Sie sind auf Seite 1von 20

ETHIOPIAN

DIASPORA
TRUST FUND
STANDARD GRANT APPLICATION FORM
UNDER THE CALL FOR PROJECTS
ETHIOPIAN DI ASPORA - PARTNERSHIP TO IMPROVE SOCI AL AND
ECONO MI C W ELLBEING OF ETHIOPIANS IN NEED

EDTF SECRETARI AT
JULY 2019, ADDIS ABABA
PART ONE
APPLICANT INFORMATION

Lead Applicant.
Name of Applicant1 Waliif Agro-Industry S.C.
Organizational type2 Share Company
Year of establishment3 2016
Place of establishment Addis Ababa
Registration number
Taxpayer identification number 0049598484
Telephone number +251118121811
Mobile phone number +251911036738
E-mail Waliifagroindustry@gmail.com
Office address
(Street/Woreda/Kebele/House Addis Ababa City, Arada Sub-city, woreda 09, Arat-Kilo
No/City)
P.O. Box -

Contact Person
Contact Person

2. CO-APPLICANT4

Name of the Co-applicant5 Pan-African Consulting PLC


Organizational type6 Private Limited Company
Place of establishment Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Registration number AR/AA/2/0005847/2011
Taxpayer Identification number 0057510352
Office telephone umber +251912753960/+251911311149
Mobile Phone number +251912753960/+251911311149
E-mail panafricanconsulting@gmail.com/bereketzele@gmail.com/
ayana.humna@gmail.com
Office address Addis Ababa, Arada Sub-City, woreda 09, 4 Kilo, at Dink
(Street/Woreda/Kebele/House
Sira Building, 8th Floor, House No H8-005
No/City)

1
Name as stated on the legal registration/incorporation certificate of the organization
2
Specify as indicated on the registration/incorporation certificate of the organization. e.g. NGO, association, government entity, private sector etc.
3 In Gregorian calendar
4
If there are more than one co-applicant, please copy and paste the same table to provide the information of each co-applicant
5
Name as stated on the legal registration/incorporation certificate of the organization
6
Specify as indicated on the registration/incorporation certificate of the organization (e.g. NGO, association, government entity, private sector etc.

EDT F | CAL L F O R PRO PO SAL S | ST ANDARD G RANT APP L ICAT IO N F O RM | J UL Y 2 0 1 9


PAG E 1 OF 1 9
P.O. Box

PART TWO
PROJECT INFORMATION

1. PROJECT SUMMARY
Livelihood Enhancement for Smallholder coffee
1.1. Title of the Project farmers [LESCF]
1.2. Summary of the Proposed Project (Not exceeding 500 words)
Highlight: the need and objective of the proposed project, expected results and key
methods/approaches and activities that will be implemented to achieve the stated result(s)
Overall objective: Improved livelihood of small scale coffee farmers in Anfilo, Gidami and Sayo
districts.
Specific Objective 1: To support smallholder farmers in coffee value addition
Specific Objective 2: To promote livelihood diversification among smallholder coffee farmers
Following the specific objectives, the expected results in terms of outcomes and outputs is explained
as:
Outcomes
Outcome 1.1: Coffee production increased from 5 quintals to 10 quintals per hectare for 1000
stallholder coffee farmers per harvest season.
Outcome 2.1: 300 smallholder coffee producers practiced honey production as source of income
Outcome 2.2: 700 smallholder coffee farmers\producers fully uptake the practice of intercropping with
banana, potatoes, cabbage, legumes and mushroom for consumption and income
Outputs
Output 1.1.1: Rural institutions [cooperatives, farmers’ organizations] established and operational
Output 1.1.2: Coffee processing equipment support provided
Output 2.1.1: Apiary inputs provided and model beekeepers linked to markets
Output 2.2.1: promote GAP and SLM agricultural practices

Activities: The project will implement the following actions per the outputs.
1.1.1.1. Organize farmers’ based organizations at village levels
1.1.1.2.Establish and operation primary rural cooperatives at kebele levels, equip them essential office
running
1.1.1.3.Training for cooperative members
1.1.2.1.Provide wet coffee washing\processing machine
1.1.2.2.Provide coffee hulling machine
1.1.2.3.Provide solar dryers
2.1.1.1. Action oriented training on beekeeping concepts like colony management, bee transfer, queen
rearing, honey quality, bees protection from pests and diseases, etc.
2.1.1.2. Provide transition beehives for selected farmers
2.1.1.3. Provide modern beehives for selected motivated farmers
2.1.1.4. Provide apiary accessory inputs like queen excluders, etc.
2.1.1.5. Conduct honey market promotion and linkage events with honey farmers, collectors,
processors, and government actors.
2.2.1.1. Training on inter-cropping and other good agriculture practices and best bet sustainable land
management [SLM] practices, and coffee orchard management
2.2.1.2. Provide seeds\seedlings of shade trees, legumes, banana, and mushrooms for coffee farmers
2.2.1.3. Conduct farmers ‘coffee farms rejuvenation\renovation campaigns

EDT F | CAL L F O R PRO PO SAL S | ST ANDARD G RANT APP L ICAT IO N F O RM | J UL Y 2 0 1 9


PAG E 2 OF 1 9
1.3. Duration of the project in months Two years
1.4. Grant amount requested from EDTF 10,000,000.00
in Ethiopian Birr
Requested/Expected Secured
1.5. Financing secured from other
sources

1.6. Matching fund contributed by the 3,200,000.00


applicant (Total in ET birr)
1.6.1 In Cash (amount in ET birr) 200,000.00
1.6.2 In kind contribution
3,000,000.00
Write estimated cash value in ET Birr
1.7. Location of the Project
Oromia Region, Kelem Wollega Zone, Anfilo woreda
Region, city/Woreda, Kebele

1.8. Planned starting date of the project November 1\2019

2. PROJECT DESCRIPTION
2.1. Statement of the problem (Not exceeding 300 words)
a. Describe the problem the project intends to solve and its scale/magnitude
b. Present and explain the evidence justifying the need for intervention
Describe the problem the project intends to solve and its scale/magnitude
Despite its importance both at the macro and micro household level, the coffee sector’s performance
has remained unsatisfactory and smallholder producers face a number of challenges in the form of
low productivity and quality, lack of access to markets, little opportunities for value addition, lack of
capital and access to credit to invest in machineries, and to pay for transport to sell outputs.
The coffee chain is characterized by weak institutions including the absence of an institution to
coordinate, direct or encourage research on coffee and help build consensus among different groups.
The processing and marketing process in coffee industry are dominated by institutions that thrive on
information asymmetry in the sector to maximize profit. This makes the distribution of value added to
be highly skewed against the small coffee farmers. Cherry picking is a rather laborious task and hence
costly. Coffee farmers\assemblers need to take the fresh harvested red berries in to washing stations
within 10-12 hours of picking or otherwise, the berries may no longer be suitable for washing. This
would imply that coffee farmers in relatively remote areas will be forced to sell their coffees in dry
berries even if they want to sell in red form.
Poor maintenance and degradation of coffee orchards explained by limited competitiveness with a
decreasing in quantity and quality caused by the aging of the orchards (coffee trees are old).
The farmers use traditional processing techniques in which the coffee is dried on the floor or on
surfaces that do not allow a uniform drying of the coffee cherries which negatively affects the taste and
flavor of the coffee produced as coffee is a very sensitive crop and easily absorb the odors of drying
area. There are improper post-harvest processing and handling practices such as on bare ground,
rainy weather particularly during drying season, improver storage and transportation like earthy and
musty coffee defects.
Present and explain the evidence justifying the need for intervention
Currently, it is difficult for Smallholder coffee farmers to achieve economies of scale from coffee
production. There are market failures due to the fact that farmers are not directly selling their coffee
to the exporters, or international importers. Instead the coffee chain is populated with highly
networked illegal middlemen and agents who rely their livelihood on the created information
asymmetry, and buy the coffee at a very low price from the farmers, and sell it to private commercial
traders or large unions owning coffee processing machines. These process coffee and add-value and
sell it at a high premium price to the consumers. Due to the booming of the caffe shops in towns and
cities, there are also several emerging roasters. In general, both farmers and final consumers will be
disproportionately affected which causes economic loss\waste.
There are also non-existent or very weak and sluggish\slow primary cooperatives in the rural areas

EDT F | CAL L F O R PRO PO SAL S | ST ANDARD G RANT APP L ICAT IO N F O RM | J UL Y 2 0 1 9


PAG E 3 OF 1 9
who can otherwise collect the coffee from the members and better bargain to sell it at high farm gate
price.
Several coffee farms are also old, and poorly managed which makes it low quality and productivity.
Farmers use the traditional slash-and-burn techniques.
Despite the fact that the coffee farms can be used for multi-purpose services, the farmers still insist
on monoculture\coffee only, and invite many thin months each year due to food and income security.
The farmers do not know the reinforcing effects of some activities on another like coffee and
beekeeping
2.2. Relevance of the Proposed Project (Not exceeding 500 words)
a. Explain how the solutions and measures proposed by the project will positively contribute to
resolve/alleviate the problem
b. Discuss the evidence that the proposed intervention is the right and best measure to address
the problem
c. Describe the altered scenario as a result of the intervention your project is proposing.
d. Explain how your approach or intervention is different or unique from all others so far tried to
deal with similar problems
Explain how the solutions and measures proposed by the project will positively contribute to
resolve/alleviate the problem
The project is in conformity with the Second Growth and Transformation Plan [GTPII] to increase
coffee productivity and double coffee production by 2020 roughly equal to Brazil.
It also complies to the interests stipulated in the Ethiopia Agriculture Growth Program and the
Agriculture Commercialization Cluster Strategy
The project is in line with proclamation 660\2009 which provides for Apiculture Resources
Development and Protection
It also contributes to the Second Growth and Transformation Plan [GTP II] of target to increase total
honey production from 60.7 thousand tonnes to 123.9 thousand tonnes by the end of 2020.
The project will make positive contribution to the Ethiopian Industrial Development Strategic Plan
which is agricultural-led, export-oriented, and focused to value-addition.
It also perfectly tallies with the Apiculture Value Chain and Strategy for Ethiopia with target to
increase honey production to 200 thousand tonnes by 2025 with two basic assumptions: adoption of
improved production techniques, improved harvest and management, strengthen research and
extension, timely supply of inputs, and supporting farmers to access finance
Increment in honey production is assumed to cover the growing local demands due to population
growth and betterment of life of citizens due to economic growth.
Discuss the evidence that the proposed intervention is the right and best measure to address
the problem
Lead farmer model is one of the best extension service delivery model to disseminate information to
large number of farmers, even within distant locations.
Cooperatives strengthen the bargaining power of their member coffee farmers and assist them to
secure better farm-gate price and profit margin.
Coffee market is buyer driven, and apparently seems trade is counteracting the poverty reduction
strategy effort of the government. Value addition through improved processing might lead to higher
incomes and prices for coffee producers, coffee farmers selling to washing stations get high incomes
than those selling to traditional middlemen.
. For example, coffee value can be added in such ways as washing, environmental sustainability,
specialty production, produce’s origin and characteristics.
Washed coffee earns significantly higher premium as compared to the unwashed type at the export
level, which can be addressed by supporting processing equipment.
Crop productivity can be increased either through horizontal expansion of farmland or intensive
cultivation. The former is becoming difficult due to increasing population pressure but the latter has
been chosen rather best feasible strategy by this project. The project therefore disentangles\unveils
conservation agriculture practiced for many years by the indigenous communities particularly banana,
korarima, mushroom, legumes, etc. which benefits through increased organic matter, improved water
EDT F | CALL FO R PRO PO SALS | ST ANDARD G RANT APP L ICAT ION FO RM | JUL Y 2 01 9
PAG E 4 OF 1 9
retention, improved water fertility, reduced soil erosion, and reduced weed infestation, increased crop
productivity
The use of under shade-grown coffee mitigates climate change, and provides long term ecological
benefits by offering greater soil stability, provision of wildlife cover particularly birds, carbon
sequestration through restoration of deforested and degraded areas, protects coffee plants from
extreme weather conditions, lower evaporation rates, and greater water availability for coffee plants.
The introduction of honey bee not only increases the alternative income of the coffee farmers but
pollinates the coffee and other crops.
Describe the altered scenario as a result of the intervention your project is proposing
Until the submission time of this project nothing has been altered.
Explain how your approach or intervention is different or unique from all others so far tried to deal
with similar problems
This project has a unique added value and innovative that it maximizes the expected positive
outcomes from the intervention through optimal synergies among the activities and advancing local
embeddedness\indigenous knowledge explained for example by:
Beekeeping promotion for coffee farmers creating the synergy of income increase and coffee
production with zero trade-offs\compromise.
Shade-grown coffee among coffee producers creating environmental sustainability and fertility\water
retention with no or very low trade-offs\compromise.
Intercropping coffee with banana elevates soil potassium content in addition to its shade service,
income generation and consumption security.
Coffee intercropping with Korarima and mushroom enriches soil fertility and high market value due to
their medicinal demand.
Intercropping with legumes accelerates the nitrogen fixation and carbon cycle in addition to their
income and consumption security.
2.3. Describe the mid or long-term social, economic, environmental and other impacts of the
project. (Not exceeding 200 words)
Socially, the project has a mid-term impact to strengthen democratic structures that can be better
positioned for bargaining, negotiation, and defend interests of coffee farmers.
Economically, the project has a mid-term impact of income and consumption stability and
improvement for coffee farmers, and long-term impact of contribution to improved coffee quality.
The project has a mid-term impact of improved soil quality and coffee farming practices, and long-
term impact positive contribution to environmentally-friendly, sustainable farming.
2.4. Describe the overall objective of the project and related indicators to assess progress and
achievement of results. (Not exceeding 150 words)
The overall objective of this project is improved livelihood of small scale coffee farmers in ------districts.
The envisioned objective will be realized through three pronged strategies:
 Value-addition along the coffee chain that increases the income of smallholder coffee producers
 Forge and support rural institutions [farmers ‘organizations and rural cooperatives] to strengthen
the bargaining power of the smallholder coffee farmers\growers, and
 Livelihood diversification to enable smallholder coffee farmers generate alternative income and
consumption options

2.5. Outline and describe the specific objectives of the project and related indicators to assess
achievement of the overall objective. (Not exceeding 150 words)
The project has the following specific objectives with measuring indicators to assess performance and
achievements.
Specific Objective 1: To support smallholder farmers in coffee value addition
The project supports actions that improve value addition to the coffee produce through establishment,
institutionalization and strengthening of rural based organizations [village farmers’ organizations,
kebele primary rural cooperatives], and provide equipment for primary and secondary coffee
processing [wet coffee washing\processing machines, hulling machine, solar dryers, storage
equipment] through these institutions. By creating capacity the cooperatives will add value to the coffee
produce of their members, and further bargain the market price on behalf of their members.
Indicators to measure this objective is:

EDT F | CALL FO R PRO PO SALS | ST ANDARD G RANT APP L ICAT ION FO RM | JUL Y 2 01 9
PAG E 5 OF 1 9
Increase in average income from -----to----for each of 1000 participating smallholder coffee farmers due
to increased farm-gate price
Number of smallholder coffee producers who bought [owned] the share of Walif-agro industry PLC.
Specific Objective 2: To promote livelihood diversification among smallholder coffee farmers
This objective promotes alternative livelihood and income diversification strategies integrating with
good agricultural practices [GAPs] and best bet farm management. This includes alternative income
generation activities like coffee farms with apiculture, coffee farming intercropped with food and high
market value crops like mushroom production, banana production, and shade tree nursery production.
Indicator to measure this objective is:
70% increase in the number of smallholder coffee farmers who adopted environmental-friendly
alternative livelihood diversification strategies
45% income Increase of smallholder coffee farmers due to the livelihood intervention
2.6. Describe the main results of the project. (Not exceeding 150 words)
The project has the following results explained in terms of outcomes and outputs, derived from the
specific objectives.
Outcome 1.1: Annual coffee production increased from 5 quintals to 10 quintals per hectare for 1000
stallholder coffee farmers per harvest season.
Output 1.1.1: Rural institutions [cooperatives, farmers’ organizations] established and operational
Output 1.1.2: Coffee processing equipment support provided
Outcome 2.1: 300 smallholder coffee producers practiced honey production as source of income
Output 2.1.1: apiary toolkits provided and model beekeepers linked to markets
Outcome 2.2: 700 smallholder coffee farmers\producers fully uptake the practice of intercropping with
banana, potatoes, cabbage, legumes and mushroom for consumption and income
Outcome 2.2.1: promote GAP and SLM agricultural practices
2.7. Discuss the methodologies that will be used to generate the desired results and to achieve
the project objectives. (Not exceeding 300 words)
The entry point is based on the value chain development analytical framework discovering potentials
and bottlenecks within these levels and in the dynamic interactions between them. Walif recently
conducted a business feasibility assessment in the project area and clearly verified that smallholder
coffee farmers are disproportionately affected by the existing coffee chain and justified the need for
intervention that improves the bargaining power of these hero fellows on market price through value
addition by processing their coffee produce and quality improvement on one hand, and implementing
alternative livelihood diversification strategies that can improve the consumption and income security of
these farmers and their families.
Walif has currently over 100 active small scale coffee growers\farmers directly selling their produce to
the coffee agro-processing plant operating in the Anfilo woreda. The industry has already started
establishing kebele level coffee cooperatives and village level coffee farmers’ groups.
Capitalizing the commenced experience and live operations, the project will adopt a lead farmer
model also called contact farmers) or farmer-to-farmer extension (F2FE) using farmers field school
approach and primary kebele level coffee cooperatives establishment and institutionalization. At
village (many villages exist within a kebele) levels, farmers’ groups represented by lead/leader
farmers in all the three targeted coffee producing districts.
WAlif has a pilot demonstration site close to the agro-processing plant. The plot has different multi-
purpose and fruit nurseries and seedlings for prototyping distribution to its lead farmers. Sample
pilot/prototyping operations of some equipment like modern hives/transition hives, wet machines,
hulling machines, pulping machines, solar dryers will be demonstrated. Added to that are nursery fruit
characterization, coffee orchard and nursery management, canopy management, bee-colony rearing
and others will be demonstrated to the leader farmers.
The co-applicant organization, Pan Africa Consulting will adopt the follow-up strategy post training
services of the lead farmers, and delivers technical support in the form of field demonstrations,
learning visits, and coaching events.
The project gives training of trainers for 10% of the members of the farmers’ groups identified as
leader farmers, and these farmers are assumed to step-down the same awareness to the remaining
90% of the farmer groups following the associate model. [Note that each farmer group consists of 20-
25 coffee farmers].
EDT F | CALL FO R PRO PO SALS | ST ANDARD G RANT APP L ICAT ION FO RM | JUL Y 2 01 9
PAG E 6 OF 1 9
Group members will self-select based on the community consensus approach that ensures strong
participation and say of the beneficiaries.
2.8. Highlight new or modified approaches the project introduces and the benefits, added
values and opportunities these approaches offer to the beneficiaries of the project. (Not
exceeding 300 words)
Being embedded at the grassroots participation, the project introduces farmer-to-farmer schools
through lead farmers, and technically supported by the business development services [BDS] provider
through the co-applicant\pan African Consulting, it gives a mother-baby model of field
demonstration, experimentation, and coaching. This implants the knowledge and skills acquired for
ever, and reaches too many remote coffee farmers within the stipulated project life period.
The project also do not follow the ‘one blanket fits all’ but capitalizes the indigenous knowledge
developed by the community with respect to sustainable land management, weed control, livelihood
endeavors, and conservation agricultural practices. The project has no intention or deep interest to
promote synthetic fertilizers, herbicide, insecticides, and other bio-chemical measures but fosters
compost preparation and application, ridge farming, coffee-shades planting, inter-cropping etc.
which are environmental safe production methods. Intercropping of coffee with banana is a
longstanding tradition of the coffee farmers in the area and the project upgrades the process and
scale. Beekeeping and honey production are also similarly the longstanding livelihood of the farmers,
but the project unlocks the positive synergy that apiculture activities will bring on the production of
honey, and increase the income of the families.
The project will strengthen the very weak, disjointed, and unfair value distribution across the coffee
chain segment disproportionately harming the smallholder farmers through establishment and
operation of farmers’ groups at village levels and primary cooperatives at kebele levels to outperform
the bargaining power of these victimized farmers on marketing price and reducing the transaction
costs facing them during selling of their coffees.
This project gradually paves the way that the smallholder coffee farmers.
The project has the following milestones with their schedules
Year 1 quarter 1:
Operational agreement with government signed
MoU between Implementing partners
Year 1 quarter 2:
Launching and familiarization of the project
New staff members hired
Provide seeds\seedlings of shade trees, legumes, banana, and mushrooms for coffee farmers
Year1 quarter 3:
Rural institutions [cooperatives, farmers’ organizations] established and operational
Recruitment and group formation of coffee farmers for apiculture
Training for cooperative members
Action oriented training on beekeeping
Year 1 quarter 4:
Coffee processing machines [wet, dry hulling and solar dryers] provided with appropriate training
Apiculture beehives and related apiary toolkits provided
coffee farms rejuvenated their farms
Similarly, in the second year of the project life milestones are as:
Year 2 quarter 1:
Farmers started selling their produce at the cooperatives premises
Training on inter-cropping and other good agriculture practices and best bet sustainable land
management [SLM] practices, and coffee orchard management
Year 2 quarter 2:
Cooperatives ensured high bargaining power for price negotiation
Conduct honey market promotion and linkage events with honey farmers, collectors, processors, and
government actors
Year 2 quarter 3:
Consistent relationships between cooperatives, Farmers and Walif-Agro Industry formed
Provide seeds\seedlings of shade trees, legumes, banana, and mushrooms for coffee farmers
Year 2 quarter 4:

EDT F | CALL FO R PRO PO SALS | ST ANDARD G RANT APP L ICAT ION FO RM | JUL Y 2 01 9
PAG E 7 OF 1 9
Farmers and cooperatives buy shares from the Agro-industry [investment appetite created]
Conduct farmers ‘coffee farms rejuvenation\renovation campaigns, village farmers ‘organizations, and
kebele primary cooperatives buy the stock\share of the Walif Agro-Industry and participate on
dividend profits making them transform to investors or shareholders.
2.9. Define the key milestones of the project and corresponding dates. (Not exceeding 200
words)

2.10. Risk Analysis (Not exceeding 500 words)


Identify and discuss: (a) The possible risks of the operation, (b) How they affect the project
activities and results, (c) Prevention and mitigation strategies planned by the project
The possible risks of the operation
 Wet mills can discharge waste water directly on the streams which has a negative impact on the
population and on the other wet mills that use the stream’s water for coffee washing process
 The adoption of shadow grown coffee might make the berries take longer to ripen.
 Intercropping coffee with other crops or trees will compete for nutrients, light and moisture resulting
to low coffee yields and poor quality as well as deteriorating the soil conditions rendering it infertile.
 Farmers receive training on agronomic practices but without a proper follow-up (without adoption)
How they affect the project activities and results
Shade-grown coffees and intercropping are the most recommended conservation (best-bet) practices
and their cumulative effect is assumed to be largely beneficial (positive) than the risks listed above.
Non-adoption of training makes coffee farmers passive beneficiaries and can slip in the project from
achieving its promised targets.
Prevention and mitigation strategies planned by the project
The project has planned to provide training and awareness meetings on solid and liquid waste
management.
The decision is to balance the synergetic and trade-offs that result from the shadow-grown coffee. The
shadow grown coffee has a long term ecological sustainability effect and farmers are also encourage to
manage (prune, and shear) the canopy to prevent over-shaded trees.
Many research findings conducted in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania verified that intercropping with
coffee has no significant negative impact on yields and soil quality, and furthermore this project will
testify the result during its field implementation time.
The project will conduct farmers’ sensitization meetings to ensure that farmers are not passive
beneficiaries, and farm visits and on-farm training activities to encourage farmers’ adoption of best
agronomic practices
2.11. Stakeholders (Not exceeding 500 words)
Describe: (a) the key stakeholders of the action, (b) their role and contribution in the project and
(c) how they will perform/implement their role in the project cycle
Key stakeholders of the action:
The key stakeholders of this project are: Ethiopian Diaspora Trust Fund, Waliif Agro-Industry S.C., Pan
Africa Consulting PLC, Small Scale Coffee Farmers, woreda cooperative office, woreda agriculture
office, Ethiopian Coffee and TEA Development Authority, Oromia coffee and Tea Authority, Ethiopian
Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR), Ethiopian Coffee Exporters Association, Ethiopia Commodity
Exchange (ECX), Agricultural Transformation Agency (ATA), Primary market suppliers, Coffee
production and marketing cooperatives and unions, Private sector partners like roasters and local
coffee bean buyers
Their role and contribution in the project
 Ethiopian Diaspora Fund [EDTF] finances the interventions articulated in this proposal with
expected technical support, monitoring fidelity, and ensuring financial accountability of the
implementers.
 Walif Agro-Industry S.C will be the lead promoter and implementer of this project with responsibility
to command financial resources, produce reports, and make collaborations with academic and
research institutions.
 Pan Africa Consulting PLC being the co-applicant mainly mandated to production of capacity
building training, and provision of training, commands demonstrations, and learning visits, design
toolkits of technical nature like wet coffee washing\processing and hulling machines, solar dryer
management, coffee nursery and orchard management, beehives making, and others.
 Smallholder coffee farmers are the main beneficiaries of this project. They are expected to invent
the trainings, demonstrations and processes on their individual farms, attentively follow the
technical assistances of the project through the BDS provider [co-applicant] and the lead farmers.
They ensure their democratic participation in the project through the primary coffee cooperatives

EDT F | CALL FO R PRO PO SALS | ST ANDARD G RANT APP L ICAT ION FO RM | JUL Y 2 01 9
PAG E 8 OF 1 9
established at their respective kebeles.
 Woreda agriculture office and woreda cooperative office will give continuous extension services for
the smallholder coffee farmers.
 Ethiopian Coffee and TEA Development Authority with its objectives of strengthening the extension
service and establishing a quality based marketing system. The authority will give data and
statistics on agro-ecology suitability, coffee varieties and available production or processing
technologies, and the overall value chain performance. Therefore the authority will benefit from
better-performance in value chain and governance through effective institutions and value addition.
 Oromia coffee and Tea Authority will provide the current policies, region’s coffee chain, and desired
framework to benefit smallholder farmers. Therefore, the authority will benefit from the
effectiveness of these policies.
 Wollega University and Dembi-Dollo University will share available contextually conducted
research findings regarding the coffee production in the Kelem Wollega Zone.
 Ethiopian Coffee Exporters Association will gain indirect benefits as more volume of high quality,
high value and traceable coffee becomes available on the market
 Ethiopia Commodity Exchange (ECX) will benefit indirectly from an enhanced availability of good
quality traceable coffees
 Agricultural Transformation Agency (ATA) with its flagship programmes: the Ethiopian Soil
Information System (ETHIOSIS) and the Agricultural Commercialization Clusters (ACCs)
 Primary market suppliers will be able to buy coffee from farmers at primary marketing centres and
bulk coffee in to lots and deliver to the Ethiopian Agricultural Commodities Warehouse Service
Enterprise (EACWE) quality testing laboratories where coffees are graded. Thus, these suppliers
will have better opportunity to buy and consolidate high quality coffees.
 Secondary coffee cooperatives and unions will improve the quality of coffee they are receiving and
will have a significant demonstration effect
 Private sector partners like roasters and local coffee bean buyers benefit directly from the
availability of traceable coffee.
How they will perform/implement their role in the project cycle
The lead applicant and the co-applicant has already entered a a legally binding teaming agreement
which defines the duties and responsibilities of each entity
The applicant and the government are expected to enter in to the operation agreement regarding the
project
The project will envisage to form a twining agreement with research and academic institutions
particularly on demonstrations and issues requiring technicalities.
All the stakeholders are expected to participate on the project familiarization, launching, and
negotiation workshops to give their inputs to further improve outcomes.
The smallholder coffee farmers’ participation is democratic from the very inception that farmers’ groups
at each village of a kebele self-select their members based upon their trust and relationships. Both the
farmers ’groups and kebele primary coffee cooperatives will run through a democratically selected
members of the cooperative which fosters the active raise and demand of the members’ interest. The
lead farmers regularly develop Joint action plan for each of their farmers’ organizations like each
members’ requirements of nursery seedlings and distribution, determination of cost-sharing for the
coffee processing machines and members payment modality, apiary inputs\toolkits, intercropping
seeds, etc.
2.12. Beneficiaries (Not exceeding 300 words)
Explain: (a) the main beneficiaries of the project and their actual/approximate number, (b) how
they will benefit from the project and their role in the planning/implementation process
Main beneficiaries of the project and their actual/approximate number
The direct beneficiaries of this project are 3000 smallholder coffee farmers [60% women] engaged on
organic coffee farming in the form of forest, semi-forest, and garden coffees.
How they will benefit from the project and their role in the planning/implementation process
The smallholder coffee farmers will benefit from the project through increased income from sale of
large volume and quality coffee by the value-addition intervention.
The farmers also benefit from the improved livelihood security both in terms of consumption security
and additional income generated from the crop diversification through inter-cropping and
apiculture\honey beekeeping.
They also benefit from the retention in soil fertility, organic and sustainable farming, and
renovation\rejuvenation campaign on their individual coffee farms that increases productivity and
attractive coffee orchard management.

EDT F | CALL FO R PRO PO SALS | ST ANDARD G RANT APP L ICAT ION FO RM | JUL Y 2 01 9
PAG E 9 OF 1 9
The farmers also benefit from the decrease in transaction cost in marketing since this will be
undertaken by the primary kebele cooperatives. The cooperatives also provide them farm inputs, and
information to their members.
The cooperatives have a strong bargaining power and information access on market prices which
highly benefits the farmers hitherto captured by irregular and regular middlemen.
The smallholder farmers, farmers’ organizations, and cooperatives also buy the share of the Walif agro-
industry and participate in the sharing of dividends that gradually transforms the farmers in to small
investors.

2.13. Sustainability of results (Not exceeding 500 words)


Explain how the results and benefits generated by the project intervention will be maintained and
continued. Provide evidence on how financial, operational, environmental and social
sustainability of the project will be guaranteed after the project implementation phase.
The objectives of this project are anchored (spelt out) in the country’s relevant strategic documents and
the Second Growth and Transformation (GTP II) ensuring that the government is strongly committed.
The project will finance value-enhancing investment that will provide long-lasting benefits for the coffee
growers and their families in terms of improved cash income. This cash income will be used to
sustainably improve the growers’ livelihood conditions including increased food security through the
acquisition of food during the lean months. Agro-industry is currently a key priority for Ethiopian
Government policy.
The project is also environmentally smart and sustainable, due to the adoption of GAPs including SLM
practices
Moreover, the private sector has been slated to play the leading role in this project design and
implementation (both managerial and technical) ensuring the private led development. of the local
communities affected by their initiative
The project will mount/host highly participatory consultation workshops to elicit the beneficiaries’
participation and feedback of a full range of partners and stakeholders. This consultative process will
continue to be used throughout the life of the project to maintain the shared vision and collaborative
relationships that have been forged, and to sustain partners’ commitments to their assigned roles and
responsibilities.
This project is a farm-level implementation in which smallholder coffee farmers learn from each other,
and coherent project structures are fully in place with good skills and demonstration acquired which
makes it self-sustaining as it has already been embedded in to their daily livelihoods and farm
innovations. Say for example, a coffee farmer starts justifying that beekeeping is not only to collect
honey and earn income but to increase the production of coffee through intensified pollinations.
Inter-cropping will make their soil to retain\hold fertility which saves them from high cost of fertilizers,
which many farmers lamented.
This project is sustainable since it has a cost-sharing component. The smallholder coffee farmers are
required to make cost recovery for the machines provided by this project [wet coffee
washing\processing machine, hulling\dry coffee processing machine, and solar dryer machines. The
costs are to be recovered by distributing their payments across coffee harvest seasons. The payments
are to be collected by kebele primary cooperatives since the machines will be installed near to these
cooperative centers. These machines will also generate income by giving the processing services for
non-members on a fee basis.
This project is also sustainable since it is a prospective home for potential investors on the ground that
the smallholder coffee farmers, village farmers\organizations, and kebele primary coffee cooperatives
are assumed to buy stocks issued\shares of the agro-industry and become participate on dividend
profits.
Environmental sustainability is clear since this project promotes best bet agricultural practices like inter-
cropping, shade grown coffee farming, water and conservation practices, compost preparation and
application, and apiculture and coffee farming integration which is the most biodiversity safe way of
enhancing production and productivity.

EDT F | CAL L F O R PRO PO SAL S | ST ANDARD G RANT APP L ICAT IO N F O RM | J UL Y 2 0 1 9


PAG E 1 0 OF 19
2.14. Crosscutting themes (Not exceeding 500 words)
Describe: (a) how the project addressed crosscutting themes, (b) the added values or impact of
the proposed actions on women, youth disadvantaged/marginalized members of the society and
the environment.
The project will make women and youth economic empowerment as a transverse theme\cross-cutting
since women are at the front of poverty vulnerability. Their fate of this status also triggers them to
embark on environmental terrorism and Wanton destruction through encroaching on forests for
firewood. Youth also put pressure on coffee trees areas to collect firewood, and sell timber. They even
practice slash-and –burn on coffee trees that usually transforms in to forest fires and devastates the
flora and fauna of the area. At the back of all this it is the poverty which is the root cause. Therefore,
women are 60% of the total project beneficiaries, and youth will be highly targeted particularly on
apiculture, and coffee processing machines for value-addition.
Particularly during lead farmers\model farmers’ recruitment, it is highly targeted on young farmers so as
to maximize the skill and knowledge capture from learning and demonstration vents.
The project also mainstreams the environment by providing awareness creation on appropriate control
and management of coffee processing wastes [liquid and solid].

3. RESULTS FRAMEWORK OF THE PROJECT


Complete the results framework of the project as per the template in ANNEX 2. You can add more
rows for indicators, activities and outputs. You can copy and paste the table if you have more
objectives. DOWNLOAD ANNEX 2.
The template is also available under the ‘Projects>Call for Project Proposals’ menu of the EDTF
website.

4. KEY MILESTONES OF THE PROJECT


Complete the key milestones using the template in ANNEX 3. Copy and paste the table for projects
with more than one-year duration. DOWNLOAD ANNEX 3
The template is also available under the ‘Projects>Call for Project Proposals’ menu of the EDTF
website.

PART THREE
BUDGET PLAN

1. DETAILED BUDGET
Complete the standard budget template in ANNEX 4.
DOWNLOAD ANNEX 4 The template is also available under the ‘Projects>Call for Project
Proposals’ menu of the EDTF website.
Budget plan should present detailed budget items and their corresponding costs. Budget should be
presented in Ethiopian Birr. If the budget items include procurement of goods and services from
abroad, the equivalent amount of budget in USD can be indicated. The standard budget template is
provided in 3 of the guidelines for applicants.

EDT F | CAL L F O R PRO PO SAL S | ST ANDARD G RANT APP L ICAT IO N F O RM | J UL Y 2 0 1 9


PAG E 1 1 OF 19
2. CO-FINANCING: no co-finance
List the financing requested and secured from other sources/donors for the project (if any). Indicate
which activity of the project will be financed by the secured or requested grant. Insert more lines if
required.
Status
Amount Secured/ Project activity(s) that will be
Source of grant (Requested
requested in ETB financed by this particular grant.
/Secured)

3. MATCHING FUND
Indicate the amount of matching fund provided by the applicant and co-applicants (if any). In case of an
in-kind contribution, clearly indicate the type of in-kind contribution and provide estimated financial
value in ET Birr.
1.1. Matching fund 200,000.00
contributed in Cash
(amount in ET birr)
1.2. Matching fund Type of in-Kind Value in ET Birr
contribution in-kind Contribution
List the in-kind contribution Prototype toolkits like 2,000,000.00
and the corresponding modern and transitional
value in ET Birr beehives, bee colony,
coffee nursery and orchard
plots
Coffee processing machine 1000,000.00
for showcase
demonstration and
practicing
Total estimated in-kind 3,000,000.00
contribution

PART FOUR
ORGANIZATIONAL CAPACITY

1. COMPANY/ORGANIZATION PROFILE: Walif Agro-Industry SC


1.1. Profile
Please write short profile of your organisation/company (Not Exceeding 200 words)

Waliif Agro Industry Share Company is profound business entity operating in


wider segment of agricultural and agro processing sector mainly in Oromia
Regional State and other parts of the country. The company is established and
registered in 2016 by Ethiopian Ministry of Trade. We operate both nationally and
regionals with a well-balanced and diversified portfolio.

The company is established by the visionary shareholders in accordance with the

EDT F | CAL L F O R PRO PO SAL S | ST ANDARD G RANT APP L ICAT IO N F O RM | J UL Y 2 0 1 9


PAG E 1 2 OF 19
relevant provisions of the commercial code of Ethiopia to engage in agro-
processing sector and export end products to both national and global markets.
Currently, the company holds leading positions in Oromia Regionals State in terms
of agri-business including farming, livestock rearing and agro-processing
industries.

Besides, the company assists farmers, local investors, small and medium scale
enterprises, government agencies and unemployed youths by technological
transfer, advisory services and technical supports in the agriculture and agro-
processing sector. The company also aims to share best practices and experience
farmers and unemployed youths where the projects are located.

1.2. Please attach:


a. Organisational structure of the applicant
b. Memorandum of Incorporation/association or bylaw of the applicant organization approved
by the organization’s governing body
c. Registration/license of the applicant and co-applicants valid for the current fiscal year
d. Taxpayer Identification Certificate of the applicant and co-applicants
e. VAT registration certificate of the applicant and co-applicants (for VAT registered entities
only)

2. EXPERIENCE
2.1. Applicant’s Experience: Walif Agro-Industry SC.
Briefly describe the experience of the main applicant in implementing social and economic
development projects comparable to the proposed project. (Not exceeding 500 words)

Since its establishment the company focused directly in agricultural and agro-
processing industries mainly in Oromia Regional State. Currently the company has
gained ground in achieving some of its objectives as mentioned below

 The aim of the Waliif Agro-Industrial Share Company is to add values on


the agricultural products and deliver reliable processed agricultural
products for domestic market and fill the supply and demand gaps.
Currently the company established huge Iodized Salt Processing Plant in
Finifine Surrounding Oromia Special Zone, Burayu Town. The project
introduced environmentally friendly technologies in agro-processing sector.
 We are involved in wet and dry coffee processing project in Oromia
Regional State, Kelelm Wollega Zone and introduced modern system of

EDT F | CAL L F O R PRO PO SAL S | ST ANDARD G RANT APP L ICAT IO N F O RM | J UL Y 2 0 1 9


PAG E 1 3 OF 19
coffee process cycle into nearest investors and local farmers
 We have acquired land in Oromia Regional State, North Showa Zone, Fiche
Town for Dairy Farm and Milk Processing Factory Project. The basic
intention of this project is to create market opportunity for farmers unions
engaged in milk production and collection. We are also delighted to improve
the livelihood of small scale dairy farmers in the project site by introducing
new systems of production.
 The company employs around 300 people at national level and around 90%
of them are working in Oromia Regional State. Workers in the agro-
processing factories of the company are encouraged to grasp knowledge,
skills and experience in the projects they have engaged.

2.2. Applicant’s Project Portfolio: Walif Agro-Industry SC.


List projects that are similar or relevant to the proposed project the applicant organisation has
implemented or is implementing in the past five years. Insert more lines if necessary.

Years of
implementation Brief description of Main results achieved by the
Total project budget
(starting and ending the project project
dates/year)

Since Sept. 2016 Wet & Dry Coffee 4,000,000.00 (ETB)  Add value on coffee
Processing Project  Support local coffee farmers
 Introduce coffee washing
technologies
 Create job opportunities

 Job Opportunities
 Market opportunities
Iodized Salt
Since Sept. 2017 2,500,000.00 (ETB)  Technological Transfer
Processing Plant
 Skills & knowhow
development
 Enhance agriculture and
industrial linkage
 Improve livelihood of local
Dairy Farm and Milk dairy farmers
Since June 2018 Processing Factory 45,000,000.00(ETB)
 Create market linkage for
Project
unions
 Add value on dairy
products

EDT F | CAL L F O R PRO PO SAL S | ST ANDARD G RANT APP L ICAT IO N F O RM | J UL Y 2 0 1 9


PAG E 1 4 OF 19
2.3. Co-applicant’s Experience
Briefly describe the experience of co-applicants in implementing social and economic development
projects comparable to the proposed project. Add more tables if there are more co-applicants.

2.3.1. Experience of Co-applicant 1: Pan Africa Consulting PLC.


Supporting Tea Processing Factory Project of Verdanata Harvest through Conducting Socio-
economic and Environmental Impacts

Advising and Couching Red Meat Processing Factory Project of Kifile Mulat Agricultural
Development Project

Conducting Policy Analysis on New Global Fund Model: Implication to CSO & Affected
Communities.

Surveying the Prospects & Constraints of Migration to Middle East

Analyzing economic, social, financial and environmental feasibility and execution strategy for
Fruits and Vegetable Farm & Export Project of TSS Farm
Analyzing Environmental and Social Impact Assessment for Heavy Trucks Assembly Plant of
H.H (Hagos Hadgu)Engineering

Analyzing economic, social, financial and environmental feasibility and Execution Strategy for
for Flour Factory of Tiret Flour Factory Plc

Analyzing economic, social, financial and environmental feasibility and execution strategy for
Animal Feed Manufacturing and Livestock Rehabilitation Center of Degomote Farm PLC

Analyzing economic, social, financial and environmental feasibility and execution strategy for
Ginger Oil Processing and Manufacturing Project of Damene Balcha Enterprise

2.4. Co-applicant’s Project Portfolio


List projects that are similar or relevant to the proposed project the co-applicant organisation has
implemented or is implementing in the past five years. Insert more lines if necessary. Add more
tables if there are more co-applicants.

Project Portfolio – Co-applicant 1: Pan Africa Consulting PLC


Years of Brief description of the Total project Main results achieved by
implementation project budget the project
(starting and ending
dates/year)
2014 Analyze polices on New 15,000.00 USD  Assess policy issues of
Global Fund Model: new global model
Implication to CSO &
 Assess the application of
Affected Communities
the models on national
CSO and Affected
communities

EDT F | CAL L F O R PRO PO SAL S | ST ANDARD G RANT APP L ICAT IO N F O RM | J UL Y 2 0 1 9


PAG E 1 5 OF 19
2015 Surveying the Prospects 12,050. 00USD  Assess the opportunities
& Constraints of of migration to middle
Migration to Middle East
east
 Assess the constraints of
migration of people to
middle east
 Recommend the way
forward
Since Sept. 2018 Animal Feed 18,000,000.00 (ETB)  Add value for agricultural
Manufacturing Project products
Dec. 2018 Flour Factory  Support local farmers
Jan.2019 Fruits and Vegetable 21,000,000.00 (ETB)  Introduce new technologies
Farm & Export Project  Create job opportunities
April, 2019 Ginger Oil Processing 45,000,000.00 (ETB)  Enhance market chains
and Manufacturing
 Improve local livelihood
Project
June, 2019 Tea Processing Factory 105,000,000.00  Increase government
Project (ETB) revenue
 Support national
development

2.5. Profession and Experience of Key Managerial, Technical and Administrative Staff
2.5.1. Complete the profile form for each managerial staff (Annex 5) that will be engaged in the
project. DOWNLOAD ANNEX 5 The template is also available under the ‘Projects>Call
for Project Proposals’ menu of the EDTF website.
2.5.2. Complete the profile form for each technical staff (Annex 6) that will be engaged in the
project. DOWNLOAD ANNEX 6 The template is also available under the ‘Projects>Call
for Project Proposals’ menu of the EDTF website.
2.5.3. Compete the profile form for each administrative staff (Annex 7) that will be engaged in
the project. DOWNLOAD ANNEX 7 The template is also available under the
‘Projects>Call for Project Proposals’ menu of the EDTF website.
2.5.4. Attach the full CV of managerial, technical, key administrative and finance staff of the
project for additional reference.

3. FINANCIAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE CAPACITY

Please provide the following document[s] as proof of financial capacity:


1.1. Financial management and procurement guideline approved by the relevant governing body or
the applicant organization;
1.2. Balance sheet of the applicant organization for the last year for which accounts have been
closed;
1.3. Income statement of the applicant organization for the last year for which accounts have been
closed;
1.4. Audit report of the organization for the last financial year or the year before. (Applicants can
submit, internal audit report, external audit report or both)

EDT F | CAL L F O R PRO PO SAL S | ST ANDARD G RANT APP L ICAT IO N F O RM | J UL Y 2 0 1 9


PAG E 1 6 OF 19
PART FIVE
REPORTING AND COMMUNICATION

1. MONITORING AND SUPERVISION PLAN


Describe the monitoring and supervision plan of the project
Provide: monitoring and supervision tools, key milestones, reporting schedules and products of the
reporting and supervision process.
The project will conduct a quarterly monitoring and supportive supervision visits on the key project
infrastructures, sample farmer plots using key informant interviews, farmer groups\ discussions
particularly among lead\model farmers and generate a comprehensive monitoring reports. The reports
will be supported by case stories, videos and pictures for verifying evidence. The monitoring will be a
joint monitoring and participatory in nature that involves government experts and local lead farmers to
broadly raise challenges and ways for resolution.
During this monitoring, it is expected that the achievement, non-achievement, on-going, and muted
milestones will be identified and presented for decision.
Mid-term evaluation, and end-line evaluation will be conducted using participatory self-evaluation led
by the co-applicant, Pan Africa Consulting PLC with participation of beneficiaries, government, and
financing donor [EDTF].

EDT F | CAL L F O R PRO PO SAL S | ST ANDARD G RANT APP L ICAT IO N F O RM | J UL Y 2 0 1 9


PAG E 1 7 OF 19
2. COMMUNICATION
2.1. Communication activities, tools and products (Not exceeding 500 words)
Describe the (a) project’s communication approach/strategy for this project, (b) the
communication products that will be produced, (c) how the communication products will be
disseminated and (d) the targeted result of each communication activity/product.

project’s communication approach/strategy for this project


.

Communication products that will be produced


 Baseline report
 Minutes of Performance review meeting
 Quarterly performance reports
 Annual reports
 Project completion reports
 Mid-term evaluation report
 End-line evaluation report
How the communication products will be disseminated
WAlif will submits:
 Baseline assessment
 Quarterly performance review meeting of the applicant, co-applicant and key stakeholders
 Quarterly performance reports on a regular basis
 Annual reports yearly
 Project completion reports
 Mid-term evaluation at the end of the first year
 End-line Evaluation immediate to the close out of the project
Targeted result of each communication activity/product
 1 baseline report produced
 8 performance review meetings
 8 project progress reports submitted
 annual project reports
 1 project mid-term evaluation report
 1 project end-line evaluation report

2.2. Perception and Feedback of Stakeholders (Not exceeding 500 words)


a. Describe the communication and other tools, systems and processes the project will
use to capture perception and feedback of project stakeholders and beneficiaries at
different stages of the project cycle management.
b. Describe products that will be generated from the process.
Describe the communication and other tools, systems and processes the project will use to
capture perception and feedback of project stakeholders and beneficiaries at different stages
of the project cycle management
The project will conduct a beneficiary assessment survey in the third quarter of year one in the
project life and collate beneficiary satisfaction using standard ratings.
In each quarter, the lead applicant will organize after action review meetings with the co-applicant,
and government counter parts with the presence of representative from the donor organization
[EDTF].
The project will develop an interactive feedback loop mechanism in which farmers and all
stakeholders can place their ideas. Even, we provide streaming videos to probe comments and
trigger stakeholders on our website.
The project will host multi-stakeholder platforms biannually to collect and augment their feedbacks.
Describe products that will be generated from the process
 Beneficiary assessment survey

EDT F | CALL FO R PRO PO SALS | ST ANDARD G RANT APP L ICAT ION FO RM | JUL Y 2 01 9
PAG E 1 8 OF 19
 Quarterly after action review reports
 Bi-annual Multi-stakeholder platform reports

LIST OF ANNEXES

ANNEX 1: Standard Application Form


ANNEX 2: Result Framework Template
ANNEX 3: Key Project Milestones Template
ANNEX 4: Budget Template
ANNEX 5: Profile form: Management Staff
ANNEX 6: Profile form: Technical Staff
ANNEX 7: Profile form: Key Administration and Finance Staff
ANNEX 8: Declaration of Honour
ANNEX 9: Grant Application Checklist

EDT F | CAL L F O R PRO PO SAL S | ST ANDARD G RANT APP L ICAT IO N F O RM | J UL Y 2 0 1 9


PAG E 1 9 OF 19