Sie sind auf Seite 1von 18

Steam Turbine Fundamentals

An introductory guide to the operation of modern steam turbines

v. 1.0
1
Foreword

About the presentation
This presentation teaches the reader about the operation and importance of steam turbines in electricity 
generation.   

Readers will become familiar with the key components of a steam turbine, and be able to describe how the 
complete system works.

It is suitable for engineers entering the power industry, and keen enthusiasts of power systems.

Note that it assumes some basic knowledge of electrical and thermodynamic systems.

2
History
► Invention attributed to Sir Charles Parsons in 1884.

► First compound (multi‐stage) turbine developed in 1887.

► A majority of the world’s power today is produced by steam turbines from a variety of fuels 
including:
• Coal
• Nuclear
• Oil
• Concentrated Solar
• Geothermal

► Some major manufacturers include:
• Siemens
• Toshiba
• Alstom
• General Electric

3
Basic Principles

What they do

► Steam turbines are used for stable, high output electricity needs.  Modern units 
can exceed 1GW from a single system.

► They are coupled to AC generators and run at constant speed (usually 
3,000rpm) which creates a reliable frequency (50Hz Australia, 60Hz USA) and 
stable output power.

4
Basic Principles
How they do it
► Boilers create superheated steam which is 
used to spin a turbine.  

► Steam turbine operation is based on the 
Rankine cycle with 4 key stages:
• 1‐2: Pressurise
• 2‐3: Heat
• 3‐4: Expand
• 4‐1: Condense

Boilers ‘pressurise’ and ‘heat’,
Turbines ‘expand’ and ‘condense’.

5
Basic Principles
Importance of steam turbines
Pro’s
• Very stable base load
• High level of control over electricity output
• Very high output from single machines (up to 1GW+)
• Serviceable life can be in excess of 30 years
• Very diverse.  Can use a wide range of power sources to generate steam

Con’s
• Long start up and shut down times.  Not ideal for peak loading
• High capital expense.  Generally viable only  in large scale installations
• Minimal redundancy.  Taking a single unit offline can take up to 1GW of 
power off a grid
• Maintenance intensive.  Require full time maintenance technicians and 
engineers to operate.

6
Turbine Layout
Steam path indicated in blue.  

Read on for a breakdown of each component
7
1 ‐ Boiler

Water is pressurised and superheated to set conditions, generally:
• 600+ deg C*
• 15+MPa*

Steam passes through a series of protection valves:
• Main isolation shuts down the system in an emergency
• Governor valves regulate the inlet steam for consistent operation

*typical value.  Will vary depending on manufacturer, machine size, and age.
8
2 – HP Turbine

Steam enters the HP (high pressure) turbine through nozzles.

Mechanical energy is generated by the steam passing over a series of fixed and rotating blades.  
Fixed blades on the stator guide steam through the rotor blades, causing the rotor to turn.

The steam expands and cools as it moves through the blades.
Steam leaves at a reduced pressure and temperature, approximately:
• 350 degC*
• 7 MPa*

*typical value.  Will vary depending on manufacturer, machine size, and age.
9
3 – Re‐heat

Steam re‐enters the boiler through a dedicated ‘re‐heat’ system.

This raises the steam back to inlet temperature, but does not change 
pressure.

10
4 – IP Turbine

Re‐heated steam enters the IP (intermediate pressure) turbine under the re‐
heated conditions, approximately:
• 600+ deg C*
• 6‐7 MPa*

Steam exits the IP turbine through the ‘cross over pipe’.

*typical value.  Will vary depending on manufacturer, machine size, and age.
11
5 – LP Turbine

Steam from the cross over pipe enters the centre of the LP (low pressure) 
turbine at a further reduced pressure and temperature, approximately:
• 350deg C*
• 900 kPa*

Steam expands out in both directions along the IP blades.  By the last set of 
blades, the steam has lost enough energy that it is no longer superheated.

*typical value.  Will vary depending on manufacturer, machine size, and age.
12
6 ‐ Condenser

The condenser rapidly cools the steam leaving the LP turbine.

As the steam condenses, it vastly reduces its volume, creating a vacuum.  Condenser 
conditions may be approximately:
• 40 deg C*
• 10 kPa(abs) *

This vacuum draws steam through the LP turbine, extracting more mechanical power.

*typical value.  Will vary depending on manufacturer, machine size, and age.
13
7 – Return to Boiler

Condensed water is passed through a series of pre‐heaters on its way back to 
the main boiler.

Though it may seem counter‐intuitive to deliberately cool the steam in the 
condenser only to re‐heat it again, a more in depth analysis of the 
thermodynamics and re‐heat process will show that this increases the 
efficiency of the system.

14
8 ‐ Generator

The turbine extracts power simultaneously from the HP, IP and LP rotors.

The shaft is coupled directly to a generator.  This outputs 3 phase power to a 
step up transformer, and finally the electricity grid.

15
System Review

1. Steam is superheated to 600+ degrees C, and 15+ MPa.
2. It passes through the HP turbine, converting heat and pressure to rotating energy
3. Exit steam returns to the boiler for re‐heat, but pressure remains the same.
4. It then passes through the IP turbine at 600+ degrees C and 6MPa.
5. Steam flows through the crossover pipe, directly in to the LP turbine at 350 degrees C and 
900kPa
6. Steam exists the LP turbine to the condenser, operating at 40 degrees C and 10kPa 
absolute
7. The Condensed water is returned to the boiler through a series of pre‐heaters.
8. The generator is rotated by the common shaft, and outputs a consistent 3 phase load.

16
Further Study

Useful topics to learn 
from here:

• Impulse vs. Reaction turbines
• Steam seals
• Re‐heat and feedwater systems
• Generator cooling systems

17
About the author
My name is Joshua Lowndes, I am a Mechanical Engineer from Perth, Australia.  I work directly 
with grid connected steam turbines, consulting in maintenance and technical support roles. 

I believe steam turbines are fundamental to all large scale power generation facilities, fossil 
fuel and renewable energy alike, and an understanding of them is paramount for any engineer 
in the Power industry.  

I welcome any feedback and I’m always open to discussion on Western Australia’s power 
industry.

Thanks for reading!

Joshua Lowndes
Mechanical Engineer
Perth, Australia

If you have any questions or would like to talk more on the Power 
Industry in WA, I welcome you to get in touch via LinkedIn. 18