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How to Use This Manual

We want you to use this manual as a study guide when you watch the videos and do the workouts yourself.
Remember, it is important that you are able to cue and demonstrate each exercise and provide a progression/
regression when asked. It may be worth printing this manual out, writing notes in the margins, and having it open
while you take your written test.

We hope that this manual is something you are proud to keep on your book shelf and reference frequently
throughout your career.

Written Exam Checklist:


( ) I watched all 45 practical exam exercise videos
( ) I watched all 5 level 1 lectures
( ) I read the manual thoroughly
( ) I read/highlighted important topics from Coach Boyle’s Book Advances in Functional Training
( ) I understand that I need an 80 to pass (40 correct out of 50 questions) and there is a $25 retake fee

Practical Exam Checklist:


( ) I completed the example 4 - week Training Program provided for me in my sign-up email which is also
located under the “Documents” tab “Level 1 Reading Material” online
( ) I passed my written exam
( ) I have a full understanding of the progression/regression sheet, the coaches cues for each exercise,
and how to perform each exercise
( ) I re-watched all the exercise videos

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Table of Contents
Mission Statement .......................................................................................................................... pg. 6
Core Values .................................................................................................................................... pg. 6
Origin Story .................................................................................................................................... pg. 7
Who is Mike Boyle? ........................................................................................................................ pg. 8
Your Instructors .............................................................................................................................. pg. 9 - 10
The Goal ........................................................................................................................................ pg. 11
The Certification Process ............................................................................................................... pg. 11 -13
The Written Exam ........................................................................................................................... pg. 11
The Practical Exam ........................................................................................................................ pg. 11
Benefits .......................................................................................................................................... pg. 11
The Practical Event Schedule ........................................................................................................ pg. 12
The Practical Event Format ............................................................................................................ pg. 12
Practical Testing Format ................................................................................................................. pg. 12
Practical Test Scoring ..................................................................................................................... pg. 12
Failing the Practical Exam .............................................................................................................. pg. 13
Cancelation and Refund Policy ...................................................................................................... pg. 13
What if I am injured or have a disability? ........................................................................................ pg. 13
Recertification ................................................................................................................................ pg. 13
Common Concepts and Terms Used in the CFSC ........................................................................ pg. 14 - 15
Progressions and Regressions ...................................................................................................... pg. 16 - 17
MBSC Programming Concepts ...................................................................................................... pg. 17
Study Guide Checklist .................................................................................................................... pg. 18
MOVEMENT PREP .................................................................................................................... pg. 19 -33
Foam Rolling ................................................................................................................................ pg. 19
Glutes/Hip Rotators
Quadriceps
Adductors
Lats
Upper Back/Traps
Stretching/Mobility ....................................................................................................................... pg. 20
90/90 Hip Stretch
Spiderman Stretch
Quad T-spine Rotation
V-stance T-Spine Rotation
Ankle Mobility
Activation ..................................................................................................................................... pg. 21 - 22
Hip Lift Variations
Mini-Band Series

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Motor Control Circuit/FMS Corrective ....................................................................................... pg. 23 - 25
Sandbag Breathing
Shoulder Mobility - Floor Slides
Active Straight Leg Raise - Leg Lower
Rotary Stability - Quadruped Hip Extension
Hurdle Step - Lying Hip Flexion, Push Up Hip Flexion, 1/2 Kneeling Hip Flexion
Dynamic Warm Up ....................................................................................................................... pg. 26 - 29
Squat Matrix
Bear Crawl
Lateral Crawl
Knee Hug
Leg Cradle
Quad Stretch Heel to Butt
Linear Skip
Lateral Skip
High Knee Run
Heels Up Knees Up (Butt Kicks)
Straight Leg Walk
Straight Leg Skip
Shuffle
Carioca
Ladder Drills ................................................................................................................................. pg. 30
In-In-Out-Out
1-2-Stick
Cross-In-Front
Cross-Behind
Scissors
Light Implement Power ............................................................................................................... pg. 31 - 33
Medicine Ball Throws
Tall Kneeling Chest Pass
Standing Chest Pass
½ Kneeling Side Toss
Standing Side Toss
Jump Training
Box Jump
Vertical Jump
Lateral Bound
STRENGTH TRAINING ........................................................................................................... pg. 34 - 41
Circuit 1 ........................................................................................................................................ pg. 34 - 35
KB Deadlift/Toe Touch Progressions

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Chin-up
Anti-Extension Series
Circuit 2 ........................................................................................................................................ pg. 36 - 37
Goblet Squat
Push-up
Anti-Rotation Series
Circuit 3 ........................................................................................................................................ pg. 38 - 39
Split Squat
Overheard Pressing
Chop/Lift Series
Circuit 4 ........................................................................................................................................ pg. 40 - 41
Single Leg Deadlift
DB Row
Leg Curl Progressions
Practical Exam Testing Structure and Evaluation Guidelines ....................................................... pg. 42
Example MBSC Adult Program .................................................................................................... pg. 43 - 45
Regression / Progression Sheet .................................................................................................... pg. 46 - 47
CFSC Level 2 ................................................................................................................................ pg. 48 - 49
How do I Host an Event? ............................................................................................................... pg. 49
Partnerships .................................................................................................................................. pg. 50 - 51
Affiliates ......................................................................................................................................... pg. 52
How to Contact Us ........................................................................................................................ pg. 53

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Mission Statement

To provide education for fitness professionals that is up-to-date, applicable, and based both on scientific
evidence and practical experience. Our aim is to demonstrate a systems-based approach to coaching, helping
fitness professionals train anyone in any setting in a safe and productive manner. We hope to raise the bar for
those looking to enter the field of strength and conditioning and personal training.

While much of the fitness industry is focused on selling training tools or capitalizing on training fads,
the Certified Functional Strength Coach Certification focuses on teaching the fundamentals of coaching and
program design. Fundamentals are the foundation on which great, sustainable careers are built. Like many other
certifications, CFSC involves an online test. However, what separates our educational experience is a practical
event that includes a full day of hands on coaching and concludes with a practical coaching examination. In
addition, we are consistently auditing and updating our educational offerings to provide coaches with the best
resources to safely and effectively train clients.

Core Values

1. Up-to-Date Content - We want to provide the most current, evidence-led, experience based content in
the industry. We continue to update our content weekly based on new scientific evidence and coaching practices
to provide the most cutting-edge material for our coaches.

2. Over Delivering - We strive to overdeliver in everything we do. Whether it is customer service, coaching,
or content creation our goal is to go above and beyond expectations.

3. Continuing Education - As coaches we are continually challenging ourselves to learn and grow and
want to provide the same opportunities for every member. A CFSC event marks the beginning of a relationship
with our coaches, not the end. We want to continue providing education and support for every CFSC coach to
improve the industry as best we can.

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Origin Story
Since beginning work on the Certified Functional Strength Coach project back in 2013, our mission has
been to improve the level of practical mastery in the fitness industry and change the way coaches become
professionally certified. This mission was one that was born from our recognition of inadequacy of our current
professional standards.

Many of the popular certification courses for coaches in our industry requires nothing more than
memorizing a text book and taking a computerized exam.

This barrier for entry is embarrassingly low.

We need to demand more from our professional education bodies and raising the barrier or entry to our
field.

From a quick glance, the CFSC may seem like


other certifications out there, but take a closer look
and you will see we are building something that will
revolutionize the fitness industry.

At CFSC, we want to teach you how to blend


the science and art of coaching and the ability to ad-
dress a multitude of situations as they occur on the
training floor. Although we require mastery of theory
and a written exam, to become certified, you are re-
quired to attend a one-day CFSC practical course.

We believe the missing piece of strength and conditioning certifications is the lack of a practical coaching
exam. Passing a written exam may demonstrate your understanding of theory, but it does not mean you are
an effective coach. With the CFSC, we require applicants to not only attend a practical course but also pass
a practical exam at the end of the day. At the one-day course, you will be split into small groups (about 12-15
attendees per coach) that mimic how we run groups at MBSC. We want to ensure every person attending our
course receives the personal attention required to maximize their learning experience. Throughout the day, we
will breakdown the MBSC programming and progression/regression system so you can adapt it to your own
coaching system. Once the training is complete, each attendee will take a practical exam where he/she will be
tested on their ability to demonstrate and coach the basic movement patterns we use at MBSC. The attendee’s
knowledge of the progression/regression system and ability to communicate effectively will also be tested. Upon
passing the Level One course, coaches will be ready to address the daily challenges faced by a personal trainer
or strength and conditioning coach.

In October 2014, we had our very first Certified Functional Strength Coach event. Since then we have certi-
fied over 2,500 coaches in over 10 countries. We plan to continue to raise the bar and develop a skilled network
of coaches that can deliver great demonstrations and provide clear and effective coaching for their clients.

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Who is Mike Boyle?

Michael Boyle is one of the foremost experts in the field of Strength


and Conditioning, functional training, and general fitness. He is known
internationally for his pioneering work and is an in-demand speaker at
Strength and Conditioning conferences and Athletic Training clinics
around the world. Because of his expertise in sports performance training,
Boyle has coached elite athletes on teams such as the Boston Red Sox,
Boston Bruins, New England Revolution, and Boston Breakers as well as
the U.S. women’s Olympic teams in soccer and ice hockey. In 2012, Boyle
joined the Boston Red Sox coaching staff as a Strength and Conditioning
consultant for the team which later won the 2013 World Series. His client
list over the years reads like a “who’s who” of athletic success including retired American football defensive and
Marcellus Wiley, 2012 Olympic judo gold medalists Kayla Harrison, and Liverpool striker Daniel Sturridge.

Boyle was the head strength and conditioning coach at Boston University from 1984 to 1997. From 1990
to 2012 he was the strength and conditioning coach for men’s ice hockey at BU.

Boyle provides performance-enhancement training for athletes of all levels through his Boston-based gym,
Mike Boyle strength and conditioning, which is been named one of America’s 10 Best Gyms buy Men’s Health
magazine. Boyles range of experience includes training athletes from the middle school level to all-stars in most
major professional sports.

Boyles the owner and editor of StrengthCoach.com, a website dedicated to educating straining edition and
coaches and personal trainers.

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Your Instructors

Kevin Carr
coachkevincarr@gmail.com

Brendon Rearick
brendon@rearickstrength.com

Marco Sanchez
marco@bodybyboyle.com

Ken Whittier
kmwhitti16@gmail.com

Kristina Jennings
kristinajennings33@gmail.com

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Vinny Talluto
vincenttalluto@yahoo.com

Stephen Bigelow
stpbigelow@gmail.com

Dan McGinley
danmcginley86@gmail.com

Ana Tocco
toccoana@gmail.com

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The CFSC Manual

This manual has been created for prospective CFSC coaches as a “download” of an MBSC coach’s mind.
This includes the coaching cues, our system of progressions and regressions, a brief look at how we program,
and other frequently asked questions we think are worth covering.

The Goal

After passing the Level One CFSC Certification, you should be able to substitute as a coach for the Adult
Program at Mike Boyle Strength and Conditioning. You will be learning the MBSC programming and coaching
techniques used to build our industry-wide reputation.

The Certification Process

The Written Exam:

Next, you must review the online educational material (practical exam exercise videos, video lectures, and
Coach Boyle’s “Advances in Functional Training” ebook). Once you have done that you must take the Level One
written exam. This exam consists of 50 multiple choice questions based on the previously mentioned material.
A 80% (40 correct answers) is required to pass.

The Practical Exam:

Once you have passed the written exam, you should go into the “Practical Exam Exercise Videos” and
review them thoroughly. The practical exam will consist of these movements as well as their progressions /
regressions. Be sure to note the proper setup of the demonstration as well coaching cues for the movement. For
some of these videos, we also mention common problem situations and how to address them. It is vital that you
view these videos before attending the practical course. It is also HIGHLY suggested that you do the example
four week workout program that is provided to you in the study materials. There is more information about how
the practical exam is administered later in the manual.

Benefits:

After becoming certified you will have access to exclusive CFSC benefits. These benefits are setup to
make sure CFSC coaches have additional motivation to continue to get better. You can access these under
the “Benefits” tab after logging on to the CFSC Website. We currently have partnerships with the following
organizations:

• Precision Nutrition ($400 OFF their Certification) Link : http://get.pn/l1-vip-thrive


• Functional Movement Screen (10% off their Certification and Products) Code: CFSC10
• Perform Better (10% off their online store) Code: CFSC10
• BodyByBoyle Online (50% OFF) Email: support@bodybyboyleonline.com
• Liability Insurance Link: http://www.cphins.com/certified-personal-trainer-cfsc/

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The Practical Event Schedule:
(Schedule may change based on the venue. If this is the case, the updated schedule will be provided via
email. You may also finish earlier based on group size.)

8:00am - Registration
8:30am - 8:45am - Intro/Welcome/Review of Structure for the Day
8:45am - 9:15am - (Block 1) Foam Rolling/Stretching/Activation
9:20am - 9:50am - (Block 2) Motor Control/FMS Correctives
9:55am - 10:25am - (Block 3) Dynamic Warm up
10:30am - 11:00am - (Block 4) Ladders, Light Implement Power (Throwing), Jump Training
11:00am - 11:25am - Q&A/Review
11:30am - 12:10pm - LUNCH/BREAK
12:15pm - 3pm - Strength Training (in 4 Tri-set Blocks)
3pm - 3:15pm - Q&A/Review
3:15pm - 5:30pm - Practical Testing
5:45pm - Closing Remarks/Certificates

The Practical Event Format:

After attendance is taken, you will be put into a group of up to 15 people. You will have the same
instructor for the duration of the event, including practical testing. Within your group, you will be paired up with
another person. Throughout the day you are encouraged to practice demonstrating the movements as well as
the coaching cues with your partner. This will help you better prepare for the practical exam. For each move-
ment during the Strength Training sections, your instructor will explain some common movement issues we see
along with how to correct them. Your instructor will also cover at least one progression and regression for each
baseline movement pattern.

Practical Testing Format:

In the online video library, there is example video of how the practical exam is run. We recommend
watching this so you can better understand the format of the test. The key for the practical exam is to provide
3-4 clear and concise coaching cues. It should not take more than 30 seconds to demonstrate the exercise and
provide the necessary coaching cues to execute the movement correctly.

Practical Test Scoring:

Below you will find the exact testing and scoring structure; every movement will be taken directly from the
online video library. Your instructor will test you on your ability to demonstrate and properly cue the movement
patterns as well as ask for a progression or regression based on a specific scenario.

3 Strength Training Movements


• Total of 3 possible points based on
• Correct demonstration (pass/fail)
• Use of proper coaching cues (pass/fail)
• Correct progression/regression answer (pass/fail)

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2 Movement Drills (Activation/Motor Control/Dynamic Warm Up/Ladder)
• Total of 2 possible points based on
• Correct demonstration (pass/fail)
• Use of proper coaching cues (pass/fail)

You must score 11 out of 13 possible points to pass.

Failing the Practical Exam:

If you do not pass the practical exam, your instructor will explain why and what you must work on. Once
your instructor makes the decision it is final; you cannot retake the practical exam at that event. In the week
following your event, you will receive an email with instructions on how to proceed with the practical exam. If
you choose to continue with the exam, you may submit a video showing competency of the movements and
coaching cues you were marked incorrect for. There is a $100 submission fee.

Cancellation and Refund Policy:

You may cancel your registration up to 30 days before the date of your scheduled event. If you cancel
within 30 days of your event you will be charged a $200 Cancellation Fee and will not be eligible for a refund.
Please contact support@certifiedfsc.com with any questions. Certified Functional Strength Coach reserves the
right to cancel any event up to 30 days prior if the minimum amount of sign-ups is not reached. If CFSC cancels
an event, you will be refunded in full or given the option to transfer payment to a future event.

What if I am injured or have a disability?:

We can accommodate for all injuries and disabilities; that is the beauty of our training system. Please let
us know in advance by emailing support@certifiedfsc.com explaining your situation and the best way we can
help you. We will have your adjusted practical exam and our instructors prepped before the event so you feel
comfortable the entire day.

Recertification:

Your CFSC certification is effective for 3-years. At that point, you have the option to recertify by taking a
new online exam and paying the recertification fee of $99. This includes continued access to the latest study
material and videos so you can stay up to date with how our program and system is evolving. This also includes
a free audit of any level one course of your choosing.

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Common Concepts and Terms Used in the CFSC

PRI and Breathing - PRI stands for the Postural Restoration Institute. In 2014, we began to implement
some concepts learned during multiple PRI courses and in-services given at MBSC. The primary concept we
have adopted is the use of diaphragmatic breathing during movement preparation. Long inhalations with 360
degrees of expansion through the thorax followed by long exhales through pursed lips (or a straw) creating
internal rotation of the ribs can be used to make full use of the diaphragm. We do this to help correct postural
alignment issues. You will see these breathing techniques in a lot of our warmup exercises. We are also experi-
menting with using a set of 5 breaths for certain drills instead of a specific number of reps.

FMS - The Functional Movement Screen was developed by Gray Cook and Lee Burton to help determine
the potential cost of performing movements with an individual based on their movement quality. At MBSC we
execute the full FMS screen with personal training clients while we utilize the concepts of the screen and the
common issues we see in the general population when we develop group programming.

FMS Corrective/Motor Control Circuit - In our warm up we have a section dedicated to motor control
drills based on the Functional Movement Screen. These are a set of drills put together to clear up some of the
common issues we see in the FMS screen with general population clients. Creating a pro-active corrective
exercise system allows us to manage movement dysfunctions more effectively in a group setting.

K.I.S.S. – “Keep it Simple Stupid.” A saying Mike Boyle uses when explaining the beautiful simplicity of the
MBSC program. Basically, why overcomplicate something that doesn’t need to be?

Risk vs Reward - We are always thinking of this concept when building and coaching the program. As
coaches, we cannot take risks that outweigh the reward of the exercise. Always ask yourself: “Is there a safer
way to achieve the same training result/effect?”

The Joint by Joint Approach - The Joint by Joint Approach was conceived by Gray Cook and expanded
on by Mike Boyle. It is a simple concept that breaks down the interconnected functionality of the human joint
system. Based on the ideas in the Joint by Joint, there are certain joint systems that work best a as mobile
system and others that work best as a stable system. The nature of interconnectedness between joints brings
about the idea that if you have discomfort or pain in one joint, you should look at the joint above or below for the
real issue. It could be the lack of mobility or stability in a joint located above or below in the chain causing the
problem. Here is an excerpt from an article Mike wrote on the subject:

The first thing you should notice is the joints alternate between mobility and stability. The ankle needs
increased mobility, and the knee needs increased stability. As we move up the body, it becomes apparent the hip
needs mobility. And so the process goes up the chain - a basic, alternating series of joints.

Joint — Primary Need


Ankle — Mobility (sagittal)
Knee — Stability
Hip — Mobility (multi-planar)

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Lumbar Spine — Stability
Thoracic Spine — Mobility
Scapulo-Thoracic — Stability
Gleno-Humeral — Mobility

The Process is Simple…


Lose ankle mobility, get knee pain
Lose hip mobility, get low back pain
Lose thoracic mobility, get neck and shoulder pain, or low back pain

How Sh*tty is too Sh*tty? - This analogy is in regards to the exercise execution of your group. What level
of exercise form below perfect are you willing to let them get away with? You should always strive for perfection
and try to reduce the risk of potential injury due to improper form as much as possible. Be continually using the
“Sh*t Test”… if it looks athletic, it is athletic. If it looks like sh*t, it is sh*t, so fix it.

Internal vs. External Cues - It is scientifically proven that external cues work better than internal cues. We
try to use as many external cues and analogies as possible when we’re coaching.

External Cueing - An external focus cue directs the client’s attention away from their body. The focus is
instead on the outcome of their movement on the environment.

“Push the floor away from you.”


“Jump and touch the ceiling.”
“Blow out your birthday candles.”
“Stand up like you’re going to be measured.”
“Throw the bar to the sky.”
“Line up like you’re on balance beam.”
“Drive the band out.”
“Break the bar or bell”

Internal Cueing - An internal focus cue directs the client’s attention to his/her body parts and how they
move.

“Externally rotate your hips”


“Extend your leg behind you”
“Activate _________”
“Exhale your ribs down”
“Get your elbows higher”
“Engage your lats”
“Shoulder back, chest out”

During your practical exam, we are much more impressed by your ability to be brief and use analogies
than we are by your knowledge of anatomy and muscle actions. These terms and parts are important for your
knowledge as the coach, but your clients do not understand what you mean or care about these things. The just
want to know what it should look like and the best way to achieve that.

15
Progressions and Regressions

The Progression and Regression system is very much like a playbook. In sports, you are not going to
run the same play for every situation; training is no different. This is where the “Art of Coaching” comes in. In
a perfect world, a client would start with the “baseline” movement, but there are always situations where he/
she may need to begin with a regressed version of that movement pattern. There are some movements with
prerequisites that the client should be able to perform before progressing movement pattern. Here are a few
examples:

· 8 Bodyweight Single Leg Deadlifts before attempting to load the pattern


· 30 second Front Plank before attempting Stability Ball Rollouts

There are also situations when it is best to program variable repetition schemes for bodyweight exercises
that do not allow for increases in load. Here are a few examples:

· Push-ups: Not everyone is going to have a free rack to use small increments of incline if someone cannot
do Push-ups from the ground. Use a rep range of 8-12 reps. The subject must be able to do at least 8 reps at
that position, but encourage them to perform up to 12. If they can do more than 12 reps, progress them to a more
challenging incline.

· Chin-ups: It is very challenging to deload the chin up in small increments, even when you have a variety
of bands. Use a rep range of 5-8 reps. The subject must do at least 5 reps, but is encouraged to do up to 8. If
they can do more than 8 reps, progress them in the loading (or in this case deloading).

Baseline - The baseline movement pattern is the exercise 80% of the people that come into our facility
should be able to perform correctly. Above the baseline, we have the regressions (less challenging), and below,
we have the progressions (more challenging).

Example of the Progressions/Regression Structure:


Assisted Split Squat
Split Squat
Eccentric RFE Split Squat
Goblet RFESS
2 DB RFESS
2 DB RFESS w/a Weighted Vest

Regression - A regression is a less challenging version of a movement pattern. If a client is not able to
perform a baseline movement pattern correctly, we will regress them to an easier, less complex version. One
example of this would be regressing from an Eccentric Rear Foot Elevated Split Squat to a Split Squat.

Progression - A progression is a more challenging version of a movement pattern. If a client excels at the
baseline (or current movement pattern), we will progress them to a more challenging version. One example of
this is going from a Push-up to a Feet Elevated Push-up.

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The implementation and position of the loading can also be a regression/progression. An example of this
would be a moving from the goblet loading position in the Rear Foot Elevated Split Squat to two dumbbells (a
progression). The implementation of loading (or potentially deloading) can also be used as a regression. An
example could be moving a two dumbbell Single Leg Deadlift being to a one dumbbell Single Leg Deadlift.

Lateralization - Lateralizations are not necessarily progressions or regressions. If a client is struggling with
the current movement, we may use a different exercise that is similar to the movement pattern being performed
to teach proper positioning or another skill. An example would be someone who cannot grasp proper torso
position in a Kettlebell Deadlift. We may lateralize to a Goblet Squat which will give them the feedback needed
to keep their chest up and spine in a safe position.

MBSC Programming Concepts

Adult Program - The adult program is constructed for a length of 60-minutes, with about 25 minutes
dedicated to Movement, 25 minutes to Strength Training, and 10 minutes to Conditioning. Our #1 goal with the
Adult Program is to get the clients to come in and say they feel better after each session. It is NOT our goal
for them to come in after each session and say that they could barely walk because they were so sore. With
consistency, our program will make adults will feel better, move better, and improve their fitness.

Exercise Selection - Think movements, not muscles. The programs we use at MBSC consists
mostly of multi-joint movements such as lunges (hip/knee) and chin ups (shoulder/elbow). By doing this, we are
strengthening movements instead of isolating muscles and getting much more “bang for our buck.” Our time is
limited with these individuals so we have to maximize it the best we can.

Tri-set - Much of the strength training in the adult program is structured in tri-sets, or three-exercise circuits
done one after the other and repeated for as many sets as prescribed. This is done to use the space of our
facility and the time we have available as efficiently as possible. We construct the tri-sets with one upper body
movement, one lower body movement, and one core exercise or corrective, with the corrective usually being
associated with one of the exercises in that tri-set. This allows the body parts being trained to recover while the
client performs other movements.

Here is an example of one of our tri-sets:

A1) Chin Up (3x5)


A2) 1 DB Single Leg Deadlift (3x8/side)
A3) Scapular Floor Slides with Exhale (2x5)

Eccentric - When you see “Eccentric” in our program, it is signifying that we want a 5 second controlled
decent. You will most commonly see this the Split Squat variations and Chin-ups. You may think that slowing
the tempo would make it more difficult, but we use it in situations where the client lacks control in the movement
pattern. An example would a client who cannot control their descent in a Split Squat, causing their knee to slam
against the floor.

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How to Use This Manual

We want you to use this manual as a study guide when you watch the videos and do the workouts yourself.
Remember, it is important that you are able to cue and demonstrate each exercise and provide a progression/
regression when asked. It may be worth printing this manual out, writing notes in the margins, and having it open
while you take your written test.

We hope that this manual is something you are proud to keep on your book shelf and reference frequently
throughout your career.

Written Exam Checklist:

( ) I watched all 45 practical exam exercise videos


( ) I watched all 5 level 1 lectures
( ) I read the manual thoroughly
( ) I read/highlighted important topics from Coach Boyle’s Book Advances in Functional Training
( ) I understand that I need a 80 to pass (40 correct out of 50 questions) and there is a $25 retake fee

Practical Exam Checklist:

( ) I completed the example 4 - week Training Program provided for me in my sign-up email which is also
located under the “Documents” tab “Level 1 Reading Material” online
( ) I passed my written exam
( ) Have a full understanding of the progression/regression sheet, the coaches cues for each exercise, and
how to perform each exercise
( ) I re-watched all exercise videos
( ) I understand that I need an 11/13 to pass my practical and there is a $100 retake fee

18
Station 1
Foam Rolling Circuit
Notes:
• Many people will try to roll in the most comfortable/least useful way. It is important to follow the coaching
cues to ensure clients are rolling effectively.
• We try to stick around 10 rolls per muscle due to time constraints. If your client is particularly “tight” in a
certain area, you can spend more time there. However, in order to maintain the flow of a group it may be better
for clients to come in early or stay later for extra soft tissue work.
• Over time, the body adapts to foam rolling. It is a good idea to start everyone with a soft roller, moving to
more dense foam once clients can handle the pressure. Eventually, transitioning to PVC/Trigger Point rollers and
tennis/lacrosse/softballs is an option if clients can tolerate it.
• More is NOT always better; it should be a “hurt so good type of feeling” and never painful to the point
where clients are holding their breath and guarding.

Gluteus Maximus/Hip Rotators


“Sit down on foam roller”
“Cross right leg over left knee”
“Put right hand on the ground behind you”
“Roll the right hip”
“Switch sides and repeat”

Quadriceps
“Lay right leg on top of roller”
“Roll from the top of knee to bottom of hip”
“If needed, pressure can be reduced by placing both legs on roller or opposite leg on ground”
“Switch sides and repeat”

Adductors
“Lay right leg on top of roller with hip and knee at 90 degrees so groin region is on roller”
“Split the upper leg in half”
“Roll from inside of the leg toward the hip”
“Rolls from inside of the leg towards the knee”
“Switch sides and repeat”

Latissimus Dorsi/Posterior Shoulder


“Lay right armpit on roller with arm extended overheard”
“Roll from armpit/back of shoulder to ribcage”
“Keep torso facing the wall in front, not floor”
“Switch sides and repeat”

Upper Back/Trapezius
“Lay upper back/shoulder blades on roller”
“Put hands behind head with elbows pointing up towards ceiling”
“Roll from top of shoulders to bottom of shoulder blades”

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“Do not roll on the neck”
“You can also put arms across body”

Stretching / Mobility Circuit


Notes:
• Like foam rolling, clients will try to stretch in the most comfortable positions possible. Please follow the
cueing below to ensure clients are stretching effectively.
• Use breath to drive the stretch. As clients exhale fully, try to get them to maintain posture and “melt”
deeper into the stretch.
• To build on the above, use a prescribed number of breaths (3-5) with advanced clients instead of time or
repetitions with stretching. With youth athletes, the clock is your best friend, helping keep order and avoid chaos.

90/90 ER/IR Hip Stretch


“Sitting on floor, begin with right hip/knee at 90 degrees in the front and left hip/knee at 90 degrees in the
back”. The front (right) leg should be placed in hip external rotation; back (left) leg placed in hip internal rotation
“Place left hand on right foot and right hand besides right knee. Maintaining neutral posture, bring chest
towards the wall in front of you while pressing front (right) knee into ground. Stretch should be felt in the back of
front hip (glutes/hip external rotators)”
“Place both hands behind back directly next to each hip. Maintaining neutral posture, rotate chest /
shoulders towards back (left) hip while pressing both knees into ground. Stretch should be felt on side of left hip
(hip internal rotators)
“Switch sides and repeat”

Spiderman Stretch
“Start in a pushup position, bringing right foot outside right hand and placing left knee on ground”
“Squeeze back glute and press hips down while bringing chest up”
“With front (right) foot flat, press right elbow into right knee”
• With beginners, hold for a prescribed number of breaths. With advanced clients perform 3-5 repetitions
per side (1 breath then switch)

Quadruped T-Spine Rotations/Rib Rolling


“With shins and shoelaces on ground, sit hips back to heels and place forearms/hands on ground in front
of knees. Spine should be in a flexed/round position”
“Keeping left forearm/hand on ground, grab the left side of the ribcage below chest with right hand”
“Maintaining contact between hips and heels, press left forearm/hand into ground and slowly rotate head
and chest towards the ceiling to the right”
“Perform 5 repetitions per side”

V-Stance T-Spine Rotations


“Spread feet as wide as possible maintaining straight legs and place both hands on ground”
“Press left hand into ground slowly rotate head/chest and right hand toward the ceiling to the right”
“Perform 5 repetitions per side”

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Ankle Mobility
“Standing with both hands against wall, place right foot 6-12” away from wall, with left foot directly behind
and to the side”
“Maintaining heel contact with front (right) foot and a proper arch, slowly press knee towards the wall over
the middle of right foot (3rd/4th toe)”
“Perform 5 repetitions per side”

Glute Activation
Notes:
• The goals of activation drills are to learn correct muscle timing patterns for hip extension/abduction and
establish proper motor control between the hip and lumbar spine. This reduces the risk of lumbar spine and
hamstring injuries as well as provides a good warm-up stimulus.
• “Glute activation” exercise should always be felt in the glutes, never the lumbar spine or hamstrings.

2 Leg Hip Lift


“Lay on back with knees bent to 90 degrees”
“Heels down, toes up”
“Press heels into floor and lift hips towards ceiling while squeezing glutes”
“Perform 10 repetitions”

1 Leg Hip Lift


“Lay on back with knees bent to 90 degrees”
“Heels down, toes up”
“Bring right knee to chest and press left hand into right knee”
“Press left heel into floor and lift hips towards ceiling while squeezing left glute”
“Perform 5 repetitions per side”

Mini-Band Circuit - ER, Squats, Single Leg Hold, Lateral Band Walk

External Rotations
“Place mini-band directly below knees and assume an athletic position with knees slightly bent and hip
pushed back”
“Keeping feet flat on ground, press both knees out against band”
“Maintaining left knee pressure against band and flat feet, drop right knee in towards left knee and then
reverse directions, pressing out against the band to the right”
“Perform 5 repetitions per side”

Squats
“Place mini-band directly below knees and assume an athletic position with knees slightly bent and hip
pushed back”
“While reaching hands out in front, press knees out against band and perform 5 squats without letting band
pull knees together”

Single Leg Holds


“Place mini-band around ankles and assume an athletic position with knees slightly bent and hip pushed
back”

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“Maintaining pressure against band, shift all weight onto right foot, hovering left foot off of ground”
“Hold for 5 seconds, 3 repetitions per side”

Lateral Band Walks


“Place mini-band around ankles and assume an athletic position with knees slightly bent and hip pushed
back”
“Maintaining pressure against band and flat feet, push left foot into ground and step with right foot, moving
body to the right”
“Shoulders and hips stay parallel and level to the floor every step”
“Perform 10 repetitions per side”

Notes on Foam Rolling, Stretching and Activation

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Station 2

Motor Control Circuit/FMS Correctives


Notes
• This is the most coaching intensive portion of the warm up. Begin by coaching breath as the principles of
breathing will carry over into each motor control exercise.
• Corrective exercise is very simply learning to disassociate hips from spine, shoulders from spine, and
shoulder from neck.
• Breathe then move; prioritize spinal position then move limbs.
• Each exercise correlates to a specific FMS screen, underlined above the exercise name. Progressions
with similar cueing are listed instead of repeated.
• There are 7 FMS screens, but only 4 corrective categories listed. The other 3 (Deep Squat, Inline Lunge,
Trunk Stability Push-up) are covered in the Strength Training portion of the course.

Sandbag Breathing
“Lay on back with knees bent to 90 degrees”
“Heels down, toes up”
“Place light sandbag on stomach/belt buckle”
“Inhale through nose for 5 seconds, the bag should rise”
“Exhale through mouth for 10 seconds, the bag should fall”
“Perform 5 breaths”

Shoulder Mobility
Supine Floor Slides
“Lay on back with knees bent to 90 degrees”
“Heels down, toes up”
“Arms/elbows at 90 degrees with fists, wrists, and elbows in contact with ground”
“Inhale through nose”
“Exhale through mouth, sliding arms overhead as far as possible maintaining ground contact with fists,
wrists, and elbows”
“Inhale and bring arms down”
“Perform 5 repetitions”

Progressions: Wall-Slide, Low Velocity OH Movements, High Velocity OH Movements

Active Straight Leg Raise


Supported Leg Lower
“Lay on back with legs straight and super-band around one foot”
“Pull both legs off ground as high as possible keeping both legs 100% straight”
“Inhale through nose”
“Exhale through mouth; slowly lower leg without band towards floor maintaining straight legs”
“Reset and perform 5 repetitions per side”

Progressions: Unsupported Leg Lower, Single Leg Deadlift Patterning

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Rotary Stability
Quadruped Hip Extension from Elbows
“Begin in a quadruped position (all 4’s) with forearms on ground, elbows under shoulders, and knees under
hips”
“Place a pad under ONE knee”
“Inhale through nose”
“Exhale through mouth, slowly raise leg/heel not on pad towards ceiling maintaining a bent knee”
“Only raise leg as far as possible without moving spine”
“Reset and perform 5 repetitions per side”

Progressions: Quadruped Hip Extension from Hands, Quadruped Opposites, Crawling

Hurdle Step
Supine Band Hip Flexion
“Place a light mini-band around feet”
“Lay on back bringing knees to chest past 90 degrees with hands”
“Inhale through nose”
“Extend one leg straight maintain grip on opposite leg”
“Exhale through mouth; try to hold bent leg above 90 degrees and maintain extended leg position”
“Reset and perform 5 repetitions per side”

Valslide Hip Flexion


“Start in push-up position with Slide under one foot”
“Inhale through nose”
“Exhale through mouth, slowly bring Slide knee towards chest without moving spine”
“Reset and perform 5 repetitions per side”

½ Kneeling Wall Hip Flexion


“Facing wall, start in a half kneeling position, straight arms pressing into wall”
“Down knee under hip, front heel under knee, back toe dug into ground”
“Inhale through nose”
“Exhale through mouth, lifting front foot off ground as high as possible without moving spine”
“Reset and perform 5 repetitions per side”

Progressions: Skipping, Sled Work, Sprinting

Notes on Motor Control Circuit/FMS Correctives

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STATION 3

Dynamic Warm-Up
Notes:
• The Dynamic Warm-up serves 3 main purposes: Increase Tissue Temperature, Prime Nervous System
for Training, Practice Movement Patterns being used in the session.

Squat Matrix

Toe Touch to Squat


“Begin standing with feet shoulder width and toes slightly turned out”
“Maintaining straight legs and flat feet, bend down and touch toes”
“Holding toes, slowly pull/lower down into a squat position with elbows inside knees”
“In bottom position, take a full breath and press elbows out against knees”
“Maintaining hold in bottom position, lift both arms overhead one at a time, spreading chest as tall and wide
as possible”
“Stand through heels and return to start position”
“Perform 5 repetitions”

Modifications: Heel board/small plate if heels off ground

Split Squat
“Begin in a half kneeling position with hands behind head, right knee down, and left foot in front”
“Right knee directly below hip, left heel directly below knee”
“Stand up through front heel, slowly lower back to start position”
“Perform 5 repetitions per side”

Modifications: Progressing to Forward Lunge

Lateral Squat
“Begin in a wide stance with legs straight, feet flat, and toes forward”
“While reaching arms forward and maintaining a straight left leg, sit hips back and towards right side, as if
squatting on right leg”
“Stand up through right heel returning to start position”
“Perform 5 repetitions per side”

Modifications: Progressing to Lateral Lunge

Reaching Single Leg Deadlift


“Begin with a soft bend in both knees”
“Maintaining knee bend, reach forward and kick backward with both left arm and leg”
“Left arm and left foot should be as far away as possible from each other; body in a long straight line”
“Press through right heel and return to start position”
“Perform 5 repetitions per side”

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Dynamic Warm-Up

Bear Crawl
“Begin in a quadruped (all 4’s) position with hands under shoulders and knees under hips”
“With small, slow steps crawl forward with opposite arm and leg”
“Steps should be smooth with no choppy or bouncing motion”
“While crawling, picture balancing a glass of water on back, hips should not sway”

Modifications: 4-point crawl (knees off ground), pad on back

Lateral Crawl
“Begin in a push-up position with feet together and hands under shoulders”
“With small, slow steps crawl to right with opposite arm and leg”
“Left arm should cross over right arm while right leg moves to right”
“Right arm and left leg return to start postion”
“Steps should be smooth with no choppy or bouncing motion”
“While crawling, picture balancing a glass of water on back, hips should not sway”
“Return to start crawling to left”

Knee Hug
“Standing tall, grab one knee and pull towards chest with toe up”
“Maintain a tall position without slouching forward, leaning back, or bending down knee”
“Take a few steps forward and switch sides”
“Perform 3-5 repetitions per side”

Leg Cradle
“Standing tall, grab outside right knee and over right shin”
“Twist right leg so that right hand is under knee and left hand is over shin and pull towards chest”
“Maintain a tall position without slouching forward, leaning back, or bending down knee”
“Take a few steps forward and switch sides”
“Perform 3-5 repetitions per side”

Quad Stretch Heel to Butt


“Standing tall, grab one foot and pull back towards butt keeping knees close together”
“Maintain a tall position without slouching forward, leaning back, or bending down knee”
“Take a few steps forward and switch sides”
“Perform 3-5 repetitions per side”

Linear Skip
“Standing tall, march in place with knees towards chest and toes up”
“Begin skipping in place with opposite arm and opposite leg rising”
“Continue skipping forward in a rhythmic motion with opposite arm and leg action”

Lateral Skip
“Standing tall and facing right, march in place with knees towards chest and toes up”

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“Begin skipping in place with opposite arm and opposite leg rising”
“Pushing off right (back) leg, skip left in a rhythmic motion with opposite arm and leg action”
“Return facing same direction pushing off other (left) leg”

High Knee Run


“Run forward with opposite arm and leg action”
“Knees high and toes up”

Heels Up Knees Up (Butt Kicks)


“Run forward with opposite arm and leg action”
“Heels kick straight up to butt and knees come with”

Straight Leg Walk


“Standing tall, kick right leg up as high as possible maintaining a straight leg”
“At highest point, snap leg back down to ground so that feet are next to each other”
“Maintain a tall position without slouching forward, leaning back, or bending down knee”
“Take a few steps forward and switch sides”
“Perform 3-5 repetitions per side”

Straight Leg Skip


“Begin skipping in place with opposite arm and opposite leg rising, maintaining straight legs”
“Continue skipping forward in a rhythmic motion with opposite arm and leg action”

Shuffle
“Begin in an athletic position facing right”
“Pushing off right (back) foot, shuffle left while staying low and not crossing feet”
“Return facing same direction pushing off other (left) leg”

Carioca
“Begin standing tall facing right”
“Move left at a medium speed, alternating crossing right leg in front and behind while turning hips”
“Return facing same direction crossing left leg in front and behind”

Notes on the Squat Matrix and Dynamic Warm Up

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STATION 4

Ladder Drills
Notes:
• Ladder drills serve 3 purposes: Increase Tissue Temperature, Prime Nervous System for Training,
Improve Multi-Planar Coordination.
• Ladders do NOT make you fast.
• Ladders add fun to training.

In-In-Out-Out
“Start with one foot on either side of ladder”
“One at-a-time, bring both feet into the box”
“Then bring both feet out of the box, ending up with each foot outside the next box”
“Continue the length of the ladder and return to start moving backwards if possible”

1-2-Stick
“Start on right side of ladder”
“Bring inside (left) foot into ladder, then outside (right) foot”
“Push out of ladder box with 2nd (right) foot and stick on 1st (left) foot in Single Leg Hold position”
“Hold stick for 2 seconds and continue the length of the ladder alternating sticking sides”
“Return to start moving backwards if possible”

Cross-In-Front
“Start on the right side of ladder”
“Crossing in front of inside leg, bring outside (right) foot into ladder (1)”
“Bring inside (left) foot outside ladder on opposite side (2)”
“Bring foot inside ladder (right) outside, resetting in start position (3)”
“Continue the length of the ladder with the 3-step cadence and return to start moving backwards if possible”

Cross-Behind
“Start on the right side of ladder”
“Crossing behind inside leg, bring outside (right) foot into ladder (1)”
“Bring inside (left) foot outside ladder on opposite side (2)”
“Bring foot inside ladder (right) outside, resetting in start position (3)”
“Continue the length of the ladder with the 3-step cadence and return to start moving backwards if possible”

Scissors
“Start on the right side with feet/body facing ladder”
“Place front (right) foot in the ladder, back (left) foot outside ladder”
“Jump and switch feet so back (left) foot is in ladder, and front (right) foot is outside ladder”
“Continue the length of the ladder with both feet touching each box, front foot first”
“Facing same direction, return to start with left foot in front”

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Light Implement Power

Medicine Ball Throws

Notes:
• Medicine Ball Throws develop Upper-body Power and develop Full-body Coordination.
• We rarely throw Medicine Balls heavier than 10 lbs, with most clients using 6 or 8 lbs.
• Because throwing is power work, our main focus is speed. The best cue will always be “throw the ball as
hard as you can” or “try and break the wall”.
• We usually cap off at 30 throws (3 sets of 10) per session.
• Kneeling variations are used to remove joints from the movement, allowing for easier learning and a lower
stability demand.

Tall Kneeling Chest Pass


“Facing wall, begin with both knees down on pad, with chest tall and back toes dug into ground”
“With ball at chest, bow towards wall pressing hips back towards heels”
“Drive hips forward towards wall, powerfully throwing ball and returning to start position”
“Perform for 10 repetitions”

Standing Chest Pass


“Facing wall, begin in a standing position with ball at chest”
“Bow towards wall pressing hips backwards”
“Drive hips forward towards wall, powerfully throwing ball and returning to start position”
“Perform for 10 repetitions”

½ Kneeling Side Toss


“Sideways to wall, begin in a half kneeling position with right (inside) knee up and left (outside) knee down
with toes dug into ground, holding ball at left hip”
“Rotating through the chest, powerfully throw ball over inside knee at wall, maintaining lower body position.”
“Perform for 5 repetitions per side”

Standing Side Toss


“Sideways to wall, begin in a standing position with right side facing wall”
“Rotating through the hips and chest, powerfully throw ball at wall”
“Perform for 5 repetitions per side”

Jump Training

Notes:
• Plyometrics/Jump Training develop Lower-body Power and Eccentric Strength.
• Learning how to land and control the body eccentrically in bilateral and unilateral positions can safe-guard
clients against lower extremity injury.
• Prioritizing landing mechanics over jump height is always the safest way to train jumping.
• We rarely perform more than 15 foot contacts (per leg) per session.

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Box Jump
“Begin in an athletic position”
“Jump to box, landing softly in the same athletic position”
“Step down and return to start position”
“Perform 5 repetitions”

Progressions: Teaching countermovement at beginning

Vertical Jump
“Begin in an athletic position”
“Jump straight up, landing softly in the same athletic position”
“Perform 5 repetitions”

Lateral Bound
“Begin in a Single Leg hold position on right leg”
“Jump left, landing softly in the same position on left leg”
“Perform 5 repetitions per side”

Notes on Ladder Drills, Medicine Ball Throws, and Plyometrics

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Strength Training
Notes:
· Strength training is relative to the person; maximum effort for one client could be warm-up for another.
Always strive for the best possible exercise selections for each individual client.
· Using Progressions and Regressions makes determining appropriate/safe levels of training easier.
· Focus on training movements, not individual muscle groups. Depending on ability level/injury history, the
goal for EVERY client’s training program is to include lower body hip and knee dominant exercise, upper body
push and pull exercise, and “anti-movement” core exercise.
· Always remember that “Do No Harm” is the most important rule of any training situation.
· Each of the 4 Strength Circuits lists cues for the BASELINE training movement. Appreciate that cues for
progressions/regressions are usually similar, but could have small differences.

Strength Circuit 1

Kettlebell Deadlift (After Toe Touch Clearance)


“Begin standing with kettlebell directly between ankles”
“Maintaining flat back/tall chest, sit hips back and down until kettlebell is reached with straight arms”
“With a strong grip on the kettlebell, squeeze shoulder blades together and press feet into floor until
standing”
“Slowly lower back to start position”
“Flat back/Tall chest position should be kept for the duration of the set”
“Perform for desired repetitions”

Toe Touch Sequence


“Begin with toes elevated and pad between knees”
“Fully exhale and fold forward while actively pushing hips back, attempting to touch toes”
“If toes are touched return to start position; if not, slightly bend knees to touch toes then return to standing”
“Perform for 8 repetitions”
“Repeat same sequence with heels elevated”

Regressions: Check Toe Touch


Progressions: Trap-Bar Deadlift, Kettlebell Swing
Modifications: Elevated Deadlift (Only if Toe Touch)

Chin-up
“Begin in a dead-hang position with palms towards you”
“Drive elbows to floor and pull yourself up until chin is over bar”
“Slowly lower under control to start position”
“Eyes remain forward for the duration of set”
“Perform for desired repetitions”

Regressions: Band-Assisted Chin-up


Progressions: Loaded Chin-up (Weight Belt, Vest, etc)
Modifications: Tempo (Eccentrics / Isometrics)

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Front Plank
“Begin in a plank position with elbows under shoulders, palms flat, straight line from head to feet”
“Hold position while maintaining a focused breathing pattern”
“Perform for desired time”

Regressions: Hands Elevated Front Plank


Progressions: Stability Ball Rollout, Body Saw/Plank Slide, Wheel Rollout
Modifications: Pad Squeeze

Notes on Deadlifting/Toe Touch, Chin-ups, and Anti-Extension Series

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Strength Circuit 2

Goblet Squat
“Begin with a dumbbell/kettlebell in the goblet position (held at chest)”
“Feet roughly shoulder width, toes roughly straight”
“Squat down under control and tap depth marker then return to start position”
“Chest stays up and knees press out for the entire squat”
“Perform for desired repetitions”

Regressions: Reaching Squat (w/ Medicine Ball/Small Weight), Assisted Squat


Progressions: 2 Kettlebell Rack Squat, 1 Kettlebell Offset Squat
Modifications: Heels Elevated

Push-up
“Begin in push-up position with body in a straight line”
“Slowly lower under control and tap depth marker then return to start position”
“Straight line from head to feet should remain in tact for the duration of the set”
“Perform for desired repetitions”

Regressions: Hands Elevated Push-up


Progressions: Feet Elevated Push-up, Loaded Feet Elevated Push-up (Vest, Chains, etc)
Modifications: Pad Adductor Squeeze

Tall Kneeling Anti-Rotation Press-Out

“Begin in a tall kneeling position with both knees down”


“Press cable away until arms are extended”
“Return to start position”
“Perform for desired repetitions”

Regressions: N/A
Progressions: ½ Kneeling ARPO, Standing ARPO

Notes on Goblet Squat, Push-up, and Anti-Rotation Series

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Strength Circuit 3

Split Squat
“Begin in a half kneeling position with hands behind head, right knee down, and left foot in front”
“Right knee directly below hip, left heel directly below knee”
“Stand up through front heel, slowly lower back to start position”
“Perform for desired repetitions”

Regressions: Split Squat Hold, Eccentric Split Squat, Assisted Split Squat
Progressions: Goblet Loading, Suitcase Loading, Rear-Foot Elevated Split Squat
Modifications: Pad Height, Bench-Block

½ Kneeling Alternate Overhead Press


“Begin in a half kneeling position with one dumbbell/kettlebell in each hand in the rack position”
“Maintaining a stable position, press one arm overhead and return to start position”
“Repeat on opposite arm”
“Perform for desired repetitions”

Regressions: N/A
Progressions: ½ Kneeling 1 Arm OHP, Standing Alternate OHP, Standing 1 Arm OHP
Modifications: Landmine/45° Pressing

In-Line Chop/Lift
“Next to a cable column, begin in a ½ kneeling in-line position with inside knee (up – chop; down – lift)”
“Pull cable to chest, press cable away until arms are extended, return cable to chest, return to start position”
“Perform for desired repetitions”

Regressions: ½ Kneeling Chop/Lift, Tall Kneeling Chop/Lift


Progressions: Iso-Split Squat In-line Chop/Lift, Standing Static Chop/Lift, Dynamic Chop/Lift

Notes on Split Squats, Overhead Press, and Chop/Lift Series

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Strength Circuit 4

Reaching Single Leg Deadlift


“Begin with a soft bend in both knees”
“Maintaining knee bend, reach forward and kick backward with both left arm and leg”
“Left arm and left foot should be as far away as possible from each other; body in a long straight line”
“Press through right heel and return to start position”
“Perform for desired repetitions”

Regressions: Check ASLR, Assisted SLDL


Progressions: 1 DB/KB SLDL, 2 DB/KB SLDL
Modifications: Valslide SLDL

Dumbbell Row
“Begin in an athletic position with knees bent and hips back”
“Place one arm on bench, maintaining flat back/tall chest”
“Row DB towards chest, pulling elbow towards back pocket”
“Slowly return to start position without losing position”
“Perform for desired repetitions”

Regressions: Check Toe Touch, Cat/Cow


Progressions: N/A
Modifications: 1 Knee Bench-Block

Eccentric Valslide Leg Curl


“Begin in supine (lying on back) with knees bent to 90°and feet on sliders; heels down, toes up”
“Perform a hip lift to get to the starting position”
“Slowly extend legs, maintaining straight line from knees to shoulders, lowering body towards the floor; this
should take 3 seconds”
“Perform for desired repetitions”

Regressions: Hip Lift Variations


Progressions: Valslide Leg Curl, 1 Leg Eccentric Valslide Leg Curl, 1 Leg Valslide Leg Curl
Modifications: Pad Squeeze (Knees/Feet)

Notes on Single Leg Deadlifts, DB Row, and Leg Curl Progressions

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Practical Exam Testing Structure and Evaluation Guidelines

Below you will find the exact testing and scoring structure. Every movement will be taken from the
video library on the CFSC website. You are tested on your ability to demonstrate and properly cue the move-
ment patterns and to correctly provide a progression or regression based on a specific situational conflict your
instructor will present. Please be sure to watch the example testing video on the CFSC website.

The practical exam structure is as follows; you must score 11 points to pass:

3 Strength Training Movements


• Total of 3 possible points based on:
• A correct demonstration (Pass/Fail)
• Use of proper coaching cues (Pass/Fail)
• Correct situational answer

2 Warm-up/Movement Drills (Activation, Motor Control, Dynamic/Ladder)


• Total of 2 possible points based on:
• A correct demonstration (Pass/fail)
• Use of proper coaching cues (pass/fail)

Example Practical Exam Scoring Sheet:

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Example 3 Day Phase 1 MBSC Adult Program
Preparing for the CFSC Training Course also includes physically being ready for a full day of training and
acquainting yourself with the movement patterns. You should rehearse and practice Phase 1 of the MBSC 3-Day
Adult Program at least 4 weeks prior to attending your scheduled event. Completing the provided program will
allow you to understand how the exercises taught at the event are programmed for clients.

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Interested in Our CFSC Level 2 Course?
With Level-2 of the CFSC we are applying that original mission statement to the athlete population and the
programming system. To achieve this we are using the same educational process that has been so successful
with Level-1. Once you register for Level-2 (keep in mind you must already be Level-1 certified) you will gain
access to the educational material on the back end of our website. We have about 5 hours of lecture content, the
Level-2 Coaching Manual, and a multiple choice exam based off of that content which must be passed before
the event. This allows us to dedicate the whole 1-day on site training to practical education.

In Level-2 we will be building off of the foundation of what our Level-1 CFSCs learned. Focus will be on
athlete specific warm-ups, speed drills, medball exercises, plyometics, and of course strength training. The
methods we use to coach and demonstrate the olympic lifts at Mike Boyle Strength and Conditioning is a major
focus of both the online content and the practical event. This includes hang cleans, barbell snatch (hang clean
grip), dumbbell snatch, and our regressions/lateralizations such as jump squats and kettlebell swings.

Not only do we pride ourselves on our required practical component to become certified, we also are proud
of our low participant to coach ration. You will never see one coach with a group of 40+ attendees. For Level-2
we have made our groups even smaller with a 10 to 1 participant to coach ration. This assures that each attend-
ee gets the attention and feedback they need to succeed.

In October 2014 we had our very first Certified Functional Strength Coach Level-1 event. Since then we
have certified over 2000 coaches at events across the United States, England, Ireland, Germany, Italy, and
Japan. The feedback has been incredible. We were striving to set a new standard for certifications when we
started the CFSC, and judging from the feedback of those that have gone through the course, we have delivered.

Since we began work on the CFSC project back in 2013 our mission was to raise the quality of the
professionals in the industry by delivering the best educational experience possible and by requiring all coaches
to pass a live practical exam. By doing this we are creating a skilled network of coaches that can deliver great
demos, and provide clear and concise coaching cues, all within a systematic approach to programming. Our
goal is to make good coaches great and great coaches even better.

With Level-2 of the CFSC we are applying that original mission statement to the athlete population and the
programming system. To achieve this we are using the same educational process that has been so successful
with Level-1. Once you register for Level-2 (keep in mind you must already be Level-1 certified) you will gain
access to the educational material on the back end of our website. We have about 5 hours of lecture content, the
Level-2 Coaching Manual, and a multiple choice exam based off of that content which must be passed before
the event. This allows us to dedicate the whole 1-day on site training to practical education.

The Pre On-Site Practical Event Educational Material Includes:

▪ Start with Why: The MBSC Programming Thought Process (Mike Boyle)
▪ Athlete Program Design (Kevin Carr)
▪ Adult Population Program Design (Kevin Carr)
▪ Building an Adaptable Training Model: Part II (Brendon Rearick)
▪ Level 2 Training Manual

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Just like with the Level-1 CFSC Certification, we require all applicants to attend an on-site practical event
and pass a practical exam at the end of that day. With the Level-2 practical exam coaches will be required to
give correct demonstrations and deliver clear and concise coaching cues for all of the movements covered. This
includes olympic lifts, single leg squats and plyometrics, kettlebell swings, and more. While this may exclude
some from becoming Level-2 CFSCs we believe it is vital to the reputation of the certification and the coaches
that do pass to have a high mark to meet.

In Level-2 we will be building off of the foundation of what our Level-1 CFSCs learned. Focus will be on
athlete specific warm-ups, speed drills, medball exercises, plyometics, and of course strength training. The
methods we use to coach and demonstrate the olympic lifts at Mike Boyle Strength and Conditioning is a major
focus of both the online content and the practical event. This includes hang cleans, barbell snatch (hang clean
grip), dumbbell snatch, and our regressions/lateralizations such as jump squats and kettlebell swings.

Not only do we pride ourselves on our required practical component to become certified, we also are proud
of our low participant to coach ration. You will never see one coach with a group of 40+ attendees. For Level-2
we have made our groups even smaller with a 10 to 1 participant to coach ration. This assures that each attend-
ee gets the attention and feedback they need to succeed.

How do I host an Event?

There has been an overwhelming amount of interest for facilities to host CFSC Certifications. We look
forward to reviewing each applicant. Here are some general requirements for hosting an event:

▪ A space and environment dedicated for the event. That includes both space and noise (no music playing
in the background/sporting events/etc.)

▪ Turf or rubber area with full warm-up capacity.

▪ A video tour of the space that will be used.

▪ Preferably a date on Fridays and Saturdays

You can fill out a host form at http://www.certifiedfsc.com/hostapply If you have any questions,
please contact us at: support@certifiedfsc.com

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We Are Partnering with the Best
We are partnering with two of the best organizations in the industry to offer an incredible value to CFSCs.
While we do not require the use of these great resources, we at CFSC find them invaluable and this is precisely
why we have worked with them to offer special discounts on certifications and educational content for CFSCs.
These discounts are EXCLUSIVE to CFSCs and available after being certified.

First, the leader in screening, Functional Movement Systems. The Functional Movement Screen has revo-
lutionized the way we screen athletes and clients, giving us an in-depth look into potential movement dysfunction
and asymmetries. Code: CFSC10.

“FMS is extremely pleased to be a part of CFSC certification process. We have no doubt, with Coach
Boyle’s experience and leadership this certification will quickly become one of the most sought-after
certifications in the industry.” - Lee Burton.

Second, the leader in general population and sports nutrition, Precision Nutrition. Dr. John Berardi and
his team at PN have put together an amazing system that has helped thousands of people reach their perfor-
mance and physique goals with proper nutrition. The Precision Nutrition certifications are amazing educational
resources for nutrition as well as the psychological aspects of behavior change. Code: http://get.pn/l1-vip-thrive

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“Precision Nutrition is excited to be partnering with the Certified Functional Strength Coach
Certification to offer an exclusive promotion on the PN Nutrition Certification.” - Dr. John Berardi

Third, Perform Better has carefully selected each product in its catalog for its ability to help improve sports
performance or rehabilitation. Whether you’re trying to make your athletes stronger, faster or more explosive,
you can trust our expert staff to suggest the right products to meet your needs. Code: CFSC10.

“We appreciate your interest in “Perform Better.” We won’t disappoint you! You’ll find the latest
equipment and ideas about functional training, full body training and rehabilitation. We don’t believe in
isolating movements, because that theory leads to poor performance and excessive injuries. Instead,
we believe the body must be trained to work as one efficient unit. Once that idea is understood,
the person training or rehabbing people can apply this theory to any sport or rehabilitation situation.
Please call us at 1-888-556-7464 to discuss your particular needs with our experts.” - Founder Bill Falk

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Our CFSC Affiliates

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Contact Us
Instagram: @certifiedfsc

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CertifiedFSC/

Private Facebook Group (Add Yourself): https://www.facebook.com/groups/1455482268067032/

Email: support@certifiedfsc.com

Anonymous Feedback Survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/RXN8SN7

Email Feedback / Testimonials Directly to Coach Boyle: mboyle1959@aol.com

Come Visit Us! MBSC Location:


29 Draper Street
Woburn, MA 01801
Phone: 781-938-1330

CFSC Map (Email support@certifiedfsc.com to be added): http://www.certifiedfsc.com/locations

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Additional Notes

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