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GRAMMATICAL COHESION

Reference Substitution Ellipsis Conjunction


No Clause
Cataph Advertises
Exophoric Anaphoric Nominal Verbal Clausal Nominal Verbal Clausal Additive Causal Temporal
oric
One of the most One of the after a
common complaints most common period
tourists from Italy complaints spent in
1.
voice after a period tourists from resorts
spent in resorts Italy abroad
abroad is that
the local chefs really and (They
do not know how to are) how to
cook pasta properly make a
2. and how to xmake a decent
decent tomato tomato
sauce. sauce.

They are equally They refer to When


confused when, Tourist from (They are)
3. traveling to France, Italy (Clause 1) traveling to
France,

they happen to find They refer to and on the


4. what Tourist from same plate to
Italy (Clause 1) boot.
they perceive as They refer to
bland, overcooked Tourist from
pasta served as a Italy (Clause 1)
5. side near a juicy
steak, and on the
same plate to boot.

The spaghetti and The spaghetti


meatballs served in and meatballs
many run-of-the-
mill Italian-
6. American
restaurants are no
less puzzling to
Italian travelers.

How are they They refers to


supposed to eat Italian Travellers
that? (Clause 5)

7. That refers to
The spaghetti
and the
meatballs
(Clause 5)
Should they finish pasta first then attack
8. the pasta first and and then the meatballs
then attack the attack the
meatballs? meatballs
At any rate, they They refer to
would probably find Italian Travellers
it disconcerting that (Clause 5)
9.
It refers to the
two questions
(Clause 6&7)
the two components
are served together
10.
in the first place.

Within their Their refers to under the


expectations for a Italian Travellers heading
meal, the dish (Clause 5) primo (first
would not properly course)
fit under the heading because of
11. primo (first course) the
because of the presence of
presence of excessive
excessive quantities quantities
of meat, of meat,

but it could not be It refers to the but it could


considered purely a dish (clause 11) not be
12. secondo (second considered
course) either. purely a
secondo ….
Although many Although
pasta sauces include many pasta
some form of fish or sauces
meat, include
13.
some form
of fish or
meat,

it is the It refers to pasta


14. carbohydrate/meat sauce (Clause
ratio 12)
that would most that
perplex Italian (carbohydra
travellers te/meat)
would most
15.
perplex
Italian
travellers

In this case, the set Themselves make sense of


of rules through refers to many meals and
which many individuals dishes may
individuals who (Clause 14) prove too
16.
recognize rigid, and
themselves as need to be
participants of the revised.
foodways
commonly defined
as ‘‘Italian’’ make
sense of meals and
dishes may prove
too rigid,
and need to be and (They
revised. (meals and
17.
dishes)) need to
be revised.
Their food-related Their refers to and their
customs and their Italian (Clause patrimony of
patrimony of 16) culinary
18. culinary knowledge knowledge
might be inadequate
to face the challenge

Why would some


19. find the experience
disturbing?
Is it not food, after It refers to after all?
all? experience
20. #
disturbing
(Clause 19)
I have chosen because, because,
examples involving (they are) being from
21. tourists from Italy being from the same
because, being from the same country,
the same country, country,
I have often heard Their refers to
their travel tourists from
22.
adventures. Italy (Clause 21)

All throughout the My refers to and in my


paper I will refer to possessive professional
anecdotal reports pronoun “I” quality as a
from personal (Clause 23) food
experience both as journalist.
23.
an individual and in
my professional
quality as a food
journalist.

As such, my My refers to
observations do not possessive
24. aim to be pronoun of
exhaustive, subject “I”
(Clause 23)
but should rather be But (they) but should
considered as initial should rather be rather be
suggestions for considered as considered
25. further inquiry into initial as initial
the topic. suggestions for suggestions
further inquiry
into the topic
Travelers of any Travelers of Themselves That (they) find
26.
provenance that find any refers to
themselves in provenance Travellers of any
unfamiliar parts of provenance
the world are likely
to tell similar
stories.

Whether they are in They refer to


Egypt, on the Travellers of any
27. beaches of Thailand, provenance
or on a Caribbean (Clause 26)
island,
some tourists expect and at the
reassuring food, proper time of
served in familiar day.
28.
ways, and at the
proper time of day.

On the other hand, Their refers to and even the On the


others look for the Travellers threatening other
new, the unusual, hand,
and even the others look
threatening in their for the new,
culinary
29. explorations, with
the adventurous
discovery of local
cuisines ranking
high on their list of
goals for the trip.

Some ‘‘foodies’’ and.. (how ( they how to


might even decide to) cook decide) to properly
to join a culinary fresh pasta dedicate a make and
tour, or to dedicate a in Bologna. week to cook fresh
30. week to learn how learn pasta in
to properly make Bologna.
and cook fresh
pasta in Bologna.

In our daily lives, Our refers to I


we tend to take and the reader
familiar flavors,
ingredients, dishes, We refers to I
31.
meals, and and the reader
foodways for
granted

they are so natural They refer to (they are) they are so


and normal flavors, normal natural and
32. ingredients, normal
dishes, meals,
and foodways
that they become They refer to If (they are)
virtually transparent, flavors, not
33.
if not completely ingredients, completely
invisible dishes, meals, invisible
and foodways
Of course, we We refer to I our likes and
maintain our likes and the reader dislikes
and dislikes
34.
Our refers to I
and the reader

but a heightened Our refers to I but a


sense of our and the reader heightened
35. culinary background sense of our
is activated only culinary
background
When we face We refer to I
something and the reader
completely
different, for
36. instance a dish from
an unfamiliar
immigrant
community.

These encounters These refer to a


with other cuisines dish from an
37. can be involuntary, unfamiliar
immigrant
community.
sometimes causing sometimes
reactions that can be (they are)
as intense as disgust, causing
38. or voluntary, as in reactions
the case of culinary that can be
tourism, as intense
as disgust
defined by folklorist (It is)
Lucy Long as the defined by
intentional, folklorist
39.
Lucy Long
as the
intentional,
exploratory and
participation in the presentation
foodways of the for
Other, participation consumption
including the of a food
consumption or item, cuisine,
preparation and meal system,
presentation for
40.
consumption of a
food item, cuisine,
meal system, or
eating style
considered as
belonging to a
culinary system not
one’s own.
While culinary one’s daily While
tourism does not environment culinary
necessarily imply tourism
41.
leaving one’s daily
environment,

since and grocery since


‘‘ethnic’’restaurants shops are ‘‘ethnic’’
42.
and grocery shops quite restaurants
are quite common, common,
travel is certainly
one of the most
direct ways to get in
43.
touch with
otherness.

The contact happens but also but also at


not only at the (The a very
cognitive level, but contact material,
44. also at a very happens) at
material, physical a very
one material,

and when it comes It refers to The and when it


45. to ingestion, contact happens comes to
(Clause 44) ingestion,
the embodied
experience of the
contact is so
46.
intimate that at
times

it can become It refers to the


uncomfortable. embodied
47.
experience of
the contact
Travel is not always an expression
an expression of of leisure and
leisure and conspicuous
48. conspicuous consumption
consumption in the
form of tourism.

Whole populations
get on the move to
flee a conflict, to
avoid a draught, or
49.
simply to look for a
better economic
environment

The food encounters Those refers to and (they and complex


that take place in the move to flee entail) processes of
50. those cases also a conflict, to complex semiosis
entail exposure to avoid a draught, processes aimed at
the Other and or simply to look of semiosis making sense
complex processes for abetter aimed at of new
of semiosis aimed at economic making situations
making sense of Environment. sense of
new situations new
situations

but the positions of but the


the parties involved positions of
in the the parties
communicative involved in
dynamics the
51. communica
tive
dynamics
in terms of
sociopolitic
al power
in terms of cultural
sociopolitical capital, and
power, cultural sheer
52. capital, and sheer economic
economic clout clout may
may vary greatly vary greatly

a fact that cannot Their refers to but


but influence their the positions of influence
involvement in the the parties their
production of sense (Clause 55) involvemen
53. out of edible t in the
materials. production
of sense out
of edible
materials.
What happens when People from
people from different
54. different cultures cultures
interact? interact

How do they They refer to and (they) acknowledge


acknowledge and people (Clause absorb and absorb
absorb unfamiliar 54) unfamiliar unfamiliar
elements into their elements into
culinary systems, or Theirs refers to their culinary
55. alternatively ignore people (Clause systems
or despise them? 54)

Them refers to
people (Clause
54)
Eating is not a
choice for human
56.
beings.

The differences in
57. culinary systems
encountered during
a trip abroad
to a different region Thst (it)
in one’s country, or offers
even to a restaurant dishes
that offers dishes
from other food
traditions, must be
addressed sooner or
later, in a more or
less conscious
fashion,
acknowledging and
taking into account
the existence of
58. diverse culinary
worlds in terms of
ingredients, cooking
techniques,
flavorings,
preparations,
utensils, meal
structure, table
manners,
distribution of the
meals during the
day, and social
dynamics
LEXICAL COHESION

Reiteration Collocation
No General Nouns Signalling Nouns
Repetition Synonym Near Synonym Superordinate Hyponomy Antonomy
Should they finish
the pasta first and
then attack the
meatballs? would
probably find it
disconcerting that
the two components
are served together in
the first place.

1.
the two
components are
served together in for instance a dish
the first place. from an unfamiliar
Within their immigrant
expectations for a community.
meal,
2.
the dish would not
properly fit under
the heading primo
(first course)
because of the
presence of
excessive quantities
of meat, but it
could not be
3. considered purely a
secondo (second
course) either.

make sense of
meals and dishes
may prove too
rigid, and need to
be revised. Their
food-related
customs and their
patrimony of
culinary knowledge
might be
inadequate to face
the challenge

4.
I will refer to
anecdotal reports
from personal
experience both as
an individual and in
my professional
quality as a food
journalist
5.
On the other hand,
others look for the
new, the unusual,
and even the
threatening in their
6. culinary
explorations, with
the adventurous
discovery of local
cuisines ranking
high on their list of
goals for the trip.

Some ‘‘foodies’’
might even decide to
join a culinary tour,
or to dedicate a week
to learn how to
properly make and
cook fresh pasta in
Bologna.

Whole populations
get on the move to
flee a conflict, to
avoid a draught, or
simply to look for a
better economic
environment

7.
Eating is not a
choice for human
beings.

8.
What happens
when people from
different cultures
interact?

the existence of
diverse culinary
9. worlds
culinary worlds
in terms of
ingredients,
cooking
techniques,
flavorings,
preparations,
utensils, meal
structure, table
manners,
distribution of
the meals
during the day,
and social
10. dynamics
CHAIN INTERACTION
One of the most common complaints tourists from Italy voice after a period spent in resorts abroad is that (1)

the local chefs really do not know how to cook pasta properly and how to make a decent tomato sauce.(2)

They are equally confused when, traveling to France, (3)

they happen to find what (4)


they perceive as bland, overcooked pasta served as a side near a juicy steak, and on the same plate to boot.(5)

The spaghetti and meatballs served in many run-of-the-mill Italian-American restaurants are no less puzzling to Italian travelers. (6)

How are they supposed to eat that? (7)

Should they finish the pasta first and then attack the meatballs? (8)
At any rate, they would probably find it disconcerting that (9)
the two components are served together in the first place. (10)

Within their expectations for a meal, the dish would not properly fit under the heading primo (first course) because of the presence of excessive quantities of meat,
(11)

but it could not be considered purely a secondo (second course) either. (12)

Although many pasta sauces include some form of fish or meat, (13)

it is the carbohydrate/meat ratio (14)


that would most perplex Italian travellers (15)

In this case, the set of rules through which many individuals who recognize themselves as participants of the foodways commonly defined as ‘‘Italian’’ make sense
of meals and dishes may prove too rigid, (16)
and need to be revised.(17)

Their food-related customs and their patrimony of culinary knowledge might be inadequate to face the challenge (18)

Why would some find the experience disturbing? (19)


Is it not food, after all?(20)
COHESIVE CHAIN

Tourist from Italy - They -They -They-They-They - Their - Italian - Their – themselves – Their – Their

Pasta and decent tomato sauce – They are bland – The spaghetti and meatball - Many pasta sauce – It -

The Spaghetti Tourist from Italy Voice


Meatballs  Happen to find
They
That They  Perceive  Pasta

They Supposed

They Finish Pasta / Meatball

They Find

Their Expectation

They
I have chosen examples involving tourists from Italy because, being from the same country, (1)
I have often heard their travel adventures. (2)

All throughout the paper I will refer to anecdotal reports from personal experience both as an individual and in my professional quality as a food journalist.(3)

As such, my observations do not aim to be exhaustive, (4)


but should rather be considered as initial suggestions for further inquiry into the topic. (5)

Travelers of any provenance that find themselves in unfamiliar parts of the world are likely to tell similar stories. (6)

Whether they are in Egypt, on the beaches of Thailand, or on a Caribbean island, (7)
some tourists expect reassuring food, served in familiar ways, and at the proper time of day. (8)

On the other hand, others look for the new, the unusual, and even the threatening in their culinary explorations, with the adventurous discovery of local cuisines
ranking high on their list of goals for the trip. (9)

Some ‘‘foodies’’ might even decide to join a culinary tour, or to dedicate a week to learn how to properly make and cook fresh pasta in Bologna. (10)

In our daily lives, we tend to take familiar flavors, ingredients, dishes, meals, and foodways for granted (11)

they are so natural and normal (12)


that they become virtually transparent, if not completely invisible (13)
Of course, we maintain our likes and dislikes (14)
but a heightened sense of our culinary background is activated only (15)
When we face something completely different, for instance a dish from an unfamiliar immigrant community. (16)

These encounters with other cuisines can be involuntary, (17)


sometimes causing reactions that can be as intense as disgust, or voluntary, as in the case of culinary tourism, (18)
defined by folklorist Lucy Long as the intentional, (19)
exploratory participation in the foodways of the Other, participation including the consumption or preparation and presentation for consumption of a food item,
cuisine, meal system, or eating style considered as belonging to a culinary system not one’s own. (20)
Tourist from Italy – Their – Themselves – They- They

I - my professional - my observations

We - our - we

Tourist from Italy I

Their  My professional

Travellers find My observation

Themselves

They are in Egypt

Their culinary explorations We

Their list of goals Our

We
While culinary tourism does not necessarily imply leaving one’s daily environment, (1)

since ‘‘ethnic’’restaurants and grocery shops are quite common, (2)


travel is certainly one of the most direct ways to get in touch with otherness. (3)

The contact happens not only at the cognitive level, but also at a very material, physical one (4)

and when it comes to ingestion, (5)


the embodied experience of the contact is so intimate that at times (6)

it can become uncomfortable. (7)


Travel is not always an expression of leisure and conspicuous consumption in the form of tourism. (8)

Whole populations get on the move to flee a conflict, to avoid a draught, or simply to look for a better economic environment (9)

The food encounters that take place in those cases also entail exposure to the Other and complex processes of semiosis aimed at making sense of new situations (10)

but the positions of the parties involved in the communicative dynamics (11)
in terms of sociopolitical power, cultural capital, and sheer economic clout may vary greatly (12)

a fact that cannot but influence their involvement in the production of sense out of edible materials. (13)
What happens when people from different cultures interact? (14)

How do they acknowledge and absorb unfamiliar elements into their culinary systems, or alternatively ignore or despise them? (15)

Eating is not a choice for human beings. (16)

The differences in culinary systems encountered during a trip abroad (17)


to a different region in one’s country, or even to a restaurant that offers dishes from other food traditions, must be addressed sooner or later, in a more or less
conscious fashion, acknowledging and taking into account the existence of diverse culinary worlds in terms of ingredients, cooking techniques, flavorings,
preparations, utensils, meal structure, table manners, distribution of the meals during the day, and social dynamics (18)

Culinary tourism -> the contact happen ->

Travel -> eating -> the differences in culinary system


Culinary Tourism  Tourism Travel
The Contact Whole Populations
Eating
The Differences in
culinary system
COMMENT:

I think, this paragraph is not coherent. In the first paragraph actually they’re coherent but start from second paragraph till three paragraph are not. The author
discuss too out of the topic but still in the same theme.

My opinion can be proved from the cohesive chains. The bold word is showing the main topic which talked in the text. First paragraph is coherent. The author
is consistent talk one topic. Second Paragraph, the author started changed the topic but the author still want talk about the first topic (Italian tourist) but the
author is failed to give one text which is coherent. The Last paragraph, the author has told the topic beyond of the topic, start from culinary, and the author
shows to the reader about contact as well. The reason the text is not coherent is the reference is not consistent also the lexical word which the author used.