15) as shown. Remove twelve bolts (14)
and the washers that hold the main hydraulic pump to the flywheel housing.

12. While keeping the main hydraulic pump level, remove it and the drive coupling from the engine
flywheel and flywheel housing. The combined weight of the main hydraulic pump and the pump drive
coupling is 145 kg (320 lb).
13. Remove four socket head bolts (16) and coupling (17) from the flywheel.

14. Remove insert (18) from element (19).

15. Loosen two setscrews (21), and remove coupling assembly (20) from the main hydraulic pump.

16. Remove socket head bolt (22) and coupling assembly (23) from hub (25).

17. If necessary, remove two locating pins (24) from the hub.

18. Remove the other two coupling assemblies from the hub as in Steps 16 and 17.
NOTE: The following steps are for the installation of the main hydraulic pump and pump drive
coupling.

19. Assemble the coupling assembly. Install two locating pins (24) in hub (25).

20. Put coupling assembly (23) in position on hub (25). Install socket head bolt (22) that holds it.

21. Install the other two coupling assemblies on the hub as in Steps 19 and 20.

22. Be sure the splined shaft of the main hydraulic pump is clean and free of dirt and debris. Put a thin
coat of 5P0960 Multipurpose Grease on the splined shaft.

23. Install coupling assembly (20) on the splined shaft of the main hydraulic pump. Install the
coupling assembly until it is flush with the end of the splined shaft. If necessary, use a soft faced
hammer to locate the coupling assembly on the splined shaft. Use a straight edge to be sure the end of
the coupling assembly is even with the end of the splined shaft. Tighten two setscrews (21) that hold
the coupling assembly in position to a torque of 110 ± 10 N·m (80 ± 7 lb ft).
24. Install insert (18) in element (19).

25. Put coupling (17) in position on the engine flywheel. Install four socket head bolts (16) that hold
it. Tighten the socket head bolts to a torque of 215 ± 10 N·m (159 ± 7 lb ft).

26. Fasten a lifting strap and a hoist to main hydraulic pump (14). While holding the main hydraulic
pump level, put it in position on the engine flywheel housing. Be sure the coupling assemblies are in
alignment with each other. Push the main hydraulic pump against the engine flywheel housing.

27. Install twelve bolts (15) and the washers that hold the main hydraulic pump to the engine flywheel
housing.
28. Check the condition of the O-ring seals used in the ends of the hose assemblies and pipe assembly
that connect to the main hydraulic pump. If any of the seals are worn or damaged, use new parts for
replacement.

29. Connect two hose assemblies (12) and five hose assemblies (11) to the main hydraulic pump.
Connect pipe assembly (13) to the main hydraulic pump.

30. Reinstall muffler (10). Install the two clamps and four nuts (9) that hold the muffler.

31. Install clamp (8) that holds the muffler to the turbocharger.

32. Install lower plate (7) and upper plate (6). Install eleven bolts (5) and the washers that hold the
plates in position.

33. Reinstall support (4) and two bolts (3) that hold it.
34. Reinstall cover assembly (2) and nine bolts (1) and the washers that hold it.

35. Fill the hydraulic oil tank with oil to the correct level. See the Operation & Maintenance Manual
for the correct filling procedure.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:22:44 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Disassembly and Assembly


320, 320 L & 320 N EXCAVATORS VEHICLE SYSTEMS
Media Number -SENR5458-02 Publication Date -01/11/2004 Date Updated -06/10/2009

SENR54580032

Main Hydraulic Pump


SMCS - 5070-017

Disassemble & Assemble Main Hydraulic Pump

Start By:

a. remove main hydraulic pump and pump drive coupling

NOTICE

During disassembly of the main hydraulic pump, mark all components


so they can be reinstalled in their original locations. Mixing
components will shorten the service life of the pump.
1. Thoroughly clean the outside of the main hydraulic pump prior to disassembly.

2. Remove drain plug (1), and drain the hydraulic oil from the main hydraulic pump into a suitable
container.

3. Fasten the main hydraulic pump to tool (A) as shown.

4. Remove tube assembly (2) from the main hydraulic pump.

5. Remove twelve socket head bolts (3) that hold the head group in position.

6. Fasten tool (B) and a hoist to head group (4) as shown. Remove the head group from the main
hydraulic pump. The weight of the head group is 43 kg (95 lb).
7. Remove two dowels (5) from the main pump housing.

8. Remove two control plates (6) from the main hydraulic pump.

NOTE: Steps 9 through 27 are for the disassembly of the head group.

9. Remove eight socket head bolts (7) that hold pump control head groups (8) in position. Remove the
pump head groups from the housing.

10. Disassemble both pump control head groups. Remove O-ring seals (17) and (18) from housing
(11). Remove piston (14), bushing (13) and piston (12) from housing (11). Remove cover (9), seats
(16) and spring (10) from housing (11). Remove O-ring seal (15) from cover (9).

11. Remove pins (21), spools (20) and springs (19) from the housing.
There are two compressed springs behind housing assembly (23). When
six socket head bolts (22) are removed, the spring force will be released.
To prevent possible personal injury, slowly and evenly loosen the socket
head bolts while retaining the housing assembly.

12. While retaining housing assembly (23), slowly and evenly loosen six socket head bolts (22) to
release the spring force.

13. Remove housing assembly (23) from the head.

14. Disassemble housing assembly (23). Remove six O-ring seals (28) and two O-ring seals (29) from
housing (23). Remove two springs (24), two springs (25) and two spacers (26) from the housing.
Remove two sheets (27) from the housing.
15. Remove three plugs (30) from the housing.

16. Remove O-ring seal (31) from each plug (30).

17. Remove three bushings (32), the three valves and three seats from the housing.

18. Remove two guides (35), two springs (34) and two spacers (33).

19. Turn the head around. Remove eight socket head bolts (36) and two cover groups (37) from the
head.

20. Remove O-ring seals (38) and (39) from each cover group.
21. Remove two bolts (42), and two pistons (41) from the head. Remove ring (40) from each piston.

22. Using the appropriate size Allen wrench, loosen socket head screw (43) in each large piston in the
head. The socket head screws do not have to be completely removed.

23. Mark the positions of rods (44) prior to removing them from the large pistons in the head. The
rods can only fit the piston one way because of the locking setscrews.

24. Remove rods (44) from the large pistons. This will permit removal of the pistons from the head.

25. Remove pistons (45) from the head.


26. Remove guides (46) from the head.

27. Remove O-ring seals (47) and (49), packing (48) and back-up ring (50) from each guide (46).

28. Remove two cylinders (51) from the pistons in each pump rotating group.

29. Remove spacer (52) and four bevel spring washers (53) from each cylinder (51).
30. Remove fourteen screws (54) from each retaining plate (55).

31. Remove center pistons (56) and retaining plates (55) from the main pump housing.

32. Remove pistons (57) from the main pump housing.

33. Remove ring (58) from each piston (57).


34. Remove four socket head bolts (59) and plate (60) from the main pump housing.

35. Remove O-ring seal (61) from plate (60).

36. Install a 12 mm bolt in the end of gear assembly (62) as shown. Pull straight up on the bolt to
remove the gear assembly from the main pump housing.

37. Using tooling (C), removing bearing (63) from gear assembly (62).
38. Remove the main pump housing from tool (A). Turn the main pump housing over as shown.

39. Remove four socket head bolts (64) and gear pump (65) from the main pump housing.

NOTE: Only the O-ring seals and the plugs in gear pump (65) are serviceable. However, the gear
pump can be disassembled to be cleaned.

40. Remove O-ring seals (66) and (67) from gear pump (65).

41. Put an alignment mark (68) across the body and cover of gear pump (65) for assembly purposes.

42. Separate body (73) from cover (69). Remove O-ring seal (72) from cover (69).
43. Remove gear shaft (71) and ring gear (70) from cover (69).

44. Check the condition of bushing (74) in cover (69) and bushing (75) in body (73).

45. Remove bearing (76) from the main pump housing. The bearing is a slip fit.

46. Using tool (D), remove retaining ring (77). Remove cover (78).

47. Remove seal (79) from cover (78).


48. Remove O-ring seal (80) from the main pump housing.

49. Install a suitable size bolt (81) in the end of pump rotating group (82). Hit the end of the upper
pump rotating group to remove it from the main pump housing.

50. Remove plug (83) from the main pump housing. Install a suitable size bolt in threaded hole for
plug (83). Tighten the bolt to remove the lower pump rotating group from the main pump housing.

51. Disassemble the upper pump rotating group. Remove spanner nut (84). Remove bearing (85),
shims (86), bearing (87), spacer (88) and bearing (89) from the shaft.
52. Disassemble the lower pump rotating group. Remove spanner nut (90). Remove bearing (91),
shims (92), bearing (93), spacer (94) and bearing (95) from the shaft.

53. Fasten tool (E) to the shaft in the main pump housing using a suitable size bolt and washer. Use
tool (E) to remove the shaft from the main pump housing.

54. Remove gear (96) from the main pump housing. Sliding the gear to the center of the housing, and
remove it out the top.

55. Remove race (97) and bearing (98) from the main pump housing. The race and bearing are slip
fits.
NOTE: The following steps are for the assembly of the main hydraulic pump.

56. Be sure all parts of the main hydraulic pump are thoroughly clean and free of dirt and debris.
Check the condition of all O-ring seals, back-up rings, and gaskets. If any of these components are
worn or damaged, use new parts for replacement. Put clean hydraulic oil on all parts during assembly.

57. Install bearing (98) in its original position in the main pump housing. The bearing is a slip fit.
Install race (97) in bearing (98).

58. Heat gear (96) to a maximum temperature of 85 °C (185 °F). Lower the temperature of the shaft
to -40 °C (-40 °F). Place the preheated gear in the main pump housing, above the bearing. Install the
cooled shaft, with the attached race, through the gear and into the lower bearing. Note that the shaft
has a woodruff key and the gear has a corresponding slot. Install the upper bearing on the shaft. It is a
slip fit.

59. Assemble gear pump (65). Install ring gear (70) and gear shaft (71) in cover (69). Install O-ring
seal (72) in cover (69). Put body (73) in its original position on cover (69). Install O-ring seals (66)
and (67) in body (73).

60. Put gear pump (65) in position in the main pump housing, and install four socket head bolts (64)
that hold it.
61. Assemble both pump rotating groups for the main hydraulic pump as in Steps 62 through 65.

62. Heat bearing (95), spacer (94) and bearing (93) to a maximum temperature of 100 °C (212 °F).
Install the bearings and spacer on the shaft as shown.

63. install shims (92) so the distance between the top of the shim pack to the bottom of the lower
bearing [dimension (X) is 76 + 0 - 0.05 mm (2.99 + 0 - 0.002 in).

64. Heat bearing (91) to a maximum temperature of 100 °C (212 °F). Install the bearing on the
shaft as shown.

65. Put 9S3263 Thread Lock on the threads of the shaft of the pump rotating group. Install spanner
nut (90). For the correct bearing preload, turn the pump rotating group while tightening spanner nut
(90). The shaft running torque should be approximately 1 to 2 N·m (1 to 1.4 lb ft).

66. Lower the temperature of the upper and lower rotating pump groups to a temperature of -40 °C (-
40 °F). Install the upper and lower rotating pump groups in their original locations in the main pump
housing. Be sure the timing marks on each pump rotating group are in alignment with each other as
shown.

NOTE: If you are assembling with new parts, the rotating groups should be offset so that both pistons
are not hitting the Top Dead Center at the same time. Align the top of the piston socket on one side
with the middle tooth of the area between two piston sockets on the inverse rotating group.
67. Install O-ring seal (80) in the main pump housing.

68. Install seal (79) in cover (78). Install the seal with the lip facing toward the inside of the pump
housing and until it makes contact with the counterbore in the cover.

69. Install cover (78) in its original position in the main pump housing.

70. Using tool (D), install retaining ring (77) to hold cover (78) in position in the main pump housing.
71. Lower the temperature of gear assembly (62) to -40 °C (-40 °F). Raise the temperature of bearing
(63) to 85 °C (185 °F). Install bearing (63) on gear assembly (62).

72. Install gear assembly (62) in the main pump housing as shown.

73. Install O-ring seal (61) on plate (60).

74. Install plate (60) in the main pump housing. Install the four socket head bolts that hold it.

75. Install rings (58) on seven pistons (57). Install the pistons in their original locations in the pump
rotating group.
76. Install center piston (56) with retaining plate (55) in its original position over pistons (57). Be sure
the screw holes in the retaining plate are in alignment with the screw holes in the pump rotating
group.

NOTICE

Screws (54) that hold retaining plate (55) to the pump rotating group
must be tightened evenly. If the screws are not tightened correctly,
pistons (57) will bind in the retaining plate.

77. Put 9S3263 Thread Lock on the threads of the seven screws that hold the retaining plate to the
pump rotating group. Install the screws, and tighten them evenly.

78. Repeat Steps 75 through 77 for the other pump rotating group.

NOTICE

Bevel spring washers (53) are not flat. These washers should be
installed so they provide the maximum amount of height.

79. Install spacer (52) and four bevel spring washers (53) in each cylinder (51). Install the bevel
spring washers so they provide the maximum amount of height.
80. Install two cylinders (51) in their original locations on the pump rotating groups.

81. Reinstall two dowels (5) in the main pump housing as shown.

82. Reinstall two control plates (6) in their original positions on cylinders (51).

83. Assemble both pump control head groups. Install back-up ring (50), packing (48) and O-ring seals
(47) and (49) on each guide (46).

84. Install guides (46) in the head.

85. Install pistons (45) in the head.


86. Reinstall rods (44) in the large pistons in the head. Install the rods in their original positions. The
rods will fit only one way.

87. Tighten socket head screw (43) in each large piston in the head.

88. Install a ring (40) on each piston (41). Install piston (41) and bolt (42) in each large piston.

89. Install O-ring seal (39) on each cover group (38).


90. Put two cover groups (37) in position on the head. Install eight socket head bolts (36) that hold the
cover groups in position.

91. Install two spacers (33), two springs (34) and two guides (35) in the head.

92. Install the three seats, three valves and three bushings (32) in the housing.

93. Install an O-ring seal (31) on each plug (30). Install three plugs (30) in the housing.

94. Assemble housing assembly (23). Install two sheets (27) in housing (23). Install two spacers (26),
two springs (25), and two springs (24) in the housing. Install two O-ring seals (29) and six O-ring
seals (28) in housing (23).
95. Put housing assembly (23) in position on the head. Slowly and evenly tighten six socket head
bolts (22) to compress the springs in the housing assembly.

96. Install two springs (19), two spools (20) and two pins (21) in the housing assembly.

97. Assemble both pump control head groups. Install O-ring seal (15) on cover (9). Install spring (10),
seats (16) and cover (9) in housing (11).

98. Put both pump control head groups in position on the housing. Install eight socket head bolts (7)
that hold the pump control head groups in position.
99. Fasten tool (B) and a hoist to head group (4) as shown. Put the head group in position on the main
hydraulic pump.

100. Install the twelve socket head bolts that hold the head group to the main hydraulic pump.

101. Reinstall tube assembly (2) on the main hydraulic pump.

102. Be sure drain plug (1) is tight.

End By:

a. install main hydraulic pump and pump drive coupling

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:23:36 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Disassembly and Assembly


320, 320 L & 320 N EXCAVATORS VEHICLE SYSTEMS
Media Number -SENR5458-02 Publication Date -01/11/2004 Date Updated -06/10/2009

SENR54580025

Swivel Joint
SMCS - 5060-010; 5060-017

Remove & Install Swivel Joint

At operating temperature, the hydraulic oil tank is hot and under


pressure. Hot oil can cause burns. To prevent possible personal injury,
release the pressure in the implement hydraulic circuits (boom, stick
and bucket) before any hydraulic lines or components are disconnected
or removed.

1. Release the pressure in the hydraulic system as follows:

a. Fully retract the rod in the stick cylinder.


b. Adjust the position of the bucket so it will be flat on the ground when the boom is lowered.
c. Lower the boom until the bucket is flat on the ground.
d. Shut off the engine, and put the hydraulic activation control lever in the "Lock" position.
e. Move the control levers for the boom, bucket, stick and swing through their full travel
strokes. This will relieve any pressure that may be present in the pilot system.
f. Slowly loosen the air breather cap on the hydraulic oil tank to release the pressure.
g. Tighten the air breather cap on the hydraulic oil tank.
h. The pressure in the hydraulic system has now been released. Lines and components can now
be removed.

2. Clean the outside of the swivel joint and the area around the swivel joint prior to removal.

3. Disconnect hose assembly (1) from the top of the swivel joint.

4. Put identification marks on the five remaining hose assemblies (3) as to their location on the swivel
joint. Disconnect five hose assemblies (3) from the swivel joint. Put plugs in the ends of the hose
assemblies to keep dirt and debris out of the hydraulic system.

5. Remove the two bolts and the washers that hold setting plate (2) in position. Remove setting plate
(2).

6. Remove eight bolts (4).

7. Fasten tool (A) to the swivel joint as shown. Fasten a hoist to tool (A).

View From Under Machine


8. Put identification marks on hose assemblies (5) and (8) and tube assemblies (6) as to their location
on the bottom of the swivel joint. Disconnect the hose assemblies and tube from the bottom of the
swivel joint. Put plugs in the hose assemblies and tube assemblies to keep dirt and debris out of the
hydraulic system.

9. Cover the ports in the bottom of the swivel joint with tape to keep dirt and debris out of the unit.

10. Remove six bolts (7).

11. Remove the swivel joint from the machine. The weight of the swivel joint is 43 kg (95 lb).

NOTE: The following steps are for the installation of the swivel joint.

12. Be sure the threaded holes in the undercarriage frame assembly for mounting the swivel joint are
clean and free of dirt and debris.

13. Apply 1U8846 Gasket Maker to the surface of the undercarriage frame assembly on which the
swivel joint is installed.

14. Fasten tool (A) and a hoist to the swivel joint, and put it in its original position in the
undercarriage frame assembly. Be sure the identification mark on the bottom face of the swivel joint
is facing toward the front of the machine.

15. Put 9S3263 Thread Lock on the threads of six bolts (7). Install six bolts (7) in the bottom of the
swivel joint.

16. Remove the tape from over the ports in the bottom of the swivel joint. Check the condition of the
O-ring seals in the ends of hose assemblies (5) and (8) and tube assemblies (6). If the seals are worn
or damaged, use new parts for replacement. Connect the hose assemblies and tube assemblies in their
original location on the bottom of the swivel joint. Tighten hose assembly (8) to a torque of 30 ± 4
N·m (22 ± 3 lb ft).

17. Remove the hoist and tool (A) from the top of the swivel joint.

18. Install setting plate (3). Install the two bolts and washers that hold setting plate (2) in position.
Reinstall eight bolts (4).

19. Check the condition of the O-ring seals in the ends of the six hose assemblies that are connected to
the top of the swivel joint. If the seals are worn or damaged, use new parts for replacement. Connect
the six hose assemblies in their original location on the swivel joint. Tighten the four large hose
assemblies that are connected to the sides of the swivel joint to a torque of 190 ± 20 N·m (140 ± 15 lb
ft).

20. Fill the hydraulic oil tank with oil to the correct level. See the Operation & Maintenance Manual
for the correct filling procedure.

Disassemble & Assemble Swivel Joint


Start By:
a. remove swivel joint

1. Thoroughly clean the outside of the swivel joint prior to disassembly.

2. Remove four bolts (1) and cover (2) from outside housing (8). Remove O-ring seal (4) from the
outside housing.

3. Remove two bolts (5) and the washers and retainer (7) from rotor (9). Remove outside housing (8)
from rotor (9).

4. Turn the outside housing over, and remove O-ring seals (6) and seals (3) from the outside housing.

NOTE: The following steps are for the assembly of the swivel joint.

5. Be sure all parts of the swivel joint are clean and free of dirt and debris.

6. Check the condition of seals (3) and O-ring seals (6). If the seals are worn or damaged, use new
parts for replacement. Install seals (3) and O-ring seals (6) in outside housing (8). Put 5P0960
Multipurpose Grease on seals (3) and O-ring seals (6).

7. Install outside housing (8) over rotor (9). Install retainer (7) and two bolts (5) and the washers that
hold the retainer.

8. Check the condition of O-ring seal (4). If the seal is worn or damaged, use a new part for
replacement. Put 5P0960 Multipurpose Grease on O-ring seal (4). Install the seal in the outside
housing.

9. Install cover (2) and four bolts (1) that hold it.

10. Check the swivel joint for leaks. Plug the drain ports of the inside body. Apply shop air pressure
in the top of the swivel joint, and check for leaks.
End By:

a. install swivel joint

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:24:31 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Specifications
320, 320L, 320N AND 320S EXCAVATOR HYDRAULIC SYSTEM
Media Number -SENR5453-03 Publication Date -01/01/2000 Date Updated -11/10/2001

Main Control Valves


SMCS - 5060-010; 5060-017
(1) Torque for relief valve ... 160 ± 30 N·m (120 ± 22 lb ft)

Quantity ... two

(2) 1076370 Spring:

Free length ... 49.3 mm (1.94 in)

Outside diameter ... 15.5 mm (.61 in)

(3) 4T3148 Spring:


Free length ... 34.8 mm (1.37 in)

Outside diameter ... 5.4 mm (.21 in)

(4) Torque for plugs ... 215 ± 40 N·m (160 ± 30 lb ft)

Quantity ... six

(5) 1047294 Spring:

Free length ... 62.3 mm (2.54 in)

Outside diameter ... 36.0 mm (1.42 in)

(6) Torque for bolts: ... 50 ± 7 N·m (37 ± 5 lb ft)

Quantity ... four

Apply 9S3263 Thread Lock on threads of bolts.

(7) 5I4318 Spring:

Free length ... 39.0 mm (1.54 in)

Outside diameter ... 12.5 mm (.49 in)

(8) Torque for tongue ... 50 ± 7 N·m (37 ± 5 lb ft)

(9) Torque for nuts ... 61 ± 6 N·m (45 ± 4 lb ft)

Quantity ... four

(10) Torque for plugs ... 95 ± 9 N·m (70 ± 7 lb ft)

Quantity ... four

(11) Torque for valves ... 105 ± 20 N·m (75 ± 15 lb ft)

Quantity ... four

(12) 7I1248 Spring:

Free length ... 28.0 mm (1.10 in)

Outside diameter ... 8.7 mm (.34 in)

(13) 7I0976 Spring:

Free length ... 53.9 mm (2.12 in)

Outside diameter ... 13.1 mm (.52 in)


(14) Torque for guide ... 50 ± 7 N·m (37 ± 5 lb ft)

Apply 9S3263 Tread Lock on threads of guide.

(15) Torque for plug ... 50 ± 7 N·m (37 ± 5 lb ft)

(16) 6E5046 Spring:

Free length ... 33.0 mm (1.30 in)

Outside diameter ... 9.2 mm (.36 in)

(17) 6E5045 Spring:

Free length ... 30.0 mm (1.18 in)

Outside diameter ... 4.6 mm (.18 in)

(18) 1047295 Spring:

Free length ... 59.2 mm (2.33 in)

Outside diameter ... 36.0 mm (1.42 in)

(19) Apply 9S3263 Tread Lock on threads of bolt.

(20) Torque for plugs ... 105 ± 40 N·m (75 ± 15 lb ft)

Quantity ... two

(21) Torque for plugs ... 215 ± 40 N·m (160 ± 30 lb ft)

tx2>> Quantity ... two

(22) 1047296 Spring:

Free length ... 60.0 mm (2.36 in)

Outside diameter ... 36.0 mm (1.42 in)

(23) Torque for plug ... 215 ± 40 N·m (160 ± 30 lb ft)

Quantity ... two

(24) Torque for valve ... 135 ± 10 N·m (100 ± 7 lb ft)

(25) 6I6795 Spring:

Free length ... 30.0 mm (1.15 in)

Outside diameter ... 12.0 mm (.47 in)


(26) 4T3510 Spring:

Free length ... 35.6 mm (1.40 in)

Outside diameter ... 8.4 mm (.33 in)

(27) Torque for valve ... 75 ± 10 N·m (55 ± 7 lb ft)

(28) Torque for retainer ... 75 ± 10 N·m (55 ± 7 lb ft)

(29) Torque for nut ... 50 ± 10 N·m (37 ± 7 lb ft)

(30) 6E5169 Spring:

Free length ... 72.2 mm (2.84 in)

Outside diameter ... 17.67 mm (.70 in)

(31) 2S2596 Spring:

Free length ... 33.3 mm (1.31 in)

Outside diameter ... 8.3 mm (.33 in)

(32) Torque for bolts ... 50 ± 7 N·m (37 ± 5 lb ft)

Quantity ... four

Apply 9S3263 Tread Lock on threads of bolts.

(33) 6E5168 Spring:

Free length ... 25.4 mm (1.00 in)

Outside diameter ... 3.95 mm (.16 in)

(34) 1047293 Spring:

Free length ... 59.68 mm (2.35 in)

Outside diameter ... 36.0 mm (1.42 in)

(35) 6E2157 Spring:

Free length ... 45.5 mm (1.79 in)

Outside diameter ... 16.5 mm (.65 in)

(36) Torque for plug ... 50 ± 7 N·m (37 ± 5 lb ft)

(37) 3N3252 Spring:


Free length ... 38.2 mm (1.52 in)

Outside diameter ... 10.3 mm (.41 in)

(38) 7I7415 Spring:

Free length ... 38.8 mm (1.53 in)

Outside diameter ... 9.6 mm (.38 in)

Bench Test

Main relief valve pressure setting:

Travel ... 34 300 ± 490 kPa (5000 ± 72 psi)

Implements/swing ... 31 400 ± 490 kPa (4550 ± 72 psi)

Line relief valve pressure setting:

Boom, stick, bucket ... 33 800 ± 1470 kPa (4900 ± 215 psi)

Travel ... 36 800 ± 1470 kPa (5350 ± 215 psi)

Swing ... 29 400 ± 980 kPa (4250 ± 140 psi)

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:26:02 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Specifications
320, 320L, 320N AND 320S EXCAVATOR HYDRAULIC SYSTEM
Media Number -SENR5453-03 Publication Date -01/01/2000 Date Updated -11/10/2001

Pilot Control Valves


SMCS - 5060-010; 5060-017

Implements And Swing Pilot Control Valves


(1) Torque for nut ... 39 ± 4 N·m (29 ± 3 lb ft)

(2) Torque for joint ... 29 ± 3 N·m (21 ± 2 lb ft)

(3) 4I6370 Spring:

Free length ... 31.7 mm (1.25 in)

Outside diameter ... 8.8 mm (.35 in)

(4) 4I6368 Spring:

Free length ... 61.0 mm (2.40 in)

Outside diameter ... 16.6 mm (.65 in)


(5) 4I6367 Spring:

Free length ... 32.1 mm (1.26 in)

Outside diameter ... 8.8 mm (.35 in)

(6) Torque for bolt ... 36 ± 2 N·m (27 ± 1 lb ft)

Travel Pilot Control Valve

(1) Torque for set screw ... 12 ± 3 N·m (9 ± 2 lb ft)

Quantity ... two

(2) Torque for nut ... 55 ± 10 N·m (41 ± 7 lb ft)

Quantity ... two


(3) Torque for bolt ... 28 ± 7 N·m (21 ± 5 lb ft)

Quantity ... two

(4) 996142 Spring:

Free length ... 40.0 mm (1.57 in)

Outside diameter ... 10.0 mm (.39 in)

(5) 874707 Spring:

Free length ... 50.0 mm (1.97 in)

Outside diameter ... 20.7 mm (.81 in)

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:27:00 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Disassembly and Assembly


320, 320 L & 320 N EXCAVATORS VEHICLE SYSTEMS
Media Number -SENR5458-02 Publication Date -01/11/2004 Date Updated -06/10/2009

SENR54580037

Proportional Reducing Valve


SMCS - 5467-010; 5467-017

Remove & Install Proportional Reducing Valve


NOTE: The proportional reducing valve is located behind the right rear access door.

At operating temperature, the hydraulic oil tank is hot and under


pressure. Hot oil can cause burns. To prevent possible personal injury,
release the pressure in the implement hydraulic circuits (boom, stick
and bucket) before any hydraulic lines or components are disconnected
or removed.

1. Release the pressure in the hydraulic system as follows:

a. Fully retract the rod in the stick cylinder.


b. Adjust the position of the bucket so it will be flat on the ground when the boom is lowered.
c. Lower the boom until the bucket is flat on the ground.
d. Shut off the engine, and put the hydraulic activation control lever in the "Lock" position.
e. Move the control levers for the boom, bucket, stick and swing through their full travel
strokes. This will relieve any pressure that may be present in the pilot system.
f. Slowly loosen the air breather cap on the hydraulic oil tank to release the pressure.
g. Tighten the air breather cap on the hydraulic oil tank.
h. The pressure in the hydraulic system has now been released. Lines and components can now
be removed.
2. Disconnect wiring harness (4) from the clip. Disconnect wiring harness (4).

3. Disconnect two hose assemblies (1) from the proportional reducing valve.

4. Remove two socket head bolts (2) and proportional reducing valve (3) from the pilot manifold.

NOTE: Install the proportional reducing valve in the reverse order of removal.

5. Check the oil level in the hydraulic oil tank. Fill the hydraulic oil tank with oil to the correct level.
See the Operation & Maintenance Manual for the correct filling procedure.

Disassemble & Assemble Proportional Reducing Valve


Start By:

a. remove proportional reducing valve

1. Be sure the outside of the proportional reducing valve is clean and free of dirt and debris prior to
disassembly.

2. Remove O-ring seals (1) and (2) from the proportional reducing valve.
3. Remove two socket head bolts (3) and solenoid (4).

4. Remove fitting (6) from the valve body. Remove the O-ring seal from the fitting.

5. Remove O-ring seal (10), rod (9), spool (8) and spring (7) from the valve body (5).

NOTE: Assemble the proportional reducing valve in the reverse order of disassembly. Prior to
assembling the proportional reducing valve, be sure all parts are clean and free of dirt and debris. Put
clean hydraulic oil on the internal parts of the valve. Also, check the condition of the O-ring seals. If
the seals are worn or damaged, use new parts for replacement.

End By:

a. install proportional reducing valve

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:28:01 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Disassembly and Assembly


320, 320 L & 320 N EXCAVATORS VEHICLE SYSTEMS
Media Number -SENR5458-02 Publication Date -01/11/2004 Date Updated -06/10/2009

SENR54580034

Hydraulic Activation Control Valve


SMCS - 5130-010; 5130-017

Remove & Install Hydraulic Activation Control Valve

At operating temperature, the hydraulic oil tank is hot and under


pressure. Hot oil can cause burns. To prevent possible personal injury,
release the pressure in the implement hydraulic circuits (boom, stick
and bucket) before any hydraulic lines or components are disconnected
or removed.

1. Release the pressure in the hydraulic system as follows:

a. Fully retract the rod in the stick cylinder.


b. Adjust the position of the bucket so it will be flat on the ground when the boom is lowered.
c. Lower the boom until the bucket is flat on the ground.
d. Shut off the engine, and put the hydraulic activation control lever in the "Lock" position.
e. Move the control levers for the boom, bucket, stick and swing through their full travel
strokes. This will relieve any pressure that may be present in the pilot system.
f. Slowly loosen the air breather cap on the hydraulic oil tank to release the pressure.
g. Tighten the air breather cap on the hydraulic oil tank.
h. The pressure in the hydraulic system has now been released. Lines and components can now
be removed.
View From Under Cab

2. Remove seven bolts (1), the washers and spacers that hold access cover (2) in place. Remove the
access cover from under the cab.

View From Under Cab

3. Put identification marks on hose assemblies (6) that are connected to the hydraulic activation
control valve so they can be reinstalled in their original locations. Disconnect the hose assemblies
from the hydraulic activation control valve. Put plugs in the ends of the hose assemblies to keep dirt
and debris out of the hydraulic system.

4. Disconnect wiring harness (4) from the neutral switch.

5. Disconnect rod (5) from the hydraulic activation control valve.

6. Remove the two bolts and washers that hold hydraulic activation control valve (3) in place.
Remove the hydraulic activation control valve.

NOTE: The following steps are for the installation of the hydraulic activation control valve.

7. Put hydraulic activation control valve (3) in place under the cab. Install the two washers and bolts
that hold it.

8. Connect rod (5) to the hydraulic activation control valve.

9. Connect wiring harness (4) to the neutral switch in the hydraulic activation control valve.

10. Check the condition of the O-ring seals used in the hose assemblies that are connected to the
hydraulic activation control valve. If any of the seals are worn or damaged, use new parts for
replacement.
11. Connect hose assemblies (6) to the hydraulic activation control valve in their original locations.

12. Reinstall access cover (2) under the cab.

13. Check the oil level in the hydraulic oil tank. Fill the hydraulic oil tank with oil to the correct level.
See the Operation & Maintenance Manual for the correct filling procedure.

Disassemble & Assemble Hydraulic Activation Control Valve


Start By:

a. remove hydraulic activation control valve

1. Be sure the hydraulic activation control valve is thoroughly clean prior to disassembly.

2. Put identification marks on all hydraulic fittings in the valve body as to their location. Remove the
fittings from the valve body.

3. Mark the position of lever (12) on the end of valve spool (9) so it can be reinstalled in its original
position. Remove nut (13) and lockwasher (6). Remove lever (12) from the end of the valve spool.

4. Remove bolts (5) and retainer (4) from valve body (3). Remove bolts (1) and block (2) from valve
body (3). Slide valve spool (9) out of the valve body.

5. Remove rings (7) and (11) and seals (8) and (10) from the valve body.

NOTE: Assemble the hydraulic activation valve in the reverse order of disassembly. Prior to
assembly, be sure all parts of the valve are clean and free of dirt and debris. Put clean hydraulic oil on
the internal parts of the valve. Also, check the condition of the seals and rings. If any of the seals or
rings are worn or damaged, use new parts for replacement. Tighten nut (13) that holds lever (12) in
position to a torque of 12.5 ± 2.5 N·m (10 ± 2 lb ft).

End By:

a. install hydraulic activation control valve

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:29:02 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Systems Operation
3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5546-15 Publication Date -01/07/2013 Date Updated -30/07/2013

i02877884

Lubrication System
SMCS - 1300
Illustration 1 g01432304

Lubrication system schematic

(1) Turbocharger

(2) Valve mechanism

(3) Oil supply line

(4) Camshaft

(5) Fuel injection pump

(6) Oil cooler


(7) Main oil gallery

(8) Piston cooling jet

(9) Oil pressure relief valve

(10) Timing gear

(11) Oil filter

(12) Crankshaft

(13) Oil bypass valve

(14) Suction bell

(15) Oil pump

Under normal operation, the oil travels from the oil pan through the suction bell (14) to oil pump
(15) . Oil pump (15) sends warm oil through oil filter (11) to oil cooler (6) . Oil cooler (6) is mounted
in the path of the coolant on the right side of the engine block. Engine oil is cooled or engine oil is
warmed by the element of the oil cooler with the water in the cylinder block. When the pressure of the
oil system reaches 343 kPa (50 psi) oil pressure relief valve (9) opens. Excess oil flows to the oil pan
when oil pressure relief valve (9) opens. The oil pressure relief valve provides the main relief for the
lubrication system. The oil pressure relief valve is adjustable by the use of shims. If oil pressure relief
valve (9) does not open, increased oil pressures could result in component damage. Oil bypass valve
(13) is used as a backup to relieve system pressures. The valve is located on the bottom of the engine
block inside the oil pan. Oil bypass valve (13) will open if the lubrication system oil pressure reaches
981 ± 98 kPa (142 ± 14 psi).

Part of the oil is directed to fuel injection pump (5) and part of the oil is directed to timing gears (10)
from main oil gallery (7) . Oil is also supplied through oil supply line (3) for turbocharger (1) . Engine
oil flows through the inlet tube in the cartridge housing in order to lubricate the turbocharger bearings.
Oil travels from the drain of the turbocharger through an oil return line to the oil pan.

Oil is sent from main oil gallery (7) through drilled passages in the cylinder block. The passages in
the cylinder block connect main bearings and camshaft bearings. Oil travels through drilled holes in
crankshaft (12) in order to give lubrication to the connecting rod bearings. A small amount of oil is
sent through piston cooling jet (8) in order to cool the pistons. Oil travels through the grooves in the
camshaft bearing bore. The oil then travels into oil passages that connect to valve mechanism (2) . Oil
then flows from valve mechanism (2) to the bores of the tappet.

The oil travels back to the engine oil pan after the oil completes the process of lubrication.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:30:16 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Testing and Adjusting


3064 and 3066 Engines for Caterpillar Built Machines
Media Number -SENR5546-15 Publication Date -01/07/2013 Date Updated -30/07/2013

i01574562

Engine Oil Pump - Inspect


SMCS - 1304-040

If any part of the oil pump is worn enough in order to affect performance of the oil pump, the oil
pump must be replaced.

Perform the following procedures in order to inspect the oil pump. Refer to Specifications, "Engine
Oil Pump" for clearances and torques.

1. Remove the cover for the engine oil pump. Refer to the Disassembly and Assembly, "Engine
Oil Pump - Remove".

2. Clean all of the parts. Look for cracks in the metal or other damage.
Illustration 1 g00530573

Engine oil pump

(1) Driven gear assembly

(2) Drive gear assembly

(3) Oil pump gear

(4) Idler gear assembly

(5) Spindle

NOTICE

Before operation, the pump must be lubricated with clean engine oil
and the pump must turn freely by hand or damage to parts can be the
result.

Note: The minimum acceptable oil pressure at low idle is 100 kPa (15 psi).

Measure the backlash between the oil pump gear and the idler gear.

Note: Replace the gears if the backlash exceeds 0.35 mm (0.014 inch).

Note: The oil pump gear and the drive gear assembly are not serviceable if the oil pump gear is
removed.
Illustration 2 g00530644

(3) Oil pump gear

Note: Do not use a torch.

Heat the oil pump gear to 180° to 220°C (356° to 428°F) and support the end of the drive gear shaft in
order to install the oil pump gear. Press the oil pump gear until the oil pump gear is flush with the end
of the shaft.
Illustration 3 g00530697

(6) Housing for oil pump gear

Measure the difference in the length of the assembly for the oil pump gear. Measure the depth in the
oil pump housing.

Note: Replace the oil pump gear assembly if the clearance exceeds the service limit of 0.150 mm
(0.0059 inch).

Measure the clearance between the oil pump gears and the oil pump housing with a feeler gauge.

Note: Replace the oil pump gear assembly if the clearance exceeds the service limit of 0.100 mm
(0.0039 inch).
Illustration 4 g00530702

(6) Housing for oil pump gear

(7) Cover

Measure the inside diameters of the bores of the shafts in the cover (7) and the oil pump housing (6).
Measure the bores of the shafts.

Note: Replace the oil pump gear assembly, the cover, or the oil pump housing if the clearance
exceeds the service limit of 0.150 mm (0.0059 inch).

Note: Replace the drive gear and driven gear as an assembly.


Illustration 5 g00835890

(5) Spindle

(8) Idler gear bushing

Measure the inside diameter of the idler gear bushing.

Measure the diameter of the spindle.

Clean the surface of the oil pump cover (7). Install the cover to the oil pump housing (6). Install bolts
for the oil pump cover.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:30:55 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Specifications
320, 320L, 320N AND 320S EXCAVATOR HYDRAULIC SYSTEM
Media Number -SENR5453-03 Publication Date -01/01/2000 Date Updated -11/10/2001

Final Drive
SMCS - 1304

(1) Torque for bolts ... 530 ± 69 N·m (390 ± 50 lb ft)

Quantity ... 16
Apply 9S3263 Thread Lock on threads

(2) Apply 1U8846 Gasket Maker on the mating surfaces of the cover and housing.

Apply 5P3931 Anti-Seize Compound on surfaces where pin (3) and bearings (4) come in contact.

Bearings (4) preload adjustment procedure:

1. Put a load "P" of 4000 kg (8820 lb) on bearing (4).

2. Rotate housing (10) to seat the bearing.

3. Reduce load "P" to 1000 ± 100 kg (2200 ± 220 lb).

4. Measure dimension B.

5. Measure dimension (C) of gear (8).

6. Use a maximum of two shims (9), to obtain a total shim thickness of ... (A - B) ± 0.05 mm (.002
in).

Shim (9) thickness:

0961773 ... 0.15 mm (.006 in)

0961774 ... 0.30 mm (.012 in)

0961775 ... 0.40 mm (.016 in)

0961776 ... 0.50 mm (.020 in)

0961777 ... 0.60 mm (.024 in)

0961778 ... 0.70 mm (.028 in)

0961779 ... 0.80 mm (.031 in)

0961780 ... 1.00 mm (.039 in)

0961781 ... 1.60 mm (.063 in)

7. If two shims are used, the thinner one should be placed next to gear (8).

(5) O-rings of floating seal and all surfaces in contact with them must be clean and dry at assembly.
Put a thin layer of oil on the surfaces that make contact on the metal seals just before installation.

(6) Make stake marks near opening of each pin hole after installation, as indicated in VIEW A.

(7) Torque for bolts ... 270 ± 39 N·m (200 ± 29 lb ft)

Quantity ... 16
Apply 9S3263 Thread Lock on threads.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:32:31 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Disassembly and Assembly


320, 320 L & 320 N EXCAVATORS VEHICLE SYSTEMS
Media Number -SENR5458-02 Publication Date -01/11/2004 Date Updated -06/10/2009

SENR54580001

Duo-Cone Seals
SMCS - 7561-012; 7561-016

Assembly And Installation Of Conventional Duo-Cone Seals


This instruction gives the procedure for installing Conventional Duo-Cone Seals.

It is most important that correct assembly and installation procedures are followed when Duo-Cone
Seals are used. Many of the Duo-Cone Seal failures are the direct result of one or more mistakes made
during assembly or installation of the seal components.

(1) Seal (2) Rubber Toric Ring (3) Housing Retaining Lip (4) Housing Ramp (5) Seal Ring Housing
(6) Seal Ring Face (7) Seal Ring Ramp (8) Seal Ring Retaining Lip (9) Installation Tool.

1. Remove any oil film, dust or other foreign matter from toric rubber rings (2) and from ramps (4)
and (7) and lips (3) and (8) of both seal rings (1) and housings (5). Use isopropyl alcohol and clean
cloth or paper towels for wiping.

NOTICE

Never permit oil to get on the toric rings or ramps before both seal
rings are put together in their final assembled position (Step 10).

Avoid prolonged skin contact with isopropyl alcohol. Avoid breathing


the vapors in enclosed areas without adequate ventilation and do not
smoke. Do not use near open flame or welding operations or other
heated surfaces exceeding 482° C (900° F).
2. Put toric ring (2) on seal ring (1), at the bottom of seal ring ramp (7) and against retaining lip (8).

NOTICE

Make sure that toric ring (2) is straight on seal ring (1) and is not
twisted. Be careful when you work on the rubber toric ring. Nicks, cuts
and scratches can cause leaks.
3. Put installation tool (9) onto seal ring (1) with toric ring (2). Lower the rings into a container with
isopropyl alcohol until all surfaces of toric ring (2) are wet.

NOTICE

Do not use Stanisol or any other liquid that leaves an oil film or does
not evaporate quickly.

4. With all surfaces of toric ring (2) wet, use installation tool (9) to position seal ring (1) and toric ring
(2) squarely against housing (5) as shown. Use sudden and even pressure to pop (push) toric ring (2)
under retaining lip (3) of housing (5).
5. Check assembled height (A) in at least four places, 90° apart. The difference in height around the
ring must not be more than 1 mm (.04").

6. If small adjustments are necessary, do not push directly on seal ring (1); use installation tool (9).

7. Toric ring (2) can twist if it is not wet all around during installation or if there are burrs or fins on
retaining lip (3) of housing (5).

NOTICE

Misalignment, twists and bulges of the toric ring will cause Duo-Cone
Seal failures. If correct installation is not obvious, remove seal from
housing and repeat steps 3 thru 6.
IMPORTANT: Toric rings (2) must never slip on the ramps of either seal rings (1) or seal ring
housings (5). To prevent slippage, wait a minimum of two minutes to let the isopropyl alcohol
evaporate before further assembly. Once correctly in place, the toric ring must roll on the ramps only.

8. Wipe seal faces (6) of seal rings (1) clean. Use a lint free cloth or paper towl. No particles of any
kind are permissible on the sealing surfaces. Even a small piece from a paper towel can hold the seal
faces apart and cause leakage.
9. Put a thin film of clean oil on the seal faces. Use an applicator, a disposable tissue or a clean finger
to distribute the oil evenly. Be careful not to get any oil on the rubber toric rings.

10. Make sure both housings (5) are in correct alignment and are concentric. Move the parts slowly
and carefully toward each other.

NOTICE

Do not slam seals together. High impact can scratch or break the seal
components.
11. Once in place, fasten all parts tightly.

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:34:24 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.
Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product: EXCAVATOR
Model: 320 EXCAVATOR 2DL
Configuration: 320, 320L & 320N TRACK-TYPE EXCAVATORS 2DL00214-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3066 ENGINE

Disassembly and Assembly


320, 320 L & 320 N EXCAVATORS VEHICLE SYSTEMS
Media Number -SENR5458-02 Publication Date -01/11/2004 Date Updated -06/10/2009

SENR54580024

Final Drives
SMCS - 4050-010; 4050-017

Remove & Install Final Drives

Start By:

a. separate track assemblies

At operating temperature, the hydraulic oil tank is hot and under


pressure. Hot oil can cause burns. To prevent possible personal injury,
release the pressure in the implement hydraulic circuits (boom, stick
and bucket) before any hydraulic lines or components are disconnected
or removed.

1. Release the pressure in the hydraulic system as follows:

a. Fully retract the rod in the stick cylinder.


b. Adjust the position of the bucket so it will be flat on the ground when the boom is lowered.
c. Lower the boom until the bucket is flat on the ground.
d. Shut off the engine, and put the hydraulic activation control lever in the "Lock" position.
e. Move the control levers for the boom, bucket, stick and swing through their full travel
strokes. This will relieve any pressure that may be present in the pilot system.
f. Slowly loosen the air breather cap on the hydraulic oil tank to release the pressure.
g. Tighten the air breather cap on the hydraulic oil tank.
h. The pressure in the hydraulic system has now been released. Lines and components can now
be removed.

2. Remove access cover assembly (1) from over the rear side of the final drive.

3. Fasten tool (A) and a hoist to final drive (1). Put slight lifting tension on the final drive with the
hoist.

4. Disconnect hose assemblies (3) and (6) from the travel motor. Disconnect two pipes (5) from the
travel brake valve. Put plugs in the pipes and hose assemblies to keep dirt and debris out of the
hydraulic system.

5. Remove sixteen bolts (4) that hold the final drive to the undercarriage frame assembly.

6. Install suitable size forcing screws in two threaded holes (2) in the undercarriage frame assembly.
Tighten the forcing screws evenly to loosen the final drive from the undercarriage frame assembly.
Remove the final drive. The weight of the final drive is 404 kg (890 lb).
NOTE: The following steps are for the installation of the final drive.

7. Be sure the mating surfaces of the final drive and the undercarriage frame assembly are clean and
free of dirt and debris.

8. Check the condition of the O-ring seals in the ends of two pipes (5) and in hose assemblies (3) and
(6). If any of the seals are worn or damaged, use new parts for replacement.

9. Fasten tool (A) and a hoist to final drive (1), and put it in position in the undercarriage frame
assembly. Be sure all mounting bolt holes are in alignment.

10. Put a thin coat of 9S3263 Thread Lock on threads of sixteen bolts (4). Install sixteen bolts (4)
that hold the final drive to the undercarriage frame assembly. Tighten the bolts evenly.

11. Connect two pipes (5) to the travel brake valve. Connect hose assemblies (3) and (6) to the travel
motor.

12. Reinstall the access cover assembly over the rear of the final drive.

13. Check the oil level in the hydraulic oil tank. If necessary, fill it to the correct level. See the
Operation & Maintenance Manual for the correct filling procedure.

End By:

a. connect track assemblies

Disassemble & Assemble Final Drives


Start By:

a. remove final drives

1. Thoroughly clean the outside of the final drive prior to disassembly.

2. Remove the travel brake valve and the travel motor from the final drive. See the topics "Remove &
Install Travel Brake Valves" and "Remove & Install Travel Motors" in this module.

3. Put an alignment mark across the sections of the final drive for assembly purposes. The parts must
be reinstalled in their original locations.
4. Fasten the final drive to tool (A). The combined weight of the final drive and the sprocket is 310 kg
(685 lb).

5. Remove fifteen bolts (1) and the washers that hold cover (2) in place.

6. Using a soft faced hammer, break the seal between cover (2) and ring gear (3). Remove the cover.

7. Remove thrust plate (4) from cover (2).

8. Remove sun gear (5) from the carrier assembly.

9. Remove spacer (7) from carrier assembly (6). Remove carrier assembly (6) by lifting it straight up.
10. Disassemble carrier assembly (6) as follows:

a. Drive spring pin (8) into planetary shaft (9) with a hammer and punch.
b. Remove planetary shaft (9), two thrust washers (10) and planetary gear (11) from the carrier.
Remove bearing (12) from the planetary gear.
c. Remove spring pin (8) from planetary shaft (9) with a hammer and punch.
d. Remove the other two planetary gears from the carrier as in Steps 10a through 10c.

11. Remove sun gear (13) from carrier assembly (14).

12. Remove carrier assembly (14). Remove spacer (15) from the carrier assembly.
13. Disassemble carrier assembly (14) as follows:

a. Drive spring pin (16) into planetary shaft (17) with a hammer and punch.
b. Remove planetary shaft (17), two thrust washers (18) and planetary gear (20) from the
carrier. Remove two bearings (19) from the planetary gear.
c. Remove spring pin (16) from planetary shaft (17) with a hammer and punch.
d. Remove the other two planetary gears from the carrier as in Steps 13a through 13c.

14. Fasten tool (B) and a hoist to ring gear (3) as shown. Remove the ring gear from the main
housing. The weight of the ring gear is 50 kg (110 lb).

15. Remove O-ring seal (21) from the main housing.

16. Remove sixteen bolts (22) that hold gear (23) to the housing.
17. Using tool (C), remove gear (23) from the housing.

18. Remove shims (24) from under gear (23).

Typical Example

19. Fasten tool (D) and a hoist to main housing (25) as shown. Separate the main housing and final
drive sprocket from the motor housing. The combined weight of the main housing and final drive
sprocket is 105 kg (232 lb).

20. Remove Duo-Cone seal (26) from the motor housing.


21. Remove Duo-Cone seal (27) from the main housing.

22. Remove bearings (28) and (29) from the main housing.

23. If necessary, remove the sprocket from the main housing. See the topic "Remove & Install Final
Drive sprocket" in this module.

NOTE: The following steps are for the assembly of the final drive.

24. Be sure all parts of the final drive are thoroughly clean and free of dirt and debris prior to
assembly. Check the condition of all O-ring seals used in the final drive. If any of the seals are worn
or damaged, us new parts for replacement. Reassemble the final drive on tool (A).

25. If the final drive sprocket was removed from the main housing, see the topic "Remove & Install
Final Drive Sprockets" in this module. This topic will give the necessary details for installation on the
sprocket on the main housing.

26. Apply a thin coat of 5P3931 Anti-Seize Compound to the surfaces inside the main housing that
make contact with bearings (28) and (29). Install bearings (28) and (29) in their original locations in
the main housing with a press. Install the bearings until they make contact with the counterbores in
the main housing.

27. Use the following procedure to determine the correct bearing preload and the correct thickness of
shims (24) used under gear (23):

Typical Example

a. Fasten tool (D) and a hoist to main housing (25) as shown. Install the main housing on the
motor housing.
b. Using a suitable press and spacer, apply a load of 4000 kg (8820 lb) on bearing (28).
c. Rotate the main housing to seat the bearings.
d. Reduce the load on bearing (28) to 1000 ± 100 kg (2200 ± 220 lb).
e. With the load still on bearing (28), measure the distance between the top face of the motor
housing and the inner race of bearing (28) with a depth micrometer. Take this measurement in
several locations around the bearing. Find the average of the dimensions measured, and record
it. Call this dimension (Y).

f. Using a depth micrometer, measure the step height of gear (23) at several locations around
the gear. Find the average of the dimensions measured, and record it. Call it dimension (X).
g. Determine the correct thickness of the shim pack [made up of shims (24)] to be used between
the motor housing and gear (23). The shim pack thickness is equal to dimension (Y) - (X) +
0.05 mm (0.002 in).

NOTE: If two shims are required, install the thinner shim next to gear (23) when it is installed.

28. Remove the main housing from the motor housing.

NOTICE

See the topic "Assembly And Installation Of Conventional Duo-Cone


Seals" in this module.

NOTE: The rubber seals and all surfaces that make contact with the seals must be clean and dry.
After installation of the seals, put clean SAE 30 oil on the contact surfaces of the metal seals.
29. Using tool (E), install Duo Cone seal (27) in the main housing.

30. Using tool (E), install Duo-Cone (26) seal in the motor housing.

NOTICE

Do not scratch or damage the Duo-Cone seals in the main housing or


the motor housing during assembly of these two components. After
installation of the main housing on the motor housing, there will be a
small gap between the components. The gap is caused by the Duo-Cone
seals and will and will be eliminated during installation of gear (23).

Typical Example

31. Fasten tool (D) and a hoist to main housing (25) as shown. Install the main housing on the motor
housing.
32. Apply a thin coat of 5P3931 Anti-Seize Compound to the four pins in gear (23).

33. Install shims (24) determined in Steps 27a through 27g and gear (23) in its original position on the
motor housing. If two shims were required, install the thinner shim next to the gear.

34. Put a thin coat of 9S3263 Thread Lock on the threads of sixteen bolts (22). Install bolts (22) that
hold gear (23) in place. Tighten the bolts to a torque of 270 ± 39 N·m (200 ± 29 lb ft).

35. Install O-ring seal (21) in the main housing.

36. Thoroughly clean the mating surface of the main housing that makes contact with ring gear (3).
Put a bead of 1U8846 Gasket Maker on the mating surface of ring gear (3). Fasten tool (B) and a
hoist to ring gear (3). Put the ring gear in its original position on the main housing. It may be
necessary to use a soft faced hammer to seat the ring gear on the main housing.
37. Assemble carrier assembly (14). Put clean SAE 30 oil on two bearings (19). Install bearings (19)
in planetary gear (20). Install a thrust washer (18) on each side of the planetary gear. Install the thrust
washers and the planetary gear in the carrier. Install planetary shaft (17) in the carrier and through
planetary gear (20). Be sure the spring pin hole in the carrier is in alighment with the spring pin hole
in the planetary shaft. Install spring pin (16) until it is 2 to 3 mm (.078 to .118 in) below the outside
surface of the carrier, and with the split in the spring pin facing to either side of the carrier as shown
in illustration C28668P1. To prevent the spring pin from falling out, make a stake mark on each side
of the spring pin hole in the carrier.Each stake mark should be approximately 1.5 mm (0.10 in) from
the spring pin hole.

38. Install the other two planetary gears in carrier (15) as in Step 37.

39. Put spacer (15) in position in carrier assembly (14). Install carrier assembly (14) in ring gear (3).
Move the carrier assembly back and forth during installation to ensure all gears engage properly.

40. Install sun gear (13) in carrier assembly (14).


41. Assemble carrier assembly (6). Put clean SAE 30 oil on bearing (9). Install bearing (9) in
planetary gear (11). Install a thrust washer (10) on each side of the planetary gear. Install the thrust
washers and the planetary gear in the carrier. Install planetary shaft (9) in the carrier and through
planetary gear (11). Be sure the spring pin hole in the carrier is in alignment with the spring pin hole
in the planetary shaft. Install spring pin (8) until it is 2 to 3 mm (.078 to .118 in) below the outside
surface of the carrier, and with the split in the spring pin facing to either side of the carrier as shown
in Illustration C28668P1. To prevent the spring pin from falling out, make a stake mark on each side
of the spring pin hole in the carrier. Each stake mark should be approximately 1.5 mm (0.10 in) from
the spring pin hole.

42. Install the other two planetary gears in carrier (15) as in Step 41.

43. Install carrier assembly (6) in ring gear (3). Move the carrier assembly back and forth during
installation to ensure all gears engage properly.

44. Install spacer (7) in carrier assembly (6).


45. Install sun gear (5) in carrier assembly (6).

46. Install thrust plate (4) in cover (2).

47. Be sure the machined surface of ring gear (3) and cover (2) is thoroughly clean, free of dirt and
debris and is dry. Put a bead of 1U8846 Gasket Maker around the machined surface of the ring gear.
Put cover (2) in its original position on the ring gear.

48. Put a thin coat of 9S3263 Thread Lock on the threads of fifteen bolts (1) that hold cover (2) in
position. Install bolts (1) and the washers that hold the cover. Tighten the fifteen bolts to a torque of
530 ± 69 N·m (390 ± 50 lb ft).

49. Install the travel motor and travel brake valve in the final drive. See the topics "Remove & Install
Travel Brake Valves" and "Remove & Install Travel Motors" in this module.

End By:

a. install final drives

Copyright 1993 - 2017 Caterpillar Inc. Fri Jul 21 21:35:11 UTC+0700 2017
All Rights Reserved.
Private Network For SIS Licensees.