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Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Capstone Project 2019 – Overview

1. Introduction and Project Overview ..............................................................................................................2


2. Project Coordinators ...................................................................................................................................2
3. Primary Academic Lecturers and Technical Advisors ................................................................................2
4. Supporting Consulting Engineers ...............................................................................................................3
5. Due Dates for Formal Deliverables.............................................................................................................3
6. Lectures, Design Office Sessions, and Learning Approach .......................................................................4
7. Progress and Assessment ..........................................................................................................................4
7.1. Technical Scope and Project Proposal (10%) .....................................................................................4
7.1.1. Weeks 1 & 2 – Preparation for Week 3 submission ....................................................................4
7.1.2. Week 3 – Submission ..................................................................................................................5
7.2. Team Presentation and Q&A, “40% Design” Report (15%) ................................................................5
7.2.1. Weeks 3 to 6 – Preparation .........................................................................................................5
7.2.2. Week 6 – Submission- Interim Client Presentation .....................................................................5
7.3. Preliminary Report (5%) ......................................................................................................................6
7.3.1. Weeks 7, 8, and 10 – Preparation ...............................................................................................6
7.3.2. Week 10 – Submission ................................................................................................................6
7.4. Final Report (60%) ..............................................................................................................................6
7.4.1. Weeks 11 and 12 – Preparation ..................................................................................................6
7.4.2. Week 12 - Submission .................................................................................................................7
7.5. Presentation and Team Interview (10%) .............................................................................................7
7.5.1. Week 12 or Week 13 – Submission ............................................................................................7
8. Technical Sub-Discipline Expectations and Resources .............................................................................9
8.1. Water Engineering ...............................................................................................................................9
8.2. Construction Management ............................................................................................................... 10
8.3. Geotechnical Engineering ................................................................................................................ 12
8.4. Transportation Engineering .............................................................................................................. 13
8.5. Environmental and Resource Management ..................................................................................... 14
8.6. Structural Engineering (Including Bridge Design) ............................................................................ 15

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Capstone Project 2019 – Overview – Page 1
1. Introduction and Project Overview
Welcome to the Capstone Project. This is your key reference document for the project deliverables and
schedule.
Students are to work as a team and develop a feasible design proposal for Ōrākei Station to Tamaki Drive
Shared Path (Stage 4 of the Glen Innes to Tamaki Drive Shared Path). A walkway and cycleway that runs
from Ōrākei Train Station across Purewa Stream alongside Ngapipi Road (including water edge section) to
Tamaki Drive on the Auckland city waterfront. This will be a preliminary design which will require near final
alignment and near final sizing, but will not require detailed design. Your goal should be to design each
component of the project to a level of detail that will allow a reasonable construction cost estimate to be
developed, and for your client to make informed decisions about how to move the project forward.
This project is happening in real time using data from 2018 and 2019 on-site investigations. This project has
a range of possible solutions and conflicting constraints. Within your team, you will allocate specific roles for
each team member, but all students will need to be familiar with all aspects of the project, design process, and
the team “design office” procedures. Your team will visit the site, evaluate all the information provided, consider
options and propose a viable design solution. Appropriate technical validation supported by calculations will
be required, but detailed calculations are not the focus of what will be evaluated. Your team should focus on
the development of a concise report which integrates each of the technical sub-disciplines into a cohesive,
client-focused report summarising the key aspects of your proposed solution.

2. Project Coordinators

Name Email Role

Hugh Morris hw.morris@auckland.ac.nz Project Coordinator

Andrew C. Brown a.c.brown@auckland.ac.nz Project Coordinator

3. Primary Academic Lecturers and Technical Advisors

Name Email Technical Specialisation

Seosamh Costello s.costello@auckland.ac.nz Transport and Pavements

Prakash Ranjitkar p.ranjitkar@auckland.ac.nz Transport and Pavements

Vicente Gonzalez v.gonzalez@auckland.ac.nz Project Management

Yang Zou yang.zou@auckland.ac.nz Project Management

Ken Elwood k.elwood@auckland.ac.nz Structures

Charlotte Toma Charlotte.Toma@auckland.ac.nz Structures

Bruce Melville bw.melville@auckland.ac.nz Hydrology, Scour, Maritime

Kobus van Zyl k.vanZyl@auckland.ac.nz Hydrology, Scour, Maritime

Naresh Singhal n.singhal@auckland.ac.nz Environmental

Tumanako Faaui t.faaui@auckland.ac.nz Environmental

Michael Pender m.pender@auckland.ac.nz Geotechnical

Andrew C. Brown a.c.brown@auckland.ac.nz Geotechnical

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Capstone Project 2019 – Overview – Page 2
4. Supporting Consulting Engineers
Special thanks to GHD ( www.ghd.com ) for their support in providing data, assisting with setting up this project,
and contributing to the student experience. Thanks also to Auckland Transport for their permission as GHD’s
client for the project to be run this year. Additional consulting engineersmay assist during design office sessions
throughout the semester; their contributions to the course are very much appreciated.

Company Name Role

GHD Priyanka Patel Project Engineer, Infrastructure Delivery

GHD Gansen Govender Senior Project Manager, Infrastructure Delivery

5. Due Dates for Formal Deliverables


The table below lists the due dates for the formal deliverables in the Capstone Project 2019. Note that in
addition to these dates, the Part IV Projects final report is due on 27 September 2019, Systems Week is
scheduled for 30 September 2019 to 4 October 2019, and the Part IV Projects presentation day is on 12 October
2019. There will be many competing constraints on your time at the end of the semester; therefore,
making substantial progress at the beginning of the semester is imperative.

% of
Due Date(s) Submission Final Submission Location
Mark
Friday, 2 August 2019,
Project Site Visit -- Project Site
7:30am – 11:00am
Friday, 9 August 2019, Technical Scope and
10 Submitted electronically on Canvas
4:00pm (Week 3) Project Proposal
Friday, 30 August 2019,
Presentation and Q&A Tutorial room
9:00am (Week 6)
15(1)
Friday, 30 August 2019,
“40% Design” Report Submitted electronically on Canvas
4:00pm (Week 6)

Friday, 11 October 2019,


Preliminary Report 5 Submitted electronically on Canvas
9:00am (Week 10)

Thursday, 24 October Submitted electronically on Canvas


Final Report 60(2)
2019, 12:00pm (Week 12) -AND- Hardcopy delivered to SSS
Friday, 25 October 2019 Assigned room (may or may not be
(Week 12) Presentation and Team tutorial room). Some teams will
10(1,2)
Tuesday, 29 October 2019 Interview present on 19 October and the
(Study Break / Week 13) remainder will present on 24 October.

NOTES:(1) Presentations will include an individual score that contributes 5% towards the final mark.

(2) The final report will include technical appendices with individual contributions noted, student marks
will include an individual proportional weighting based on the appendices to which they contributed.
The final report will additionally be modified by a peer assessment factor which could reduce an
individual share of the marks. The team interview will evaluate students overall understanding of the
project and confirm the validity of the peer assessment

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Capstone Project 2019 – Overview – Page 3
6. Lectures, Design Office Sessions, and Learning Approach
Students are expected to attend all lectures and to be aware of all presented content even if they are focussed
on one sub-discipline.

Lecture
Time Purpose
Room
303-G20 Tuesdays
Lectures and Tutorial Sessions
(PLT1) 9:00am – 10:00am
OGGB 4 Friday 26 July 2019
Special Week 1 Friday Lecture
(260-073) 9:00am – 10:00am
OGGB 4 Friday 9 August 2019
Special Week 3 Friday Lecture
(260-073) 9:00am – 10:00am

303-G14

303-G15

303-G16
Fridays
Design Office Sessions
9:00am – 11:00am
119-110

119-130

119-G30

This course is intended to be a simulation of a design office experience, working in a team on a specific open
ended project that must achieve real coordinated outcomes. Students will largely self-direct their learning
based on previous coursework and extend their technical knowledge specific to the project and apply it to their
design. Students will manage their team and take advantage of the available resources including specialist
staff and consulting engineers. Make use of the technical advisors available. You are to seek their help and
make specific requests for all aspects of the project. There will be some casual advice provided, but it is your
responsibility to seek the information you need to make progress.

It is expected that the “Design Office” on Friday will be attended as an employee obligation; otherwise,
appropriate notification and alternative arrangements should be made with your team leader. The various
components of the project are very interdependent, requiring close coordination and communication between
team members from various sub-disciplines. Independent progress will need to be made outside of the “Design
Office” time, with the “Design Office” session serving as a weekly opportunity for a formal team meeting and
collaborative work.

The project outcomes will be largely assessed based on the submission of a team report. This will include
individual and team components of the mark and will include a peer assessment factor. The processes and
performance of the team as noted in the course outline will be evaluated in all the assessments and also in
observed roles that are undertaken.

7. Progress and Assessment


7.1. Technical Scope and Project Proposal (10%)
7.1.1. Weeks 1 & 2 – Preparation for Week 3 submission
Update your individual CV content based on what you submitted for Team Formation, but more focussed on
what evidence you would want to give your client about your capabilities (examples on Canvas). Your team is
to make a preliminary evaluation of the technical and support material provided for the project and determine
the amount of work they can accomplish in each of the technical areas. Your team is to assign a team leader

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Capstone Project 2019 – Overview – Page 4
and collectively agree on the roles all team members will undertake to complete the minimum tasks required
for the final Report. These may change with time, but need to be proposed for the most effective performance
of your team to the best of your initial project understanding.

7.1.2. Week 3 – Submission


On Friday of Week 3, the team is to submit:
1) A document that overviews the Scope of the project and what tasks will be required to complete the
report. This document should include an overview of who will undertake each task in order to deliver
a concise, well targeted, and technically sound final report. It should also include who is going to take
what leadership/management roles within the team, a simple work timeline, and a table showing the
time allocations to a maximum of 100 hours per person, to be charged at $170 per hour.
2) A well formatted CV for each team member, two sides of A4 maximum (about 1 page pure text)
including what capabilities you have developed from relevant courses, and other relevant experience
or special skills.
3) A bullet point list of the key drawings, illustrations, photographs and tables you propose for the body
your final report (There will be additional content in appendices). Note what key resources you plan to
use beyond what are listed in the course information.
4) A covering proposal letter to “the client” (UOA City Transport Corporation) in response to the Request
for Proposal (RFP). The letter should concisely explain what you understand to be the key objectives
of the project, the work you are going to undertake, the general overview of what will be provided in
the final report, and your price to undertake the work. (Two A4 pages maximum in formal letter layout.)
This is a well structured, non-technical explanatory summary of the work product you propose to deliver
to the client – not a sales pitch for your services.

There needs to be adequate detail in this document for the staff and review panel to consider if your proposed
work plan is adequate for a high quality output, or to give feedback or indicate where it is over-ambitious or
lacking in detail. Note that students will be expected to keep timesheets, so time allocations at this stage should
be as realistic as possible (also note that it is generally better to overestimate your time allocation at the pricing
stage). The document should be submitted to Canvas in the form of a single compiled PDF file.

7.2. Team Presentation and Q&A, “40% Design” Report (15%)


7.2.1. Weeks 3 to 6 – Preparation
The provided technical and support documents should be thoroughly reviewed for the project data relevant to
your proposed solution. The data should be fully evaluated and a detailed programme of work confirmed within
the team. Where additional information is required, students need to identify how (or if) they can obtain that
information, what additional skills they need to learn, and make early information requests to the client for
additional information.

Preliminary proposals for how your team will approach the design alternatives should be developed and
integrated. Key decisions for each aspect need to be mapped so that dependencies are clear and are
anticipated (e.g. where geotechnical decisions could impact the structural engineering, or where hydrology
could change alignment etc.) Each member should be progressing the design of their individual components,
with special consideration given to how they will be integrated into the overall structure of the final report.

7.2.2. Week 6 – Submission- Interim Client Presentation


On Friday of Week 6, roughly half the team (likely 4 people from a team of 9) are to present for a maximum of
15 minutes, using PowerPoint or similar presentation software. The team is to provide a fully legible PDF
softcopy of the presentation on CANVAS 24 hours ahead. Additionally, a “40% Design” report should be
provided separately as a single PDF file on Canvas for evaluation and feedback. At the “40% Design” stage,
the overall structure of the team’s design report and proposed solutions should be taking shape, and a few
simple “back of the envelope” calculations to determine feasibility of proposed solutions should be near
complete. The main purpose of the “40% Design” report is to provide the client with a document to supplement
your presentation and allow them a chance to evaluate your project plans in big picture terms. Most of the
report will be 40% complete with the two most advanced technical sub-disciplines providing indicative technical

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Capstone Project 2019 – Overview – Page 5
detail at the “80% Design” stage. All the technical aspects of your solutions can be refined during the
preparation of your preliminary report.

The presentation is to a panel of advisors and others, and is to include:


1) An overview of:
o The project;
o The social, political and environmental context; and
o The technical work proposed
2) A progress report on the technical work and issues faced
3) Near final details on approximately 40% of the final report content and two technical appendices
4) A forward-looking update on:
o What is going to be achieved by final report submission;
o The time/budget spent compared to the proposed timeline; and
o An evaluation of the roles being undertaken and their effectiveness

Four team members should contribute to the verbal presentation, and they should indicate the roles and project
contributions of the non-speakers. The panel will then provide feedback and engage in a question and answer
session with the entire team for about 15 minutes following the presentation.

The presentation assessment will include a team mark and an individual mark for presenters, the weighting will
be approximately 5% (of overall course mark), those who do not present t.

7.3. Preliminary Report (5%)


7.3.1. Weeks 7, 8, and 10 – Preparation
During these three weeks, all the technical work should be completed, with photographs, diagrams, tables and
drawings near complete. The structure of the report should be final and all the background data evaluation
and introductory work should be completed. The body of the report should include a number of clear
illustrations to quickly orient the reader to your key design decisions. These illustrations need to make the
concepts clear to your client, but do not need to be technical drawings.

Note that Systems Week is in Week 9, and you will therefore have limited opportunities during that week to
make progress on Capstone tasks; you should budget your time accordingly during Weeks 7, 8, and 10.

7.3.2. Week 10 – Submission


On Friday of Week 10, the team is to submit:

1) A single page summary of the team’s progress to date and what remains to be done;
2) A Table of Contents for the Report (page numbers not needed) which should include all
headings/subheadings to clearly indicate the full report structure;
3) A fully formatted draft of several sections of the final report body, including introductory material
and key tables/diagrams/drawings; and
4) One complete sub-discipline appendix of the final report

Your file should be submitted electronically on Canvas as a single compiled PDF file. This preliminary report
will receive some rapid preliminary feedback in Week 11 to help with your efforts in bringing together the final
report.

7.4. Final Report (60%)


7.4.1. Weeks 11 and 12 – Preparation
During these two weeks, all technical work should be complete and the team should focus their efforts on
bringing their work together into a concise, well-structured report which allows the client to easily understand
the key objectives, conclusions, and results of the team’s design process. The report should not include dense
technical discussion or detailed calculations; technical details of the project’s design approach are to be

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Capstone Project 2019 – Overview – Page 6
compiled into technical appendices which would be suitable for a specialist reviewer to quickly check that the
proposed design solutions are fundamentally and technically sound.

7.4.2. Week 12 - Submission


The final team report is to be well structured and well formatted with adequate white space, submitted in both
electronic form (as a single compiled PDF file to Canvas) and one hardcopy (to be delivered to the Student
Services Stall on Level 3). Note that there will be major penalties for late submission. Minimum
requirements and contents for the report are:

1) Bound, A4 pages, 10-pt minimum font size. Use an appropriately sized comb binding (or similar).
Do not leave report binding and assembly until the last minute; the professionalism and quality of
your final product will be adversely affected if it is hastily assembled and bound.
2) Formal cover page
3) List of authors
4) Executive Summary (2 pages)
5) Table of Contents
6) Major sections and subsections clearly identified. In total, the report should contain about 20-30
pages of concise, well-written text, diagrams, and tables. Emphasis should be placed on
organisation, structure, and clarity rather than attempting to maximise the amount of information
provided.
7) Technical drawings, formal illustrations, and/or site photographs
8) References – Technical references with any formal referencing system. Technical appendices
may contain their own lists of references.
9) Appendix A – Team Management Details:
a. A1 Time summary for personnel and consulting cost compared with price
b. A2 Typical timesheet
c. A3 Meeting minutes for a typical meeting
d. A4 CV’s of all Team members (appropriate to the project)
e. A5 List of each authors written contributions and team roles undertaken, including a roughly
200-word statement on the team structure and way of working
10) Appendix B – List of files and supplementary documents which do not form part of the final report
11) Appendices C (and more) – Technical Appendices: each appendix should represent one major
sub-discipline, and should contain the major technical details supplementing the report, along with
summary calculations and the relevant details of more highly technical calculations. Technical
appendices should be well structured and organised, and should provide a deeper technical
background to the key aspects of the project. As with the report, the emphasis in technical
appendices should be on organisation, structure, and clarity, rather than attempting to generate as
much information as possible. The technical appendices should be less than approximately 60
pages total with no more than 20 pages in any individual appendix.

12) Electronic Compendium – Where technical work has involved substantive calculations, data sets
or support material that would be too extensive or repetitive for the Appendices this may be
optionally submitted as a pdf document on CANVAS. It should be one document which is a
compilation of each clearly designated sub-discipline that requires compendium additions. This
will not be specifically marked and only viewed for further confirmation of points in the
appendices.

7.5. Presentation and Team Interview (10%)


7.5.1. Week 12 or Week 13 – Submission
On either Friday of Week 12 or Tuesday of Week 13 (some teams will present in Week 12, the remainder in
Week 13), the four or five team members who did not present in Week 6 will deliver a 15 minute presentation,
followed by a 30 minute interview to be conducted with all team members. Prior to this presentation, each team
member will be asked to submit a confidential peer evaluation to measure the relative contributions of each
team member (more specifics on the peer evaluation will be provided mid-semester). The main purpose of the
presentation and team interview is to summarise your key project outcomes, to evaluate what you have learnt

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Capstone Project 2019 – Overview – Page 7
as part of the Capstone project, and for advisors to get a sense of team dynamics and individual contributions
to supplement the peer evaluations. Any materials not included in the final report should be available in
hardcopy (4 copies) and also submitted electronically on Canvas a fully legible PDF softcopy.

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Capstone Project 2019 – Overview – Page 8
8. Technical Sub-Discipline Expectations and Resources
8.1. Water Engineering
8.1.1. Overview
The water engineering considerations for the project are aimed at ensuring that the shared path and supporting
structures are not subjected to undue risk due to either rainfall or oceanic effects. These factors will be
important in determining the level of the shared path and protection against damage due to storm events.

8.1.2. Specific Deliverables


For the 2019 project, the following aspects need to be considered:

• Prevent damage to the project due to storm water flooding events.


o Identify critical points where flooding damage can occur.
o Estimate appropriate flood levels at these points.
o Design considerations to ensure that the project can deal with these events.

• Prevent damage to the project due to sea level factors. Consider the following factors:
o Tides
o Storm surge
o Wave action
o Climate change

8.1.3. Relevant Courses


Previous courses that have key information for the capstone design project are:
• Open channel hydraulics (CIVIL 331)
• Flood estimation (ENVENG 333)

8.1.4. Resources and References


Resources and references relevant to this project include:
• Auckland Council, “Guidelines for stormwater runoff modelling in the Auckland Region,” TP 108,
Auckland Regional Council, April 1999;
• Ministry for the Environment, Guidance for local government on preparing for climate change:
o http://www.mfe.govt.nz/climate-change/technical-guidance/guidance-local-government-
preparing-climate-change
• NIWA 2013 Storm tide for the Auckland region
• Auckland Council, Coastal Inundation by Storm-tides and Waves in the Auckland Region, June 2016,
Technical Report 2016/017:
o https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/environment/what-we-do-to-help-
environment/Documents/coastal-inundation-in-auckland.pdf
• Auckland Council Topographic and Hydrological maps:
o https://geomapspublic.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/
• Auckland Unitary Plan:
o http://unitaryplan.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz
• Fahy, F., Irving, P., Johns, S. (compilers) 1990. Coastal Resource Inventory; First Order Survey;
Auckland Conservancy

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Capstone Project 2019 – Overview – Page 9
8.2. Construction Management
8.2.1. Overview
For the construction management component of the Civil capstone project, students should be able to:

• Integrate aspects of construction techniques and methodology (including temporary traffic


management) with the developed design for the case study project.
• Demonstrate an appreciation of key aspects of safety in design to mitigate construction safety risks
and also consider whole of life safety for ongoing maintenance and operation of the case study project.
• Undertake appropriate assessment of stakeholder requirements and integrate key requirements with
the developed design for the project.
• Undertake high-level cost estimates for the project and understand trade-offs between design,
planning, and cost constraints.

8.2.2. Specific Deliverables


In order to assess the above, the following deliverables are proposed as part of the overall Report:
• A construction sequence proposal outlining the key stages and construction methods proposed. Visual
aids should be provided to allow for a clear explanation of the construction method. Additionally, a
Gantt Chart with the main construction stages should be provided.
• A safety in design risk management register / plan. Identify the top 10 hazards, and include this in the
main body of the report.
• A stakeholder analysis
• A draft project construction budget (first draft high level using standardized rates), using the Cost
Estimation Manual (SM014) from New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA), focusing on a Pre-Design
Estimate level of detail.
• Manage a consulting design fee via series of timesheets (fee report)
• Decision-making matrix to document the different options developed, and a rationale of how an option
is selected as the best.
• Provide project progress reports as requested during the semester.

8.2.3. Relevant Courses


Materials taught in the following courses are relevant for addressing the construction management issues
explored in this Capstone course. These courses include (but not necessarily limited to) the following:
• ENGGEN 303 and 403 (Systems): Stakeholders, commercial management, complexity and ambiguity
(systems thinking), inventive problem solving (TRIZ), project management, teamwork and
interpersonal skills.
• CIVIL 791 (Construction Management): Construction management, risk management, health and
safety, cost estimating, financial management.
• CIVIL 709 (Cost Engineering): Construction engineering cost planning.
• CIVIL 790 (Civil Administration): Procurement, Construction contracts, Construction Contracts Act,
Resource Management Act (RMA).

8.2.4. Resources and References


Resources and references relevant to this project include:
• Lecture notes for relevant courses listed above
• Harris, Frank. (2013). Modern construction management (7th ed.). Hoboken, N.J.: Hoboken, N.J.:
Wiley-Blackwell 2013.
• Knutson, Kraig, & Schexnayder, Cliff J. (2009). Construction management fundamentals (2nd ed.).
Boston: McGraw-Hill Higher Education.
• NZTA (2010). Cost Estimation Manual SM014. New Zealand Transport Agency.
o https://www.nzta.govt.nz/assets/resources/cost-estimation-manual/docs/cost-estimation-
manual-sm014.pdf
• NZTA Elemental Cost Database:
o https://www.nzta.govt.nz/assets/resources/cost-estimation-manual/docs/SM014-elemental-
costing-database.xlsx

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Capstone Project 2019 – Overview – Page 10
• Rawlinson & Co. (2013). Rawlinson's New Zealand Construction Handbook. Auckland, N.Z.:
Rawlhouse Publishing 1986-2013.
• Hendrikson, C. {1998). Project Management for Construction: Fundamental Concepts for Owners,
Engineers, Architects and Builders. First Edition originally printed by Prentice Hall, ISBN 0-13-731266-
0. https://www.cmu.edu/cee/projects/PMbook/
• HSE, Health and Safety in Construction, Health and Safety Executive {HSE). Available at:
https://www.preston.gov.uk/GetAsset.aspx?id=fAAyADMA00A2ADMAfAB8AFQAcgB1AGUAfAB8AD
AAfAA1

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Capstone Project 2019 – Overview – Page 11
8.3. Geotechnical Engineering
8.3.1. Overview
For the Geotechnical Engineering component of a Civil capstone project it would be expected that the project
would cover interpretation of results of laboratory testing and ground investigation (borehole logs, CPT, SPT,
etc.), consolidation and seepage, bearing capacity, foundation design, slope stability analysis and design of
retaining structures.

8.3.2. Specific Deliverables


For the 2019 project these specific points need to be considered:
• Design of bridge and walkway foundations and/or abutments
• Design of retaining walls and engineered fill (if applicable)
• Estimation of shear strength parameters from in-situ and lab tests

8.3.3. Relevant Courses


Previous courses that have key information for the capstone design project are:
• CIVIL322 (Geomechanics 2)
• CIVIL721 (Foundation Engineering)
• CIVIL722 (Slope Engineering)
• CIVIL741 (Ground Improvement Engineering)

8.3.4. Resources and References


Resources and references relevant to this project include:
• CIVIL322, CIVIL721 course notes
• Naval Facilities Engineering Command (1986). DESIGN MANUAL 7.02 - Foundations & Earth
Structures http://www.geotechnicaldirectory.com/publications/Dm702.pdf
• Washington State Department of Transportation (2013) Geotechnical Design Manual
http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/Publications/Manuals/M46-03.htm
• Lancellotta, R. (2008). Geotechnical Engineering, Second Edition, CRC Press.
• Other geotechnical engineering textbooks books available in the library or geotechnical design
manuals available on the internet.

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Capstone Project 2019 – Overview – Page 12
8.4. Transportation Engineering
8.4.1. Overview
For the Transportation Engineering components of a Civil Engineering capstone project, it would be expected
that the project would include traffic measurements and studies, highway capacity and level of service, traffic
signal design and operations, facilities for public transport and active modes, the design of the horizontal and
vertical alignment, cross-section details and pavement materials and thicknesses.

8.4.2. Specific Deliverables


For the 2019 project, these specific points are the minimum that would need to be considered:
• Calculations of delays and level of service for different road uses at intersections
• Design of facilities for cyclists and pedestrians at intersections based on design guidelines
• Horizontal alignment calculations and drawings
• Vertical alignment calculations and drawings
• Typical cross sections
• Pavement materials and thicknesses

8.4.3. Relevant Courses


Previous courses that have key information for the capstone design project include:
• Civil 360 (Transportation Engineering 1)
• Civil 361 (Transportation Engineering 2)
• Civil 758 (Traffic Systems Design)
• Civil 759 (Highway and Transportation Design)

8.4.4. Design Standards and Supporting Literature


The Design Standards and Guidelines referred to below should form the basis for development of the basic
design parameters and assumptions for the project. The various publications, principally published by
Auckland Transport, NZTA and AUSTROADS set standards and guidelines for road projects in New Zealand.
Key among these are:

• Auckland Transport
o Auckland Transport Code of Practice (especially Chapter 12 Footpaths and Pedestrian
Facilities and Chapter 13 Cycling Infrastructure Design)
• AUSTROADS
o Guide to Road Design Series (especially Part 6A: Paths for Walking and Cycling)
o Cycling Aspects of Austroads Guides (2017)

The following may also provide some useful information:

• NZ Transport Agency
o NZTA Pedestrian Planning and Design Guide
o NZTA Cycling Network Guidance
• Auckland Transport
o Auckland Transport Roads and Streets Framework

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Capstone Project 2019 – Overview – Page 13
8.5. Environmental and Resource Management
8.5.1. Overview
The environmental and resource management considerations for the project are aimed at ensuring that the
potential adverse effects associated with the project are identified and addressed. Addressing these factors
are a legal requirement to gain resource consent to undertake the project, and will be important to assess the
relative benefits of potential options.

8.5.2. Specific Deliverables


For the Environmental Effects and Resource Management component of the 2019 Civil Engineering capstone
project report, the following deliverables are proposed:

• Prepare an assessment of environmental effects (AEE), within which you will:


o Describe and analyse the state of the pre-existing environment;
o Identify the potential environmental effects associated with the construction and operation of
the project, across all stages;
o Evaluate the identified potential adverse effects and propose measures to avoid, remedy or
mitigate;
o Demonstrate understanding of the relevant environmental statutory considerations relating to
different construction actions and the potential adverse effects; and
o Compare relative effects across the different options considered.

For the 2019 project these specific points need to be considered:


• Local communities and mana whenua
• Pedestrians
• Ecology
• Flooding
• Large trees and vegetation

8.5.3. Relevant Courses


Previous courses that have key information for the capstone design project include:
• ENVENG 244 (Environmental Engineering 1)
• ENVENG 333 (Engineering Hydrology)
• ENVENG 701 (Urban Stormwater Management)
• CIVIL 790 (Civil Administration)

8.5.4. Resources and Supporting Literature


The guidelines and statutory documents referred to below should help form the basis for development of the
AEE produced for the report:

• Auckland Council
o Auckland Unitary Plan 2016
o Te Aranga Principles - Auckland Design Manual

• Ministry for the Environment


o Resource Management Act 1991
o Local Government Act 2002
o A Guide to Preparing a Basic Assessment of Environmental Effects
o New Zealand Urban Design Protocol

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Capstone Project 2019 – Overview – Page 14
8.6. Structural Engineering (Including Bridge Design)
8.6.1. Overview
For the Structures component of a Civil Capstone project, it would be expected that the project would cover
determining the general structural form of a bridge, determining the size of key members, pile caps and
abutments, the general structure of the walkway over the water, and retaining wall structure near the train
station. Assumptions will need to be made for initial concept development once a preliminary location is
determined.

8.6.2. Specific Considerations


The following information will be required from your team to develop your preliminary design for your initial
concepts:
• Plan location, proposed alignment and elevations of shared path
• Maximum and minimum deck level, Maximum and minimum underside levels
• Limitations on pier or pile locations
• Width of pavement
• Construction limitations and site access
• Durability assessment

The Preliminary Design will include:


• Loadings, configuration and design constraints from the NZTA Bridge Design Manual or similar
• A feasible structural concept with plan view sketched showing abutments and piers
• Material types determined and major components sized to a level of precision suitable for costing
• An elevation view of the proposal showing all major components
• Two or more cross sections of the structure developed illustrating key features
• Calculations supporting approximate sizing of abutments, piles, beams elements, retaining structure
and piers
• Calculations for the main longitudinal and lateral steel content if a concrete structure is used
• A review and proposed protection system

8.6.3. Relevant Courses


Courses that have key information for the capstone design project include:
• CIVIL 313 (Structures and Design 3)
• CIVIL 715 (Advanced Structural Concrete)
• CIVIL 713 (Structures and Design 4)
• CIVIL 721 (Foundation Engineering)

8.6.4. Resources and References


Earlier Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering course references are:
• NZ Standard for Design of Structural Steel 3404:1997
• NZ Standard for Design Concrete Structures 3101:2006.
• NZ Standard for Design of Timber Structures 3603: 1993

It is anticipated (and hoped) that student teams will draw on their knowledge from all previous taught courses
in Civil and Environmental Engineering. Students are expected to identify, source and utilise any relevant
resources for the project such as nationally and internationally accepted standards, code of practice, or
guidance document.

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Capstone Project 2019 – Overview – Page 15