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stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

THE DIGITAL CLASSROOMS SERIES

DIGITAL TOOLS FOR TEACHERS - TRAINERS' EDITION

BY NIK PEACHEY !

COPYRIGHT © PEACHEYPUBLICATIONS.COM

!

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019 Photo by Nik Peachey 1 INTRODUCTION In this Trainers’ Edition of

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Photo by Nik Peachey

1

INTRODUCTION

In this Trainers’ Edition of Digital Tools for Teachers I have built on the original volume by updating and extending many of the original chapters and also by adding seven additional new chapters.

In this book the first four chapters are provided as a guide for teachers who want to use the book for teacher training and development.

Using the tools, tips and activities provided in these first chapters a teacher with some basic experience of using technology in the classroom should be able to create

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INTRODUCTION

motivating hands-on edtech training for their peers or for pre-service trainee teachers.

The fifth additional chapter is dedicated to providing a range of links to ready-made computer games that can be used for language acquisition and development.

The sixth additional chapter focuses on virtual reality and provides links to a range of tools and resources that can enable teachers to exploit this area of technology within their classroom practice.

The seventh additional chapter looks at the area of e-safety and the things that we can do to protect our students, ourselves and our computers from some of the potential threats that we can encounter online.

The remainder of the book, like the first edition, is a collection of more than 100 links to tools and resources that have been chosen and organised to enable teachers to easily find ways of applying technology to the activities they do with their students.

I sincerely hope you find this book useful and that it helps you to enhance your teaching and training and helps to make your students’ learning experience richer and more engaging.

If you wish to use this book and the resources from it to do training and want copies of Digital Tools for Teachers for

t r a i n e e

t e a c h e r s

p l e a s e

c o n t a c t

m e

a t :

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CONTENTS

Contents

The sites, apps and resources within the book have been divided into the following chapters:

1. - Introduction

1

2. - Conceptual Models

11

3. - Training Tips

25

4. - Training Activities

31

5. - Training Tools

52

6. - Reading Tools

60

7. - Writing Tools

73

8. - Listening Tools

94

9. - Speaking Tools

102

10. - Grammar Tools

114

11. - Presentation Tools

122

12. - Poll & Survey Tools

130

13. - Infographic Tools

137

14. - Course Creation Tools

148

15. - Games & Gamification

163

16. - Virtual Reality Tools

172

17. - e-Safety

179

Most of the tools and resources selected for the book are either free or have a useable permanent freemium offering, so you won’t be forced to pay for any of these resources in order to sustain the work you are doing with your students.

I do recommend though that when you find any sources particularly useful, and when you feel you would like to continue using them on a longer term basis, that you consider upgrading to a premium account and so give the financial support that many of the companies need to sustain their business and make improvements and developments from which you and other teachers will eventually benefit.

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KEEPING

UP-TO-DATE

Your Contribution

Over the coming years it is my intention to regularly review and expand on the contents of this book and keep them up-to-date. If you would like to be involved and assist in this process you can do so by:

Suggesting tools to be included in future editions

Writing an entry about a tool found useful

Reporting a dead link or a tool or resource that has become commercially unviable for teachers

Reporting a typo or factual error.

you have used and

Anyone who contributes in any of the ways above will get

a brief mention in the next edition of the book along with a link to their own blog or website.

S e n d

c o n t r i b u t i o n s

t o :

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FURTHER

READING

Further Reading

This is the first book in the Digital Classrooms series and the winner of the 2016 British Council Innovations award for Teacher Resources. The book combines practical classroom activities with resources reviews and 27 video tutorials to help teachers develop the skills they need to effectively exploit one of the most useful resources available online.

This book was designed to help teachers exploit a wide range of digital tasks and resources to encourage students to think more critically about web based information. The book contains 12 lesson plans, the whole of ‘Exploiting Infographics’ and more chapters including how to exploit poll and survey resources as well as tasks for exploiting presentations.

This book was designed to provide simple examples of how technology can be applied to common classroom activities. The book contains seven video tutorials to help teachers understand how to use the tools and apps as well as step-by-step procedure to ensure the activities go smoothly.

This book was designed to help teachers understand how to exploit Infographics both as resources for prompting discussion and digital research. The book contains a collection of motivating creative tasks for the development of digital skills. There is a range of advice and example tasks that can be used with a wide different classes. This book is also contained within ‘Thinking Critically through Digital Media’.

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This book contains a collection of 10 lesson plans that are designed to develop students’ digital literacy and critical thinking skills. All ten lessons are also included in ‘Thinking Critically through Digital Media’.

This is the oldest of the books and was first published in 2009. It has since been downloaded more than 250k times. It contains reviews of ten tools along with a range of pedagogical activities that can be used with each one.

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LESSON PLANS

Lesson Plans

Each of these lesson plans constitutes between 90 and 180 minutes of study and can be used in part as simple conversation classes or in total for deeper research projects. All lesson plans are included in ‘Thinking Critically through Digital Media’ and a selection of 10 are included in ‘10 Lessons in Digital Literacy’.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019 ABOUT THE AUTHOR Photo By Maria Fuller Nik Peachey is a freelance

Photo By Maria Fuller

Nik Peachey is a freelance teacher trainer, writer, course designer, conference speaker and learning technology consultant.

He has been involved in education since 1990 and has lived and worked all over the world.

He is a two-time British Council Innovations Award Winner and the Co - founder of PeacheyPublications.com.

He has worked with a wide range of educational companies, publishers and institutions including Macmillan, CUP, OUP, British Council, International House, Bell Educational Services, University of Westminster, The Open University, The BBC, Google Creative Labs, EtonX and many more.

Nik is a keen blogger and content curator. You can find his

and

sites

and his curation

at:

He also publishes a twice monthly Learning Technology and ELT newsletter at: https://tinyletter.com/technogogy/

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COPYRIGHT AND PIRACY

© 2017 Nik Peachey

If you wish to use this book and the resources from it to do

training and want copies of Digital Tools for Teachers for trainee teachers please contact me at:

a discount code so that your trainees can download a low cost copy.

This book is an independent publication and has been created in my own time and at my own expense.

can

feed my

family and send my daughters to college.

When you download or share this book illegally or without my permission you are stealing from me and my family.

If you have downloaded this book without permission or paying, please do the right thing and go buy a copy from:

If you can’t afford or don’t have the means to buy it, then

it helps you and your

students.

Thanks

I depend on

produce more

the proceeds work like this

from the book

and

so

that

I

so

that

I

can

read

on in peace and

I hope that

Nik Peachey

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019 Photo by Celia Ortega 2 CONCEPTUAL MODELS This chapter contains five

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Photo by Celia Ortega

2

CONCEPTUAL MODELS

This chapter contains five models that you can use to underpin your understanding of how to integrate technology into education. The models are a mixture of concepts and principles that predate digitally networked environments and ones that have been directly developed as a result of them. Each of the five entries also includes a presentation with a reflection task that you can use to develop your understanding of how the concepts apply to your own working practice. You can also use these presentations and tasks when training other teachers.

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MASLOW’S HIERARCHY OF NEEDS

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs was originally developed by Abraham Maslow in his 1943 paper ‘A Theory of Human Motivation’. Maslow studied what he called ‘exemplary people’ and looked at how and what motivated them to achieve. His study included Albert Einstein, Jane Addams, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Frederick Douglass. Maslow also studied the healthiest and highest achieving 1% of the college student population.

As a result he developed the hierarchy of needs as an attempt to describe what people need in order to achieve a level of fulfilment from their lives or what Maslow describes as ‘self-actualisation’.

lives or what Maslow describes as ‘self-actualisation’. This hierarchy is divided into five levels usually depicted

This hierarchy is divided into five levels usually depicted in the form of a pyramid moving from the sections at the bottom, providing for our basic physiological needs of food and shelter, to the level of ‘self-actualisation’ at the top.

This paradigm is a useful one for education because it can help us to focus on what education is really for, helping

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MASLOW’S HIERARCHY OF NEEDS

students to realise their own potential and lead fulfilling lives, rather than achieving what can be rather abstract syllabus goals.

The relevance to educational technology is that it can help us decide which tools we choose to use with our students and how we enable our students to use these tools.

It has become a mantra that pedagogy should lead technology rather than the other way around and this is true. Much early implementation of educational technology did focus on using technology as a form of motivational gimmick rather than because it was the best way to achieve a pedagogical goal, but that is not the only truth. Putting the technology into the hands of students and helping them to understand how to use it in a way that leads to their own self-actualisation can also be a perfectly legitimate goal in itself. If we do this though, we should be sure that the technology we teach students about has genuine functionality for them outside of the classroom and measuring this against Maslow’s hierarchy is a good way to do this.

Training Presentation

Use this link to view the training presentation:

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SAMR

Substitution Augmentation Modification Redefinition - SAMR

SAMR was introduced by Dr Ruben Puentedura in 2006. SAMR is a paradigm for describing how we integrate technology into education, though with the proviso that if we want to use technology in a way that is truly transformative we should be aiming to develop tasks and activities that are more towards what it describes as the modification and redefinition parts of the model.

Using the paradigm can help us to analyse the way we are using technology and to think about how we can evolve the way we use it, from the more superficial substitution type tasks to ones that redefine the way students interact with content, each other and the teacher.

Here are the four ways it classifies the application of technology along with an example of how the same task could evolve through this process.

classifies the application of technology along with an example of how the same task could evolve

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SAMR

SubstitutionTechnology acts as direct substitute with no functional change. The task remains the same but a computer is used as part of that task.

E.g. Find a text online to use in place of one of the texts in your course book. Ask your students to read it and answer comprehension questions.

Augmentation Technology acts as a direct tool substitute for an analogue activity, but with functional improvements.

E.g. Find a text online to use in place of one of the texts in your course book. Ask students to use some digital tools to mark up the text with notes, highlight specific areas to remember and use an online dictionary to check new vocabulary.

ModificationTechnology allows for significant task redesign.

E.g. Find a text online to use in place of one of the texts in your course book. Ask students to use some digital tools to mark up the text with notes, highlight specific areas to remember and use an online dictionary to check new vocabulary. Then ask students to share their reflections about the text on a blog which is shared within a wider educational community. They then comment on each others’ posts. They later meet together in a virtual live forum to discuss and debate the content.

RedefinitionTechnology allows for the creation of new tasks previously not possible.

E.g. Find a text online to use in place of one of the texts in your course book. Ask students to use some digital tools to mark up the text with notes, highlight

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SAMR

specific areas to remember and use an online dictionary to check new vocabulary. Students then work collaboratively to research the background to the text online and create a digital survey about it. They share the survey through social media. They then collect and analyse the data from the survey and work together online to create an infographic or video report of their analysis of their survey responses.

Getting teachers to approach technology with this kind of awareness can certainly have its benefits and SAMR has definitely attracted quite a following.

Training Presentation

Use this link to view the training presentation:

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

BLOOM’S

TAXONOMY

Bloom’s Taxonomy

Blooms Taxonomy originated in 1956 as a way of promoting higher order forms of thinking in education rather than memorisation and rote learning. There are three taxonomies, Cognitive, Affective and Psychomotor, though the one most commonly referenced is the one for Cognitive Domain.

The taxonomy has more recently been appropriated by educational technologists to understand how to better use technology in a way that will lead to deeper levels of learning.

The diagram below shows how the various activities can be mapped onto a scale of thinking skills that move from lower to higher order.

of thinking skills that move from lower to higher order. Many critics of the early use

Many critics of the early use of e-learning and educational technology tools, rightly in many cases, pointed out that the application of new technologies had led to a regression in

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BLOOM’S

TAXONOMY

the application of pedagogy and that most computer based learning systems focused on enabling of testing students’ abilities to remember or understand input and so was restricted to the development of lower order thinking skills.

With the more recent development of platforms that support user generated content and more social and computer mediated human interactions, this criticism can much more easily be rebuked. As educators we now have at our disposal a wider range of tools and resources that enable us to apply, analyse, evaluate and create.

In order to meaningfully apply this taxonomy to our use of technology, I believe we have to be very careful to focus on understanding the nature of the tasks we ask students to accomplish with the technology. We cannot simply attribute a technology to a higher or lower order thinking skill and assume that by using that technology the students are achieving that level of cognitive engagement.

Training Presentation

Use this link to view the training presentation:

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TPACK

Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge - TPACK

TPACK is an attempt to identify the knowledge and understanding that teachers need to possess in order to effectively use technology in an educational environment.

The paradigm looks at the individual primary knowledge areas of content, pedagogy and technology, but also helps us to focus on the areas where these skills need not only to overlap, but combine into new levels and fields of understanding. The initial primary knowledge areas are:

Content Knowledge “Teachers’ knowledge about the subject matter to be learned or taught.

Pedagogical Knowledge “Teachers’ deep knowledge about the processes and practices or methods of teaching and learning.

Technology Knowledge Knowledge about certain ways of thinking about, and working with technology, tools and resources. Being able to recognise when information technology can assist or impede the achievement of a goal.

and resources. Being able to recognise when information technology can assist or impede the achievement of

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TPACK

But discrete knowledge of these areas individually does not presuppose that we are able to combine these fields to achieve impactful learning with technology.

TPACK is based on an understanding that we need to have knowledge of combinations of these primary areas and by combining them we create new knowledge areas. These being defined as:

Pedagogical Content Knowledge “Teacher interprets the subject matter, finds multiple ways to represent it, and adapts and tailors the instructional materials to alternative conceptions and students’ prior knowledge. PCK covers the core business of teaching, learning, curriculum, assessment and reporting, such as the conditions that promote learning and the links among curriculum, assessment, and pedagogy” (Koehler & Mishra,

2009).

Technological Content Knowledge “Teachers need to understand which specific technologies are best suited for addressing subject-matter learning in their domains and how the content dictates or perhaps even changes the technology—or vice versa” (Koehler & Mishra,

2009).

Technological Pedagogical Knowledge “An understanding of how teaching and learning can change when particular technologies are used in particular ways. This includes knowing the pedagogical affordances and constraints of a range of technological tools as they relate to disciplinarily and developmentally appropriate pedagogical designs and strategies” (Koehler & Mishra, 2009).

Finally, all six of these knowledge areas can be combined to form a seventh and ultimate field of knowledge.

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TPACK

Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) “Underlying truly meaningful and deeply skilled teaching with technology, TPACK is different from knowledge of all three concepts individually. Instead, TPACK is the basis of effective teaching with technology, requiring an understanding of the representation of concepts using technologies; pedagogical techniques that use technologies in constructive ways to teach content; knowledge of what makes concepts difficult or easy to learn and how technology can help redress some of the problems that students face; knowledge of students’ prior knowledge and theories of epistemology; and knowledge of how technologies can be used to build on existing knowledge to develop new epistemologies or strengthen old ones” (Koehler & Mishra, 2009).

or strengthen old ones” (Koehler & Mishra, 2009). We can use this framework to help focus

We can use this framework to help focus on and assess the knowledge areas that we need to develop as well as using it as a guide to help us understand which fields of knowledge our training is addressing.

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TPACK

Training Presentation

Use this link to view the training presentation:

References

Mishra, P., & Koehler, M. J. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A new framework for teacher knowledge. Teachers College Record. 108(6),

1017-1054.

Koehler, M. J., & Mishra, P. (in press). Introducing Technological Pedagogical Knowledge. In AACTE (Eds.). The Handbook of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge for Educators. To be published by AACTE and Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

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CONNECTIVISM

Connectivism

Connectivism is a theory of technology integration that has originated and is unique to the digital world. Connectivism originated as an attempt by Steven Downes and George Siemens to understand and define the ways in which learning naturally occurs in the digitally connected and socially networked world.

The theory has huge implications for the development of autonomous learning as well as online learning and has been used and misused to support the construction and implementation of a generation of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) and MOOC platforms.

Connectivist learning is based on the following set of principles:

Learning and knowledge rests in diversity of opinions.

Learning is a process of connecting specialised nodes or information sources.

Learning may reside in non-human appliances.

Capacity to know more is more critical than what is currently known

Nurturing and maintaining connections is needed to facilitate continual learning.

Ability to see connections between fields, ideas, and concepts is a core skill.

Currency (accurate, up-to-date knowledge) is the intent of all connectivist learning activities.

Decision-making is itself a learning process. Choosing what to learn and the meaning of incoming information is seen through the lens of a shifting reality. While there is a right answer now, it may be wrong tomorrow due to alterations in the information climate affecting the decision. When thinking about our use of technology in education we can use these principles as a guide to evaluate the effectiveness of our tasks and activities. We can look at the

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CONNECTIVISM

ways we are encouraging and guiding our students in the use of technology to ensure we are helping to reinforce the understanding and practice of these guiding principles.

Training Presentation

Use this link to view the training presentation:

Reference

George Siemens - Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age, Journal of Instructional Technology:

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019 3 Photo by Nik Peachey TRAINING TIPS This chapter has a

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3

Photo by Nik Peachey

TRAINING TIPS

This chapter has a collection of tips and advice that can help to ensure that your training session are successful and engaging.

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TRAINING TIPS

Tips for Training

Let’s start with some general tips and advice that I have collected over many years of training teachers around the world to use technology.

Be sure of your ground pedagogically

So many edtech trainers are great with technology, but much less versed in educational theory and pedagogy. Experienced teachers are more likely to have a stronger theoretical understanding, so be prepared to back up your ideas with sound pedagogical insights and try to relate your training back to theories of learning and pedagogical approaches.

Make sure training is hands on

Running through a list of tools and ideas in a presentation may have some value, but it doesn’t come anywhere close to the impact of giving teachers hands-on experience and the chance to actually work with the tech to create something, so make sure you include time for independent practice.

Give solid examples of what you have done

Being able to speak from experience about how you have used tech with your own students will have far more impact than theoretical applications of “You could do blah blah blah with your students.” Sharing anecdotes of how you have used technology in your own classes, the challenges you have faced and how you have overcome or even been overcome by them can really lend credibility to your training.

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TRAINING TIPS

Manage expectations

A positive attitude is great, but be prepared to also point out weaknesses, potential pitfalls and talk about your own failures. This might help your participants avoid the same mistakes and stop them from becoming disillusioned.

Make time to experiment and explore

Don’t be tempted to cram in as many tools, techniques and activities as possible. Incorporate project time into your training so that teachers have the chance to go away and explore the things that interest them most and get their own perspective on how they can use them with their students.

Back up technical training

Learning to use new tools is getting easier all the time, especially on mobile devices, but it’s still quite easy for teachers to forget which button to press or which link to follow. So back up any demonstrations with either an illustrated step-by-step guide or a video tutorial that teachers can come back to later, or better still create a community platform where teachers can continue to support each other.

Make their lives easier

Using technologies that can make what they already do a bit easier or a bit quicker is a great way to start. For example, I have a link to a tool that quickly creates a cloze test activity. Sharing tools like this that start from what teachers already do can really help to get them on your side.

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TRAINING TIPS

Do things that can’t be done

One of the most common remarks made by teachers about technology is: “Well that’s fine, but you can do that without tech by …” If you can show examples of technology use that go beyond what is already possible in the classroom, then you are much more likely to capture their enthusiasm. One example of this is the use of collaborative writing tools like PrimaryPad and its ability to track, record and show how students constructed text.

Solve classroom problems

Being able to spot a genuine classroom problem and show how technology can solve it can be very persuasive. One example of this is gist reading, which can be very challenging to teach because students tend to ignore time limits. I show how using a free digital cue prompter can give teachers control of the text and push students to gist read at the speed the teacher chooses.

Plan with long term and short term goals

However inspiring your training session is, and however short or long it is, you should make sure that teachers leave it with a plan. SMART plans are great if you have time to work on them with the teachers. If you don’t have time to get them to create individual SMART plans, at least get them to think about the first step or the first technology application they will try in their classroom and what they will do with it.

Tech can be implemented in CPD

One of the reasons many teachers feel less confident with tech is because they often only use it in the classroom. Showing how technology can become part of their own

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TRAINING TIPS

self-guided CPD and professional practice, and helping them to build their PLN can really help to energise their technology use and make their development much more autonomous and long lasting.

Make sure everything works before the training

I can’t emphasise this enough. Nothing puts teachers off more quickly than seeing the trainer fail.

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TRAINING TIPS

Before the Training Session

Before delivering any training session or activity there are some basic things that you can check to try to ensure things go smoothly.

that you can check to try to ensure things go smoothly. Make sure you have all

Make sure you have all the necessary leads and connectors to plug in your laptop or device. This includes mains lead, connectors for the data projector and ethernet cable for the internet if you need one.

If you are using wifi, make sure you have any access passwords or usernames you may need and any additional settings or plugins that you may need to access the network at the training venue.and ethernet cable for the internet if you need one. Make sure the computer you are

you may need to access the network at the training venue. Make sure the computer you

Make sure the computer you are using is fully updated and any plugins such as Flash or Java are installed with the latest version.

such as Flash or Java are installed with the latest version. Make sure you are up-to-date

Make sure you are up-to-date on any sites or resources you are showing and they haven’t redesigned the user interface or started charging since you last looked at them.

interface or started charging since you last looked at them. If you are using your own

If you are using your own computer log in to any sites you need to use before the sessions to save time and avoid getting usernames or passwords wrong when you are in front of your participants.

passwords wrong when you are in front of your participants. Make sure you have back up

Make sure you have back up versions of any materials you maybe using. Have a copy online somewhere, but also have a copy on a USB drive or something similar.

but also have a copy on a USB drive or something similar. Make sure you have

Make sure you have plenty of water to drink. It can get pretty hot when you have a room full of people all using computers.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019 Photo by Nik Peachey 4 TRAINING ACTIVITIES The activities in this

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Photo by Nik Peachey

4

TRAINING ACTIVITIES

The activities in this chapter have been designed to be used independently so feel free to choose any you feel would be suitable for the participants on your course. There are some activities which work better as follow up tasks to previous training and these are marked as ‘review’ tasks. Some activities are also better suited to fit within an on-going in-service program of development rather than as a one-off workshop sessions.

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TRAINING

ACTIVITIES

Exploring a Chapter

Rationale:

This is a simple task just to get participants focusing on tools that explore a specific area. You can choose from any of the chapters and run this activity a number of times or choose different chapters for each group so they cover a wider range of tools and skills.

Procedure:

Get participants to work alone or in pairs

Give them a specific chapter to explore.

Ask them to look at the various tools and select the one they think would be most useful to use with their students.

Regroup the participants in to groups of four and ask them to share the tool they chose and explain why they chose it and how they would use it with their students.

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TRAINING

ACTIVITIES

Identifying Criteria

Rationale:

This activity gets participants thinking more carefully about what they are looking for and what they want the resources they select to achieve. It also pushes them to think about their criteria before looking at the various resources.

Procedure:

Put the participants into groups of 4.

Ask them to brainstorm a list of criteria for evaluating web based apps or resources.

Once they have had time to brainstorm, ask them to reduce their list to the 6 most important criteria.

Once each group has reduced their list to 6 criteria regroup them with participants from other groups and ask them to compare and explain their criteria.

Now assign each group one of the chapters from the book and ask them to find a tool that meets their criteria.

Ask the group to compare what they found.

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TRAINING

ACTIVITIES

Ready-Made Materials

Rationale:

Many of the resources in the book have either ready-made materials or materials that have been created by other participants. Encouraging participants to explore these will help them to see the potential of the resources and perhaps even help them to find some ready made materials to use with their students.

Procedure:

Choose 4 - 6 tools or resource sites that you would like the participants to explore.

Give each teacher one of the sites.

Ask them to explore the site and find one example of materials that they could use with their students.

Put the participants into groups and ask them to share what they have found and tell the other participants why they like it.

At the end of the activity, ask the participants to decide which of the sites and materials they liked the most.

Give them some more time to explore the site they liked most in more detail and use it to create something for their students.

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TRAINING

ACTIVITIES

Funding a Resource

Rationale:

This is a game type activity, but it does encourage participants to research sites more enthusiastically and gets them to focus on the more positive aspects and how to present them. It’s a nice activity to do towards the end of a longer training course when participants might be starting to suffer from overload. Procedure:

Give each teacher a different site or tool to explore. If you have a large group you can just choose 7 - 8 different tools.

Get each teacher to explore the site you gave them and find as many good features as possible.

Once they have had time to do this put the participants into groups of 7 - 8 (Make sure that they have all researched different sites).

Now tell them that they need to get funding for their site but only five of the sites can be funded. They should tell the other participants about the site they researched and try to make sure that theirs is one of the five sites that gets the funding.

Once they have all described their sites they can vote on which sites to fund and which to drop.

You could then tell them that the budget has been cut and they now only have funding for three of the sites.

Once they decide on three you could get them to reduce it to one.

After this give them some time to look at all the sites and decide whether they made a good choice.

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TRAINING

ACTIVITIES

Revision Presentation

Rationale:

This is a review activity to refresh participants’ memories of what they have already covered. This is particularly useful if you are covering a lot of resources. The activity is quick to prepare and is a great way to start a new day by reviewing previous day’s learning.

Procedure:

Create a presentation deck with a screen grab of each site and tools you have presented on each slide.

Ask the participants to watch silently and try to remember what the site or tool is called and how it is used.

Allow around 30 seconds to 1 minute for each slide.

At the end of the presentation go back to the beginning of the presentation and show the first slide.

Put the participants into groups to share what they remember about the site.

Repeat this with each slide allowing about 2 - 5 minutes for each one.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

TRAINING

ACTIVITIES

Visualisation Review

Rationale:

This is a very simple visualisation activity but great to get participants thinking about what they have learned and internalising it.

Procedure:

Ask the participants to close their eyes.

Once their eyes are closed ask them to try to remember how many websites or resources they have looked at in the session.

Ask them to count silently on their fingers.

As they count ask them to try to visualise what the site looks like in their mind.

With their eyes still closed ask them to hold up the number of fingers to indicate how many sites they can remember.

Then ask them to open their eyes and compare the number of fingers they are holding up with the people around them.

Put the participants into small groups and ask them to share the sites they can remember and whatever they can remember about how the site can be used.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

TRAINING

ACTIVITIES

Your Classroom Visualisation

Rationale:

This activity works well as a follow-up to the previous one. It is a visualisation activity, but it gets participants thinking about how they will start to apply what they are learning and encourages them to share their ideas with other participants.

Procedure:

Ask the participants to close their eyes.

Once their eyes are closed ask them to think about the sites you have presented and think about the one they liked the most.

Then with their eyes still closed ask them to visualise themselves using the site with their students and think about what they will do with it.

Now ask them to open their eyes and share with a partner or in small groups the site they were visualising and how they were using it.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

TRAINING

ACTIVITIES

App Auction

Rationale:

This is a way of getting participants to quickly take a superficial look at a number of different resources. It can be used before activities that look in more depth at some of the resources or as a final activity to see what resources participants most value from the ones they have been working with.

Procedure:

Select a collection of tools or sites that you would like your training group to explore.

Create a presentation with a slide for each site and include a screenshot, the name, and the chapter and page of the book it comes from.

Give each of your participants a fictional budget and tell them they can spend it in the auction to buy sites.

They must buy at least one.

Now show them each slide in the presentation. Give a very brief description of the site and start to take bids.

Run this like an auction but try to keep it quick. After each site is sold to the highest bidder make a note of their name (or group name) and make sure they make a note of the page number from the book.

At the end of the auction tell the participants that they now have to explore the sites they bought and decide whether they have spent their money well.

They should decide this based on the usefulness of the site for their particular students.

Once they have done this you can put them in groups to share what they found out about the sites they bought.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

TRAINING

ACTIVITIES

Digitise the Course-book

Rationale:

This is a great activity for inservice training courses. It encourages participants to really think about how they can integrate the technology into their day to day teaching. This kind of activity is best done after participants have built up some knowledge of a number of different tools.

Procedure:

Ask participants to bring along a unit from one of the course books they use. Ask them to break down the activities in each unit into skills, grammar, input, etc.

Get the participants to select one of the skills and look for tools in the relevant chapters of the book that they could use to supplement, replace or enhance the course book content.

Give them time to actually create a digital variation on one of the activities from their course book.

Then put the participants into pairs or small groups and ask them to share their activity and explain how the technology they have chosen enhances it.

They can then take one of the tools that another teacher has used and see if they can also use the tool to enhance an activity from their own chapter.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

Wire-framing

Rationale:

Creating a wireframe of a website structure is a great way to ensure that participants understand and can conceptualise the navigation and contents of a site. A wireframe is a simple flow diagram which represents the structure of the site. This forces the participants to explore the various areas of the site and identify the content in each section.

Procedure:

Give participants a specific site to look at (They could all look at the same one or different ones).

Ask them to explore the site and create a wireframe diagram of the different parts.

Ask them to include brief notes about what each part of the site is for.

Once they have completed the wireframe put them into pairs and ask them to exchange the wireframes.They should then use the new wireframe to explore the site and check to see if there is anything their partner has missed.

They can then change back or you can put them into groups to share what they have found.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

TRAINING

ACTIVITIES

Presenting a Resource

Rationale:

This activity move participants from exploring resources into being able to present and inform others about them. Creating the presentation pushes them to formulate their ideas in a clear concise way. You could tell them how many slides they should use and what each slide should cover if the participants are less experienced.

Procedure:

Give participants a site to explore and ask them to create a presentation about it.

Tell them they can only use images of the site in the presentation and a title for each slide, no bullet points or text.

One they have prepared their presentation you can put them into small groups to deliver the presentation to the other participants in their group.

The groups should then choose the site they liked the best and that person should deliver their presentation for the whole class.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

TRAINING

ACTIVITIES

Creating a Video Tutorial

Rationale:

This is a useful activity which encourages participants to learn about tools in order to create their own video tutorials. This will be a useful skill to help them build online instruction for their students and help them move into training. It works well as an extension of the previous two activities.

Procedure:

Choose one of the screen capture tools from the training tools chapter of the book.

Make sure the participants know how to use it.

Now give them each a website or tool to explore and tell them to make a video tutorial showing how to use the site.

Once they have done this you can upload the tutorials to a site, blog, LMS or video sharing channel and the participants can then watch each other’s tutorials.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

TRAINING

ACTIVITIES

Interview a CEO

Rationale:

This activity is useful as a warmer type activity. It’s a lighter way of getting participants to think about criteria and which issues related to the use and design of technology they feel are important.

Procedure:

Show the participants an image of a site or tool that you would like them to research.

Now tell them to think about the creator of the resource.

Put the participants in pairs or small groups and ask them to produce a list of 10 questions they could ask the creator about the resource.

Now give them a link to the resource and ask them to research the site and try to find the answers to their questions.

You can ask the participants to exchange their questions so that they research the answers for another group’s questions and then share the answers back with them.

Once they have done their research you can ask them whether they would use the site with their students and get them to explain.

You can also use their list of questions to create a list of criteria for evaluating digital resources.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

TRAINING

ACTIVITIES

Create a Lesson Plan

Rationale:

This activity gets participants to work collaboratively on lesson plans that they can use with their students. This activity works better for participants who have a bit more experience with technology or as a later activity in a course.

Procedure:

Choose a selection of tools that you think will be useful for the participants.

Put the participants into small groups and give each group one of the tools.

Ask them to explore the tool and then create a lesson plan and an activity that they can use with their students.

Give them a lesson plan template to use for this.

Ask them to complete the template.

Now ask them to exchange the lesson plan with another group.

They should now look through the new plan and see if they can understand and improve on the plan in any way.

Next put the participants into pairs with one teacher from each group and they should share their suggestions for improvements and adapt and edit the plans.

Finally, the participants can share all of their plans together and choose the ones they would like to use.

These can also be stored and shared online.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

TRAINING

ACTIVITIES

Find a New Tool

Rationale:

This activity gets participants working more independently to search outside of the book and find new sites. They also have the chance to create an entry for the next version of the book and get published.

Procedure:

Put participants into groups and give each group the title of one of the chapters from the book.

Now give the participants a link to my Tools for Learners and Teachers site at:

Ask the groups to use the site to find a new tool to add to their chapter of the book.

Once they have found something they like they should write a short entry like the ones in the book.

They can then share their entries as a group and create their own short ebook.

They could also send the entries to me at:

If I use the entry in the next edition of the book I will credit them as the writers.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

TRAINING

ACTIVITIES

Report Back

Rationale:

This activity pushes participants to actively use what they are learning in the classroom and to report back. This activity is better suited to in-service or online courses that give participants longer to actively try things with their students. It could even be used weekly or monthly for on-going teacher development.

Procedure:

Give each teacher one tool or resource to use with their students.

Give them one week to try to use it successfully.

At the end of the week get the participants together and ask them to report back on how they used the tool and how well it worked.

They can then exchange tools and try a different one for the week.

You can keep repeating this process over a number of months if you feel the participants are motivated enough.

Be sure to track all their success stories and any materials they use so that they can all share them.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

TRAINING

ACTIVITIES

Pros and Cons

Rationale:

Often participants tend to be either overly idealistic or negative about edtech. This activity encourages a more balanced view. It’s important when using any resource that you are aware of both the benefits, as well as any potential pitfalls, and that you balance these in how you apply it within your classroom.

Procedure:

Put participants into two groups - A and B.

Give all of the participants in group A a resource to explore (This could be the same one or different ones).

Ask them to try to compile a list of 10 ‘Pros’ or reasons why they should use it.

Give all the participants in group B the same resources to explore and ask them to create a list of 10 ‘Cons’ or reasons not to use it.

Once they have had time to explore and compile their list, put them into pairs with one A and one B and ask them to compare their lists and decide together whether the resource is useful for them.

Get the pairs to feedback to the group on the site they explored and their decision.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

TRAINING

ACTIVITIES

Plan a Training Session

Rationale:

As we all know, one of the best ways to learn something is to teach it. In this activity participants create their own training session based around one of the tools or resources from the book. You ask them to design this for classroom or online delivery. This is also a great way to get them actually using some of the tools from the book to create the training.

Procedure:

Give or let participants choose one of the resources from the book.

Ask them to prepare their own training session to train other participants how to use the site.

Ask them to include some of these features in their training session:

A video tutorials showing how to use the resource

A list of pros and cons about the resource

Some example activities that participants could try

An activity that gives trainees hands on practice using the resource

A short presentation to introduce the site

If there is time you could get the participants to deliver their presentations to each other and give each other feedback and suggestions for improvement.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

TRAINING

ACTIVITIES

Create an Infographic

Rationale:

This is a review activity that gets participants thinking about the tools they have been looking at. It also helps them to learn how to disseminate information and create infographics, so it’s good for hands on skills development too.

You can choose or let the participants choose which infographic tools they use or you could suggest they use this Genially template.

Procedure:

Put the participants into small groups and ask them to share what they feel are the most useful resources they have discovered.

Ask them to work together and produce a list of the best. This could be 5 - 10 resources.

Once they have their list, ask them to create an infographic to share their list of favourites. They can create this using one of the infographic tools from chapter 11 of the book.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

TRAINING

ACTIVITIES

Create a Training Manual

Rationale:

This activity gets participants thinking in much more detail about the resources they are exploring and developing the skills to share them with their students and other participants. It’s also a good activity to get participants working and collaborating together.

This could be used as a project activity as part of in-service training or at the end of a longer training course so that participants have a takeaway that they can share.

Procedure:

Show participants one of the free manuals I’ve produced. You can download these from:

Get them to analyse the structure of the manual and think about which parts are most useful and what tools they would be needed to create a manual like this.

Now ask them to think of one of the tools they have studied and like and then structure their own training manual for it.

They can work in groups and divide up the workload.

Give them plenty of time to do this.

Once they have completed the manuals they can share them together.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019 5 TRAINING TOOLS This chapter contains a number of tools that

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

5

TRAINING TOOLS

This chapter contains a number of tools that are useful for delivering teacher training and development sessions. The tools can be used to enable a paperless approach to the delivery of training sessions. These are all tools that I frequently use during my own training courses and workshops.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

TRAINING

TOOLS

“The use of a backchannel enables you to work without any paper materials during you session.”

This is a great tool for creating a backchannel. A backchannel is similar to a chat room. This enables all your participants to connect up their devices to the room and you can then share links to sites and worksheets and they can share comments and information together.

and they can share comments and information together. The use of a backchannel enables you to

The use of a backchannel enables you to work without any paper materials during you session.

Todaysmeet can be used without registration or login so it’s really quick and easy to set up. You can also limit how long the room stays live. If you register you get more control over the room and password protect it.

This is a great tool to use with both students and teachers.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

TRAINING

TOOLS

“This is a great way to get links to sites, images, videos, worksheets and any other materials onto mobile devices in just seconds.”

The QR Code Generator - http://www.the-qrcode-generator.com/

This is a very easy to use tool for creating QR codes. These codes can be scanned by mobile devices with a code scanner and any links or text coded into them are instantly delivered to the users’ device.

into them are instantly delivered to the users’ device. This is a great way to get

This is a great way to get links to sites, images, videos, worksheets and any other materials onto mobile devices in just seconds.

To create a code, just go to the site and paste in either a text or a link. Then save the code to your hard drive and add it to worksheets and presentations or show it on a data projector.

This makes running paperless mobile workshops with teachers or students really easy.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

TRAINING

TOOLS

“This is a really useful tool for quick and easy screen capture video, but there are no edit functions so the videos it produces can be a bit rough around the edges.”

This is a great tool for creating annotated images or short video tutorials.

tool for creating annotated images or short video tutorials. You have to download and instal the

You have to download and instal the software and create a free account. Then when you open the software a round sun like interface opens on your screen.

You can then click and drag a field around a part of your screen and click an icon to grab an image of the screen. Once you have the image you can use the tools to annotate it.

Once your image is annotated you click another icon to upload it to your Jing account. The link to the image is instantly copied to your clipboard and you can then copy past the image into worksheets or presentations or just share the link with your participants.

It works in a very similar way when recording video tutorials. The video files tend to get quite large, so try to make them less the 2 - 3 minutes. You can save them as Flash files on your hard drive. This is a really useful tool for quick and easy screen capture video, but there are no edit functions so the videos it produces can be a bit rough around the edges.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

TRAINING

TOOLS

“This is a great tool for teacher training and development and also great to get students speaking and doing website reviews and sharing them together. You can get teachers or students to create their own resource library of useful tools and websites.”

This is a great tool to make screen-capture videos directly from within your Chrome browser. Once you have registered and installed the browser plugin, you just go to the page or site and click on the Loom button.

just go to the page or site and click on the Loom button. You’ll need to

You’ll need to give the plugin permission to use your microphone and webcam, then just click on ‘Start Recording’. You can choose to record whole screen or just an application window.

Click the plugin button again and your video is instantly uploaded to your profile on the Loom site and the link is copied. You’ll see the website you recorded, a webcam image of yourself talking in the lower left corner and a number of fields to type in information and add comments.

You can share a link to the recording through social media, get an iframe embed code or just get a direct link. Once you share it, users can watch and leave comments.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

TRAINING

TOOLS

“DropBox is a really useful tool for storing files online and you can have private files and well as ones that you share publicly with participants.”

When doing any kind of training it’s great to have some cloud based space where you can share files and materials with participants or just access the work from any computer.

with participants or just access the work from any computer. DropBox is a really useful tool

DropBox is a really useful tool for storing files online and you can have private files as well as ones that you share publicly with participants.

There are a number of access levels you can set with your files, so you can allow other users to edit and download them or you can make the files read only.

You can also edit a number of MS Office file types within the browser.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

TRAINING

TOOLS

“You can then store and edit all of your training materials from one place online and use any computer to do it. This also really helps you enable a paperless approach to your training.”

If you and your participants are a Google apps users then Google Drive might be a better alternative than DropBox.

Google Drive might be a better alternative than DropBox. It works in a similar way and

It works in a similar way and allows you to store, access, edit and share files online. It also integrates with a large number of other approved third party services, so if you trust Google or are just careful about the information you store online then this is a really powerful alternative to DropBox and enables you to dispense entirely with other MS Office type applications.

You can then store and edit and share all of your training materials from one place online and use any computer to do it. This also really helps you enable a paperless approach to your training.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

TRAINING

TOOLS

“It’s really easy to upload your presentations to SlideShare then share the through social media or add them to your profile on LinkedIn.”

Whether you are doing training workshops, conference sessions or plenaries it’s always really helpful to share your presentations with your participants.

helpful to share your presentations with your participants. It’s really easy to upload your presentations to

It’s really easy to upload your presentations to SlideShare then share them through social media or add them to your profile on LinkedIn.

This is also a great way of building up kudos for your training work and building your professional profile as a trainer.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019 6 READING TOOLS Photo by Isabell Winter on Unsplash Despite the

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

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READING TOOLS

Photo by Isabell Winter on Unsplash

Despite the proliferation and popularity of video and audio on the internet, the vast majority of what is published and consumed online is still text. Reading from screens, websites and digital communication tools present students with some unique challenges that the more linear, homogeneously sealed environment of paper-based communication doesn’t. In contrast to the challenges of reading from screen, digital tools also offer a range of functionality to support the reading process and make it more engaging and enriching.

It can also be argued that we now consume text in a very different way on digital devices. We are much more likely to explore background information, take tangental journeys away from the original topic and read across multiple texts and genres during our searches and researches. Developing the skills necessary to read effectively in this new digital environment can only be done using the tools and devices that are native to that environment, so as teachers we need to ensure that we are using a range of digital texts and tools that help students to develop the skills they need to navigate this digital world with confidence.

This chapter contains a range of tools and resources to help you develop your students’ reading skills. These range from tools to assist with vocabulary whilst reading to resources with a wide range of ready-made graded authentic and semi authentic content to help engage and motivate your students both at home and in the classroom.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

READING

TOOLS

“This is a great study tool for doing digital research and a great way to build students’ digital literacy skills.”

This is a really useful Google Chrome plugin and iOS app that students can use to save quotes, links, screenshots or images from websites as they do online research.

Once the plugin has been installed, they just highlight parts of the webpage they want to save and click on the yellow icon.

the webpage they want to save and click on the yellow icon. The information is saved

The information is saved into their account. The 'notes' are saved as cards and these can then be added to collections, known as ‘Storylines’.

All information that is saved is linked back to the original source and students can add notes about the information and why they saved it. They can also organise and re-arrange the information they save to make it more accessible.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

READING

TOOLS

“This is a good sound way to use translation to support reading and vocabulary building.”

ReadLang - http://readlang.com

This is a useful tool to assist students’ reading and to build vocabulary. They just add the browser plugin and then click on words to get translations of any words they highlight in an online text. The words they translate are saved into their profile and they can then use them to generate flashcard revision activities.

then use them to generate flashcard revision activities. Students can also edit the flashcards and add

Students can also edit the flashcards and add additional information to them.

This is a good sound way to use translation to support reading and vocabulary building. It is a freemium product so students can use it to learn 10 new words each day. If they want unlimited use then there is a charge of around $5 for a year.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

READING

TOOLS

“This is a great way to get students at lower levels engaged with current topics.”

News in Levels - http://www.newsinlevels.com/

This is a useful site to find semi-authentic content for lower levels. The content is based around current news items and each article is available at three different levels.

and each article is available at three different levels. The texts also have a recording of

The texts also have a recording of someone reading the news. Level 1 is a very simplified version of the text with quite a slow clear reading.

The top level texts can be as long as 3000 words and normal speed. There is also an app version for both iOS and Android. This is a great way to get students at lower levels engaged with current topics in English.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

READING

TOOLS

“This is a really marvellous tool for structuring students’ reading development in an engaging way.”

This is another site that uses news stories as the basis for language learning. Each story can be accessed at different levels and if students register they can also access interactive quizzes and open text comprehension questions that have been set by their teacher.

comprehension questions that have been set by their teacher. If you register as a teacher the

If you register as a teacher the site also offers you some LMS type management tools that enable you to track learners’ scores and set questions. This makes it ideal for setting and checking reading homework. This is a really marvellous tool for structuring students’ reading development in an engaging way.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

READING

TOOLS

“This is a great tool for helping students develop reading skills and helping teachers to produce motivating reading activities based around authentic content.”

This is a useful tool for creating a reading activity based around any text. Just copy and paste text into the yellow field and click on ‘Rewordify text’ and the text will be simplified to make it easier to read.

and the text will be simplified to make it easier to read. The site will also

The site will also help you create vocabulary activities based around synonyms and you can print a number of activity types based around the text including a cloze test. There is also an interesting feature which analyses and highlights all the parts of speech in different colours.

This is a great tool for helping students develop reading skills and helping teachers to produce motivating reading activities based around up-to-date content.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

READING

TOOLS

“This is great for getting students to work more autonomously on their reading skills.”

This site was designed to help grade K5 - K12 first language speaker students develop their reading and comprehension skills, but can also be really useful for second language development.

can also be really useful for second language development. Students can choose from a range of

Students can choose from a range of graded texts and get a wide range of interactive activities and reading support. Teachers can also register on the site and assign specific texts to their students.

The reading support tools combine text-dependent comprehension questions and discussion type questions to focus students’ attention as well as text-to-speech and dictionary / glossary type vocabulary support. Students and teachers can also download the text as a pdf file.

This is great for getting students to work more autonomously on their reading skills.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

READING

TOOLS

“The site looks like it will be better for higher level readers rather than beginners as many of the articles are quite complex.”

ReadWorks Digital - http://digital.readworks.org/

Like many of the other tools this site helps teachers find ready made reading activities that they can assign to students. The site has ready prepared questions for the texts as well as vocabulary support.

questions for the texts as well as vocabulary support. ReadWorks also makes it very easy to

ReadWorks also makes it very easy to print the articles for use in classrooms where there is limited internet connectivity.

The site looks like it will be better for higher level readers rather than beginners as many of the articles are quite complex.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

READING

TOOLS

“This is a really useful free resource which is constantly growing.”

DreamReader - http://dreamreader.net/

This site was designed specifically for English language learners and has a range of reading texts at different levels. Each text also has an interactive online quiz and an audio recording of the text.

interactive online quiz and an audio recording of the text. The materials can also be downloaded

The materials can also be downloaded as pdf and printed for use in the classroom. Each one also has a downloadable version of the audio file.

These materials are great for homework, reading assignments or for use in the classroom. This is a really useful free resource which is constantly being up-dated.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

READING

TOOLS

“Used over time this can be a really powerful tool to help students develop their reading skills and vocabulary.”

This is a tool that can be used to assist students with the reading of more challenging web based texts.

with the reading of more challenging web based texts. They simply add the URL of the

They simply add the URL of the text to Lingro and it overlays an interactive dictionary on the text. Students can then click on any word to get a dictionary definition or translation. The words they click on are collected in the Lingro ‘history’ and students can then add them to wordlists in the ‘Learn’ section of the site. The wordlists they create can then be converted into interactive flashcards for vocabulary revision.

The ‘Sentence History’ part of the site also stores a link to the original text where the student found the word and the sentence that it appeared in, so students also have an example sentence and information about context.

Used over time this can be a really powerful tool to help students develop their reading skills and vocabulary.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

READING

TOOLS

“This is a powerful tool for developing students collaborative digital study and research skills.”

To use Scrible you need to instal a browser plugin. Scrible can be installed on most browsers including mobile versions.

can be installed on most browsers including mobile versions. Once installed it can be used while

Once installed it can be used while students read online. The toolbar enables student to annotate web based texts with sticky notes, highlight, underline and strike out words as wellas a range of other features. All of the annotated texts are stored in the student’s library so they can then come back to the text and find and review their annotations. The texts can also be shared privately or through social media with a tutor or peer.

This is a powerful tool for developing students’ collaborative digital study and research skills.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

READING

TOOLS

“This is a real timesaver for anyone creating courses using authentic materials.”

This is a real timesaver for anyone creating courses using authentic materials. The site generates word lists from authentic texts and includes definitions of the words and a range of activities to help students understand and remember the words. All you have to do is choose the text and download the worksheets ready for printing.

the text and download the worksheets ready for printing. You just copy and paste the URL

You just copy and paste the URL of the page you want to use with your students and after about 1 minute the process will be complete. You can then see the text of the page with the key words underlined and download three separate documents; reformatted text, word list with definitions and vocabulary building activities, as PDF.

The word list also contains example sentences of the words used in context as well as a QR code that links back to the original article or webpage online.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

READING

TOOLS

“VocabReminder is a useful tool to recommend to any of your students who have Apple devices.”

This is an iOS dictionary app that has been designed to help you revise and remember your new vocabulary.

When you find a word you want to learn, add it to your list of words by tapping on the bell icon next to each word.

list of words by tapping on the bell icon next to each word. The app will

The app will then setup a schedule of reminders to help you remember to check the meanings of the words you've chosen and give you a small test of your understanding of the word.The app is particularly useful because it will work without an internet connection, but it's only available for Apple devices at present.

You can check out the quality and suitability of the definitions by going to the site and using the ‘Word Search’ feature.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019 7 WRITING TOOLS Photo by Thought Catalog on Unsplash With the

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

7

WRITING TOOLS

Photo by Thought Catalog on Unsplash

With the vast majority of written discourse being created on digital devices it would seem only natural that we look to digital tools to assist in both the production of a wide range of text based genre and also in the teaching of the sub-skills of writing.

In addition to this the move to digital text production has enabled the creation of a number of tools that can assist students in the production of better quality writing and supply them with feedback, guidance and suggestions for improving the quality of their output. Many of these kinds of tools don’t exist in the analogue world of paper-based production, so it is imperative that we as teachers help to educate our students to enable them to get the best from these tools and resources.

Another significant change that digital text production has ushered in is the ability to produce text collaboratively, both asynchronously and synchronously. The skills involved in working collaboratively to produce and refine text are becoming increasingly important in todays modern workplace, so again this reinforces the importance of developing students writing skills within the digital realm.

This chapter contains a range of resources to help you develop your students’ digital writing skills. These range from tools to help students develop collaborative writing and peer editing skills to more creative tools to help students exploit poetry and develop stories and digital narrative.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

WRITING

TOOLS

“This is a fantastic tool for getting students to write collaboratively and / or peer edit each others’ work.”

PrimaryPad - http://primarypad.com/

This is a fantastic tool for getting students to write collaboratively and / or peer edit each others’ work. PrimaryPad is a little like a web-based word processor. Just go to the site and click on ‘Create Pad’ and the site creates a unique webpage for your text. Then just start writing. Share the link to the page with more people and you can all write into the same page at the same time.

and you can all write into the same page at the same time. You can also

You can also use the chat window at the side of the page to give advice or comment about the text. If you click on the ‘Timeslider’ (the little clock icon next to the star) you can watch a recording of the text being created and see how the text was constructed and how students edited and changed each others’ work. Any work created on the free version of the site will remain there for up to 30 days.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

WRITING

TOOLS

“This is like a lesson in creative writing and it’s great for showing students how you can start with a very simple idea and add more detail to make the idea more interesting.”

Telescopic Text - http://www.telescopictext.com/

This is a simple web page that starts with the sentence “I made tea.” but as you click on the grey highlighted words in the sentence it starts to extend and become a complex paragraph about making tea.

to extend and become a complex paragraph about making tea. This is a lesson in creative

This is a lesson in creative writing and it’s great for showing students how you can start with a very simple idea and add more detail to make the idea more interesting. It also demonstrates the use of different clauses and relative clauses in sentences as well as the impact of using more adverbs and adjective. The second version of Telescopic Text http://www.telescopictext.org/ (.org not .com) allows you to register and create your own telescopic sentences. This is great if you want to create materials that demonstrate specific grammar or writing style points to your students. You can even personalise them and include students’ names and build them into the example sentences.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

WRITING

TOOLS

“The app will identify areas where your text is difficult to read and suggest ways that you can make it clearer.”

The Hemingway app is a tool for style checking your writing.

The Hemingway app is a tool for style checking your writing. You can copy & paste

You can copy & paste or write directly into it and then click on ‘Edit’ to get your writing evaluated for level and clarity. The app will identify areas where your text is difficult to read and suggest ways that you can make it clearer.

This is a good tool for less formal writing, as a lot of the suggestions focus on making sentences shorter and removing passive voice.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

WRITING

TOOLS

“This site is built around the concept of using image prompts to inspire digital writing activities for students.”

This site uses image prompts to inspire digital writing activities for students.

prompts to inspire digital writing activities for students. Teachers can create classes and assign writing tasks

Teachers can create classes and assign writing tasks to students. The students do their writing tasks within the platform and can publish and share them there. This is a little like posting to a blog, but within a safe environment.

Students can comment on each others’ postings and collect them into a gallery. The site also has an interesting tool to add voice recordings so you can use this for speaking activities too. The site is free to use with up to 40 students and they can produce up to 5 postings each. After that you have to have a premium account, but it is very reasonably priced, especially if you choose the whole school solution. You can also access the writing prompts without signing up by going to:

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

WRITING

TOOLS

“There are some interesting writing tasks that can be as simple as summarising your weekend in ten words or could be much longer.”

Write the World - https://writetheworld.com/

This site is a little bit like WriteAbout, but it is targeted at 13 - 18 year old native speakers. Students can register and then access writing groups or just write about specific image based prompts. There are some interesting writing tasks that can be as simple as summarising your weekend in ten words or could be much longer creative writing activities.

words or could be much longer creative writing activities. There are also some set writing competitions

There are also some set writing competitions that students can enter. Their writing is collected into a portfolio so they can look back and see how they have progressed. You can see some of the writing prompts here:

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

WRITING

TOOLS

“This is an interesting tool that theoretically allows you to check how polite your written communication is.”

The Politeness Checker - https://foxtype.com/politeness

This is an interesting tool that theoretically allows you to check how polite your written communication is. You just type in a sentence and then the site will give you a percentage rating for politeness. You can then make changes to the sentence to try to improve the politeness score.

to the sentence to try to improve the politeness score. The site also gives you some

The site also gives you some analysis of the words or phrases which change your score. It’s questionable how accurate this is, but it’s a good tool to use with students to draw their attention to register and levels of politeness. You can make this into a game by getting students to try to produce the most polite text by altering various words.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

WRITING

TOOLS

“This is a great tool for creating branching stories. These are stories that allow the reader to choose how the plot progresses as they read through the story.”

Inklewriter is a tool for creating interactive narrative or what I used to call reading mazes. These are stories that present the reader with various options through the story and allow the reader to choose how the plot progresses as they read through.

to choose how the plot progresses as they read through. To start writing your own story

To start writing your own story just click on ‘Start Writing’, then give your story a title and add the first paragraph. You can then add the options for your reader.

The site tracks your options as you build the story and you can also see an overview map of the different connections as you write.

Students can work collaboratively and take it in turns to add the different options at the end of each paragraph.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

WRITING

TOOLS

“The app works in the browser on tablets or laptops, so it’s ideal for the BYOD classroom.”

This is a great free web based app that allows students to create digital story books. It’s very simple to use, they just add backgrounds and characters to the pages of the book and then type in their text.

to the pages of the book and then type in their text. They can save the

They can save the books they create into their own library. This is a great way to get younger learners writing. The app works in the browser on tablets or laptops so it’s ideal for the BYOD classroom. You can see some examples here:

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

WRITING

TOOLS

“This is great for students who need a little help with the imaginative part of the writing.”

Plot Generator is a great tool for students who can’t think what to write about. They can just fill in blank spaces with different aspects of the plot and the site will generate a story plot for them.

the plot and the site will generate a story plot for them. The student can then

The student can then use this plot to write the story. There is quite a wide range of story types to choose from and they can even use it to generate song lyrics and a range of letters. This is great for students who need a little help getting started with the imaginative part of the writing.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

WRITING

TOOLS

“This is a nice tool to use with older teens and ideal for class trips or documenting out of the classroom projects.”

Steller is a great way to get your students creating short books on their mobile phones. You can download the free app for Android or iOS.

phones. You can download the free app for Android or iOS. The students can then take

The students can then take photographs or videos on their phone and use the app to add text and make them into very professional looking short digital books.

The site has a lot of social media wrap around and students can comment on each others’ books and share them on social media platforms.

This is a nice tool to use with older teens and ideal for class trips or documenting out of the classroom projects. You can see some example books here:

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

WRITING

TOOLS

“This is a nice way to get students working collaboratively with poetry.”

This is an iOS app that enables students to collaboratively create short texts such as poems or haiku. Each student adds a line and passes it on through the app.

Each student adds a line and passes it on through the app. The texts can be

The texts can be overlaid onto images and posted through social media when they are finished. This is a nice way to get students working collaboratively with poetry.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

WRITING

TOOLS

“This is a nice way to get students working collaboratively with poetry.”

TextAdventures - http://textadventures.co.uk/

Text adventure games are a great way of really engaging students in reading. They get the chance to take some control of the narrative and find their own way through the story by making choices at various points in the narrative.

story by making choices at various points in the narrative. On the ‘TextAdventures’ site you can

On the ‘TextAdventures’ site you can find lots of examples for your students to read, but if you log in you can also get your students to create an adventure themselves. You can give them an image and an introductory text to get started and tell them how many different stages the story should have. Then get them working together exploring the different branches and possibilities at each turn. This is great for collaborative writing projects and great to get students thinking about the potential consequences of different actions.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

WRITING

TOOLS

“This is a nice way to get students working collaboratively with poetry.”

This is a great tool for quickly creating video summaries. You can use it to write a short summary or just put in the URL of an online article or blog posting and then pick the parts of the text you want to include in the video.

pick the parts of the text you want to include in the video. Once you’ve structured

Once you’ve structured the text, the site will automatically find images and clips to go with each section of the text. You can then edit these manually or add your own images. Once you have the look and feel of the video right, you just select music and add your branding. The video renders online and you can then download a copy to your hard drive and uploaded to any online sharing sites and embed it into a course or blog.

This is a great tool to use to encourage students to produce short summaries. It forces them to keep the amount of text to a minimum so they focus on key points. Selecting and matching images to the text can also help make the points more memorable.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

WRITING

TOOLS

“This is a nice way to get students working collaboratively with poetry.”

Story Wars is a great way to make writing creative and competitive.

is a great way to make writing creative and competitive. Students read short chapters of the

Students read short chapters of the beginnings of stories and then have to submit the next chapter of the story. The readers of the story can then vote for which new chapter they feel is the best continuation of the story. The one with the most votes becomes part of the story. There are lots of stories in progress that students can add to or they can start their own. Each story has a fantastic image to help prompt the imagination. The site is free, but there is a ‘classroom’ version for $15 a month which makes all the stories your students create private and gives you the teacher the ability to give your students feedback on their submissions. There is also a free iOS version for mobile devices.

The site is an ideal way to get teens enthusiastic about reading and writing fiction.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

WRITING

TOOLS

“This is a useful tool to illustrate and publish any short fiction writing your students produce.”

This is an interesting web based tool for combining text and images into beautiful visual short stories or poems. Once you have signed in you can start to create your narrative by typing in text and searching for and selecting images to combine with the text.

searching for and selecting images to combine with the text. There are lots of artistic images,

There are lots of artistic images, gifs and video clips to choose from and you can choose how to position the text over the images. Once your narrative is complete it plays like a presentation that users can click through to read or you can set it to auto-play.

The app seems to be particularly popular with teens and there’s a lot of teen type fiction on the themes of romance and or horror stories. Some of the themes can be a bit strong so it’s best to use this only with more mature students. The app is also social so users can comment on, follow and like each others creations.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

WRITING

TOOLS

“Particularly good for anyone working on EAP or studying for an IELTS or similar exam.”

This is a really cleverly designed Chrome add-on to get your students self-assessing and improving their own writing.

students self-assessing and improving their own writing. The add-on opens in the sidebar of the document

The add-on opens in the sidebar of the document and you can select from a number of aspects that you would like to work on. Select from the menu and you will see a submenu that has more specific features to choose from.

When you click on one of the features, you will see the places in your document where improvements could be made and get a list of them in the side bar. You can then decide which sentences are okay and which you would like to improve.

It doesn't do the work for the students like a grammar or spell-checker but it does push them to think about their writing at a more stylistic level.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

WRITING

TOOLS

“This is a nice way to get students working collaboratively with story telling.”

This is a really interesting app for developing reading and writing skills in a collaborative and creative way.

and writing skills in a collaborative and creative way. The app is based around a common

The app is based around a common classroom activity in which students write stories together by adding a sentence and passing it on to another writer. The next writer then adds a sentence and either passes it back or passes it to another student. The process continues until the story is finished.

The app works both synchronously and asynchronously and has a text chat window on the side of the interface so students can interact with each other as they build the story.

This is a great way to get students writing collaboratively and you can follow it up with some peer correction or get the students to take the stories and enhance and improve them by adding more description and detail.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

WRITING

TOOLS

This is a fantastic site for creating intercultural exchange projects with students from different schools around the world.

“All the materials are provided and the students just need a device (the service works on most devices) and an internet connection.”

works on most devices) and an internet connection.” The site has a wide variety of interesting

The site has a wide variety of interesting projects that you can choose from and they are well designed and structured with learning goals, levels and age appropriacy clearly sign-posted.

In order to register on the site as a teacher you have to be located at a physical school which you identify when you sign up. Once this is done you can select your project and get your students registered using a class code that you find on your dashboard.

The site automatically matches your class up to another class somewhere around the world. Then your students will need to commit 30 - 45 mins each week for the length of the project (usually about 6 weeks)

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

WRITING

TOOLS

Newspaper Generator - https://newspaper.jaguarpaw.co.uk/

This is a useful tool that enables you to create what looks like a newspaper front page.

“This is a nice way to get students writing news type texts and then publishing them.”

writing news type texts and then publishing them.” To do this you upload an image, select

To do this you upload an image, select a title and a headline and then write in the details of the story. Then just click on 'Make it' and the site will produce a PDF that you can download.

You can use it to get them thinking about fake news by creating a selection of news articles, some based on real news stories and others that you invent. You can then ask them to research the articles and find out which ones are real and which are invented.

You could use the headlines and articles to generate discussion over which are real and which are fake or work on how to spot fake news.

Newspaper Generator can be used in an enjoyable way to raise awareness of issues regarding the credibility of news and to promote more critical thinking.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

Peergrade is a great tool to get students assessing each others’ work and giving each other feedback.

“Peergrade looks like a really excellent tool to encourage a process approach to writing and to encourage students to think more deeply about how their work is evaluated and what they should be aiming to achieve.”

is evaluated and what they should be aiming to achieve.” You can create classes and then

You can create classes and then assign digital assignments that can include a range of different media. The students then complete and submit their tasks online. Once they have submitted their assignment they then grade the assignments of their peers.

After they have graded their peers they are able to find the feedback from their peers on their own work.

As the teacher you can set up rubrics for the students to use when they grade each others' work.

The platform also has a live session mode that enables you to do writing work in the live connected classroom.

The basic account is free and unlimited. If you want to use this regularly and especially if you want to implement the use of it across your school then it's well worth checking out the subscription models.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019 8 Photo by Alice Moore on Unsplash LISTENING TOOLS Much like

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

8

Photo by Alice Moore on Unsplash

LISTENING TOOLS

Much like speaking, the digital communications revolution has expanded access to a huge variety of digital genres and with that a range of voices and accents that students would never experience in the analogue classroom. These digital communication tools coupled with the proliferation of mobile devices offer students the opportunity to work more autonomously to develop their listening skills both inside and outside the classroom. Helping students to negotiate the huge range of available tools and use them in a way that enables them to develop their listening and communication skills more effectively should be among the top priorities of language teachers.

This chapter contains a range of tools and resources to help you develop your students’ listening skills. These range from a wide variety of authentic ready-made content based around news or songs to tools that can be used to support and assist with listening skills whilst watching video clips from YouTube.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

LISTENING

TOOLS

“Listenwise is a really powerful tool for developing students listening skills and for saving teachers planning time.”

This is an amazingly rich resource for developing listening skills using texts about current events. The site has a huge collection of ready made listening materials on a really wide range of international topics.

materials on a really wide range of international topics. Once you register on the site, you

Once you register on the site, you can access listenings and scripts and well as a range of interactive and classroom activities.

Once you select a lesson you can easily get a link to share with your students. Any teacher can register for free, use the classroom materials and share links to the resources with their students. To use the interactive online materials and get access to the LMS you need to have a premium account. This will enable you to use and track the materials for homework assignments. The premium membership will also allow you to customise, adapt and assign the content to specific students or classes.

You can see some examples of the materials here:

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

LISTENING

TOOLS

“This is a great way to get students working on their listening skills at home.”

Lyricstraining - http://lyricstraining.com/

This site features music videos in a range of different languages. Students can choose a video and then select their level of challenge. The site then generates cloze activities based around the song lyrics.

generates cloze activities based around the song lyrics. At the advanced level all the words are

At the advanced level all the words are deleted and it becomes a dictation type activity, but at lower levels just a few words are extracted. Students then listen, line-by-line, and type in the missing words.

There is also some gamification to add to the motivation level. Students can score more point if they type in the words more quickly. There is a time limit and if they are too slow they have to restart of the activity. If there’s a song you particularly want to use you can register on the site and create your own activity. You will need the lyrics and a link to the video on YouTube. This is a great way to get students working on their listening skills at home.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

LISTENING

TOOLS

“This is a really great way for students to practice and improve their listening skills and get instant feedback.”

Listen and Write - http://listenandwrite.com

This site is a little like Lyricstraining but with a greater variety of content and exercise types.

but with a greater variety of content and exercise types. Students can select listening activities at

Students can select listening activities at various levels and then choose the type of activity they want to do. These range from typing in a complete sentence then getting it corrected to just typing in letters or words.

If students want to save their scores they need to register, but registration is free. This is a really great way for students to practice and improve their listening skills and get instant feedback. Teachers can also register and create activities. You will need an audio file and a transcript. It can take a little time to create your first activity, but once you have created one it shouldn’t take longer than 15 - 20 mins to do another.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

LISTENING

TOOLS

“Produced by CNN this is a excellent site for higher level students.”

The site is updated with a news summary every week. Produced by CNN this is a excellent site for higher level students. The site includes transcripts as well as downloadable podcasts and videos.

transcripts as well as downloadable podcasts and videos. There are no ready made materials, but it

There are no ready made materials, but it does provide easy to use authentic content that you can create short lessons around.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

LISTENING

TOOLS

Breaking News English - http://www.breakingnewsenglish.com/

This site has a vast collection of lesson materials designed around current news stories. The stories have been rewritten to be accessible for lower level English language learners. As well as the stories and multiple activities that accompany each one, there are audio recordings of the stories that students can listen to.

“This is a great source of classroom materials for teachers.”

is a great source of classroom materials for teachers.” Multiple audio files are provided for each

Multiple audio files are provided for each story so that students can listen to the story at slower speeds.

This is a great source of classroom materials for teachers.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

LISTENING

TOOLS

“This is a great way to get younger students using YouTube whilst ensuring that they won’t find disturbing or inappropriate materials.”

YouTube Kids - https://kids.youtube.com/

This app is from YouTube. It is designed to be family / child friendly. The app works on android or iOS and enables you to allow kids to use and browse videos on YouTube without having to worry about them finding anything inappropriate.

having to worry about them finding anything inappropriate. There is a very comprehensive parental guide which

There is a very comprehensive parental guide which helps teachers and parents to understand how to use the app. The guide also has some useful advice on screen time and other related issues.

This is a great way to get younger students using YouTube whilst ensuring that they won’t find disturbing or inappropriate materials or comments.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

LISTENING

TOOLS

“This is a great tool if you have a lot of transcription work to do, but also a great tool to develop students' listening.”

SwiftScribe - https://swiftscribe.ai/

SwiftScribe is a great tool for making audio to text transcription much easier. The tool only works in the Chrome browser so you'll need to download it.

in the Chrome browser so you'll need to download it. Once you have registered you can

Once you have registered you can upload any audio file and SwiftScribe's speech to text engine will attempt to transcribe it into English text. Once it has done this you or your students can listen to the audio file whilst reading through the text in the browser. When you spot errors in the transcription you can just click on the space bar to pause the audio and then edit the text in the browser window. The site has tools which will help slow down or repeat sections of the text and there are keyboard short cuts to make all this faster.

This is a great tool if you have a lot of transcription work to do, but also a great tool to develop students' listening. You can give them and audio file to transcribe and they can upload it and then check and correct the transcription. Once it's complete they can download and send it to you or peer check each others work.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019 9 SPEAKING TOOLS Photo by Jason Rosewell on Unsplash Digital connectivity

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

9

SPEAKING TOOLS

Photo by Jason Rosewell on Unsplash

Digital connectivity has brought about a revolution in the way we use voice to communicate both with each other and with the digital devices that accompany us wherever we go. Face-to-face synchronous communication across continents has become a day-to-day experience for many people and the use of voice to control various aspects of our computers and indeed our homes is becoming normalised.

With the falling cost, increased accessibility and use of voice communication tools across continents and cultures it seems only natural that we should be helping our students to access and make use of these tools effectively both inside and outside the classroom. These tools don’t just offer our students the opportunity for genuine language use both inside and outside of the classroom but they also offer them the opportunity to record and reflect on their own abilities and take a more autonomous and self-aware approach to the development of speaking skills.

This chapter contains tools to help you develop your students’ speaking skills. These range from tools to help with specific areas of pronunciation to tools you can use to get students recording their own voices. These tools can help you to create engaging multimedia activities that get your students speaking.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

SPEAKING

TOOLS

“This is the kind of tool that can be used to get younger students speaking. It gives them the opportunity to play out different roles and to listen and reflect on their own speaking before they save and share.”

This is a creative tool for encouraging students to practice speaking and developing dialogues in a really enjoyable way.

speaking and developing dialogues in a really enjoyable way. It is available on mobile for iOS

It is available on mobile for iOS and Android users. Once downloaded you can use it to create short 3D animated videos with your own voiceovers.

Just open the app, choose the type of storyboard structure you need then select the background and characters for each scene.

When you open the first scene you then click on record and touch the character you want to attach the voice to. You can hold your finger down on the character to move it around as you speak, then do the same with the other characters.

Once you have recorded the scene you can select the background music you want for it and review it. Move on through the scenes until the story is created. You can then download the finished video to your phone and share it on a site or through social media.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

SPEAKING

TOOLS

“This is a great tool to set up speaking homework tasks and get students exploring a wide range of issues whilst developing their digital skills and confidence in front of their webcam.”

This is a great tool for adding a blended learning element to your face-to-face courses or even for building 100% online learning.

courses or even for building 100% online learning. Using Flipgrid you can create a number of

Using Flipgrid you can create a number of ‘grids’ based around top level themes and then build 'topics' into these.

When you build a topic you can add various video based resources and questions, then students can respond by recording short video clips giving their opinion on the topic.

The free version gives you one grid that you can use to create any number of discussion topics. The paid version which is $65 a year has a lot of additional features including the ability to connect up with other Flipgrid classrooms around the world.

It's well worth looking through the existing grids that have been created on the platform to see how it works and look at some of the really great work that's being done with the platform.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

SPEAKING

TOOLS

“This is a great way to make reading aloud less stressful and more productive for students.”

Fluency Tutor - https://www.texthelp.com/en-gb/products/fluencytutor Fluency Tutor is a really interesting concept. It is a Chrome plugin that converts a computer into a kind of language lab. If you sign up as a teacher you can then assign texts to students and they can record themselves reading the text and send it to you for feedback. You see all your students’ submissions in the LMS and you can the listen to them and send them feedback.

LMS and you can the listen to them and send them feedback. They will have the

They will have the time to read and understand the text before recording it and they have the opportunity to listen to themselves and improve their recording. This a great way to give students speaking practice for homework and it give you the opportunity to listen to each individual student and analyse their pronunciation problems. You do both need to have Google Chrome though and they will need to register with an email address.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

SPEAKING

TOOLS

“This is a nice simple tool to get students speaking and working on their pronunciation.”

Dictation - https://dictation.io/

This is a very simple to use web-based app that works in the Google Chrome browser. It looks like a simple sheet of lined paper, but it enables students to use their computer microphone to dictate text into the page. The text can then be copied and pasted into any document.

The text can then be copied and pasted into any document. This is a nice simple

This is a nice simple tool to get students speaking and working on their pronunciation, though they will need a quiet space to do it and a good microphone, so better for autonomous study at home.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

SPEAKING

TOOLS

iTalk Recorder -

04

This is a great app for iOS users. It enables you to quickly record and share example audio recordings of sentences, words or texts for your students to listen to. Better still get your students speaking, recording and sharing with you and each other.

“It enables you to quickly record and share example audios of sentences, words or texts for your students to listen to.”

sentences, words or texts for your students to listen to.” Just record and share directly from

Just record and share directly from your iPhone or iPad. You can also save the recordings into DropBox to save space on your device.

There is also a premium version with a greater range of features available for a very small one off fee.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

SPEAKING

TOOLS

“Once you have recorded your clip you can save it to your hard-drive or share through email, a range of social media or embed code.”

This is a very simple to use browser based tool for creating and sharing short audio clips. Simply enable Flash in your browser and start recording. Once you have recorded your clip you can save it to your hard-drive or share through email, a range of social media or embed code.

share through email, a range of social media or embed code. The recording quality isn’t outstanding,

The recording quality isn’t outstanding, but this is a good way to get students recording speaking activities, sharing them, or collecting them into a speaking portfolio.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

SPEAKING

TOOLS

“This is a great way to combine the use of edtech with image based speaking activities.”

This is a great app to get students talking about or describing images they create or upload. The app works in either the Google Chrome browser or on Android phones. Students simply add an image and then record themselves talking about it.

add an image and then record themselves talking about it. The ‘sketches’ can then be posted

The ‘sketches’ can then be posted online and embedded into websites and shared on social media. You can see some examples here:

This is a great way to combine the use of edtech with image based speaking activities.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

SPEAKING

TOOLS

“Shadow Puppet is a great tool for creating digital narrative, doing reports or homework assignments or creating more personalised speaking activities.”

Shadow Puppet - http://get-puppet.co/

This app takes enables teachers or students to create sequences of images and videos and record a monologue about each one.

of images and videos and record a monologue about each one. The images can be ones

The images can be ones they have created themselves or they can find images by using the apps search function. The image search draws on Creative Commons images from a wide range of source.

Students can also add annotations, emojis and other ornaments to the images. The app then exports the sequence and monologue as a video file that can be shared through social media, email or embedded into a blog or website.

The site also includes lesson ideas for a range of topics across the curriculum as well as some useful printable resources for the classroom. At present it is only available for iOS.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

SPEAKING

TOOLS

“You can copy and paste large chunks of text and then with the click of a button it will be transcribed into phonemic script.”

This is a really useful tool for working with text and phonemic script. You can copy paste large chunks of text and then with the click of a button it will be transcribed into phonemic script. You can also use the speak button to get the site to read the text to you using text-to-speech technology. You can then copy and paste the phonemic script into documents to create student activities.

phonemic script into documents to create student activities. You can choose from a UK or US

You can choose from a UK or US phonemic transcription of the text.

Phonetizer will also work on mobile platforms but can be tricky to use on the smaller screen size.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

SPEAKING

TOOLS

“This app offers a very simple quick way to convert up to 300 characters of text into phonemic symbols.”

PhoTransEdit -

This app offers a very simple quick way to convert up to 300 characters of text into phonemic symbols. Just type or copy paste your text into the upper field, click on transcribe and your text will appear as phonemes in the window below.

and your text will appear as phonemes in the window below. You can them copy and

You can them copy and paste the text into any document or presentation. There is also a free desktop version that you can download from the site for use offline.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

SPEAKING

TOOLS

“This is a great way to get students comparing different accents, as well as finding pronunciation models for words they want to learn and showing the word in context.”

This is a marvellous tool that enables you to use YouTube as a form of pronunciation corpus. You can type in a word or phrase to the search engine and it will find a series of videos where that word or phrase appears along with subtitles.

where that word or phrase appears along with subtitles. You can choose between US, UK and

You can choose between US, UK and AUS sources and also get a direct link to the part of the video where the word occurred and share it with students.There's even a small tool to slow things down if you feel that helps.

You can use the green buttons to skip forward to the next clip or back to the last one.

This makes it easy to hear lots of examples in context quite quickly. You can even click on the words in the subtitles to get a dictionary definition.

The site works in the browser so should work across platforms and on most mobile phones and tablets too.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019 10 Photo by Amador Loureiro on GRAMMAR TOOLS Whilst digital communication

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

10

Photo by Amador Loureiro on

GRAMMAR TOOLS

Whilst digital communication has become the scapegoat for what is perceived to be a decline in the standards of grammatical accuracy in English, it also offers us unparalleled access to sources, resources and tools that can enable us to carry out simple empirical studies into how language is genuinely used by its speakers. The internet now gives us access to the kind of corpora that was once exclusively limited to university research departments and every student can now access the tools to mine that data for genuine and geographically specific examples of language use. As teachers we need to be able to understand how the use of these tools can underpin what we teach and the production of the learning materials we produce.

This chapter contains a range of tools to enable you to develop your students’ understanding of English grammar and syntax. These range from tools that analyse grammar to those that enable you to instantly create grammar activities or create corpus based materials that exploit authentic online content.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

GRAMMAR

TOOLS

“This is a wonderful tool to enable teachers and students to create hours of language practice.”

TubeQuizard - http://tubequizard.com/

This is a marvellous site that creates interactive grammar and vocabulary activities based on the subtitles and transcriptions from YouTube videos. Students can either browse the available quizzes by level or by type of video. They then click on the video to do the activity. Most are gap fill type activities and students can listen and type in the answers or click ‘Check’ to find the answer.

in the answers or click ‘Check’ to find the answer. You can also search for specific

You can also search for specific words or phrases and TubeQuizard will find you a video that contains the words or phrases you are looking for and enable you to create your own quiz.

This is a wonderful tool to enable teachers and students to create hours of language practice.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

GRAMMAR

TOOLS

“This is a great tool for getting students to check their own sentence structure and vocabulary.”

Ludwig is an interesting concept. You can type in a sentence and then match it against similar texts found online. You can also add a * in the sentence instead of a word and Ludwig will show you possible words to replace the *.

and Ludwig will show you possible words to replace the *. Unlike some similar sites like

Unlike some similar sites like GoogleBattle (http://googlebattle.com/) or GoogleFight http://www.googlefight.co.uk/ Ludwig only draws on well written sources, so is more representative of a better level of English.

This is a great tool for getting students to check their own sentence structure and vocabulary.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

GRAMMAR

TOOLS

“Just type in any sentence and the site will produce a diagram of the sentence with all of the parts of speech and word forms labeled.”

This is a great site for anyone who likes to analyse the grammatical structure of sentences. Just type in any sentence and the site will produce a diagram of the sentence with all of the parts of speech and word forms labeled and colour coded.

the parts of speech and word forms labeled and colour coded. This is great for introducing

This is great for introducing students or trainee teachers to form analysis. Students can look for sentences in a text that have the same or similar structure. They can also use the form diagrams and replace parts of the sentence with new words of the same word class to create new meanings within the same structure. This should illustrate the generative nature of grammatical structures.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

GRAMMAR

TOOLS

“This is a great way to get students engaging with, enjoying and thinking about grammar.”

This site reminds me of the grammar auction game I used to play with students. Grammar Gamble is a competitive quiz game that anyone can join.

Gamble is a competitive quiz game that anyone can join. The player starts with $100 and

The player starts with $100 and can gamble as much or as little of that sum on their answer to a multiple choice question. If they are sure they are right they can gamble all of it, but if they are unsure they can reduce the amount. If they get the answer correct they win more money and can increase their bet next time. You can use this as a competition among students to see who can make the most money in ten minutes.

This is a great way to get students engaging with, enjoying and thinking about grammar.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

GRAMMAR

TOOLS

“This is a great way to create materials and exercises that draw on authentic language or for students to collect examples of new words or phrases they are learning.”

This site give you access to a corpus of more than 3.7 billion words collected from web news sources (News On the Web). The corpus is constantly being renewed as new web news appears so this is a great way to make sure that your searches are drawing on up-to-date sources of English. You can type in any word or ‘string’ of words and then find examples of use from within the corpus.

words and then find examples of use from within the corpus. This is a great way

This is a great way to create materials and exercises that draw on authentic language or for students to collect examples of new words or phrases they are learning.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

GRAMMAR

TOOLS

“This is a really useful tool for quickly creating reference materials for students.”

Verb conjugation tool - http://www.prologo.net/english/

This is a great tool to quickly create verb conjugation charts. Simply click on the verbs that you want to include in your chart and the site will instantly generate the chart for you.

and the site will instantly generate the chart for you. You can choose between having a

You can choose between having a simple table of the conjugations or having a flow chart showing the use of each verb within a sentence structure.

showing the use of each verb within a sentence structure. This is a really useful tool

This is a really useful tool for quickly creating reference materials for students.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

GRAMMAR

TOOLS

“This is a very simple tool that enables you to instantly create cloze test activities based around any text.”

This is a very simple tool that enables you to instantly create interactive cloze test activities based around any text. Just copy and paste a text from any site or document into the main field and click on submit. You can produce either plain text cloze tests or interactive ones.

produce either plain text cloze tests or interactive ones. The site will also allow you to

The site will also allow you to choose the types of words that are extracted from the text, so you can for example just remove articles or prepositions. When an interactive cloze has been created you can type in the missing words and the site will highlight the words in red if they are incorrect. The activities this tool creates can’t be saved, so there is no copyright infringement, but that also means that you can’t create and distribute the activities to multiple students. You can show students how to use the tool to create their own revision tests though, so it’s still very useful and works well on an interactive whiteboard.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019 11 PRESENTATION TOOLS Photo by Daniel Cheung on Unsplash The ability

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

11

PRESENTATION TOOLS

Photo by Daniel Cheung on Unsplash

The ability to produce and deliver convincing presentations is becoming a common feature of both the business and academic world, so for many of our students the development of this ability is a high priority. Creating and delivering presentations presents a number of challenges for native and non-native speakers alike. Virtual presentations, either synchronous or asynchronous, are also becoming increasingly popular. As teachers, the digital realm offers us a range of tools and resources to help students develop the skills they need, both to create dynamic visually engaging slide decks, as well as to work on the oral delivery of this genre of communication.

This chapter contains a range of tools and resources to enable you to create and share presentations. These range from tools to help you share presentations for the classroom to tools which enable you to add talking head narration and embed presentations into online courses. There are also tools to help you create simple animated presentations or more unusual types of presentation like web based posters or single page websites.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

PRESENTATION

TOOLS

“The site makes it very easy to share your presentation through a range of social media and you can also easily add them to your LinkedIn profile.”

SlideShare is a free online platform for sharing your presentation slides. This can make your slides much more accessible to others after the presentation.

much more accessible to others after the presentation. The best way to add your slides to

The best way to add your slides to SlideShare is to save them to PDF first and then just upload them. The site makes it very easy to share your presentation through a range of social media and you can also easily add them to your LinkedIn profile.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

PRESENTATION

TOOLS

“This is a great alternative to getting students to stand up and do a presentation.”

This is a great alternative to getting students to stand up and do a presentation. Instead it allows students to create a narrated video presentation. This could be used as a great first step towards delivering their own physical presentation. It also offers the students the choice between recording their own narration or using a text to speech generated narration.

own narration or using a text to speech generated narration. The site is free and simple

The site is free and simple to use. Once students register they just need to type their script for each slide and stage in the presentation and then the site will automatically generate images to go with the script.

Students can then go through and edit each slide, change the images or add their own narration. At each step their are video guides so there shouldn’t be too many technical challenges. There are also plenty of examples here:

https://www.mysimpleshow.com/examples/ so it would be good to choose a couple for students to look at first so they understand what they are going to create.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

PRESENTATION

TOOLS

“To get started just click on the edit icon and you can simply type in your text and the links to the media you want to include.”

QwikSlides is a very simple browser-based tool for creating online presentations.

simple browser-based tool for creating online presentations. Basically you can add text, links to online images

Basically you can add text, links to online images and videos and customise the look of the presentation a little. It’s not nearly as powerful in terms of design as something like Keynote or PowerPoint, but it does get the job done and the presentation online very quickly and it is free.

To get started just click on the edit icon and you can simply type in your text and the links to the media you want to include. Each line in the editor creates a new slide.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

PRESENTATION

TOOLS

“The site does have a couple of advantages over SlideShare though, especially for Apple users. It accepts KeyNote presentations and will retain any animations used in the presentation too.”

AuthorStream is similar to SlideShare. It’s a tool for hosting your presentations online. You can also add audio narration and the site will then convert them to videos which you can download, though this is a paid feature so you will have to upgrade from the free version to do that.

you will have to upgrade from the free version to do that. The site does have

The site does have a couple of advantages over SlideShare though, especially for Apple users. It accepts KeyNote presentations and will retain any animations used in the presentation too. The site does look a bit out of date though and isn’t as well designed as SlideShare.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

PRESENTATION

TOOLS

“Students can use the single page to share and display the results of their research and add explainer text.”

Tackk is another alternative to doing presentations in the classroom. It allows students to create a single webpage and add different kinds of media and text to the page.

and add different kinds of media and text to the page. The pages are social so

The pages are social so other students can either contribute to the page or comment, etc. The pages are also easily shared through social media. The designs look very modern and professional so this is a very motivating way for students to share their work.

Students can use the single page to share and display the results of their research and add explainer text.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

PRESENTATION

TOOLS

“There is a really wide range of digital assets that students can search through and use in their pages and this includes images, video 360 images as well as designs, animations shapes and text.”

Buncee is a cross between presentation tool and digital canvas. You can use it to create either a sequence of slides or just use one slide as a kind of digital poster.

of slides or just use one slide as a kind of digital poster. There is a

There is a really wide range of digital assets that students can search through and use in their pages and this includes images, video, 360 degree images as well as icon designs, animations shapes and text. Buncee also works a little like a social network so that students can follow each other and like and comment on each other’s work.

Buncee is a freemium product so there are some features which are locked without payment (audio recording being the most useful one) but the tool is still very useful even if you just work with the free features. There is also an educational version of Buncee.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

PRESENTATION

TOOLS

“It provides a kind canvas on which you can layout a mixture of assets that you wish to present, such as video clips text and images.”

Prezi is very popular among the edtech community at present and claims to represent a shift away from the traditional linear form of presentation.

shift away from the traditional linear form of presentation. It provides a kind canvas on which

It provides a kind canvas on which you can layout a mixture of assets that you wish to present, such as video clips text and images. You then chart a course around the various assets zooming in and out as you talk through them.

Prezi is very mobile friendly too and has a dedicated app for iOS.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019 12 POLL & SURVEY TOOLS Photo by Olu Eletu on Unsplash

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

12

POLL & SURVEY TOOLS

Photo by Olu Eletu on Unsplash

The ability to create surveys for the collection and analysis of data is useful for teachers and students alike. Data collected through the creation of action research projects can help us as teachers to evaluate our own effectiveness. Surveys can also be used to provide motivating, realistic and meaningful classroom and online learning tasks. Most usefully we can also get our students to create surveys to carry out their own research and help them to find answers and conclusions in their data. This ability to collect, analyse and interpret data is a key digital literacy skill and one that can help to inform students critical thinking when dealing with data based information.

This chapter contains a range of tools to help you create polls and surveys. These range from complex multiple question type polls with embedded multimedia, to simpler single response, brainstorming and collaborative type polls that can be used for crowdsourcing and sharing information.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

POLL & SURVEY TOOLS

“It’s pretty easy to use, you just drag and drop the types of question you want to use and then edit the parameters to add the text for the questions and possible answer alternatives.”

SurveyMonkey is a freemium product and one of the online survey tools that has been around for the longest. Using a free subscription you can produce surveys with up to 10 questions and collect up to 400 hundred responses. This is likely to be enough for the vast majority of student created surveys. It’s pretty easy to use, you just drag and drop the types of question you want to use and then edit the parameters to add the text for the questions and possible answer alternatives.

the text for the questions and possible answer alternatives. It’s also very easy to export the

It’s also very easy to export the data you collect from the surveys and analyse the answers. It does look a bit dated though compared to many of the newer survey tools and it doesn’t have very attractive design templates.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

POLL & SURVEY TOOLS

If you are a Google user Google Forms is a great and very

simple to use free tool for creating surveys. You can choose

a simple template or start from a blank. You can also

choose from a reasonable selection of question types

including text input.

Google have made it very simple to integrate video from YouTube and search for and add images. The surveys can be customised quite simply by adding background images and different designs and there doesn’t seem to be any limit to the number of response you can collect.

“The surveys can be customised quite simply by adding background images and different designs and there doesn’t seem to be any limit to the number of response you can collect.”

be any limit to the number of response you can collect.” Google Forms are mobile adaptive

Google Forms are mobile adaptive so you don’t have to worry if you are working in classes where students use a range of different devices.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

POLL & SURVEY TOOLS

“This is a really powerful survey creator and one of the most user friendly ones I’ve tried.”

This is a really powerful survey creator and one of the most user friendly ones I’ve tried. It works on a freemium model which limits the number of templates you can use on a free subscription, but if you are happy with limited design options that won’t be a problem. Some of the question types are only available for premium users, but again, the available ones enable you to cover most situations.

the available ones enable you to cover most situations. There is a really wide range of

There is a really wide range of questions types to choose from and you can just drag and drop these onto your survey template.

Typeform offers good support for images and media, so if you want to add videos from YouTube or upload images Typeform is a good option.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

POLL & SURVEY TOOLS

“This is a great tool to use with students to create online engagement and easy enough so that students can use it to create surveys too.”

Survmetrics - https://survmetrics.com/

This is yet another freemium survey creation tool, but unlike the vast majority of these tools, this one is easy to use and has some really attractive template designs.

easy to use and has some really attractive template designs. This is a great tool to

This is a great tool to use with students to create online engagement and easy enough so that students can use it to create surveys too. You can find some useful examples at: https://survmetrics.com/examples/

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

POLL & SURVEY TOOLS

“You simply add a single question or problem and then users can add ideas for solving the problem.”

This is one of the survey tools I use most and it’s a great tool for exploring the pros and cons around a particular problem and really pulling in ideas from the students. You simply add a single question or problem and then users can add ideas for solving the problem.

and then users can add ideas for solving the problem. They can also add the pros

They can also add the pros and cons of each idea and then vote for the ones they like the best. The data the survey produces can be hard to analyse, though the voting part is quite straight forward. It’s a great tool to use in class, because it’s very simple and quick to create the survey and students can exchange surveys easily and get instant results.

To find out more about how to use Tricider read my article – Crowdsourcing Knowledge with Students.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

POLL & SURVEY TOOLS

“This is a great tool for very simple surveys that just require a simple text input.”

AnswerGarden – https://answergarden.ch/

This is a great tool for very simple surveys that just require a simple text input. It’s great for brainstorming words related to a topic or how students feel about a topic.

words related to a topic or how students feel about a topic. The answers can also

The answers can also be exported to Wordle which creates a colourful word cloud showing the most popular options in larger sizes. It’s also a great tool for use in the classroom because the site automatically generates a QR code for each survey so students can quickly scan the survey onto their phones and answer immediately.

To find out more about how to use AnswerGarden read my article – Brainstorming and polling with AnswerGarden.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019 13 INFOGRAPHIC TOOLS Photo by Cris DiNoto on Unsplash The visual

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

13

INFOGRAPHIC TOOLS

Photo by Cris DiNoto on Unsplash

The visual display of data and information in the form of infographics has become a regular feature of digital publishing. Infographics are both a much more accessible format for conveying dense information on screens and also offer a range of animated and graphic features that can help to convey the information in a more colourful way.

Infographics make information much more accessible for students and can also form the basis of motivating digital literacy and critical thinking tasks. The growth in the popularity of infographics has also spawned a whole generation of infographic creation apps that teachers and students can use freely to create and share their own understanding and perspective. These tools open up a wide realm of creative tasks that can develop students’ digital literacy skills and show the results of research and comprehension tasks.

This chapter contains a range of tools to help you create various kinds of visual representations of information. The tools in this chapter vary from those that can be used to create standard graphs and infographics, to ones that can be used to quickly transform text into to visual displays.

stallone.santino@yahoo.com 19 Apr 2019

INFOGRAPHIC