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Scarlett Johansson says 'Marriage Story' felt fated

Lindsey Bahr, Ap Film Writer Updated 3:41 pm PDT, Thursday, August 29, 2019 Actor
Scarlett Johansson poses for photographers upon arrival at the premiere of the film
'Marriage Story' at the 76th edition of the Venice Film Festival, Venice, Italy,
Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019. (Photo by Arthur Mola/Invision/AP) less Actor Scarlett
Johansson poses for photographers upon arrival at the premiere of the film
'Marriage Story' at the 76th edition of the Venice Film Festival, Venice, Italy,
Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019. (Photo by ... more Photo: Arthur Mola, Associated Press
Photo: Arthur Mola, Associated Press Actor Scarlett Johansson poses for
photographers upon arrival at the premiere of the film 'Marriage Story' at the 76th
edition of the Venice Film Festival, Venice, Italy, Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019. (Photo
by Arthur Mola/Invision/AP) less Actor Scarlett Johansson poses for photographers
upon arrival at the premiere of the film 'Marriage Story' at the 76th edition of
the Venice Film Festival, Venice, Italy, Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019. (Photo by ...
more Photo: Arthur Mola, Associated Press Scarlett Johansson says 'Marriage Story'
felt fated VENICE, Italy (AP) — When Noah Baumbach asked Scarlett Johansson to meet
with him about a new film he was going to write about a divorce, he didn't know she
was going through one in real life. "It felt fated in a way," Johansson said. "It
came somehow at just the right time." Johansson stars alongside Adam Driver in
"Marriage Story," a Netflix film about a couple — she plays an actress and he plays
a theater director — with an 8-year-old son managing a bi-coastal separation and
divorce. It premiered Thursday at the Venice Film Festival, where it is competing
for the Golden Lion award. Although Johansson had her own experiences to draw on
having most recently divorced French businessman Romain Dauriac in 2017, she said
there was something of everyone behind the film in the brutally honest but tender
character study. Baumbach wrote the script knowing that Driver and Johansson would
play the couple in question. He said he realized in the writing process that,
"Through a divorce we could explore a marriage." "Although they're coming apart,
love always exists," he said. "It's in every scene, it's there." Laura Dern, who
plays Johansson's divorce lawyer, added that it personifies "the business of
divorce." One scene, in which the two leads have a particularly traumatic fight,
had audiences at the Venice Film Festival buzzing. Driver said he didn't really
analyze it afterward, but that it was two "pretty difficult" days. Baumbach added
that it was "harrowing" and they'd often have to stop for a break, with the actors
either going to their rooms or taking a walk around the block to regroup. "They
would run the whole scene almost every time. It was like watching two of the best
athletes compete," Baumbach said. "In many ways it was one of the most rewarding
experience I've had as a director." The film will make stops at the Telluride and
Toronto Film Festivals before hitting theaters on Nov. 6, followed by its Netflix
debut on Dec. 6. ___ For complete coverage of the fall film season, visit:
www.apnews.com/FallFilms

Italy’s New Marriage of Convenience

Most Italians shrugged. We dealt with Silvio Berlusconi for 20-odd years and coped
with Matteo Renzi’s youthful self-centeredness. So we were used to political
megalomaniacs, long before the United States or Britain. But Mr. Salvini’s behavior
lately really is disconcerting. Time on the opposition benches might force him to
cool off. Still, the outcome is not obvious. A new government is likely to be
formed, in the next few days. But the Democratic Party and the Five Star Movement
are quite different, and so are their voters. If their strange marriage fails,
President Mattarella — the coolest head in this whole mess — will have no choice
but to dissolve Parliament and call for a general election in the autumn. So Italy
is, once again, on the brink — a spot it occupies all too often. Will it manage to
take a step back and avoid going over? It might. On three conditions. First, the
political agenda. A government is formed to do something, not to prevent someone
else’s rise (even if that someone is Mr. Salvini). The Democratic Party stands for
open society, open market, investments, Europe and NATO; Five Star has been toying
with conspiracy theories and anti-vaxx propaganda, has ranted against the European
Union and supported Nicolás Maduro in Venezuela. The Democrats belong, in most
respects, to the new moderate left; the Five Stars borrow many ideas from the old
radical left. A good sign is that the most quarrelsome characters, such as
Alessandro Di Battista, are not expected to be in the new government. And the
outgoing (and incoming) prime minister just took control of the digital
transformation of the notoriously labyrinthine Italian Civil Service. The second
condition relates to personal relations within the new coalition. Luigi Di Maio,
the nominal leader of the Five Stars, like the rest of his movement, spent most of
his political career accusing the Democratic Party of everything under the sun,
from corruption to child trafficking. When he realized that joining the Democrats
was the only alternative to an early election — in which his leadership and his
movement would probably be devastated in the pattern set in recent European
elections — and that a lot of Five Star deputies don’t even have a job to go back
to, he swallowed his pride and agreed to join forces with his archrivals. But will
the rest of the movement follow their leader’s conciliatory attitude? An online
vote by Five Star voters — on a party site called the Rousseau platform, a clumsy
attempt at “direct democracy” — will deliver an early indication. The same
question, of course, should be put to the Democrats, who have long considered the
Five Stars aggressive and incompetent amateurs. The third condition relates to Mr.
Conte himself. Provided that the appointed prime minister overcomes the personal
ambitions within his supporting parties — Luigi Di Maio is sulking because he wants
to keep his rank of deputy prime minister — Mr. Conte must grow further into his
new shoes. True, he stood up to Mr. Salvini in the Senate, accused him of
disloyalty and bluntly confronted him on a string of thorny issues, including a
continuing investigation into reports that Russia contributed to funding the
League. But for one year he seemed powerless and sometimes hopeless — a figurehead
with no real power, an obscure law professor chosen to mask the differences between
the coalition strongmen. Now he’ll be a prime minister with growing support in the
country and the backing of Italy’s president. If he acts like a prime minister, who
knows? Italy may have found a new government with some badly needed stability, led
by an unexpected statesman.

Ulrika Jonsson 'signs up' for 'First Dates' after marriage split

Ulrika Jonsson is apparently going on TV to find Mr Right after the end of her
third marriage, which she previously said was “sexless”. The presenter, 52, has
reportedly signed up for Channel 4 show First Dates, where she will have another go
at finding love. According to The Sun, Jonsson will appear on a special celebrity
episode in aid of Stand Up To Cancer. It comes a few months after the star split
from her husband Brian Monet. The couple tied the knot in 2008 but parted company
earlier this year. Jonsson later said they only had sex once in eight-and-a-half
years. Read more: Ulrika Jonsson had sex with husband once in eight years In a
heartfelt article she penned for The Sun, she recalled how she thought she “might
have to just accept that [she] would never have sex ever again”. “The reason I
thought this is because I had not had sex for four and half years,” she admitted.
“And the time before that was four years prior. I was living in a sexless marriage
for nearly a decade. Jonsson’s first marriage was to cameraman John Turnbull. The
couple wed in 1990 and had a son together, but went their separate ways in 1995.
Read more: First Dates viewers heartbroken over contestant She later had a
relationship with German hotel manager Marcus Kempen and they had a daughter before
calling time on their romance. In 2003 she exchanged vows with Lance Gerrard-Wright
after they met on a television show, and the pair welcomed a daughter in 2004
before separating the following year. The former Gladiators star also has a son
with Monet. Jonsson’s episode of First Dates is reportedly set to air in the next
few weeks.

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