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Module Intro page

LEARNING MODULE

SUBJECT GRADE LEVEL

MODULE NO. : (TITLE)

INTRODUCTION AND FOCUS QUESTION(S): (Write 1-2 paragraph intro


hooking students’ interest and leading to Essential Question.)
Paragraph 1: Have you ever wondered….

OR: Have you at a certain time asked yourself….

OR: Have you always wanted to…

OR: Have you thought of…

OR: Do you think it is possible…

OR: What would you do if…

Paragraph 2: In this module, you will find out… Remember to search for
the answer to the following question(s):

LESSONS AND COVERAGE:


In this module, you will examine this question when you take the
following lessons:
Lesson 1 – (State lesson title and topic)
Lesson 2 – (State lesson title and topic)
Lesson 3 – (State lesson title and topic)

In these lessons, you will learn the following:


Lesson 1 Write in bulleted form Performance Objectives.

Lesson 2 Write in bulleted form Performance Objectives.

Lesson 3 Write in bulleted form Performance Objectives.

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MODULE MAP:
Here is a simple map of the above lessons you will cover: (Provide
diagram of module map)

EXPECTED SKILLS:
To do well in this module, you need to remember and do the following:
(List key study skills and other actions that will help students succeed in doing the
module)

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Start of Lesson 1

LESSON NO. 1: TITLE


PRE-ASSESSMENT: (Write another set of 20 multiple-choice items. Mark the
correct answer with an asterisk and below the last choice, write an explanation of the
correct answer and why the others are not right. Code the item as A, M or T.)
Let’s find out how much you already know about this module. Click on the letter that you
think best answers the question. Please answer all items. After taking this short test, you
will see your score. Take note of the items that you were not able to correctly answer and
look for the right answer as you go through this module.

\EXAMPLE:
(A) 1. A group of indiuals of different species occupying a particular area is called what?
A. Biosphere
B. Community *
C. Ecosystem
D. Population

Biosphere refers to all areas with living things in them; ecosystem refers to a community
of species interacting with the environment; and population refers to group of individuals
of similar species living in a particular area.

EXPLORE:

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(Provide hook activity that leads to the Essential Question.
Pose Essential Question. Have students make meaning out of the question.
Have students show and state their initial ideas in a section of a chosen map of conceptual
change.)
Let’s begin by…

OR: Let’s start the module by…

ACTIVITY NO. : TITLE


DESCRIPTION:
PROCESS QUESTIONS:

End of EXPLORE:
(Challenge or invite students to find out how much of their initial ideas is valid, correct or
in line with current thinking by doing succeeding activities in next section.)
You just tried finding out…
Let’s now find out what the answer is by doing the next part.
What you learn in the next sections will also enable you to do the final
project which involves… (Give a brief description of expected output)

OR: You gave your initial ideas on…by answering the… (Map of
Conceptual Change).
Let’s find out how others would answer the above and compare their
ideas to our own. As you compare, you will find out if your ideas are in
line with the standard. You will also learn other concepts which will
help you complete a required project found at the end. This project is
about (Give a brief description of expected output)
We will start by doing the next activity.

FIRM UP:

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(Have students acquire facts and other pertinent information in an interactive way using
various sources (e.g., readings, videos, blogs, podcasts, Websites, primary documents).
Ask students to organize information and make meaning out of the terms and facts they
encounter. Have them establish relationships and connections among different facts (e.g.,
use graphic organizers, process questions, tables, frames).
Have students review their ideas in Explore and answer again the Essential Question.
Do formative assessments (e.g., exercises, mini-quizzes, check-ups, practice work.)
Your goal in this section is to learn and understand key concepts…

ACTIVITY NO. : TITLE


DESCRIPTION:
PROCESS QUESTIONS:

(Remember to incorporate SRL cognitive and metacognitive activities)

End of FIRM UP:


In this section, the discussion was about…

Go back to the previous section and compare your initial ideas with the
discussion. How much of your initial ideas are found in the discussion?
Which ideas are different and need revision? What new learning goal
should you now try to achieve?

Now that you know the important ideas about this topic, let’s go
deeper by moving on to the next section.

DEEPEN:

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(Probe into students’ understanding by asking students to deduce and make inferences.
Present misconceptions and errors and challenge students to determine if there are any
errors and explain their ideas.
Present different situations and ask students to make generalizations and draw
conclusions. Have them justify their generalization or conclusion by citing relevant text.
Ask students to connect the concepts they learned with other ideas. Have them show their
generalization or connections in a creative way with Web 2.0 applications.
Ask students to answer again the Essential Question and reflect on their previous ideas.
Students may express their reflections in another section of the initial chosen map of
conceptual change or a similar organizer.
Do formative assessments (e.g., exercises, mini-quizzes, check-ups, practice work.)
Your goal in this section is to take a closer look at some aspects of the
topic.

ACTIVITY NO. : TITLE


DESCRIPTION:
PROCESS QUESTIONS:

(Remember to incorporate SRL cognitive and metacognitive activities)

End of DEEPEN:
In this section, the discussion was about…

What new realizations do you have about the topic? What new
connections have you made for yourself? What helped you make these
connections?

Now that you have a deeper understanding of the topic, you are ready
to do the tasks in the next section.

TRANSFER:

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(Provide scaffold for students to do their own transfer by using a gradual release of
responsibility from modeling or demonstration to collaborative practice to independent
performance. Use interactive resources such as simulations and games.
Provide checklist or rubric for students to evaluate their practice or final output.
Have students state their final answer to the Essential Question in a section of a chosen
map of conceptual change. Have them compare their idea with answers in previous
sections.
Ask students to reflect on their learning and the learning process. Have them share their
reflections in a creative way.)
Your goal in this section is apply your learning to real life situations. You will be given a
practical task which will demonstrate your understanding.

ACTIVITY NO. : TITLE


DESCRIPTION:
PROCESS QUESTIONS:

End of TRANSFER:
In this section, your task was…

How did you find the performance task? How did the task help you see
the real world use of the topic?

You have completed this lesson. Before you go to the next lesson, you
have to answer the following post-assessment.

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GLOSSARY OF TERMS USED IN THIS LESSON: (List in alphabetical
order the key terms and give their definitions)

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REFERENCES AND WEBSITE LINKS USED IN THIS LESSON:
(For References, use MLA style to cite publications.
For Websites, state the URL and annotate or give the Website title. Arrange Websites
according to their appearance in the module.
Provide other credits for multimedia materials such as images and sounds.)

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POST-ASSESSMENT: (Write another set of 20 multiple-choice items. Mark the
correct answer with an asterisk and below the last choice, write an explanation of the
correct answer and why the others are not right. Code the item as A, M or T.)
It’s now time to evaluate your learning. Click on the letter of the answer that you think
best answers the question. Your score will only appear after you answer all items. If you
do well, you may move on to the next module. If your score is not at the expected level,
you have to go back and take the module again.

EXAMPLE:
(A) 1. A certain plant requires moisture, oxygen, carbon dioxide, light, and minerals in
order to survive. This shows that a living organism depends on
A. abiotic factors. *
B. biotic factors.
C. material cycling.
D. symbiotic relationships.

Biotic factors refer to living organisms; material cycling refers to movement of distribution
of materials only – light is a form of energy; and symbiotic relationships mainly pertains
to living organisms only.

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