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The Voice for Business Aviation in Europe Annual Review 2014-2015 Business Aviation in Europe: State

The Voice for Business Aviation in Europe

Annual Review

2014-2015

Business Aviation in Europe:

State of the Industry 2015

Done in collaboration with

Europe: State of the Industry 2015 Done in collaboration with www.wingx-advance.com www.amstatcorp.com www.eurocontrol.int

www.wingx-advance.com

www.amstatcorp.com
www.amstatcorp.com

www.eurocontrol.int

CONTENTS

03

04

05

07

08

09

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

18

Introduction

Overview

What is Business Aviation?

Sub-divisions of the Definition

The European Business Aviation Association

EBAA Representativeness of the Business Aviation Industry

EBAA Membership 1996-2014

State of the Industry

Economic Outlook

• Traffic Analysis

The European Fleet

Activity Trends by Aircraft Types

Business Aviation Airports

Business Aviation and Safety

A Challenging Industry

Challenges from the Inside

1. Means of Booking a Business Aviation Flight

2. Positioning Flights

3. Fleet Growth Vs Traffic

Challenges from the Outside

1. Fuel Prices

2. Route Charges

3. Taxes

Revenue per Flight Indicator

Looking Ahead: Projects for 2015

Description of Projects

EBAA Members (as of 1 April 2015)

INTRODUCTION

In our last annual review, looking back at 2013, we concluded that 2014 would be a defining moment for Business Aviation. In the first half of the year, we saw four consecutive months of growth – a breath of fresh air following the years characterised by recession. We were hoping to see that the economic storm was over so we could all sail ahead onto smoother waters. Some pundits were prompted to celebrate, rather hastily, the end of the recession and the beginning of a new era of slower, but hopefully long-lasting, growth. But the choppy results that followed tempered some of that enthusiasm, and we finally ended the year with a meagre growth percentage of 0.7 (i.e. half of the Secretariat’s prediction). Only now can we say that 2014 was in fact a defining year: it wiped the slate clean so that we can start again at zero (point seven).

The whole Business Aviation sector is still doing all it can and crossing its fingers in the hope that this respite will gain momentum and officially kick off a new, more positive, cycle for 2015 and beyond. If no earth-shattering events were to happen in Europe this year, Business Aviation should be the first to benefit from some economic stability. But let’s remain on the safe side, any growth outpacing 1, possibly 1.5%, should be seen for what it really is: a major achievement considering where we are coming from.

We shouldn’t overlook other signals from the market either. Whilst immune to schadenfreude, it can help to put things in perspective, to add context, by looking at the recent results of other sectors in the air transport sector. In terms of movements, network carriers didn’t do as well as Business Aviation; they basically saw a stall in supply (+0.2%). In fact, with the notable exception of low-cost carriers (+6.5%), all the

Rodolfo Baviera Chairman
Rodolfo Baviera
Chairman

other sub-sectors were worse off than in 2013 (cargo was -0.5%, and charters plummeted

at -9%). While times remain challenging for all

forms of transport, we shouldn’t forget that in many ways, Business Aviation has fared, and continues to fare, better than most of its air transport peers.

Nonetheless, Business Aviation has work to do if it wants to reach the heights it has been anticipating since the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis. In March last year, the EBAA set sail on a new approach for its activities on behalf of its 500+ members, considerably altering the Association’s traditional working method, with the aim of injecting added-value into the sector.

A number of new initiatives have already been

embarked upon, and 2015 will see several of them coming into fruition. Some of these initiatives are centred on core operational needs, such as fair access to ground and air infrastructure, and obtaining the skills and talent necessary to run the industry; others focus on ensuring safer, greener, and more efficient operations that run harmoniously with other players in the air transport ecosystem; and others lean towards ensuring that the industry’s reputation, particularly in European policy and business circles, is positive and based on good, solid information.

Since the impact of Business Aviation is often greater than many perceive, the EBAA and the entire industry are pulling together the resources to find necessary solutions and demonstrate the value of Business Aviation. The EBAA is investing around € 1m in projects and initiatives for 2015, because more than ever Business Aviation means business.

Brian Humphries

President

more than ever Business Aviation means business. Brian Humphries President Fabio Gamba CEO Annual Review 2014-2015
more than ever Business Aviation means business. Brian Humphries President Fabio Gamba CEO Annual Review 2014-2015

Fabio Gamba

CEO

more than ever Business Aviation means business. Brian Humphries President Fabio Gamba CEO Annual Review 2014-2015

OVERVIEW

What is Business Aviation?

OVERVIEW What is Business Aviation? Sub-divisions of the Definition IBAC also identifies three sub-divisions that

Sub-divisions of the Definition

IBAC also identifies three sub-divisions that collectively make up Business Aviation. These sub-divisions are not actively promoted on their own, but they may be used by regulatory authorities and others for specific requirements, provided that the complete definition of Business Aviation is also made available.

Sub-division 1:

Business Aviation – Commercial

The commercial operation or use of aircraft by companies for the carriage of passenger or goods as an aid to the conduct of their business and the availability of the aircraft for whole aircraft charter, flown by a professional pilot(s) employed to fly the aircraft.

Sub-division 2:

Business Aviation – Corporate

The non-commercial operation or use of aircraft by a company for the carriage of passengers or goods as an aid to the conduct of company business, flown by a professional pilot(s) employed to fly the aircraft.

Despite there being no official definition for Business Aviation, one definition by the International Business Aviation Council (IBAC) is generally accepted:

Business Aviation is the ‘sector of aviation which concerns the operation or use of aircraft by companies for the carriage of passengers or goods as an aid to the conduct of their business, flown for purposes generally considered not for public hire and piloted by individuals having, at the minimum, a valid commercial pilot license with an instrument rating.’

Sub-division 3:

Business Aviation – Owner Operated

The non-commercial operation or use of aircraft by an individual for the carriage of passengers or goods as an aid to the conduct of his/her business.

Sub-division 4:

Business Aviation – Fractional Ownership

The operation or use of aircraft operated by an entity for a group of owners who jointly hold minimum shares of aircraft operated by the entity. Fractional Ownership operations are normally non-commercial; however, the operation of the aircraft may be undertaken as a commercial operation in accordance with the AOC held by the entity.

THE EUROPEAN BUSINESS AVIATION ASSOCIATION

The European Business Aviation Association (EBAA) is a non-profit association, founded in 1977 and based in Brussels, Belgium. Its 543 member companies span all aspects of the Business Aviation sector in Europe and elsewhere. The EBAA’s aim is to promote excellence and professionalism amongst its

members and to ensure that Business Aviation is properly recognised as a vital sector of the European Economy. EBAA represents corporate operators, commercial operators, manufacturers, airports, fixed-base operators, and Business Aviation service providers.

EBAA Representativeness of the Business Aviation Industry

The industry is composed of, and shared between, large and well-equipped Business Aviation operators (with a fleet of 10 or more aircraft) and small companies (with less than 5 aircraft). EBAA sees its representativeness increase with company size; therefore the operators with a fleet of 10 or more aircraft are well represented throughout EBAA’s activities (EBAA represents 71% of European operators with 10 or more aircraft).

EBAA Membership 1996-2014

with 10 or more aircraft). EBAA Membership 1996-2014 EU 28 operators with 10 or more aircraft
EU 28 operators with 10 or more aircraft Non-EBAA 29% EBAA 71% fig 1
EU 28 operators
with 10 or
more aircraft
Non-EBAA
29%
EBAA
71%
fig 1
60% Evolution of BusAv 50% Operators 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 2005 2006 2007 2008
60%
Evolution
of BusAv
50%
Operators
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
-10%
Number of operators
Growth

Note: this chart includes piston aircraft and bizliner jets

In general, EBAA has been steadily growing since the late 1990s, and especially since the early 2000s. This is clearly linked with the beginning of the annual European Business

Source: WINGX /EBAA I fig 2

Aviation Convention and Exhibition (EBACE), and the obligation for exhibitors to affiliate themselves to one of the two organisers (EBAA or the US-equivalent, NBAA).

THE EUROPEAN BUSINESS AVIATION ASSOCIATION

Total EBAA

members

600 500 400 300 200 100 0 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
1996
1998
2000
2002
2004
2006
2008
2010
2012
2014

Example: in 10 years – from 2000 to 2010 –EBAA almost quadrupled its number of members, breaking the ceiling of the 400 mark in 2010, followed immediately after by another landmark momentum – the 500 mark, and that in the midst of the perfect storm!

fig 3

Generally, it is remarkable to see that since 2009 and the global financial crisis, EBAA’s membership continues to climb, which is a good sign for the future.

543 MEMBERS 66 COUNTRIES fig 4
543
MEMBERS
66
COUNTRIES
fig 4

STATE OF THE INDUSTRY

Economic Outlook

3.4% EU 28 GDP 4% Growth 2.5% 3.1% 3% 2.1% 1.3% 1.7% 2% 0,0% 0.5%
3.4%
EU 28 GDP
4%
Growth
2.5%
3.1%
3%
2.1%
1.3%
1.7%
2%
0,0%
0.5%
1%
2.0%
-0,4%
0%
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
-1%
-2%
-3%
-4%
-4,4%
-5%

According to the European Commission’s 2014 winter forecast: “The pace of the recovery remains slow as Europe continues to struggle to leave the legacies of the crisis behind it. Economic growth remains also weighed down by unfinished macroeconomic adjustment and sluggish implementation of reforms, as well as long-standing weak growth trends. Moreover, uncertainty about the geopolitical situation, commitments to future policy initiatives and

fig 5

energy-price developments have gained importance in 2014. While private consumption has been the main engine of growth in the current recovery, investment has failed to recover and exports have done little to support growth. The economic recovery in the EU and the euro area is therefore expected to have lacked momentum in 2014, with annual GDP expected to have increased by respectively 1.3% and 0.8%.”

EUR - USD

1.45

1.4

1.35

1.3

1.25

1.2

1.15

1.1

1/2/2013 3/2/2013 5/2/2013 7/2/2013 9/2/2013 11/2/2013 1/2/2014 3/2/2014 5/2/2014 7/2/2014 9/2/2014 11/2/2014
1/2/2013
3/2/2013
5/2/2013
7/2/2013
9/2/2013
11/2/2013
1/2/2014
3/2/2014
5/2/2014
7/2/2014
9/2/2014
11/2/2014
fig 6

New developments have occurred that are expected to brighten in the short term the EU’s economic outlook that would otherwise have deteriorated since the autumn. Oil prices have declined sharply, the euro has depreciated noticeably, the European Central Bank (ECB) has decided to expand the size and composition of its outright asset purchases by adding sovereign bond purchases, and the European Commission has presented its Investment Plan of €315 billion in the next three years. Details of the Aviation

Package, under its plan, are yet to come. The strengthening of the U.S. dollar against the euro is having a mitigated but significant impact on Business Aviation operational costs. Indeed, while some operational costs priced in U.S. dollars are becoming relatively more expensive, the value of aircraft already present in fleets have followed the same pattern and it is now more and more interesting for owners to divest their asset to get the immediate gains provided by this strengthening of it.

STATE OF THE INDUSTRY

Traffic Analysis

Average monthly growth (vs. previous year)

40%

30% 20% 10% 0% -10% -20% 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
30%
20%
10%
0%
-10%
-20%
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
Charter
All-Cargo
Business Aviation
Lowcost
Traditional Scheduled

Here in figure 7, you’ll see Business Aviation

departures (in magenta) over the past ten years compared with other air transport modes. Note the interesting trends:

Cargo, network carriers, and Business Aviation follow roughly the same pattern, with Business Aviation taking the lead, even if only slightly;

• Low Cost Carriers are on a different planet. Even during the crisis in 2009-2012 they continued to expand;

Charter airlines (Monarch, TUI, or Thomas Cook) follow a reverse trend. They expanded whilst the rest of the industry was experiencing serious troubles in 2012,

The European Fleet

fig 7

and contracted immediately after when things were clearly on the mend for the rest. Supply in 2014 nosedived to -9%!

The second thing this chart shows is that departures, while an interesting KPI as a unique measure, gives very little practical information. For instance, the Association of European Airlines (AEA) announced that its Revenue per Passenger per Kilometre in 2014 jumped 4.4%, while movements based on departure grew only

0.1%.

Let’s keep that in mind when taking the pulse of the Business Aviation industry.

3,500 9% 8% 3,000 7% 2,500 6% 2,000 5% 4% 1,500 3% 1,000 2% 500
3,500
9%
8%
3,000
7%
2,500
6%
2,000
5%
4%
1,500
3%
1,000
2%
500
1%
0
0%
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
Existing
New
fleet growth (YoY %)
N° Aircraft
Fleet Growth

fig 8

STATE OF THE INDUSTRY

Another interesting statistic relates to the European Business Aviation Fleet. European Business Aviation is seeing a stop to the decline in growth witnessed during the last 4 years (from 8 to 2%), and is heading back to where it was in 2012. A 5.5% increase is more than robust, and was unexpected. With 152 aircraft delivered in 2014, the European fleet maintains its position as the second biggest in the world, equivalent to around 18% of the total global fleet. It is still far behind the U.S., and it is within reaching distance by Latin America, which comes in at third largest.

As a side note to the insight pulled from the graph here, but relevant (and interesting) to note: if we do a combined reading of Airbus, Boeing and EUROCONTROL 2014 numbers* of the legacy carrier industry, the European legacy carrier fleet represents “only” around 4 000 aircraft. Compared to the European Business Aviation fleet, with its 3 300 aircraft, the gap is surprisingly small, and doesn’t stand up to the widely-held belief that Business Aviation is a small industry that sits “at the margin” of the air transport sector.

(*Boeing Current Market Outlook 2014–2033, Airbus Global Market Forecast 2014-2033, EUROCONTROL)

Activity Trends by Aircraft Types

Ultra Long Range

Heavy Jet

Midsize Jet

Super Midsize Jet

Super Light Jet

Light Jet

Entry Level Jet

Very Light Jet

Turboprop

2005 2014 15.678 +274,9% 58.773 100.227 +5,6% 105.852 68.242 -19,0% 55.257 25.306 +59,5% 40.366 51.392
2005
2014
15.678
+274,9%
58.773
100.227
+5,6%
105.852
68.242
-19,0%
55.257
25.306
+59,5%
40.366
51.392
+31,2%
67.403
120.759
-13,0%
105.073
40.257
-29,7%
28.317
3
+1.157.100,0%
34.716
173,461
-1,3%
171,198

fig 9

Growth in the market clearly comes from the ultra long-range segment (+275%!), the super midsize jets (Falcon 2000, Gulfstream G450 and the super light jet (Citation XLS, Lear 35 and 40). The segment suffering the most is clearly the entry level jets, although this is more than tempered by the very promising, even though somewhat overdue, results of Very Light Jets (Diamond, Eclipse and smaller Phenoms).

Overall, in 10 years, movements measured by departures expanded 12%. That is probably what would have been seen on a per year basis a decade ago, but that was a different era, and that was logically unsustainable. If Business Aviation remembers where it has come from (12%, or an average of 1.2% of traffic growth per year), then it is not at all negligible.

The part to remember here is that the heavy jets segment is now, and for the first time ever, the segment that is the most used in Europe – more than light jets, with the exception of the work horse of the industry, the turboprop, which is now in slight decline.

STATE OF THE INDUSTRY

Business Aviation Airports

Top-10 BusAv

Airports Average

Daily Departures

80.0 70.0 60.0 50.0 40.0 30.0 20.0 10.0 0 Paris Geneve Nice London/ Moskva/ Zurich
80.0
70.0
60.0
50.0
40.0
30.0
20.0
10.0
0
Paris
Geneve
Nice
London/
Moskva/
Zurich
Farnborough
Milano
Roma
Wien
Le Bourget
Cointrin
Luton
Vnukovo
CIV
Linate
Ciampino
Schwechat
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014

Regarding departures from the top-10 airports over the last six year, the result is mixed. Nice, Luton and Farnborough are in growth mode, and have been for the last five years. For the top-two airports, the trend is more difficult to grasp. Le Bourget has yo-yoed year in year out, but 2014 ended on a positive note. This is unfortunately not the case of Geneva, the second biggest airport, where traffic has continued to decline since 2011. Zurich finds itself in a similar configuration. Is there a Swiss case?

fig 10

Similarly the two major Italian airports have witnessed a continuous decline in movements; however, last year they recorded their first growth years in five years, which bodes well for the future.

If major Business Aviation airports don’t reflect the positive trends witnessed in other KPIs, then where do operators fly to and from? The answer is relatively straightforward: “somewhere else”. This means airports that are not in the top-10. So Business Aviation is likely to see some changes in the list in the months and years to come.

are not in the top-10. So Business Aviation is likely to see some changes in the
are not in the top-10. So Business Aviation is likely to see some changes in the

STATE OF THE INDUSTRY

Business Aviation and Safety

Number of Fatal Accidents of EASA and Third- country Registered Business Aviation Aeroplanes

19

19

18

17 14 9 8 8 7 7 5 3 2 2 2 2 1 1
17
14
9
8
8
7
7
5
3
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
2005 2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
EASA MS registered
Third Country registered
Linear (EASA MS registered)
Linear (Third Country registered)

The trend for Business Aviation safety is markedly

positive. In 10 years, with traffic expanding (even if only slightly), European Business Aviation overall has maintained its very robust safety record with the number of fatal accidents sitting at an average of two per year. The other news is that in the rest of the world, despite a poor 2014 with 18 fatal accidents, there is a downward trend (just under

11 fatal accidents on average per year today –

where 10 years ago the number was 14). That’s still

11 too many of course, but if the trend achieved

between 2011 and 2013 could be reiterated over a longer period, that would be a major achievement.

fig 11

Hopefully the new TCO (Third Country Operators Regulation, imposed by EASA and MS on any foreign-registered aircraft flying to the EU) will contribute to keep that trend even lower.

The point to highlight here is, despite 2014- 15’s news headlines of dark days in aviation safety, which have made a strong impression on people, Business Aviation cannot be considered as having poor safety records and reputation. This is particularly important to remember at times like these.

records and reputation. This is particularly important to remember at times like these. Annual Review 2014-2015
records and reputation. This is particularly important to remember at times like these. Annual Review 2014-2015

A CHALLENGING INDUSTRY

Like any industry living in a constantly evolving economic world, Business Aviation faces many challenges. On the one hand, Business Aviation is an industry that is characterised as separate

Challenges from the Inside

Means of booking a business aviation flight

from other kinds of aviation through its own singularities; on the other hand, however, it faces the same global challenges that every economic entity knows.

Share of

addressable

market

60% OF THE MARKET COVERED BY BROKERS

Large brokersof addressable market 60% OF THE MARKET COVERED BY BROKERS Small brokers Online brokers Direct (operator)

Small brokersof addressable market 60% OF THE MARKET COVERED BY BROKERS Large brokers Online brokers Direct (operator)

Online brokersof addressable market 60% OF THE MARKET COVERED BY BROKERS Large brokers Small brokers Direct (operator)

Direct (operator)of addressable market 60% OF THE MARKET COVERED BY BROKERS Large brokers Small brokers Online brokers

10% 40% 48%
10%
40%
48%

2%

Only 40% of Business Aviation passengers book their flight directly via the operators. So far so good. After all, this figure is even smaller for airlines. But what airlines have that Business Aviation doesn’t are Global Distribution Systems (GDSs), the running costs of which are only a tiny, almost insignificant fraction of the final fare due to the volume generated.

Positioning flights

fig 12

Nothing of the sort for Business Aviation. Only 2% of the deals are made online. The remaining 58% are booked by brokers – ranging from the self-employed broker with a computer and a phone (90% of the deals), to the well-established broker company employing more than 10 people. Of course brokers are essential in bringing deals to operators, but this has a cost.

46% Average 44% positioning flights 42% 40% 38% 36% 34% 2012 2013 2014
46%
Average
44%
positioning
flights
42%
40%
38%
36%
34%
2012
2013
2014

Despite a surge in 2014, which remains unexplained, the trend in positioning flights is still downwards. Business Aviation has managed to decrease empty aircraft by 5% over the last three years (if we remain enthusiastic that the last trimester was an isolated blip in an otherwise decreasing trend).

fig 13

At around 39% though, this is still quite significant. Unless operators can reach, and eventually get under the 1/3 (33%) mark, this will continue to weigh heavily on their operations and fares.

A CHALLENGING INDUSTRY

Fleet growth vs traffic

15%

10%

5%

0%

-5%

-10%

-15%

-20%

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Fleet Growth Traffic Growth
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
Fleet Growth
Traffic Growth

The Business Aviation fleet expansion is without a doubt a good thing; it surely is for the OEMs and the managing companies. However, overall for the sustainability and margins of the sector this is more questionable, especially if the fleet grows faster than the traffic (demand). This

Challenges from the Outside

Full prices

fig 14

would lead to a form of overcapacity – supply outweighing demand. On average, it means that the asset is used less, while its depreciation remains (almost) unchanged compared to a scenario where the aircraft would be used intensively.

€ 2.80 Jet A1 € 2.60 Evolution € 2.40 € 2.20 € 2.00 € 1.80
€ 2.80
Jet A1
€ 2.60
Evolution
€ 2.40
€ 2.20
€ 2.00
€ 1.80
€ 1.60
€ 1.40
€ 1.20
€ 1.00
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014

The price per gallon has literally collapsed. It was at an all-time high of € 2.4 per gallon in late 2012, and fell to the current € 1.45 per gallon today. That’s a drop of 40% (!). The result for Business Aviation operating costs is, at least for a period of time, a slashing by half of 21% of our operating costs. And this happened almost

fig 15

overnight (in fact, it took less than six months to unfold). So the equivalent is 10.5% of the total operating costs removed.

All things being equal, this alone could have easily been the best news the industry has received in these challenging times.

A CHALLENGING INDUSTRY

According to the European Commission, the oil price fall should stimulate activity

The recent steep fall in oil prices should provide a boost to EU GDP over the forecast horizon but will further depress headline inflation this year. The decline in oil prices is substantial and market expectations suggest an only gradual rebound. Lower oil prices over the forecast horizon are expected to benefit EU real GDP growth by raising the real disposable income of households and by widening corporates’ profit margins. Higher real incomes and profits should also help households and firms to service their debt and continue deleveraging, provided that, as it is assumed in this forecast, the fall in oil prices does not lead to second-round effects on income and wages and a subsequent increase in the real debt burden. However, with nominal interest rates close to zero, central banks have limited options to prevent an unwarranted increase in real interest rates. This should lessen the positive impact of the oil price fall to some extent.

Route Charges

Route + 8.4% since 2010 charges € 148,000,000 € 144,000,000 € 142,000,000 € 140,000,000 €
Route
+ 8.4% since 2010
charges
€ 148,000,000
€ 144,000,000
€ 142,000,000
€ 140,000,000
€ 138,000,000
€ 136,000,000
€ 134,000,000
€ 132,000,000
€ 128,000,000
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014

Route charges have increased by 8.4% in 5 years, in the face of the Single European Sky (SES) and the Functional Airspace Blocks (FABs) that are anything but functioning (or fabulous). Germany took the lead in unilaterally increasing its charges last year; and in total, the sector paid € 145m for 2014. That’s a significant amount, and one that is difficult to justify.

The good news, though, is threefold. First, it is getting more and more difficult for Air Navigation Service Providers (ANSPs) to increase charges as they see fit. Despite serious setbacks and continuous postponements, the Single European Sky 2+ package (SESII+) has managed to establish a complex network

fig 16

of obligations that are incumbent on Member States and ANSPs, and that should seriously hamper their natural, quasi monopolistic propensity to require more for the same service.

Second, related to the route charge cost per unit, which is relatively stagnant, a big chunk of the increase here is due to the increase in traffic. Per movement, the average cost per flight remains below the € 100 mark (unit rate is close to € 5.5).

Finally, ATM costs are worth only a small fraction of Business Aviation operating costs, around 3%, so subtle variations are unlikely to have a substantial impact on operating costs.

A CHALLENGING INDUSTRY

Taxes

Tax € 80,000,000 ETS € 70,000,000 € 60,000,000 € 50,000,000 € 40,000,000 € 30,000,000 €
Tax
€ 80,000,000
ETS
€ 70,000,000
€ 60,000,000
€ 50,000,000
€ 40,000,000
€ 30,000,000
€ 20,000,000
€ 10,000,000
€ 0
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014

The taxes have been calculated by taking on board the EU ETS, which can be considered as a form of tax. The increase or decrease is mostly due to the varying traffic pattern, but not entirely. Last year, an increase of 9.3% in taxes was seen, far outpacing Business Aviation traffic growth.

Together, these taxes (regular and EU ETS) represent slightly less than 1% of Business

Revenue per Flight Indicator

fig 17

Aviation operating costs. This may seem negligible; but, unlike charges, taxes (mostly collected through ‘per passenger’ duties, like in Germany, Italy, or the UK to name but a few countries) have nothing to do with the activity of the sector (charges are a different matter). Taxes are completely unproductive, in that they are not used by and for the sector. Needless to say, they come on top of the taxes any corporation, or operator, pay on its activity (VAT, earnings, etc.).

 

150%

RpF 2005 = 100

140%

130%

120%

110%

100%

90%

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014

The Revenue per Flight indicator (RpF) is a composite indicator that captures the benefits and the gains that our industry factors in. We notice that, the profitability of Business Aviation follows the same path as the rest of the economy. From one very factual perspective we can explain this pattern due to the fact that the cost of operations increased relatively less than the hourly rates. But this is forgetting the essence of Business Aviation, which is that

Business Aviation is nothing less than aviation for business! The sole transport industry that is defined and tailor-made to meet the transport needs of industries and business people for whom flexibility, time-gain, and access are key elements for their business, especially in today’s hyper-competitive environment. Business Aviation is more and more the unique transport mode that provides them with these benefits

LOOKING AHEAD: PROJECTS FOR 2015

The EBAA has identified the main challenges for Business Aviation as an industry and will continue working hard on its traditional activities as an Association. In addition, and in response to the industry’s concern about ‘misperception or negative perception’ of Business Aviation, the EBAA has sketched out a 3-year strategy to focus on integrated initiatives and better communication with four stakeholder groups: Industry, Government, Public, and Current and Potential Customers.

Description of Projects

y r t s u d C u r r e n n t &
y
r
t
s
u
d
C
u
r
r
e
n
n
t
&
I
P
o
t
e
n
t
i
a
P
l
u
C
b
u
l
s
i
t
c
o
m
e
r
s
t
n
e
m
n
r
e
v
o
G

fig 18

Flight Duty and Time Limitations (FTL)i t c o m e r s t n e m n r e v

Audience:

Government Demonstrate that the fatigue pattern of Business Aviation pilots in commercial operations differs from that of ‘routine’ pilots.

Why: To advocate for a tailor-made FTL system for Business Aviation operations.

How:

What:

Deliver a scientific study assessing the fatigue pattern of Business Aviation pilots

Augmented Approach to Land (AAL)assessing the fatigue pattern of Business Aviation pilots Audience: Government What: Maintain or increase

Audience:

Government

What:

Maintain or increase access of Business Aviation to major hubs in Europe by demonstrating advanced landing procedures including interoperability between technologies such as SBAS and GBAS.

Why: To position Business Aviation as a key player to consider when developing landing procedures.

Take part in the consortium responsible for this SESAR Joint Undertaking project led by Netjets as coordinator.

How:

Localiser Performance with Vertical Guidance (LPV) Undertaking project led by Netjets as coordinator. How: Audience: Industry What: Augment network accessibility by
Localiser Performance with Vertical Guidance (LPV)

Audience: Industry What: Augment network accessibility by deploying GPS approaches (LPV) at selected regional airports (selected 100). Why: To multiply the opportunities for Business Aviation to land in all weather conditions in secondary/tertiary airports. How: Partner with the European GNSS Agency (GSA) to address the different key success factors in deploying LPV.

Non-compliant Flightsaddress the different key success factors in deploying LPV. Audience: What: Why: How: Industry Assess, understand,

Audience:

What:

Why:

How:

Industry Assess, understand, and address non-compliant activities in Europe. To provide decision makers with tangible facts on non-compliant flights. Disseminate the results of the study assessing the breadth and depth of non-compliant activities in Europe.

Value of Business Aviationthe breadth and depth of non-compliant activities in Europe. Audience: Government and Business What:

activities in Europe. Value of Business Aviation Audience: Government and Business What:

Audience:

Government and Business

What:

Demonstrate the economic impact of the Business Aviation sector on the

LOOKING AHEAD: PROJECTS FOR 2015

Why:

How:

European economy. To update the existing figures, which date back to 2009, giving us the foundation facts to demonstrate the case for Business Aviation. Contract consulting company to perform the analysis and produce the report.

to demonstrate the case for Business Aviation. Contract consulting company to perform the analysis and produce

Skills Shortage

Audience:

Public

What:

Analyse the shortage of skills in Business Aviation.

Why:

To propose recommendations to fill the gaps, based on solid analysis of

How:

the current situation. Contract consulting company to perform the analysis.

E-CASE

Audience: Industry What: Create a safety data repository for members to access relevant information and analysis in real time. Why: To accompany the Business Aviation sector in complying with occurrence reporting legislation entering into force in fall 2015. How: Partner with an IT company to deliver the system.

Runway Performance

Audience: Government What: Extend the landing factor for CAT operations from 60 to 80% without impacting safety. Why: To advocate for a CAT legislation that is in line with NCC legislation. How: Deliver a scientific study assessing the safety impact of extending the landing factor for CAT operations.

Perception Audit

Audience: Government and Business What: Collect and analyse the views of Government and current/potential users (key EBAA audiences) to gain deeper insight into the perception/ reputation of Business Aviation, especially relating to specific project topics. Why: Mitigate the current perception of Business Aviation. How: Deliver a study portraying the views of governments and users.

RETROSPECTIVE EBACE 2014

Looking back to last year’s event, here are some key numbers :

13 256 Delegates

499 Exhibitors – one of the highest numbers in the show’s 14-year history! 56 Aircraft showcased 2 276 Spaces reserved

HIGHLIGHTS:

Frank Brenner, Director General, EUROCONTROL André Kudelski, Vice-Chairman of Aéroport International de Genève; Chairman and CEO, Kudelski Group Roland Werner, State Secretary of Transport, Saxon State Ministry for Economic Affairs, Labour and Transport

EBAA MEMBERS (as of 1 april 2015)

Full Members (alphabetical)

ABELAG, SA

E-AVIATION - EFD EISELE

K-AIR Srl

SUNDT AIR A/S

Belgium

FLUGDIENST GmbH

Italy

Norway

ABS JETS, j.s.c.

Germany

LANDMARK AVIATION

SW BUSINESS AVIATION Ltd.

Czech Republic

EFS - EUROPEAN FLIGHT SERVICE

France

Azerbaijan

ACROPOLIS AVIATION Ltd. United Kingdom

Sweden

LONDON CITY AIRPORT JET CENTRE, Ltd.

SWISS JET AG Switzerland

ELIT’AVIA d.o.o.

United Kingdom

AERO-DIENST GmbH & Co. KG Germany

Slovenia

LONDON EXECUTIVE

TAG AVIATION (UK) Ltd. United Kingdom

EUROFLY SERVICE, SpA

AVIATION

AEROVISION

Italy

United Kingdom

TAG AVIATION, SA

France

Switzerland

 

EXECUJET AVIATION GROUP

LUXWING Ltd.

AIR

ALSIE, A/S

Switzerland

Malta

TARKIM UCAK BAKIM

Denmark

 

ONARIM VE HAVACILIK AS

EXECUTIVE AIRLINES, SL

MALETH AERO LIMITED

Turkey

AIR

CHARTER SCOTLAND Ltd.

Spain

Malta

United Kingdom

FAI - RENT-A-JET AG

MASTERJET GROUP

TIRIAC AIR, SRL Romania

AIR

HAMBURG

Germany

France

FTVERKEHRSGESELLSCHAFT

 

TOYO AVIATION

mbH

FLAIRJET Ltd.

MEDAVIA, Co. Ltd.

Romania

Germany

United Kingdom

Malta

AIR

INDEPENDENCE GmbH

FLYING SERVICE, NV

METROJET LIMITED

TYROLEAN JET SERVICES Austria

Germany

Belgium

Hong Kong

 

UNIJET, SA

AIRFIX AVIATION Ltd. Finland

G5 EXECUTIVE, AG Switzerland

MHS AVIATION GmbH Germany

France

 

VISTAJET

AIRLEC AIR ESPACE

GAINJET, SA

MJET GmbH

LUFTFAHRTUNTERNEHMEN

France

Greece

Austria

GmbH

 

Austria

ALBINATI AERONAUTICS SA

GAMA AVIATION Ltd. &

NETJETS EUROPE

Switzerland

GROUP COMPANIES

United Kingdom

VOLDIRECT SAS

United Kingdom

France

ALMAJET

 

NOMAD AVIATION AG

France

GENEL HAVACILIK AS Turkey

Switzerland

WINDROSE AIR JETCHARTER GmbH

ALPHA STAR AVIATION SERVICES

GESTAIR SA

NORTH FLYING A/S Denmark

Germany

Saudi Arabia

Spain

XCLUSIVE JET CHARTER

AMIRA AIR GmbH Austria

GLOBAL JET CONCEPT, SA Switzerland

ORION (MALTA) Ltd. Malta

LIMITED United Kingdom

 

PANAVIATIC AS

AMJET EXECUTIVE SA

GLOBEAIR AG

Estonia

Greece

Austria

ARCUS EXECUTIVE AVIATION Switzerland

GROSSMANN JET SERVICE spol. s r.o.

PANJET (PAN AVIATION) Turkey

Czech Republic

PREMIER AVIA

ASTONJET

Russian Federation

France

GRUP AIR-MED SA Spain

PREMIUM JET

BALTIC JET AIRCOMPANY, Ltd. Latvia

HERMES EXECUTIVE

Switzerland

AVIATION LIMITED

PRIVAJET

BUSINESS JET

Virgin Islands, British

Malta

MANAGEMENT GmbH

 

Austria

HYPERION AVIATION Ltd.

PRIVATAIR, SA

Malta

Switzerland

CAPITAL JETS

 

Russian Federation

IVORY JET SERVICES

QATAR EXECUTIVE

Djibouti

Qatar

CAT AVIATION, AG Switzerland

IXAIR

RIZON JET UK LIMITED

France

United Kingdom

COMLUX MALTA Ltd. Malta

JET AVIATION BUSINESS Spain

ROYAL JET LLC United Arab Emirates

DALIA AIR

 

Morocco

JETS, AG

SAUDIA PRIVATE AVIATION

Switzerland

Saudi Arabia

DASSAULT FALCON SERVICE France

JETFLITE Oy

SKYWORK EXECUTIVE AG

Finland

Switzerland

DC

AVIATION GmbH

Germany

JETFLY AVIATION SA Luxembourg

SUN-AIR OF SCANDINAVIA A/S Denmark

Associate Members (alphabetical)

328 GROUP

AEROPORT PAU PYRENEES

AMAC AEROSPACE AG

AVIATION BROKER GmbH

Germany

France

Switzerland

Germany

3A MALTA LIMITED

AEROPORTS DE CATALUNYA

AMBIANCE PIERRE

AVIATION MANAGEMENT

Malta

Spain

ET GRANIT

SYSTEMS, Inc.

 

France

USA

AB CORPORATE AVIATION France

AEROPORTS DE PARIS France

AMSTAT Inc.

AVIATION REGISTRY GROUP

 

USA

Ltd. LLLP

ABACUS Isle Of Man

AEROWORKS INTERNATIONAL Co., Ltd.

AES

AMSTERDAM SOFTWARE

USA

ABELAIR AVIATION Ltd. Cyprus

Japan

BV / FBO ONE Netherlands

AVIATION SERVICES MANAGEMENT Ltd. United Arab Emirates

AIRCRAFT ELEKTRO /

AP

ACASS

ELEKTRONIC SYSTEM GmbH

AERONAUTICAL

AVIATION SPARES

Canada

Germany

PROFESSIONALS

AND REPAIRS Ltd.

 

MALTA Ltd.

United Kingdom

ACC COLUMBIA JET

AFFINITY MANAGEMENT

Malta

SERVICE GmbH Germany

SERVICES (MALTA) LIMITED Malta

APOGEE OPERATIONS Ltd. United Arab Emirates

AVIATRAX Ltd. (MALTA) Malta

ACH AIRCRAFT INTERIOR

AIR BP Ltd.

AVIATRAX SA

France

United Kingdom

APPLEBY Isle Of Man

Luxembourg

ADLUX

AIR CHARTER SERVICE, plc

AVICON AVIATION

Switzerland

United Kingdom

APRON AVIATION

Pakistan

 

Turkey

ADSE CONSULTING &

AIR CULINAIRE WORLDWIDE

AVINODE

ENGINEERING Switzerland

USA

ARGOS VIP PRIVATE HANDLING, Srl

ARINC DIRECT

Sweden

ADVANCED AIR SUPPORT France

AIR LINK INTERNATIONAL Ltd. Ukraine

Italy

AVJET ROUTING FLIGHT SUPPORT United Arab Emirates

ADVANCED JETS

AIR SERVICE BASEL GmbH Switzerland

United Kingdom

AVOCET AVIATION UK Ltd.

USA

ASE GROUP

United Kingdom

AEGIS CORPORATE

AIR SUPPORT A/S Denmark

Morocco

BACC - BUSINESS AVIATION

SERVICES LIMITED

ASISTIM GmbH

CENTRE COLOGNE GmbH

Malta

AIR TOTAL INTERNATIONAL SA France

Germany

Germany

AERO INTERNATIONAL c/o JAHR TSV GmbH & Co. KG Germany

AIRBUS CORPORATE JET CENTRE

ASTER JETFUEL DMCC United Arab Emirates

BAHCO - SNA EUROPE [Deutschland] Germany

AEROCREDO

France

ATLANTIC AIR CHARTER AND FLIGHT SUPPORT

BALDWIN AVIATION

Russian Federation

AIRBUS HELICOPTERS SAS France

SERVICES CORPORATION Turkey

USA

AEROEX GmbH

BANK CIC SUISSE SA

Switzerland

AIRBUS SAS

ATLAS CORPORATE

Switzerland

France

SERVICES LIMITED

AEROLUX Ltd.

Isle Of Man

BANK OF AMERICA

United Kingdom

AIRCRAFT CORPORATE

MERRILL LYNCH

AERONAUTICA (MALTA)

SERVICES (MALTA) Ltd. Malta

ATR - AVIONS DE TRANSPORT REGIONAL

United Kingdom

LIMITED

France

BART INTERNATIONAL

Malta

AIRCRAFT GUARANTY

Belgium

AERONAUTX

FINANCIAL CORPORATION USA

AURORA AVIATION SA United Arab Emirates

BBA AVIATION

LUFTFAHRTSCHULE GmbH

USA

Austria

AIROPS SOFTWARE Ltd.

AVBUYER

United Kingdom

United Kingdom

BBGA - BRITISH BUSINESS

AEROPORT

AND GENERAL AVIATION

CANNES-MANDELIEU

AIRSERVICE

AVEX AVIATION EXPERTS AG

ASSOCIATION

France

BREMGARTEN GmbH

Switzerland

United Kingdom

Germany

AEROPORT COLMAR

AVIA GROUP Ltd.

BEDEK AVIATION / AERO

HOUSSEN

ALDOWALIYA AIR

Russian Federation

HANDLING Ltd.

France

Iraq

Israel

AEROPORT D’AVIGNON

ALPARK

AVIA MALDIVES Pvt. Ltd. Maldives

BERMUDA GOVERNMENT

France

Switzerland

Bermuda

 

AVIABEL SA

AEROPORT INTERNATIONAL DU CASTELLET

ALTENRHEIN AVIATION Ltd. Switzerland

Belgium

BIZAV SERVICES Ltd. Malta

France

AVIAPARTNER L.L.C.

 

ALTITUDE AEROSPACE

Russian Federation

BIZJET, SA

AEROPORT LYON-BRON

INTERIORS LIMITED

Switzerland

France

New Zealand

AVIASTRA FLIGHT

 

CHARTER Ltd.

BLAKE TECHNICAL SARL

United Kingdom

Switzerland

EBAA MEMBERS (as of 1 april 2015)

BLUM&GROB ATTORNEYS

CESSNA AIRCRAFT - (UK)

DRABPOL Sp. JAWNA

FINSERVE AVIATION

AT LAW Ltd.

United Kingdom

Poland

INSURANCE

Switzerland

Belgium

BOMBARDIER BUSINESS

CHARTER GREEN LIGHT Russian Federation

E-AVIATION SWISS Sagl Switzerland

FLIGHT SUPPORT MALDIVES

AIRCRAFT Canada

CHARTERSCANNER

EAN AVIATION

Pvt. Ltd. Maldives

United Arab Emirates

Nigeria

BOUTSEN AVIATION SAM

FLIGHTFORCE SAM

Monaco

CHECKPORT AVIATION

EBAA FRANCE

Monaco

SECURITY

France

BOUTSEN DESIGN SARL Monaco

France

EBAA SWITZERLAND

FLIGHTSAFETY INTERNATIONAL UK, Ltd.

CHEERFUL JET GROUND

Switzerland

United Kingdom

BUILDAIR

SERVICE Co.,Ltd.

 

Spain

China

ECAIR AVIATION

FLIGHTSERVE UK Ltd.

 

France

United Kingdom

BUSINESS AND COMMUTER

CHETCUTI CAUCHI

 

AIRCRAFT

ADVISORS Ltd.

ECLIPSE

FLIGHTWORX AVIATION Ltd.

France

Malta

France

United Kingdom

BUSINESS AVIACO PARTNER

CLARK RICKETTS LLP

ELBIT SYSTEMS Ltd.

FLITELINE BV

LIMITED Cyprus

United Kingdom

Israel

Netherlands

BUSINESS AVIATION CLUB Russian Federation

CLYDE & Co LLP United Kingdom

EMBRAER EXECUTIVE JETS United Kingdom

FLY VICTOR LIMITED United Kingdom

COLT INTERNATIONAL

EMCSI CORPORATE SERVICE

FLYGPRESTANDA AB

BUSINESS AVIATION

Switzerland

Ltd.

Sweden

COMPANY Ltd.

Malta

Russian Federation

CONSORCIO AVIATION SRL Paraguay

EMD ADVISORY SERVICES

FOGLIZZO LEATHER Srl Italy

BUSINESS AVIATION SCHOOL PARIS France

CONTINENTAL JET SERVICES United Arab Emirates

LIMITED Malta

FOKKER SERVICES BV Netherlands

BUTZBACH GmbH

COREB

EMS - EUROPEAN MAINTENANCE

FRANKE CARE SYSTEM

INDUSTRIETORE

Switzerland

SERVICE AB

GmbH & Co. KG

Germany

Sweden

Germany

 

CORJET MAINTENANCE

 

CABINET CHESNEAU

Spain

ENGEL&VÖLKERS AVIATION

FREEDOM AIR, Ltd.

FISCHEL

Luxembourg

United Kingdom

France

CAE

CREDIT SUISSE AG Switzerland

EQUIOM Isle Of Man

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT, Ltd. United Kingdom

United Kingdom

CAMILLERI PREZIOSI

CRS JET SPARES USA

ERCUIS & RAYNAUD France

FUTURE FLIGHT SUPPORT Saudi Arabia

Malta

CYBERJET SAS

 

France

ERMINI AG

G.OPS

CAMPOMORI - AVIATION &

Switzerland

France

LAW

D-JET

Italy

Switzerland

EURO JET

GALLERY TO FLY

 

INTERCONTINENTAL Ltd.

Russian Federation

CARTER GREEN AEROSPACE

DAHER-SOCATA

Czech Republic

United Kingdom

France

GANADO ADVOCATES

CARYS INVESTMENT GROUP

DAO AVIATION

EUROPAIR BROKER SA Spain

Malta

LIMITED

Denmark

GAS GERMAN AVIATION

Virgin Islands, British

DASSAULT AVIATION

EUROPEAN GNSS AGENCY Belgium

SERVICE GmbH Germany

CAVENDISH TRUST

France

COMPANY LIMITED

EXCELLIUM LLC

GATE GOURMET

Isle Of Man

DB

AVIATION CONSULTANCY

Russian Federation

SWITZERLAND GmbH

LIMITED

Switzerland

CB VATAMERICA LLC USA

United Kingdom

F. LIST GmbH Austria

GBAA - GERMAN BUSINESS

DC

AVIATION Ltd.

AVIATION ASSOCIATION, e.V.

CEDAR JET CENTER / MEAG Lebanon

Malta

F.H. LAMBERT LIMITED United Kingdom

Germany

DELOITTE

GE CAPITAL

CEEVO - COMITE D’EXPANSION ECONOMIQUE DU VAL D’OISE

Malta

FARNBOROUGH AIRCRAFT INTERIORS

Switzerland

France

DELTA AEROTAXI SRL Italy

United Kingdom

GENERAL AERO COMPANY, Inc. USA

CELEBI GROUND HANDLING, Inc.

DEPARTEMENT

FCG - FLIGHT CONSULTING GROUP, Ltd.

GENERAL AVIATION SERVICE SL

Turkey

DE

LA SEINE SAINT DENIS

Cyprus

Spain

CEMAIR Pty. Ltd. South Africa

France

DIAMOND HANGAR LIMITED United Kingdom

FENECH & FENECH ADVOCATES Malta

GENEVA AIRPARK SA Switzerland

GET INTO MALDIVES TRAVELS Pvt. Ltd.

CERRETANI AVIATION GROUP, LLC

DIEHL AEROSYSTEMS

FFF LEGAL

Maldives

USA

Germany

Malta

GKN AEROSPACE SWEDEN

IDAIR GmbH

KEITAS SYSTEMS

MEYER AVOCATS

AB

Germany

France

Switzerland

Sweden

IFAERO

KENNEDYS AVIATION LLP

MEYERLUSTENBERGER

GLOBAL AVIATION BUSINESS

France

United Kingdom

LACHENAL

Andorra

Switzerland

GLOBAL FUEL

IMPEX AVIATION CORP., Inc. USA

KLM JET CENTER Netherlands

MNG JET HAVACILIK AS

ESTABLISHMENT

Turkey

Iceland

GLOUCESTERSHIRE AIRPORT

INFLIGHT DUBLIN Ltd. Ireland

KUERZI AVIONICS AG Switzerland

MOONJET FLIGHT SUPPORT United Arab Emirates

Ltd.

INMARSAT

LEVANT AERONAUTICS

United Kingdom

United Kingdom

Cayman Islands

MOTOR PRESSE STUTTGART

GOLDAIR HANDLING, SA

INNOVINT AIRCRAFT

LONDON BIGGIN HILL

GmbH & Co. KG Germany

Greece

INTERIOR GmbH

AIRPORT Ltd.

Germany

United Kingdom

MOTOTOK INTERNATIONAL

GOODWILL PRIVATE JETS France

INTERNATIONAL AIR SAFETY OFFICE, Inc.THE REGISTRY

LONDON OXFORD AIRPORT United Kingdom

GmbH Germany

GÖZEN AIR SERVICES Turkey

OF ARUBA USA

LONG RANGE AG Switzerland

MRX SYSTEMS SA Luxembourg

GRACE JET

INTERNATIONAL FLIGHT

MTS AVIATION

Bahrain

SUPPORT

LUFTHANSA TECHNIK AG

Sweden

Denmark

Germany

GREAT CIRCLE SERVICES AG

MTU MAINTENANCE

Switzerland

IQJETS

LUGANO AIRPORT SA

BERLIN BRANDENBURG

Germany

Switzerland

GmbH

HADID INTERNATIONAL

Germany

SERVICES - (UAE)

ISLE OF MAN AIRCRAFT

LUXE PLAN

United Arab Emirates

REGISTRY

France

NEWREST

Isle Of Man

Switzerland

HAITEC AIRCRAFT

LUXMEDIA GROUP

MAINTENANCE GmbH

J. MESINGER CORPORATE

JAVAJET ASIA, PT

France

NEXUS FLIGHT OPERATIONS

NORTHERN AVIONICS

Germany

JET SALES,Inc.

SERVICES

HARRODS AVIATION Ltd. United Kingdom

USA

LYNX JET PRIVATE FLIGHTS Israel

Saudi Arabia

Indonesia

M-PLIFY SA

Italy

HAYWARD AVIATION, Ltd. United Kingdom

JCB AERO

Luxembourg

NOIKOV CATERING

France

M.C.M. GROUP

FOR BUSINESS AVIATION

HELIPARK GmbH

Malta

Russian Federation

Germany

JEM CONSULT GERMANY Germany

MACH MEDIA

OCRA AEROSPACE (ISLE OF

HFIS SARL

Belgium

MAN) LIMITED

Switzerland

JEPPESEN, GmbH & Co. Germany

MAGNA AVIATION

Isle Of Man

HONDA AIRCRAFT COMPANY USA

JERSEY AIRCRAFT REGISTRY Jersey

Greece

MAINLAND GROUNDEXPRESS

OHS AVIATION SERVICES GmbH Germany

HONEYWELL INTERNATIONAL s.r.o. Czech Republic

JET AVIATION AG Switzerland

LIMITED (CHINA) China

OMNI HANDLING Lda. Portugal

 

MALLORCAIR, SL

HORIZON SWISS FLIGHT ACADEMY

JET LOGIC LIMITED United Kingdom

Spain

ONAIR INTERNATIONAL Srl Italy

Switzerland

MALTA ENTERPRISE

 

JET SUPPORT SERVICES,

CORPORATION

ONAIR SWITZERLAND

HQ FOOD & BEVERAGE S.r.l. Italy

Inc. - (JSSI) United Kingdom

Malta

Switzerland

HSF SAVUNMA HAVACILIK

JET TRANSFER

MARSHALL AEROSPACE AND DEFENCE GROUP

ONLY JET SUISSCOURTAGE GROUP

Ltd. STI Turkey

Russian Federation

United Kingdom

Monaco

JET TRAVEL CLUB - JTC Ltd.

MARTYN FIDDLER

OPMAS

HUNT & PALMER PLC

Russian Federation

ASSOCIATES LIMITED

Denmark

United Kingdom

United Kingdom

 

JETBASE Lda.

PAR AVION Ltd.

HYDREP, SA

Portugal

MAYER BROWN

USA

France

France

IACOBUCCI HF AEROSPACE

JETCRAFT CORPORATION USA

MBAA - MALTA BUSINESS

PARAMOUNT BUSINESS JETS USA

SpA Italy

JETS BIGGIN HILL Ltd.

AVIATION ASSOCIATION Malta

PARROT SA

United Kingdom

France

IBAA - ITALIAN BUSINESS

MEDAIRE Ltd.

PDC AVIATION

AVIATION ASSOCIATION

JETSUPPORT BV

United Kingdom

Denmark

Italy

Netherlands

 

MEGGITT USA

PERFECT AVIATION SA

ICM AVIATION Isle Of Man

JSC CDOS CA AEROTRANS Russian Federation

USA

Switzerland

EBAA MEMBERS (as of 1 april 2015)

PHB - OPS GROUND HANDLING SERVICES Uruguay

RUBAA - RUSSIAN UNITED BUSINESS AVIATION ASSOCIATION

SHANNON AIR LINK Ltd. Ireland

SWISS BUSINESS AIRPORTS Switzerland

PHONAK COMMUNICATIONS

Russian Federation

SHANNON AIRPORT - INTERNATIONAL

SWISSPATH AVIATION AG Switzerland

AG

RUSAERO CCAS

AVIATION SERVICES CENTRE

Switzerland

Russian Federation

Ireland

SWISSPORT EXECUTIVE

 

AVIATION

PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES SpA

S.B-MAN & Co Ltd. Ghana

SIA CAPITAL HANDLING Latvia

Switzerland

Italy

SYNERCO SA

 

SABENA TECHNICS

SIGNATURE FLIGHT

Switzerland

PILATUS AIRCRAFT Ltd.

France

SUPPORT

Switzerland

SAC - SWISS AVIATION

United Kingdom

TAG AERONAUTICS Ltd. Canada

PMG GROUP GmbH

CONSULTANTS

SIGNATURE FLIGHT

Germany

GmbH

SUPPORT SAS

THE JET BUSINESS

Switzerland

France

INTERNATIONAL

PMV INDUSTRIE

United Kingdom

France

SAFRAN

SIKORNIR SA

France

Switzerland

TISCA TIARA MOBILITY

POLTRONA FRAU SpA Italy

SAINT ROYAL AVIATION China

SKY HANDLING GmbH Germany

TEXTILES Switzerland

PORTUGAL TOURIST

TLC AVIATION

SERVICES - (PTS) Portugal

SAN MARINO AIRCRAFT REGISTRY

SKY SERVICES SpA Italy

Sint Maarten

San Marino

TMIL

PREMIER CATERING

SKYCHARTER LIMITED

United Kingdom

France

SAS PIERRE BROCHARD France

Canada

TOP AVIATION

PRIMUS AIRCRAFT

SKYGUIDE

Egypt

MANAGEMENT

SATCOM DIRECT

Switzerland

SOLUTIONS

USA

TRANSPORT MALTA

Austria

SATCOM1

SKYLINK SERVICES Ltd. Cyprus

Malta

PRIVATEFLY Ltd.

Denmark

TRAVCON CHARTER

United Kingdom

SKYPRO AVIATION LIMITED

BROKERS

 

SATORI

Latvia

Switzerland

PROFIJET SA

France

Switzerland

SCANDINAVIAN AIRCRAFT

SNC-LAVALIN AEROPORTS France

TRS AVIATION CONSULTING GmbH

PT AFM AVIASI INDONESIA Indonesia

TECHNOLOGIES A/S Denmark

SOCAR ENERGY

Germany

 

SWITZERLAND

UBS AG

QAPS GROUP BV Netherlands

SCANDINAVIAN AVIONICS, A/S

Switzerland

Switzerland

Denmark

SOGAERDYN SpA

UKIP MEDIA & EVENTS

QCM

Italy

United Kingdom

Switzerland

SCANDLEARN

R&R AVIATION CONSULTING

Sweden

SOVEREIGN BUSINESS JETS United Kingdom

UNITED AVIATION SERVICES United Arab Emirates

GmbH Austria

SCHELLENBERG WITTMER Ltd Switzerland

SPECTRO / JET-CARE United Kingdom

UNIVERSAL TURBINE PARTS USA

REGENCY AIR CHARTER Ltd. United Kingdom

SEA PRIME SpA Italy

SR TECHNICS SWITZERLAND Switzerland

UNIVERSAL WEATHER & AVIATION, Inc.

REHEAT INTERNATIONAL

United Kingdom

United Kingdom

SEACA

ST GROUP

France

France

UPPERSKY CATERING

RESOURCE CONSULTING AG Switzerland

SEAF

STANSTED NEWS LIMITED

France

Spain

United Kingdom

VECTOR AEROSPACE

RETURNJET

United Kingdom

United Kingdom

ROCKETROUTE

SEINE ET MARNE DEVELOPPEMEN France

STARS AIRLINES SERVICES Tunisia

VERHAEGEN WALRAVENS Belgium

United Kingdom

STOBART EXECUTIVE -

 

SELA

LONDON

VERSPIEREN, SA

ROCKWELL COLLINS

France

SOUTHEND AIRPORT

France

United Kingdom

United Kingdom

 

SFERA JET

VIENNA AIRCRAFT

ROLLS-ROYCE PLC

Russian Federation

STRATAJET

HANDLING Ltd.

Germany

United Kingdom

Austria

ROMANIAN AIRPORT

SG EQUIPMENT FINANCE, AG Switzerland

STUEKERJUERGEN

VIP AVIATION

SERVICES

AEROSPACE COMPOSITES

Georgia

Romania

SGI AVIATION

GmbH & Co. KG

RUAG DEUTSCHLAND GmbH

Netherlands

Germany

VIPPORT CJSC

Germany

Russian Federation

VISION SYSTEMS

WYVERN CONSULTING, Ltd.

France

USA

WEB MANUALS SWEDEN AB

YASAVA AERONAUTICS

Sweden

Switzerland

WINGX ADVANCE GmbH Germany

YOUR CHARTER SOLUTIONS Russian Federation

WM-ELECTRONICS

ZOTEFOAMS Plc

Austria

United Kingdom

Affiliate Members (alphabetical)

WM-ELECTRONICS ZOTEFOAMS Plc Austria United Kingdom Affiliate Members (alphabetical) Annual Review 2014-2015 23
WM-ELECTRONICS ZOTEFOAMS Plc Austria United Kingdom Affiliate Members (alphabetical) Annual Review 2014-2015 23
WM-ELECTRONICS ZOTEFOAMS Plc Austria United Kingdom Affiliate Members (alphabetical) Annual Review 2014-2015 23
WM-ELECTRONICS ZOTEFOAMS Plc Austria United Kingdom Affiliate Members (alphabetical) Annual Review 2014-2015 23
WM-ELECTRONICS ZOTEFOAMS Plc Austria United Kingdom Affiliate Members (alphabetical) Annual Review 2014-2015 23
WM-ELECTRONICS ZOTEFOAMS Plc Austria United Kingdom Affiliate Members (alphabetical) Annual Review 2014-2015 23
WM-ELECTRONICS ZOTEFOAMS Plc Austria United Kingdom Affiliate Members (alphabetical) Annual Review 2014-2015 23

Annual Review 2014-2015

WM-ELECTRONICS ZOTEFOAMS Plc Austria United Kingdom Affiliate Members (alphabetical) Annual Review 2014-2015 23

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