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Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Readme File


August 5, 2000
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(c) Copyright Microsoft Corporation, 2000. All rights reserved.

This file contains information that supplements the Microsoft


SQL Server 2000 documentation.

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Contents
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1.0 Introduction
2.0 Installing SQL Server 2000
2.1 System Requirements
2.2 Do Not Install Analysis Services to a DBCS Folder
2.3 Installing Analysis Services Samples
2.4 Updating Statistics After Upgrading from SQL Server 7.0
2.5 Minimum SQL Server Installation Components
2.6 Requirements for Active Directory Integration
2.7 Silverston Samples Are Not Installed
2.8 Installation Help on Windows 95
2.9 Installing SQL Server 2000 with SQL Server Version 6.5
3.0 Documentation Notes
3.1 SQL Server Core Components Notes
3.1.1 Replication and Host Integration Server
3.1.2 Backup/Restore APIs for Independent Software Vendors
3.1.3 Executing DTS Custom Tasks Created in Visual Basic
3.1.4 Desktop Engine Setup Parameters
3.1.5 Adding Properties to DTS Custom Tasks
3.1.6 @@TRANCOUNT and COMMIT in Triggers
3.1.7 Behavior of Wildcard and Escape Characters
3.1.8 Changing the SQL Server Agent Service Account
3.1.9 Adding Pure Unicode Error Messages
3.1.10 DTS Using ActiveX Scripting After Uninstalling
SQL Server 7.0
3.1.11 Removing Secondary Databases for Log Shipping
3.1.12 ODBC API: SQLGetConnectAttr
3.1.13 Connecting Early Version Clients to Named Instances
3.1.14 SQL Server Sometimes Cannot Open Static IP Port
Addresses
3.1.15 SQLSetConnectAttr and the Connection Attribute
SQL_COPT_SS_PRESERVE_CURSORS
3.1.16 SQLEndTran
3.1.17 Permissions for Active Directory Integration
3.1.18 srv_pfield (Extended Stored Procedures Programming)
3.1.19 Using the MSX Wizard with Windows Authentication
3.1.20 Updating a Table on a Linked Server
3.1.21 Effects of Locking Hints on READ_ONLY Cursors
3.1.22 Adding Dependencies to the SQL Server Resource
3.1.23 Upgrading from MSDE 1.0 to SQL Server 2000
Desktop Engine
3.1.24 Microsoft Search Service
3.1.25 References to Windows 95
3.1.26 Full-Text Catalogs Inaccessible After Changing
SQL Server Account
3.1.27 Recommendations for Designing Distributed
Partitioned Views
3.1.28 Requirements for the Desktop Engine Setup File
3.1.29 Desktop Engine Setup TARGETDIR and DATADIR
3.1.30 Reinstalling SQL Server 2000 Desktop Engine
3.2 SQL Server Books Online Functionality Notes
3.2.1 Link to MDAC and XML Documentation Does Not Work
3.2.2 Printing Limitations
3.2.3. Incorrect Hyperlinks to the ADO Connection Object
from ADO Dynamic Properties Topics
3.3 English Query
3.3.1 SaveProjectToXMLDom Method
3.3.2 Automatic Clarification of Questions Feature
3.4 Analysis Services
3.4.1 Before Registering Analysis Services Performance
Monitoring Counters on Windows NT 4.0
3.4.2 Distinct Count Aggregate Function
3.4.3 UPDATE CUBE Statement
3.4.4 Process Databases After Upgrading from Beta 2

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1.0 Introduction
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This file contains important information you should read
before installing Microsoft SQL Server 2000.

SQL Server 2000 builds on and extends the performance,


reliability, quality, and ease of use of SQL Server version
7.0. It also includes a number of new features that further
establish SQL Server as the best database platform for OLTP,
data warehousing, and e-commerce applications.

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2.0 Installing SQL Server 2000
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Microsoft SQL Server 2000 documentation is available from these
sources:

* The Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Introduction manual in the


SQL Server 2000 box.
* F1 Help available on the SQL Server Setup windows. You can
also open the SQL Server Setup Help file from the autorun
installation menu.
* You can perform a custom setup and select only the Books
Online component to install the SQL Server Books Online
documentation on the hard drive of your computer.

The complete SQL Server Books Online documentation for SQL


Server 2000 cannot be opened from the SQL Server 2000 compact
disc. SQL Server Books Online must be installed to your local
hard drive before it can be opened. The installation
documentation in the Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Introduction
manual does not include some items that arose after the manual
was printed. These items are covered in both SQL Server Books
Online and the SQL Server Setup Help file.

Use the autorun setup program on the SQL Server 2000 compact
disc to install the SQL Server 2000 components. The autorun
setup program is executed automatically when you insert the
compact disc in the drive. You can also execute it by selecting
the Autorun.exe program in the root folder of the SQL Server
2000 compact disc. Although there is a Setup.exe program in the
SQLMSDE folder of the SQL Server 2000 compact disc, this program
is intended to be used by applications that must install the
SQL Server 2000 Desktop Engine during their installation
process. The Desktop Engine Setup is not intended for installing
the SQL Server 2000 components from the compact disc. For more
information about distributing SQL Server applications, see
SQL Server Books Online.

SQL Server Books Online is a collection of HTML Help documents


and requires Microsoft Internet Explorer version 5.0. Internet
Explorer 5.0 can be downloaded from http://microsoft.com/ie.

For users of SQL Server version 7.0 who are installing SQL
Server 2000 for the first time, these new features are chosen
during setup:

* You can install multiple instances of SQL Server on one


computer.
* Failover clustering has been integrated with SQL Server
Setup.
* A SQL Server collation must be specified instead of a code
page and sort order.

For more information about these features, see SQL Server


Books Online.

When upgrading SQL Server version 6.5 to an instance of SQL


Server 2000 on the same computer, you must have first applied
SQL Server version 6.5 Service Pack 5 (SP5) or later. When
upgrading SQL Server version 6.5 to an instance of SQL Server
2000 on a different computer, you must have first applied SQL
Server version 6.5 Service Pack 3 (SP3) or later.

Service Pack 5a, which is the most current service pack for
SQL Server version 6.5, is available at
http://support.microsoft.com/support/sql.

There are two ways to upgrade from an installation of SQL


Server version 6.0 to an installation of SQL Server 2000:

* You can upgrade the installation of SQL Server 6.0 to


SQL Server 6.5, and then use the SQL Server 2000 Upgrade
Wizard to upgrade the installation of SQL Server 6.5 to
SQL Server 2000.
* You can upgrade the installation of SQL Server 6.0 to
SQL Server 7.0, and then use SQL Server 2000 Setup to upgrade
the installation SQL Server 7.0 to SQL Server 2000.

For more information, see "Upgrading an Existing Installation of


SQL Server" in either SQL Server Books Online or the Microsoft
SQL Server 2000 Introduction manual.

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2.1 System Requirements
-----------------------
Microsoft SQL Server 2000 operates on computers running Intel
or compatible Pentium, Pentium Pro, or Pentium II processors.
The processor must be running at a minimum of 166 MHz.
The editions and versions of SQL Server 2000 have these
memory (RAM) requirements:

Enterprise Edition 64 MB of minimum, 128 MB recommended


Standard Edition 64 MB of minimum
Personal Edition 64 MB on Windows 2000, 32 MB on all
other operating systems
Developer Edition 64 MB of minimum
Desktop Engine 64 MB minimum on Windows 2000, 32 MB
on all other operating systems

SQL Server 2000 has the following hard drive requirements,


depending on the components and setup option selected:

Database components 95 to 270 MB, 250 MB typical


Analysis Services 50 MB minimum, 130 MB typical
English Query 80 MB
Desktop Engine only 44 MB

SQL Server 2000 requires a monitor with VGA resolution; the


SQL Server graphical tools require a monitor with 800x600
resolution or higher.

SQL Server 2000 requires a CD-ROM drive, and a Microsoft


Mouse or compatible pointing device.

SQL Server 2000 requires Internet Explorer 5.0 or later and


is supported on these operating systems:

* Windows 2000
* Microsoft Windows NT version 4.0 Service Pack 5 or later
* Windows Millennium Edition
* Windows 98
* Windows 95 (client connectivity option only)

The latest service pack for Windows NT is available at


http://support.microsoft.com/support/NTServer.

Before installing SQL Server 2000 software on Windows 95,


you must install a Winsock 2 Update for Windows 95. This
update is supplied on the SQL Server 2000 compact disc and
can be installed by selecting the SQL Server 2000
Prerequisites option from the autorun window displayed by
the SQL Server 2000 compact disc.

SQL Server 2000 is not supported on Windows NT 4.0


Terminal Server.

For more information about the operating-system


requirements for the editions and components of SQL Server
2000, see Hardware and Software Requirements for Installing
SQL Server 2000 in either SQL Server Books Online or
the Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Introduction manual.

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2.2 Do Not Install Analysis Services to a DBCS Folder
-----------------------------------------------------
Analysis Services should not be installed to a folder that uses
characters from a double-byte character set (DBCS) in the path
or name. Install Analysis Services to a folder that uses only
single-byte characters in the path and name.

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2.3 Installing Analysis Services Samples
----------------------------------------
To install the Analysis Services samples, you must install
Analysis Services from the SQL Server compact disc. The samples
are installed at
x:\Program Files\Microsoft Analysis Services\Samples.

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2.4 Updating Statistics After Upgrading from SQL Server 7.0
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After upgrading from SQL Server 7.0, run sp_updatestats
'resample' to update the statistics on the user tables in your
databases.

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2.5 Minimum SQL Server Installation Components
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Full-Text Search is not included in a Minimum installation of
SQL Server 2000.

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2.6 Requirements for Active Directory Integration
-------------------------------------------------
To register an instance of Microsoft SQL Server 2000 in
Active Directory, the instance of SQL Server must be installed
on a computer running Microsoft Windows 2000 with the
Active Directory service enabled. The SQL Server service must
also be configured to run under either the Windows LocalSystem
account or a Windows domain account in the local administrators
group. This requirement must be met to add databases and
publications from the instance to Active Directory. Instances
of SQL Server 2000 configured to run under a power user account
do not have sufficient permissions to invoke all of the
SQL Server components required to work with Active Directory.

To register an Analysis server in Active Directory,


MSSQLServerOLAPService must be installed on a computer running
Windows 2000 with the Active Directory service enabled.
MSSQLServerOLAPService must also be configured to run under
either the Windows LocalSystem account or a Windows domain
account in the local administrators group.

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2.7 Silverston Samples Are Not Installed
----------------------------------------
Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Enterprise Edition includes a license
for four popular database schema samples. Instructions for
installing these samples using the Setup program are provided
in the topic "Database Schema Samples"; however, Setup does
not install these samples. To install the database schema
samples, double-click Unzip_silverstondb.exe located at
\Devtools\Samples\Silverstondb on the SQL Server 2000
compact disc.

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2.8 Installation Help on Windows 95
-----------------------------------
If you want to use Help during the installation of Client
Connectivity on Microsoft Windows 95, you may need to upgrade
to Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.0 and HTML Help 1.3. You can
update Internet Explorer and HTML Help by downloading the
latest versions from http://www.microsoft.com. The HTML Help
update file is named Hhupd.exe.

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2.9 Installing SQL Server 2000 with SQL Server Version 6.5
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SQL Server Books Online contains contradictory statements
about installing Microsoft SQL Server 2000 on a computer
running SQL Server version 6.5. The resulting installation
depends on whether you are installing a named instance or
a default instance of SQL Server 2000:

* If you install a default instance of SQL Server 2000 on a


computer running an instance of SQL Server 6.5, the default
instance of SQL Server 2000 becomes the accessible instance
of SQL Server, and the SQL Server 2000 program group appears
on the Start menu. The instance of SQL Server 6.5 is switched
out, and the SQL Server 6.5 program group does not appear on
the Start menu.

You can run either the default instance of SQL Server 2000
or the instance of SQL Server 6.5, but not both at the same
time. To switch between the two versions of SQL Server, use
the Microsoft SQL Server-Verswitch entry on the Start menu.
When you switch from SQL Server 2000 to SQL Server 6.5, the
instance of SQL Server 2000 becomes inactive, and the SQL
Server 6.5 program group replaces the SQL Server 2000 program
group on the Start menu. When you switch from SQL Server 6.5
to SQL Server 2000, the process is reversed.

* If you install one or more named instances of SQL Server 2000


on a computer running SQL Server 6.5 and there is no default
instance of SQL Server 2000, the instance of SQL Server 6.5
remains active as the default instance. Both the SQL Server
2000 and SQL Server 6.5 program groups appear on the Start
menu. You should use the SQL Server 6.5 tools to manage the
default instance of SQL Server 6.5, and the SQL Server 2000
tools to manage the named instances of SQL Server 2000.

* If you install both named and default instances of SQL Server


2000 on a computer running SQL Server 6.5, you can run the
named instances of SQL Server 2000 at any time, but must
version-switch between the default instance of SQL Server 2000
and the default instance of SQL Server 6.5. The SQL Server
2000 program group always appears on the Start menu. The
SQL Server 6.5 program group appears on the Start menu
whenever you have version switched to make SQL Server 6.5
the active default instance. The SQL Server 6.5 program
group does not appear when you have version switched to make
SQL Server 2000 the active default instance.

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3.0 Documentation Notes
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These are issues that arose after the SQL Server Books Online
documentation was completed.

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3.1 SQL Server Core Component Notes
-----------------------------------
These notes relate to the SQL Server core components, including
the database engine, client components, connectivity components,
graphical tools, and command prompt utilities.

3.1.1 Replication and Host Integration Server

The topic "Programming Replication from Heterogeneous Data


Sources" indicates that Microsoft Host Integration Server 2000
provides a replication Log Reader Agent for use with Microsoft
SQL Server 2000; however, Host Integration Server 2000 does not
provide a Log Reader Agent for use with SQL Server 2000.

3.1.2 Backup/Restore APIs for Independent Software Vendors

Microsoft SQL Server 2000 is supported by a large number of


third-party backup solutions. SQL Server provides application
programming interfaces that enable independent software vendors
to integrate SQL Server into their products. These APIs provide
maximum reliability and performance, and support the full range
of SQL Server backup and restore functionality, including hot
and snapshot capabilities. For information about how your backup
solution integrates with SQL Server, contact your backup solution
vendor. For information about the Backup/Restore APIs, install
the "Backup/Restore API" subcomponent of the "Development Tools"
component of SQL Server. To complete the installation of the
samples and the documentation, run Unzip_backup.exe, located at
C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\80\Tools\Devtools\Samples\
Backup.
The documentation is provided in Vbackup.chm.

3.1.3 Executing DTS Custom Tasks Created in Visual Basic

To implement a Data Transformation Services (DTS) custom task in


Microsoft Visual Basic, you must execute the custom task on the
main thread. If the custom task is included in an Execute Package
task, the Execute Package task will also need to run on the main
thread. Similarly, if the custom task is manipulated (for example,
has one of its property values assigned) by a Dynamic Properties
task, the Dynamic Properties task will need to execute on the
main thread.

3.1.4 Desktop Engine Setup Parameters

SQL Server Books Online topics "Merging the Desktop Engine into
Windows Installer" and "SQL Server 2000 Desktop Engine Setup"
document two parameters that are ignored by the final version
of the Desktop Engine Setup: USEDEFAULTSAPWD and SAPASSWORD.

By default, when run on the Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 or Windows


2000 operating system, the Desktop Engine Setup configures the
installed instance of Microsoft SQL Server to use Windows
Authentication, and places the Windows local administrator's group
in the SQL Server sysadmin fixed server role. When running Desktop
Engine Setup on the Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 2000 operating
system, you can specify a SECURITYMODE=SQL parameter to have the
installed instance configured to use SQL Server Authentication
with a null sa password. When run on the Windows 98 operating
system, the Desktop Engine Setup always configures the installed
instance to use SQL Server Authentication, regardless of whether
or not SECURITYMODE=SQL is specified.

A set of Desktop Engine merge modules that have been merged into
a Windows Installer setup has the same behavior. On the Windows
NT 4.0 and Windows 2000 operating systems, the instance of SQL
Server is configured to use Windows Authentication if
SECURITYMODE=SQL is not specified, and is configured to use SQL
Server Authentication if SECURITYMODE=SQL is specified. The
instance is always configured to use SQL Server Authentication
on the Windows 98 operating system.

You can specify SECURITYMODE=SQL in the same locations where you


can use USEDEFAULTSAPWD or SAPASSWORD. For more information, see
the SQL Server Books Online topics "Merging the Desktop Engine
into Windows Installer" and "SQL Server 2000 Desktop Engine Setup."

3.1.5 Adding Properties to DTS Custom Tasks

Because of the process Microsoft SQL Server 2000 uses to manage


DTS custom tasks, you must include both a Get and Let (or Set)
property procedure for all properties. Each property associated
with a custom task should consist of a pair of property
procedures: a property Get to retrieve the property value, and
a property Let (or Set) to assign a new value.

3.1.6 @@TRANCOUNT and COMMIT in Triggers

Microsoft SQL Server 2000 increments the transaction count within


a statement only when the transaction count is 0 at the start of
the statement. In SQL Server version 7.0, the transaction count
is always incremented, regardless of the transaction count at
the start of the statement. This can cause the value returned by
@@TRANCOUNT in triggers to be lower in SQL Server 2000 than it
is in SQL Server version 7.0.

In SQL Server 2000, if a COMMIT TRANSACTION or COMMIT WORK


statement is executed in a trigger, and there is no corresponding
explicit or implicit BEGIN TRANSACTION statement at the start
of the trigger, users may see different behavior than on
SQL Server version 7.0. Placing COMMIT TRANSACTION or COMMIT
WORK statements in a trigger is not recommended.

3.1.7 Behavior of Wildcard and Escape Characters

Wildcard characters and escape characters have these additional


behaviors in the LIKE operator in Microsoft SQL Server 2000:

* Within the '[]' characters that delimit a single character


range, the wildcard characters '%', '_', and '[' do not
operate as wildcards.

* Within the '[]' characters that delimit a single character


range, escape characters can be used, and the characters
'^', '-', and ']' can be escaped.

* If there is no character after an escape character in the


LIKE pattern, the pattern is invalid and LIKE returns FALSE.

* If the character after an escape character is not a wildcard,


the escape character is discarded and the character following
the escape is treated as regular character in the pattern.
This includes the wildcard characters '%', '_', and '[' when
they are enclosed in the '[]' characters that delimit a single
character range.

3.1.8 Changing the SQL Server Agent Service Account

If you are running Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000,


and you select to change the SQL Server Agent service account
for Microsoft SQL Server to a non-administrator account, you
must add the non-Administrator account to the sysadmin server
role in SQL Server. If you do not add the account, the
SQL Server Agent service account will not be able to log in
to SQL Server.

The SQL Server Agent service must be running under a


Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 2000 administrator account to use
non-integrated security to connect to SQL Server. SQL Server
must be running under a Windows NT or Windows 2000 administrator
account to set the SQL Server Agent connection option to
non-integrated security.

If you change the SQL Server service account to a Windows NT 4.0


or Windows 2000 non-administrator account, and you are switching
between SQL Server 6.5 and SQL Server 2000, it is possible for
you to lose access to the SQL Server 6.5 service account. For
example, if you change the SQL Server 2000 service account to
a non-administrator account on Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 2000,
and then switch to SQL Server 6.5, you will not have access to
the computer running SQL Server 6.5. You must use Control Panel
to change the SQL Server service account back to a Windows NT
or Windows 2000 administrator account.

If you have a default instance of SQL Server 7.0 and a named


instance of SQL Server 2000 on the same computer, and you manage
the default instance of SQL Server 7.0 using SQL Server Enterprise
Manager in SQL Server 7.0, you may be unable to switch the
service account on the named instance of SQL Server 2000. For
example, if both instances are running using the same
non-administrator account for the SQL Server service, and you
change the instance of SQL Server 7.0 to a different account, you
may not be able to change the service account on the instance of
SQL Server 2000. The ability to impersonate an administrator has
been lost on this account because the instance of SQL Server 7.0
and the instance of SQL Server 2000 both have the same
non-administrator account. To correct this, use Control Panel
on the instance of SQL Server 2000 to change the SQL Server
service account to a Windows NT or Windows 2000 administrator
account. After restarting the service, you can change the service
account to any other account on the computer running
SQL Server 2000.
3.1.9 Adding Pure Unicode Error Messages

The Manage SQL Server Messages dialog box does not support
adding pure Unicode messages to the sysmessages table. To add
such messages, use the sp_addmessage stored procedure. Be
sure to use the N prefix on the 'msg' parameter (for example,
@msgtext = N'xxx').

3.1.10 DTS Using ActiveX Scripting After Uninstalling


SQL Server 7.0

To use Microsoft ActiveX scripting in Microsoft SQL Server 2000


after uninstalling SQL Server 7.0, you must re-register the
ActiveX scripting library (Axscphst.dll). Use the Regsvr32.exe
registration utility and execute the following command
(substituting your own drive letter) from MS-DOS or the Windows
Run command:
regsvr32.exe C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\80\Tools\Binn\
axscphst.dll

If the registration is successful, a message box appears


indicating that Axscphst.dll is registered properly.

3.1.11 Removing Secondary Databases for Log Shipping

If all secondary databases configured for log shipping have been


removed from the secondaries themselves, the database maintenance
plan for log shipping can no longer be used to add the secondary
databases back to the plan. The database maintenance plan for
log shipping must be removed and configured again for log
shipping to work on the secondary databases.

3.1.12 ODBC API: SQLGetConnectAttr

The behavior of SQL_ATTR_CONNECTION_DEAD and


SQL_COPT_SS_CONNECTION_DEAD in Microsoft SQL Server 2000 is
different from the behavior in earlier versions of SQL Server.
In SQL Server 2000, SQL_ATTR_CONNECTION_DEAD returns the most
recent state of the connection, which may not be the current
connection state. However, SQL_COPT_SS_CONNECTION_DEAD will
always query the Net-Library for the current state of the
connection.

To differentiate between these behaviors,


SQL_COPT_SS_CONNECTION_DEAD is given a new value in the
SQL Server 2000 include files. Applications using this attribute
that are built using the SQL Server 2000 headers will return an
error (HY092, Invalid attribute/option identifier) if the
applications are run using a SQL Server 7.0 driver. It is
recommended that the application check the version of driver
being used before calling SQLGetConnectAttr, and then use
SQL_ATTR_CONNECTION_DEAD in place of SQL_COPT_SS_CONNECTION_DEAD
if the application is running on a SQL Server 7.0 driver.

3.1.13 Connecting Early Version Clients to Named Instances

The SQL Server Books Online topic "Working with Named and
Multiple Instances of SQL Server 2000" states that you must use
SQL Server 2000 client components to connect to named instances
of SQL Server 2000. However, the SQL Server version 7.0 Client
Network Utility can be used to configure a server alias name
that the SQL Server version 7.0 client components can use to
connect to a named instance of SQL Server 2000. This is
documented in the SQL Server Books Online topics "SQL Server
2000 and SQL Server version 7.0" and "Communicating with
Multiple Instances."

3.1.14 SQL Server Sometimes Cannot Open Static IP Port Addresses

When an instance of Microsoft SQL Server is configured to listen


on a static IP port (such as a default instance that takes the
default of listening on port 1433), the SQL Server service cannot
open the port if another application or component is using the
port when the SQL Server service initializes. The TCP/IP server
Net-Library will not initialize, and the instance of SQL Server
cannot accept TCP/IP connections until the service is stopped
and restarted. This problem should not occur if the instance of
SQL Server is configured to use a dynamic port address by
specifying a port address of 0 using the Server Network Utility.
If you cannot use dynamic port addresses (for example, when
SQL Server connections must pass through a firewall server
configured to pass through specific port addresses, or when some
connections are made using the client components from SQL Server
version 7.0 or earlier), then using a port address less than 1024
is recommended. Choose a port in this range that is not used
by the operating system or another application.

3.1.15 SQLSetConnectAttr and the Connection Attribute


SQL_COPT_SS_PRESERVE_CURSORS

SQL_COPT_SS_PRESERVE_CURSORS defines the behavior of cursors


when manual-commit mode is used. The behavior is exposed as
transactions are either committed or rolled back using SQLEndTran.

SQL_PC_OFF: Default. Cursors are closed when transaction is


committed or rolled back using SQLEndTran.

SQL_PC_ON: Cursors are not closed when transaction is committed


or rolled back using SQLEndTran, except when using a static or
keyset cursor in asynchronous mode, if a rollback is issued
while the population of the cursor is not complete, the cursor
is closed.

3.1.16 SQLEndTran

When SQLEndTran commits or rolls back an operation, the behavior


of the statement's associated cursor is determined by the value
of the driver-specific ODBC connection attribute
SQL_COPT_SS_PRESERVE_CURSORS, set by SQLSetConnectAttr.

3.1.17 Permissions for Active Directory Integration

In Microsoft SQL Server 2000, only members of the sysadmin


fixed server role can register databases or publications in
Active Directory; members of the dbowner fixed database role
cannot.
3.1.18 srv_pfield (Extended Stored Procedures Programming)

The SRV_PWD field is no longer supported. Do not write


extended stored procedures that use this field.

3.1.19 Using the MSX Wizard with Windows Authentication

If you are using the Make Master Server Wizard (MSX) on a


computer configured with Windows Authentication, you must
restart the computer. This is because the wizard requires Mixed
Mode Authentication (Windows Authentication and SQL Server
Authentication). The wizard will change the authentication mode
for you, but you must then restart Microsoft SQL Server and
SQL Server Agent on the master server.

3.1.20 Updating a Table on a Linked Server

You cannot update a table on a linked server through a view.


This is true for any linked server, regardless of the provider.

3.1.21 Effects of Locking Hints on READ_ONLY Cursors

The UPDLOCK and TABLOCKX locking hints no longer raise errors


on READ_ONLY cursors. Instead, the effects are identical to
the effects on OPTIMISTIC cursors. UPDLOCK causes the cursor
to acquire update scroll locks, and TABLOCKX is ignored for
the purposes of scroll locks.

3.1.22 Adding Dependencies to the SQL Server Resource

If you install SQL Server 2000 into a Windows 2000 or


Windows NT cluster group with multiple disk drives and choose
to place your data on one of the drives, the SQL Server
resource is set to be dependent only on that drive. To put
data or logs on another disk, you must first add a dependency
to the SQL Server resource for the additional disk.

To add a new disk (for example, disk K) to the SQL Server


dependencies:

1. Open Cluster Administrator in Administrative Tools.

2. Locate the group that contains the applicable SQL Server


resource.

3. If the resource for disk K is already in this group, go to


Step 4. Otherwise, locate the group that contains disk K.
If that group and the group that contains SQL Server are
not owned by the same node, move the group containing the
resource for disk K to the node that owns the SQL Server
group.

4. Select the SQL Server resource, open the Properties dialog


box, and use the Dependencies tab to add disk K to the set
of SQL Server dependencies.

3.1.23 Upgrading from MSDE 1.0 to SQL Server 2000


Desktop Engine
To upgrade from MSDE 1.0 to SQL Server 2000 Desktop Engine:

* If you are using Setup.exe, you must specify UPGRADE=1 as


a command prompt switch. For more information about the
Setup.exe command prompt switches, see "SQL Server 2000
Desktop Engine Setup" in SQL Server Books Online.
Or
If you are using the Desktop Engine merge files in a Windows
Installer setup, you must specify UPGRADE=1 with the other
Desktop Engine entries in the [Options] section of your
Windows Installer .ini file. For more information about
the Desktop Engine Windows Installer entries, see "Merging
the Desktop Engine into Windows Installer" in SQL Server
Books Online.

* You must provide a custom installation package file built


using SampleUpg.msi. For more information about
SampleUpg.msi, see "Managing Desktop Engine Installation
Package Files" in SQL Server Books Online.

Upgrading MSDE 1.0 to Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Desktop


Engine requires the use of one or two additional options
either during SQL Server 2000 Desktop Engine Setup or when
using the Desktop Engine merge modules in a Microsoft
Windows Installer installation:

* UPGRADE=1
Specifies that Desktop Engine Setup or Windows Installer
is upgrading an instance of MSDE 1.0 to SQL Server 2000
Desktop Engine. The only value supported is 1.

* UPGRADEUSER='loginaccount'
Specifies the SQL Server Authentication login account that
Desktop Engine Setup or Windows Installer will use when
connecting to the instance of MSDE 1.0 to upgrade the
master database. The login account must have a blank
password and must be a member of the sysadmin fixed server
role. Specify this parameter if you want Setup or Windows
Installer to connect using SQL Server Authentication.
The recommended option is to not specify UPGRADEUSER,
which causes Desktop Engine Setup or Windows Installer to
use Windows Authentication to connect to the instance of
MSDE 1.0. When using Windows Authentication, you must
run Desktop Engine Setup or Windows Installer under a
Windows account that has been included in the SQL Server
sysadmin fixed server role. If you do specify UPGRADEUSER,
protect your security by minimizing the amount of time the
sysadmin login can have a blank password, such as by
assigning the login a valid password immediately after
the upgrade is complete.

Specify these options in either the .ini file or as part of


the Desktop Engine Setup /settings switch. For more information
about specifying options, see the SQL Server Books Online topics
"SQL Server 2000 Desktop Engine Setup" and "Merging the Desktop
Engine into Windows Installer." Here is an example of an .ini
file for an upgrade:

[Options]
UPGRADE=1
UPGRADEUSER=SetupLogin

Ensure that the instance of MSDE 1.0 has been stopped before
you try to upgrade it to SQL Server 2000 Desktop Engine.

3.1.24 Microsoft Search Service

A note in the Creating and Maintaining Databases topic,


Full-Text Indexes, contains incorrect information about
Microsoft Search service. Here is the correct information:

The Microsoft Search service is supported on Microsoft


Windows NT and Windows 2000, but not on Windows 98.
The Microsoft Search service can be installed with
Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Personal Edition.

3.1.25 References to Windows 95

A few SQL Server Books Online topics incorrectly refer to


these configurations:

* Running instances of Microsoft SQL Server 2000 on computers


running Microsoft Windows 95.

* Running the SQL Server 2000 tools and utilities on computers


running Windows 95.

The Books Online topic "SQL Server 2000 on Windows 98"


correctly states that the SQL Server utilities and tools
are not supported on Windows 95. Likewise, the topic
"Server Components" correctly states that the SQL Server
2000 database engine and other server components are not
supported on Windows 95.

You can install the client-connectivity components on


Windows 95, which allow applications to access instances of
SQL Server 2000 on other computers.

3.1.26 Full-Text Catalogs Inaccessible After Changing


SQL Server Account

Changing Microsoft SQL Server to run under a non-administrator


account causes existing full-text catalogs to be inaccessible.
Either rebuild and perform a full population of all catalogs
belonging to this instance of SQL Server, or switch back to
an account with administrator permissions.

3.1.27 Recommendations for Designing Distributed Partitioned


Views

In designing a partitioning scheme, it must be clear what data


belongs to each partition. The partitioning column cannot be an
identity, default, or timestamp column. There are no restrictions
on the updatability of the partitioning column.

3.1.28 Requirements for the Desktop Engine Setup File

The topic "SQL Server 2000 Desktop Engine Setup" in SQL Server
Books Online provides an incomplete list of the files required to
successfully run Setup. In addition to the files mentioned in the
topic, the following files must also be copied from the SQL Server
2000 compact disc to the folder containing Setup.exe:

* Sqlresld.dll from \Sqlmsde.

* Setup.rll from \Sqlmsde\Resources\NNNN. NNNN varies depending


on the language of SQL Server 2000 that is on the compact disc.
For example, for a U S English version of SQL Server 2000,
NNNN is 1033, but NNNN is a different number for a French or
German version.

* Instmsi.exe and InstmsiW.exe from \Sqlmsde\msi.

These files must also be copied for the Desktop Engine installation
sample to work.

3.1.29 Desktop Engine Setup TARGETDIR and DATADIR

The file paths specified for Microsoft SQL Server Desktop Engine
Setup TARGETDIR and DATADIR parameters must be terminated with a
backslash. For example:

TARGETDIR="C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\Mssql$MyInstance\Binn\"


DATADIR="C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\Mssql$MyInstance\Data\"

3.1.30 Reinstalling SQL Server 2000 Desktop Engine

If an attempt to install an instance of Microsoft SQL Server 2000


Desktop Engine fails (for reasons such as specifying an incorrect
login account or using a Microsoft Windows account that does not
have sufficient file permissions), you may want to resume Setup
after correcting the error condition. This includes installations
using either Desktop Engine Setup or the Desktop Engine merge
modules in a Windows Installer installation process.

When resuming the installation process, you must specify two


installation options in addition to the options that were specified
in the original installation attempt:

* REINSTALL=All
Specifies that Desktop Engine Setup or Windows Installer install
all SQL Server 2000 Desktop Engine features. The only value
supported is All.

* REINSTALLMODE={ omus | a }
Specifies the level of processing performed by Desktop Engine
Setup or Windows Installer. Specify REINSTALLMODE=omus when
resuming a failed setup. With this option, the entire installation
process is verified and completed. Specify REINSTALLMODE=a when
you have to rebuild only the master database, such as after a
failure of the disk drive holding the master database.

Specify these options either in the .ini file or as part of the


Desktop Engine Setup /settings switch. For more information about
specifying installation options, see the SQL Server Books Online
topics "SQL Server 2000 Desktop Engine Setup" and "Merging the
Desktop Engine into Windows Installer."
-----------------------------------------------
3.2 SQL Server Books Online Functionality Notes
-----------------------------------------------
These are issues that relate to the functionality of SQL Server
Books Online.

3.2.1 Link to MDAC and XML Documentation Does Not Work

When SQL Server Books Online is opened using F1 or the Help menu
in an MMC snap-in (such as SQL Server Enterprise Manager), the
link to the MDAC and XML documentation does not work. To view
the MDAC and XML documentation, open Mdacxml.chm located in
C:\Program Files\Microsoft Sql Server\80\Tools\Books.

NOTE: The link works correctly when SQL Server Books Online
is started directly from the SQL Server Program Group on the
Start menu, or from running Sql80.col.

3.2.2 Printing Limitations

If you are using Microsoft Internet Explorer version 5.5,


printing with the "Print the selected headings and all
subtopics" option is not recommended.

If you are using Internet Explorer 5.0 or Internet Explorer 5.5,


linked topics may not always print when the "Print all linked
documents" option is selected in the Print dialog box.

3.2.3. Incorrect Hyperlinks to the ADO Connection Object from


ADO Dynamic Properties Topics

The ADO Connection object supports 60 dynamic properties, each


of which is documented in an individual topic. Each of these
topics contains a hyperlink designed to cross-reference the
ADO Connection object. These links incorrectly reference the
DTS Connection object.
To correctly reference the ADO Connection object:

1. In SQL Server Books Online, click the Search tab.

2. In the Type in the word to search for box, type:


"connection object".

3. In the Select topics pane, double-click "Connection Object"


for "ADO and SQL Server".

-----------------
3.3 English Query
-----------------
These are issues in English Query that are not reflected in the
documentation.

3.3.1 SaveProjectToXMLDom Method

The syntax for this method should be:


Set variable = EQModel.SaveProjectToXMLDOM
where variable is a returned XMLDOMDocument object to which the
project is saved.
3.3.2 Automatic Clarification of Questions Feature

The InputList object has the following additional properties to


support the Automatic Clarification of Questions feature. The
properties are read-only, optional, and of the variant data type:

* LookupQueries
Returns an array of QueryCmd objects of the size specified in
ItemCount, or is NULL. Each LookupQuery corresponds to an item
in the Items array. If the query returns no rows, the
corresponding item may not be the correct default choice for
the InputList object.

For example, for the question "How many awards did John
Fortune win?", an English Query application might not have
"John Fortune" in its dictionary; therefore, a
UserClarification Response is returned containing an InputList
with the text, "Which of these do you mean by John Fortune?"
The choices are: the name of an actor, which selects actors
named John Fortune, or the name of a movie, which selects
movies named John Fortune. A LookupQuery is associated
with each choice. If only one of these queries returns rows,
the client application can use the corresponding item as the
user selection for the InputList, and can respond to the
UserClarificationResponse without user intervention.

NOTE: LookupQueries cannot be generated for some InputList


objects. For these objects, each LookupQuery in the array
is NULL.

* EntityIDs Property
Returns an array of EntityIDs of the size specified in ItemCount.
Each EntityID corresponds to an item in the Items array. If the
choice in the Items array is an entity (for example, the name of
an actor), the EntityID contains the ID of that entity
(for example, author_name). If the choice in the Items array is
not an entity (for example, First Name), the EntityID is empty.

The InputText object has an additional property to support the


Automatic Clarification of Questions feature:

* LookupQueries is a read-only, optional property of the variant


data type and can be NULL. LookupQueries is a collection of
QueryCmds objects that are used to determine a default value for
the InputText object.

For example, for the question "List the old people", the English
Query application might not have a threshold specified for "old".
A UserClarificationResponse is returned containing an InputText
with the text, "An old person is a person whose age is over ___."
The LookupQuery selects the median age. The client application
can choose to use the returned value as the response to the
InputText and can respond to the UserClarificationResponse
without user intervention.

NOTE: LookupQueries cannot be generated for some InputText


objects. For these objects, the LookupQuery collection is empty.
---------------------
3.4 Analysis Services
---------------------
These are issues in Analysis Services that are not reflected in
the documentation.

3.4.1 Before Registering Analysis Services Performance Monitoring


Counters on Windows NT 4.0

Analysis Services performance monitoring counters are installed


to your hard disk during setup, but on Microsoft Windows NT 4.0
they are not registered automatically because of a problem with
some versions of Windows NT 4.0. Before using the manual
instructions documented in the SQL Server Books Online topic,
"Monitoring Analysis Services Performance" to register the
counters on Windows NT 4.0, review Microsoft Knowledge Base
article Q242472 for more information. You may need to move
the file Msmdctr80.dll to a different folder to meet the
requirements listed in the article. On Microsoft Windows 2000,
the performance counters are installed and registered
automatically during setup.

3.4.2 Distinct Count Aggregate Function

The Analysis Services topic "Specifications and Limits"


incorrectly identifies the restrictions on the Distinct Count
aggregate function. The Distinct Count aggregate function
requires the measure to be numeric.

In the Analysis Services topic "Indexed Views for ROLAP


Partitions," the first bullet item should read: "The partition
cannot contain measures that use the aggregate functions Min,
Max, or Distinct Count."

3.4.3 UPDATE CUBE Statement

In the Analysis Services topic "UPDATE CUBE Statement," the BNF


for the statement incorrectly indicates that multiple cells can
be updated in a single statement. Only a single cell can be
updated in each UPDATE CUBE statement.

3.4.4 Process Databases After Upgrading from Beta 2

If you upgrade from the Beta 2 release of Analysis Services,


process all upgraded databases to ensure correct data
conversion.