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Conservatorium

van Amsterdam

Study Guide
Jazz Bachelor
2017-2018

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Table of Contents
1. Bachelor’s Degree in Jazz 3
Studying at the Jazz Department 3
Management 3
Programme details 3
Mission 4
Vision 4

1.1 Learning objectives and areas of expertise 4

1.2 General structure of the programme 6


Description of the five course categories 9
Generic course descriptions 11

2. Principal subjects 16
Saxophone 16
Clarinet and Bass Clarinet 20
Trumpet 24
Trombone and Bass Trombone 28
Guitar 32
Piano 37
Double Bass 41
Bass Guitar 45
Drums 52
Percussion 57
Voice 59
Composition / Arranging 65
Theory of Music 68
Other subjects 70

3. Ensembles and Choirs 71

4. Music Theory Subjects Programme 97

5. Education and Entrepreneurship 116

6. Electives 120

7. Jazz Preparatory Course 121

8. Practical Matters 121

Attachment: Education and Examination Regulations

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1. Bachelor’s Degree in Jazz
Studying at the Jazz Department

With an exquisite population of four hundred students from more than fifty different countries, the Jazz
department offers one of the most inspiring and up-to-date study programs in Europe, with a great deal of
attention for professional practice. Our approach is contemporary; all important music streams of this
moment are given full attention.

Our teaching team consists of international and prominent names from the contemporary jazz scene that
guarantee a universal, current and inspiring vision of the study program.

With one and a half hours of main subject and technical lessons per week, more than eighty ensembles and
a thorough solfège and theory program, we offer our students a dynamic learning environment in which
they can fully utilize their potential. Through a versatile and balanced study program in the bachelor and
master programs they develop their skills as a soloist and ensemble musician to an excellent level. They
also learn to tap into the creativity they need to develop their talents and develop their musical personality.
The study program is constantly adapted to new developments and influences; with this, the department is
and remains a current reflection of today's versatile music practice.

‘Guiding students to unfold their own musical talents and become accomplished, innovative and
meaningful musicians is our ultimate commitment.’
Edo Righini – Associate Director / Head of the Jazz & Popular Music Department

Management

Edo Righini Associate Director / Head of the Jazz & Popular Music Department
Bram Strijbis Programme Co-ordinator, Study Adviser

Programme details

Study load
240 credits

Study length
4 years, full-time

Language of instruction
Dutch and English

CROHO code
34739 (B Music)

Title
Bachelor of Music

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Mission
The CvA is deeply committed to excellence in education, performance and creative activity and to the
cultural enrichment of the larger community. A premier international conservatory, the CvA inspires and
empowers highly talented individuals to realise their potential. For this, the CvA offers Bachelor’s and
Master’s degree courses in Classical, Jazz and Popular music, a Music in Education Programme and the
National Programme for Young Top Talent. Through this comprehensive offer of genres and courses, the
CvA represents a full reflection of the present-day musical landscape. It accordingly plays an active part
in shaping national and international musical life, both now and in the future.

We take full advantage of Amsterdam’s excellent learning and performance opportunities, preparing our
students to be passionate performers, composers and teachers, and imaginative, effective contributors
to the arts and society. In order to achieve this mission, the CvA offers an exceptional teaching staff of
international reputation and standing, a curriculum containing state-of-the-art education in every genre
and pathway of the present-day musical landscape and close collaboration with renowned national and
international musical institutions.

Vision
The Conservatorium van Amsterdam prepares some 1250 highly talented students for careers as
passionate performers and composers, and as imaginative, effective leaders in the international music
scene. Our guiding principle is ‘excellent education’. Our international student body thrives in a
supportive atmosphere that encourages excellence, values individuals and welcomes innovation. The
CvA inspires the performance, creation and knowledge of great music, while exchange programmes,
distant learning and entrepreneurial opportunities expand the school’s reach. Every year, hunderds of
concerts and community and outreach events take place. The CvA is a steady contributor to the cultural
fabric of Amsterdam and an important player on the world stage.

The musical world is always in motion. This has a major impact on the infrastructure, artistic concepts
and how we reach out to audiences. The musician of the future will be a specialist who is in full charge
of his profession, and who possesses skills beyond his excellence in performance. The CvA follows a clear
path through all this: excellence above all. Every element of the musical profession is practised at a high
level; musical craftmanship, artistic authenticity, but also didactic and entrepreneurial skills. All of this
provides graduate CvA students with the best possible starting position for a career in the international
music world.

1.1 Learning objectives and areas of expertise

The music programme learning objectives have been identified at the national level, and can be
broken down into three categories:
• artistic expertise;
• technical expertise; and
• professional and social expertise.

Within these categories, nine areas of expertise are further identified:


• vision and creativity;
• communication;
• the ability to collaborate;

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• technique;
• analytical ability;
• contextual focus;
• entrepreneurship;
• innovation; and
• a methodical and thoughtful approach.

Upon graduation, the student will have acquired the various types of expertise referred to in the
overview. The following chart lists the specific skills for each area of expertise, along with the
numeric codes referred to in the course descriptions (p. 9 et seq.).

Artistic expertise

Vision and creativity: The musician is artistically driven and is capable of forming opinions and convictions
relating to his own specialist field and can communicate these in the professional music world.
has developed a musical and artistic personality which enables him to make music employing an
expressive language and being professionally driven
possesses the ability, when creating or performing music, to work with various musical concepts, styles
and forms of interpretation, giving expression to these in music

Communication: The musician can communicate his approach efficiently and effectively in various
contexts and convey the artistic meaning of music to others.
explores artistic opportunities in interaction with target groups
can present himself, either alone or with others

1.3 The ability to collaborate: The musician is capable of making an active contribution to a joint product or
process together with others.
1.3.1 has the social and communication skills to participate in various musical collaborative forms

Technical expertise

Technique: The musician maintains a wide range of technical knowledge and skills, which enable him to
function in the national and international professional music world.
possesses a distinctive musical imagination that supports him in real-life situations
possesses the instrumental/vocal musical skills to prepare and perform music from a chosen field of
repertoire, as well as a knowledge of the historical and stylistic context of the music
has a mastery of enough repertoire (solo/band/ensemble/choral/orchestra) to be able to function in a
professional context
is capable of making new repertoire his own
knows how to make use of and manage any relevant parameters

Analytical ability: The musician can break down and cognitively dissect music.
is capable of analysing music he hears, or notated music with which he is presented, based on his
understanding of rhythmic, melodic and harmonic structures and forms, and on that basis, can interpret and
perform it
has knowledge of the relevant music literature and the historical and stylistic context of performance

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3 Professional and social expertise

3.1 Contextual focus: The musician is alert to developments in society and integrates these into his work as a
musician.
3.1.1 can make connections between his own artistic work, developments in music and the other arts disciplines,
and the social context
3.1.2 is capable of seeing the musical activities he undertakes from a musical vantage point involving different
traditions, style periods, cultures and regions
3.1.3 is capable of participating in musical life and can network with other musicians, listeners and potential

3.2 Entrepreneurship: The musician can create an independent professional life for himself in the world of
music.
3.2.1 can function as a cultural entrepreneur in respect of his own productions
3.2.2 presents himself and his musical product (functionally, organizationally and financially) to potential clients
3.2.3 maintains a professional attitude when dealing with clients and customers

3.3 Innovation: The musician is capable of exploring, and experimenting within his own specialist field, which is
reflected in innovative musical processes and productions.
3.3 has an enquiring mind when it comes to the further development of his specialist field and the relevant

3.4 A methodical and thoughtful approach: The musician is capable of conducting himself in a methodical and
professional way, can reflect on his conduct, is independent, and can give and receive feedback.
3.4.1 has sufficient professional knowledge, understanding and experience to examine his own artistic
performance and, on that basis, to permanently evaluate its quality and further develop it
3.4.2 is capable of setting realistic goals, can plan and adopt a structured approach to his work, and is capable of
reflecting on his own approach

3.5 Didactics: The musician can structure and undertake teaching situations in such a way that students are
encouraged to learn in the best possible way.
3.5.1 possesses didactic and methodological knowledge, insight and skills in order to prepare, undertake and
evaluate relevant learning situations
3.5.2 is capable of designing both short- and long-term learning processes which focus on the abilities and
aspirations of the target groups
3.5.3 is capable of coaching amateur-level ensembles
3.5.4 is capable of creating and/or arranging practice material for use in various learning situations

1.2 General structure of the programme

Propaedeutic year

The principal subjects focus primarily on the development of an improvisatory language. The ensemble programme
focuses on developing possibilities related to ensemble playing and on a seamless integration with the professional
world. The theory programme is characterized by an approach originating from the idiom of the individual, jazz and
related music. The result is an entirely unique, practically oriented theory programme. The same can be said for the
technique lessons, although these do depend somewhat on the specific instrument. Thus, the theory programme and

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the technique lessons actively serve to support students’ development, as is also the goal of the principal private
lessons and the ensemble lessons.

The first year is concluded with a propaedeutic examination, which can result in a binding
recommendation that the student discontinue his/her studies in the event that his/her academic
performance in the core subjects is deemed unsatisfactory. Core subjects include the principal
subject, solfège/ear-training, general theoretical subjects (GTS) and ensemble playing. A student
for whom such a recommendation has been issued may not pursue the same degree course at the
CvA.

The principal subject propaedeutic examination is held in May or June. If students pass the exam
and have completed all first-year courses, they will have earned all sixty credits for one year and
will be awarded a propaedeutic certificate. Holders of the certificate may continue their studies at
the CvA. In other words, the certificate is proof that the holder has been accepted to complete the
rest of the degree programme.

Main phase

As the course progresses, the influence exerted by the student on the general direction of his/her
course of study increases thanks to additional options from which he/she may choose.

With respect to the principal subject and in some cases technique/vocal development, a student may
be allowed to change teachers before the beginning of the academic year. Note that this is not
possible halfway through the academic year if the student has not requested a change in advance
and if such a change is not listed on his/her schedule. Students should thus carefully consider their
choice of teacher, and discuss this choice with their current teacher and/or department head.

Ensemble playing is also an important component of the main phase of the course. While a number
of ensembles are required, students can sometimes choose the teacher. In addition, students can
take certain ensembles as electives, thereby determining the direction of their studies. By choosing
‘Student Ensemble’, students can put together an ensemble themselves, determine an objective
and/or repertoire, and choose a teacher. In this case, it is important that they consult all those
involved well before the summer. Upon approval of the coordinator, such an ensemble can serve as
an alternative to one of the required ensembles. Students in a partially or fully formed group may
also register for one of the regular ensembles and, in that case, will be given priority.

During the main phase (from the second to the fourth year), examinations for all required subjects
are given at least once a year. The student’s academic goals will be outlined in close consultation
with the principal study teacher. Students with instrumental and vocal principal subjects successfully
completing all four years are awarded a Bachelor of Music degree. This is also the case for the
principal subject of Composition/Arranging.

Final examination
Preparing for the final examination constitutes the final component of the student’s studies.
Students who plan to take the final examination must see to a great many things, e.g.
* putting together a programme,
* finding other players,
* instruments,
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* sheet music and
* sending out invitations.

By starting their preparations on time, students will be able to avoid unnecessary stress.

Several important points


* Students may schedule their final examination only if they have concluded all other subjects. See
also the graduation requirements for both the bachelor’s and master’s degree programmes.
* For jazz students, the examination date must be set before 1 March and for classical students,
before 1 February.
* The examination may not exceed 60 minutes (including stage changes and announcements) and
must be at least 45 minutes long (for the classical master’s examination, these times are 90 minutes
and 75 minutes respectively).
* Postponement of the final examination is possible only if the student has obtained the written
consent of the Board of Directors.
* All examinations will take place in the concert halls of the conservatory (except for organ).
* Any special costs resulting from the student’s choice of repertoire will be borne by the student.

The general structure of the bachelor programme is outlined in the table below. The specific
requirements for each principal subject may differ, and the diagram below is presented primarily as
an indication of the general course offering. The courses are divided into six course categories. Only
for the principal subject of music theory are several course categories employed which differ slightly
from this standard.

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Description of the five course categories
1. Principal subject and related subsidiary subjects
The principal study is the unifying element in the curriculum from the propaedeutic year and into the
main phase and consists of an interpretive and a technical component, taught by various teachers.
Students may switch principal study teachers on a yearly basis; in some principal subjects, students
are even expected to do so.

In the second term of the third year – possibly in the first term of the fourth year – , the student will
be assessed by means of a recital given in preparation for the final examination. The programme of
the final examination will be determined jointly by the student and his/her principal study teacher,
and will provide the student with the opportunity of presenting his/her unique musical personality.

2. Ensembles and projects


The Jazz Department has an extended ensemble programme. There are two big bands, two choirs
and a large number of ensembles, varying in size from octet to trio and grouped by
* style (jazz, funk, Latin, fusion, Brazilian, etc.),
* instrument (saxophone quintet and quartet, trombone ensemble, guitar ensemble, etc.),
* function (trio with soloist, trio with voice),
* year (ensemble skills in the first year, preparatory division ensembles, master’s ensembles) and
* theme (Monk ensemble, composition ensemble).

Within the framework of this programme, the student is given many options. In all ensembles,
improvisation, in addition to ensemble technique, is an important point of interest. The goal of each
ensemble is to give a performance.

For the big bands, a project dedicated to a special subject and led by a guest teacher is held at least
once a year in addition to the regular programme. These projects will be concluded with a concert.

In addition to occasional guest teaching positions, there is an extensive Artist in Residence


programme, in which big names from the international world of jazz give private and group lessons,
clinics and masterclasses for one week. These projects will also be concluded with a concert given by
the students, the Artist in Residence and the teachers.

3. Music theory subjects and music and cultural history


The programme includes the following components:
* GTS: the integrated subjects of harmony, analysis and ear-training;
* general music theory;
* solfège practicums; and
* music history (jazz and classical).

The basic theory and history courses are concluded in the second year; in the third year, students are
required to choose from a number of arranging and analysis modules.

4. Education and entrepreneurship


Holders of a bachelor’s degree in music from the CvA have earned the qualification to teach at a
music school or arts centre.

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The pedagogical subjects on offer involve the methodology of the student’s own instrument,
teaching and an internship. Foundations are built which will allow students to set up their own
private teaching studios and to work in music education in the broadest sense. They are also taught
how to prepare themselves for organizational and business aspects of the professional world. A
special curriculum called the Programme for Resourceful Teaching Artists (known in Dutch as De
Ondernemende Kunstenaar, or DOK) has been developed to equip musicians with those skills
necessary to establish themselves. Guest lecturers are enlisted to teach some of the classes. The
programme is supported by the www.beroepkunstenaar.nl website, developed in collaboration with
Kunstenaars&Co. By choosing a profile and project, students largely decide for themselves how to
shape the DOK programme.

The programme begins with a course entitled Introduction to Education and Career. The student
learns about how the course of study and the professional world relate to each other and about
specific related aspects, such as managing stress and preventing injuries. This is followed in the
second year by didactics and methodology. In the third year, students are given the opportunity to
specialize (music school teacher, workshop leader, band instructor, clinician, etc.), which involves an
extensive regional internship programme.

5. Additional subjects
A portion of the curriculum, known as ‘free space’, is made up of electives, giving students the
opportunity to focus more on things like ensemble projects, world music, improvisation, live
electronics, studio engineering and subsidiary instruments related to the principal subject.
Deeper theoretical or educational study is also an option. Finally, students may also earn credits
by participating in activities, such as performances or other projects, outside the conservatory.
Permission to participate in such activities must be obtained from the programme coordinator.

Artists in Residence
The CvA has developed an outstanding Artist in Residence programme. For each department, an
internationally acclaimed guest will give clinics, workshops, masterclasses and private lessons for one
week at least once a year. This week will be concluded with a concert given by the Artist in Residence
and the students.

Career preparation

Thanks to our contacts in the world of broadcasting, at the studios, in show business and new media,
we can help students establish the contacts they need. Additionally, a special set of courses prepares
students for the business aspects of the music industry.

Exchange programmes
The CvA Jazz Department offers exchange programmes with the Manhattan School of Music, New York; New
England Conservatory, Boston; Frost School of Music, University of Miami; Temple University Philadelphia en State
University of New York te Purchase, Central Conservatory of Music Beijing en Escola de Música do Estado de São
Paulo, in addition to numerous exchange programmes in Europe.

Eujam
Eujam, an international master’s programme created by the conservatories of Amsterdam,
Berlin, Copenhagen, Paris and Trondheim, was launched in 2010.

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Generic course descriptions
Below is a brief description of each course in the general degree programme. Certain features and/or
content may vary depending on the principal subject. Differences are listed elsewhere where the
relevant principal subject is dealt with in so far as these subjects are course requirements for that
particular principal subject.

Title Principal subject

Course contents The principal subject forms the core of the study. The CvA Jazz Department offers a
wide range of specializations including Brazilian, Afro-Cuban, R & B, pop, funk, fusion
and crossover. In addition to group lessons, there are evening group recitals and
masterclasses.

The degree programme gives students ample freedom to discover their own
personal interests. Ensemble is an important component – from trios with voice or
soloist to special groups devoted to particular principal subjects, Latin and
crossover groups, jazz choir and big band.
Learning objectives 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4.
Course type Required

Level Ba 1, Ba 2, Ba 3 and Ba 4

Teacher(s) Principal study teachers, see description of each principal subject.

Credits See the overview of credits for each principal subject elsewhere in the Prospectus.

Literature/repertoire See description of each principal subject.

Method of instruction Private lessons and ensemble lessons plus projects, masterclasses and workshops.

Means of evaluation Practical examinations – Ba 1: propaedeutic examination; Ba 2 and 3: end-of-year


examinations; Ba 4: concluding examination as part of the final examination.

Assessment criteria See description of each principal subject.

Language(s) Dutch and English

Scheduling One-hour private lessons once a week, projects contingent on project participation.

Location CvA, Oosterdokskade 151

Information Bram Strijbis at bram.strijbis@ahk.nl; see also description of each principal subject.

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Title Technique
Course contents Lessons in technique are provided in respect of all performance principal
subjects. Attention is given to technical skills including posture, breathing,
finger-picking (guitar), general technical skills for wind players (brass), etc.
Learning objectives 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 3.4.1.
Course type Required
Level Ba 1, Ba 2, Ba 3 and Ba 4
Depending on the principal subject, technique will be taught only in Ba 1 and 2 or in
the upper years.
Teacher(s) Technique teachers, see description per principal subject.
Credits Ba 1: 7 points; Ba 2 and 3: 5 points; Ba 4: 2 points.
See the overview of credits for each principal subject elsewhere in the Prospectus.
Literature/repertoire See description of each principal subject.
Method of instruction Private lessons.
Means of evaluation Practical examinations – Ba 1: propaedeutic examination; Ba 2 and 3: end-of-year
examinations; Ba 4: concluding examination as part of the final examination.
Assessment criteria See description of each principal subject.
Language(s) Dutch and English
Scheduling Weekly one-hour private lessons.
Location CvA, Oosterdokskade 151
Information Bram Strijbis at bram.strijbis@ahk.nl; see also description of each principal subject.

Title Ensembles
Course contents The objective is to allow students to acquire the necessary practical experience and to
stimulate their individual creativity so that, upon leaving the degree programme, they
can successfully function in the various styles common to their instrument. Because
instrumental and individual needs can be rather diverse, a wide variety of ensembles
are offered. These are described in the ‘Ensembles’ section of this Prospectus.
Learning objectives 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 3.1.2, 3.4.
Course type Required
Level Ba 1, Ba 2, Ba 3 and Ba 4
Teacher(s) David de Marez Oyens coördinator, Eva Baggerman, Rob van Bavel, Albert
Beltman, Berend van den Berg, Jonas Bisquert, Jasper Blom, René Brijker, Arnold
Dooyeweerd, Bart Fermie, Harmen Fraanje, Ernst Glerum, Maarten van der
Grinten, Frits Heimans, Achim Heine, Frans van der Hoeven, Yuri Honing, Danny
van Kessel, Marijn Korff de Gidts, Debby Korfmacher, Sylvia Langelaan, Erik van
Lier, Abel Marcel, Michael Moore, Yaniv Nachum, Jan Oosthof, Ruud Ouwehand,
Johan Plomp, Niti Ranjan Biswas, Rafael Reina, Maurice Rugebregt, Hernán Ruiz,
Martijn Sohier, Henk Sprenger, Bodhi Sykora, Erik Vaarzon Morel, Lilian Vieira,
Lené te Voortwis, Hans Vroomans, Jos Zwaanenburg

Credits Ba 1: 4–9 points; Ba 2 and 3: 7 or 8 points; Ba 4: 3–6 points.


The number of points depends on the principal subject; for more information, see the
overview of credits for each principal subject in the Prospectus.
Literature/repertoire During the first year, the emphasis in all principal subjects is on ensemble skills in
jazz and related types of music. In addition to a specially created ensemble, there are
trios with voice, a choir and a funk/crossover group. Nearly all the ensembles give
performances at the Amsterdam Blue Note. In subsequent years, there are, on the one
hand, the style-oriented ensembles, such as jazz octets, jazz trios with a vocal or
instrumental soloist, improvisation ensembles, big bands, flamenco, Latin rhythm

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section, Brazilian and various crossover groups. On the other, there are the
instrument-oriented groups, such as the guitar ensembles, bass guitar ensembles,
saxophone ensembles, trombone ensembles and both choirs – Ladies Only and Vocal
Inchoiry. A number of groups are required. Students can also take certain ensembles
as electives, choosing from a wide selection, and thus determine the direction of their
studies. In the third and/or fourth year, students can even form their own group,
determine an objective and/or repertoire and choose a teacher.
Method of instruction Group lessons (ensembles) plus projects, masterclasses and workshops.
Means of evaluation Practical examinations – Ba 1: propaedeutic examination; Ba 2 and 3: end-of-year
examinations; Ba 4: concluding examination as part of the final examination.
Assessment criteria See description of each principal subject.
Language(s) Dutch and English
Scheduling Varies, see relevant schedule.
Location CvA, Oosterdokskade 151
Information David de Marez Oyens at david.demarezoyens@ahk.nl.

Title Ensemble skills


Course contents This ensemble explores collective improvisation. In this regard, the registering of and
reacting alertly to stimuli and the development of initiatives are of primary importance. The
various aspects of ensemble playing – volume/choice of sound, dynamic development,
improvised section playing, choice of playing method, etc. – are isolated in these lessons
and addressed. Students’ imaginations are also trained, as participants are assigned the task
of choosing a composition and then leading the group. During these lessons, the teacher will
also pay particular attention to students’ interest in subjects like arranging and ensemble
conducting.
Learning objectives 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 3.1, 3.3, 3.4.
Course type Required
Level Ba 1
Teacher(s) Maarten van der Grinten
Credits 2
Literature/repertoire By agreement with the teacher
Method of Ensemble lessons
instruction
Means of evaluation Practical examinations
Assessment criteria Being alert and responding to stimuli, and developing initiative and the imagination, which
means that the performance will be assessed on the volume/choice of sound, dynamic
development, improvised section playing and choice of playing method.

Language(s) Dutch and English


Scheduling One hour a week for the entire year
Location CvA, Oosterdokskade 151
Information Maarten van der Grinten at maarten.vandergrinten@ahk.nl

Title Music theory subjects and music and cultural history

Course contents The final examination for all instrumental and vocal principal subjects, as well as the principal
subjects of arranging and music theory will all include the music theory subjects of
general music theory, ear-training, harmony, analysis, arranging, harmony at the piano and
the subject of music history, with one exception: the subject of harmony at the piano will not

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be included in the final examination for the principal subject of piano. These subjects must
be concluded before a student may take the final examination.

In the first academic year (the propaedeutic phase), the selection of courses consists of the
following:
* general music theory;
* General Theoretical Subjects (GTS);
* solfège practicum;
* rhythmic solfège;
* harmony at the piano; and
* history of jazz music.

Except for general music theory and rhythmic solfège, these courses will be continued in the
main phase. Students will be given the chance to study three subjects in depth in the third
year; they will choose one of the courses on arranging, one of the analysis courses and
additional subjects, and one of the music history courses.
Learning objectives 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 3.1, 3.3, 3.4.

Course type Required

Level Ba 1, Ba 2, Ba 3

Teacher(s) See course descriptions in the section on music theory subjects and music and cultural
history.
Credits Idem

Literature/repertoire Idem

Method of instruction Idem

Means of evaluation Idem

Assessment criteria Idem

Language(s) Dutch and English

Scheduling See course descriptions in the section on music theory subjects and music and cultural
history.
Location CvA, Oosterdokskade 151

Information Bram Strijbis at bram.strijbis@ahk.nl

Title Education and music management


Course contents The syllabus for the pedagogical subjects consists of three components:

Propaedeutic year
1. Introduction to education and career

Post-propaedeutic phase
2. Core requirements (education, methodology and internship)
3. Elected specialization (music management)

1. Introduction to education and career


The aim of the first-year course is to introduce students to a number of important aspects
of the professional world and the structure of the conservatory. Students also get to
know one another during the course. Ten lectures and tutorials will cover the following
aspects:
* the structure of the conservatory: absentee policy, accommodation, medical care, the
dean’s office, a binding recommendation that a student discontinue his/her studies, and
reserving rooms;
* study skills;
* introduction to the Dutch professional music world;
* gaining an understanding of the Dutch tax system as it applies to musicians;
* the VAR (Declaration of Independent Contractor Status) and contracts;
* injuries and how to prevent them;
* motivational problems, psychological help; and
* workshop on giving feedback.

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2. Core requirements (education, methodology and internship)
The core requirements introduce students to methodology, education and the internship.
During this year, the student will thus gain an understanding of the most important
aspects of teaching his/her own principal subject and small ensembles, and will become
familiar with an important component that will supplement his/her future career. At the
end of the second year, a final discussion will be held during which the student and all
relevant teachers (principal subject, methodology, education) will jointly draw up a draft
concerning the elected specialization (DOK programme) and the student’s further study
goals.

3. Elected specialization (music management)


In the third year, the student will choose one of the profiles listed below. in this year is
practically oriented and project-based with a great deal of individual input from the
student. Guest teachers will be invited to discuss business aspects of the professional
world. The music management programme is supported by the
www.beroepkunstenaar.nl website. Music management enables students to prepare
themselves intensively and personally for today’s professional world.

Learning objectives 1.1, 1,2, 1.3, 3.1, 3.2, 3.4, 3.5


Course type Required
Level Ba 3 and 4
Teacher(s) Various teachers
Credits Ba 3: 5 and Ba 4: 5.
Literature/repertoire
Method of instruction
Means of evaluation Practical examinations
Assessment criteria
Language(s) Dutch and English
Scheduling
Location CvA, Oosterdokskade 151
Information frits.heimans@ahk.nl (Onderwiskundige vakken) co.dekloet@ahk.nl (Music
Business & Career)

Title Additional subjects


Course contents This course component allows students to earn a minimum of ten credits by specializing
in a particular subject or focusing on a special interest in their second, third and fourth
year of study. The electives programme is published on the intranet each year in May,
when students can sign up for the subjects they wish to take in the following academic
year.
Learning objectives 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4.
Course type Electives
Level Ba 3 and Ba 4
Teacher(s) Various teachers
Credits Each academic year, the student must earn at least ten elective credits.
Literature/repertoire Depends on subject, see electives guide.
Method of instruction Depends on subject, see electives guide.
Means of evaluation Depends on subject, see electives guide.
Assessment criteria Depends on subject, see electives guide.
Language(s) Dutch and English
Scheduling Depends on subject, see electives guide.
Location CvA, Oosterdokskade 151
Information

15
Descriptions of the principal subjects
Saxophone

The wind faculty seeks to train students to become all-round musicians capable of functioning in all areas of
the professional practice: from musical orchestras to big bands through to jazz, fusion, pop and Latin
ensembles, both live and recorded. Students gain experience in a variety of musical situations, with ensemble
playing, solo performance and improvisation as focal points.

The teaching staff of the saxophone section includes Albert Beltman, Jasper Blom, Ben van Gelder, Marc
Scholten and Simon Rigter. In the past years Branford Marsalis, Miguel Zenon and Joshua Redman were guest
teachers. Dick Oatts (Manhattan School of Music) is regular guest teacher at the Conservatorium van
Amsterdam.

Coordinator: Jasper Blom

Study programme

Objective

The objective of the course is twofold: the greatest possible development of the student's musical potential on
the one hand, and the greatest possible development of the student as a musician ready to enter the
16
professional music world on the other. This is accomplished by allowing the student to take part in various
musical situations in which ensemble playing and the development of soloistic qualities (improvisation) are
key. The student's own contribution (creativity) is also stimulated.

Propaedeutic Year

Principal subject
In the principal private lessons, the student becomes acquainted with basic musical structures on which
improvisation is based. The following are addressed:
* the development of the ear
* the development of a sense of rhythm and tempo
* tone production
* understanding of harmony in relation to improvisation
* the development of a personal musical language.

Technique
In the technique lessons, attention is given to the development of specific technical skills related to the
saxophone. The following are addressed:
* scales
* arpeggios with variations
* études and transcriptions focusing on the jazz performance tradition.

Students will begin studying the clarinet as a subsidiary instrument. In late April, a technique examination will
be held.

Ensembles
In this year, the following ensembles are required:
* ensemble skills
* jazz group
* saxophone group

For the remaining subjects, please see the credit list.

Examination (summary)

Playing ability
Programme: the student will prepare a number of pieces that exhibit his/her musical development.

Ear and reading ability


Reflex, sight-reading, ear-training.

Assessment
The following will be assessed:
* musicality; ear, understanding of melody/harmony, sense of rhythm and tempo
* affinity with the instrument
* technique, tone production, reading ability
* the development of the student's vocabulary

17
Second and third year

Principal subject
The approach outlined in the propaedeutic year will be continued.

Improvisation
The following are addressed:
* creativity
* the development of a personal style
* analysis of solo transcriptions
* knowledge of the repertoire
* ear-training in conjunction with the instrument
* interpretation of various styles

Technique
* études: Londeix, Allard
* fusion/funk performance tradition
* compound metres (Karg-Elert, Lacour)
* orchestral playing
* flageolets, double tones, circular breathing, etc.

Ensembles
* jazz group in year 2 and 3
* trio plus soloist in year 3
* Latin group, required elective in year 2 or 3
* crossover group and/or other traditions are a required elective in year 3 or 4
* big band in year 3 and year 2 and/or year 4

This phase will be concluded with a recital. This recital will constitute the last assessment before the final
examination and will take place during the second term of year 3.

Examination

The student will prepare no more than six pieces. For more information, please see the section on the
propaedeutic year. In late April of the third year, a technique examination will be held, and a flute/clarinet
examination in late June.

Fourth year

This final year will be devoted to preparations for the final examination.

Principal subject
Individual development is particularly emphasized at this point.

Ensembles
Two ensembles are required: trio plus soloist and one ensemble of the student's choice.

Final examination
* performance of at least 50 minutes, not to exceed one hour
* the student will choose the setting(s) and the repertoire; the programme will be as varied as possible and
chosen in consultation with the principal study teacher

18
* the quality of the arrangements, the student's own compositions and originality will all weigh heavily in the
assessment
* the student should present himself/herself to the best of his/her ability as an improviser and saxophonist.

Teachers

Jasper Blom + co-ordinator


Simon Rigter
Ben van Gelder
Dick Oatts, regular guest teacher – Artist in Residence
Albert Beltman, methodology + clarinet as a subsidiary subject
Marc Scholten, technique, clarinet as a subsidiary subject
Jasper van Damme, methodics
Raymond Honing flute as a subsidiary subject

Admission requirements

1. Playing skill
a. The committee will choose from three pieces of a different character, tempo and key prepared by the
candidate, in which he/she shows the committee both command of the instrument and affinity with jazz. In
playing these pieces improvisation should be an important part. For candidates who give priority to playing in
an orchestra, there are also possibilities. In this case improvisatorial skills are less important.
b. The candidate must also play written material, e.g. jazz solos, jazz etudes, and/or classical etudes (bring 4
copies of sheet music for the committee).
c. Being able to play all major and minor scales and triads at a reasonable tempo.

The committee reserves the right to interrupt the candidate's playing as according to the committee, he/she
has supplied enough information (because of the limited time of 30 minutes). Therefore it is important for the
candidate to show his/her skills as quickly as possible: not too many and/or too long solos of fellow players, no
unnecessary repetitions.

2. Hearing, tempo/timing and reading skills


This may consist of:
* playing by ear on harmonic progressions which are given by the committee members
* repeating of played fragments
* being able to play a prima vista a piece in jazz idiom (for instance a section from an orchestral part or a simple
etude)

The committee supplements the examination with some exercises which must show the candidate's skills
which have not been sufficiently disclosed up till then.

3. Assessment
The possibilities to follow a principal subject study will be discussed by the committee. Important issues for the
assessment are:
* musicality and hearing
* feeling for rhythm and tempo
* disposition for the instrument
* sight reading, technique, tone quality

19
Clarinet and Bass Clarinet
The wind faculty seeks to train students to become all-round musicians capable of functioning in all areas of
the professional practice: from musical orchestras to big bands through to jazz, fusion, pop and Latin
ensembles, both live and recorded. Students gain experience in a variety of musical situations, with ensemble
playing, solo performance and improvisation as focal points. Separate courses are offered for lead trumpet and
lead alto, these are unique in Europe.

Coördinator: Jasper Blom

Study programme

Objective
The objective of the course is twofold: the greatest possible development of the student's musical potential on
the one hand, and the greatest possible development of the student as a musician ready to enter the
professional music world on the other. This is accomplished by allowing the student to take part in various
musical situations in which ensemble playing and the development of soloistic qualities (improvisation) are key.
The student's own contribution (creativity) is also stimulated.

20
Propaedeutic Year

Principal subject
In the principal private lessons, the student becomes acquainted with basic musical structures on which
improvisation is based. The following are addressed:
* the development of the ear
* the development of a sense of rhythm and tempo
* tone production
* understanding of harmony in relation to improvisation
* the development of accompanying and melodic skills on the bass clarinet
* the development of repertoire knowledge in the field of classical music and jazz

Technique
In the technique lessons, attention is given to the development of specific technical skills related to the
saxophone. The following are addressed:
* scales
* arpeggios with variations
* études and transcriptions focusing on the jazz performance tradition.
* historical development of the instrument

Ensembles
In this year, the following ensembles are required:
* ensemble skills
* jazz group
* clarinet quartets / quintets, woodwinds group

Examination (summary)

Playing ability
Programme: the student will prepare a number of pieces that exhibit his/her musical development.

Ear and reading ability


Reflex, sight-reading, ear-training.

Assessment
The following will be assessed:
* musicality; ear, understanding of melody/harmony, sense of rhythm and tempo
* affinity with the instrument and with jazzz
* technique, tone production, reading ability
* the development of the student's vocabulary

Second and third year

Principal subject
The approach outlined in the propaedeutic year will be continued.

Improvisation
The following are addressed:
* creativity
* the development of a personal style
* analysis of solo transcriptions
* knowledge of the classical and jazz repertoire

21
* ear-training in conjunction with the instrument
* interpretation of various styles

Technique
* etudes
* performance practice
* compound metres
* orchestral playing
* flageolets, double tones, circular breathing, etc.

Ensembles
* jazz group in year 2 and 3
* trio plus soloist in year 3
* ‘free space’ ensembles
* ensembles with bass clarinet (for instance Zappa group)
* crossover group and/or other traditions are a required elective in year 3 or 4
* (optional, saxophone as a subsidiary subject) big band in year 3 and year 2 and/or year 4

This phase will be concluded with a recital. This recital will constitute the last assessment before the final
examination and will take place during the second term of year 3.

Examination
The student will prepare no more than six pieces. For more information, please see the section on the
propaedeutic year. In late April of the third year, a technique examination will be held

Fourth year

This final year will be devoted to preparations for the final examination.

Principal subject
Individual development is particularly emphasized at this point.

Ensembles
One ensemble is reqiored: trio + soloist

Final examination
* performance of at least 50 minutes, not to exceed one hour
* the student will choose the setting(s) and the repertoire; the programme will be as varied as possible and
chosen in consultation with the principal study teacher
* the quality of the arrangements, the student's own compositions and originality will all weigh heavily in the
assessment
* the student should present himself/herself to the best of his/her ability as an improvising clarinettist

Teachers

Joris Roelofs
Harmen de Boer clarinet technique
Erik van Deuren bass clarinet technique
Marc Scholten didactics

22
Admission requirements

1. Playing skill
a. The committee will choose from three pieces of a different character, tempo and key prepared by the
candidate, in which he/she shows the committee both command of the instrument and affinity with jazz. In
playing these pieces improvisation should be an important part. For candidates who give priority to playing in
an orchestra, there are also possibilities. In this case improvisatorial skills are less important.
b. The candidate must also play written material, e.g. jazz solos, jazz etudes, and/or classical etudes (bring 4
copies of sheet music for the committee).
c. Being able to play all major and minor scales and triads at a reasonable tempo.

Please note: written material in consultation with Erik van Deuren and Harmen de Boer

2. Hearing, tempo/timing and reading skills


This may consist of:
* playing by ear on harmonic progressions which are given by the committee members
* repeating of played fragments
* being able to play a prima vista a piece in jazz idiom (for instance a section from an orchestral part or a simple
etude)
The committee supplements the examination with some exercises which must show the candidate's skills
which have not been sufficiently disclosed up till then.

3. Assessment
The possibilities to follow a principal subject study will be discussed by the committee. Important issues for the
assessment are:
* musicality and hearing
* feeling for rhythm and tempo
* disposition for the instrument
* sight reading, technique, tone quality

23
Trumpet
The wind faculty seeks to train students to become all-round musicians capable of functioning in all areas of
the professional practice: from musical orchestras to big bands through to jazz, fusion, pop and Latin
ensembles, both live and recorded. Students gain experience in a variety of musical situations, with ensemble
playing, solo performance and improvisation as focal points. Separate courses are offered for lead trumpet and
lead alto, these are unique in Europe.

The teaching staff of the trumpet section consists of Ruud Breuls, Jan Wessels and Jan Oosthof (lead trumpet).
Bobby Shew, Earl Gardner, Chuck Findley, Terell Stafford, Ambrose Akinmusire, and Avishai Cohen were guest
teachers in the past years.

Co-ordinator: Jan Oosthof

Study programme

Objective

The objective of the course is to train musicians to be as versatile as possible. The programme offers students
various means of specialization, which corresponds to the individual talents of the student. This objective is
accomplished by allowing the student to take part in various musical situations in which good ensemble skills

24
and the development of soloistic qualities (improvisation) are key; additionally, the student's own contribution
(creativity) is stimulated to the greatest extent possible.

Propaedeutic Year

Principal subject
In the principal private lessons, the following issues will be addressed:
* becoming acquainted with basic musical structures on which improvisation is based. Attention is paid to tone
production, articulation, phrasing, timing and an understanding of harmony in relation to improvisation.
* the development of a personal musical language
* playing transcriptions that focus on the performance tradition of jazz music
* playing all major and minor scales, arpeggios with variations

These lessons are given by the improvisation teacher.

Technique
The technique teacher will focus particularly on technical skills including posture, breathing, embouchure and
tone production.

Ensembles
In this year, the following ensembles are required:
* ensemble skills
* jazz group
* trumpet section

Examination (summary)

* playing four pieces of different character from memory


* playing four classical solo pieces of different character

Second and third year

Principal subject
In the lessons in improvisation, the following points will receive extra attention:
* ear-training in conjunction with the instrument
* stimulating creativity and helping to develop the student's own individual style
* the analysis of solo transcriptions
* knowledge of the repertoire
* further exploration of scalar material in various intervals and with various articulations
* continued development of the student's range on the instrument

In addition, attention is now devoted to the performance tradition of fusion/funk music. The student's jazz,
classical and ensemble repertoire is expanded. In the third year, classes are put together for the purpose of
studying and performing various styles.

Ensembles
* jazz group in year 2 and 3
* trio plus soloist in year 3
* crossover group and/or other traditions are a required elective in year 3 or 4
* big band in year 2 and 3 and year 1 and/or year 4

25
This phase will be concluded with a recital. This recital will constitute the last assessment before the final
examination and will take place during the second term of year 3.

Examination (summary)
The student will prepare no more than six pieces. For more information, please see the section on the
propaedeutic year.

Fourth Year

Principal subject
During this year, the student will prepare a varied programme with the help of his/her principal study teacher.

Technique
In late January, the final technique examination will be held.

Ensembles
Two ensembles are required: trio plus soloist and one ensemble of the student's choice.

Final examination (summary)

The examination will last at least 50 and no more than 60 minutes. All students will be responsible for putting
together the repertoire that they will perform for the final examination so that they can present themselves to
the best of their ability.

Teachers
Jan Oosthof lead-trumpet, techniek, methodiek, coördinator
Ruud Breuls
Jan Wessels
Terell Stafford regular guest teacher – artist in residence
Alex Sipiagin regular guest teacher – artist in residence

Admission requirements

1. Playing skill
The committee will choose from three pieces from the standard jazz repertoire (theme and improvisation) of
different character, tempo and key, prepared by the candidate, in which he/she shows the committee both
command of the instrument and a reasonable rhythmic, harmonic and melodic understanding. In playing these
pieces improvisation must be an important factor. For candidates who give priority to playing in an orchestra
there are also possibilities. In this case improvisatorial skills are less important.
b. The candidate must also play written material, e.g. jazz solos, jazz etudes and/or classical etudes (bring four
copies of sheet music for the examination committee).
c. Being able to play:
* all major and minor scales
* all major and minor triads and dominant seventh chords

2. Hearing, tempo/timing and reading skills


This may consist of:
* repeating by ear a sung or played line
* filling in (playing solo) of a harmonic progression of given chord symbols
* playing of a written melody a prima vista
26
The committee supplements the examination with some exercises which must show the candidate's skills
which have not been sufficiently disclosed up till then.

3. Assessment
The possibilities to follow a principal subject study will be discussed by the committee. Important issues for the
assessment are:
1. musicality, hearing and melodic understanding
2. feeling for rhythm and tempo
3. affinity with jazz or derived forms is supposed to be present
4. harmonic understanding, reading chords
5. technique and tone quality
6. sight reading

27
Trombone and Bass Trombone
The wind faculty seeks to train students to become all-round musicians capable of functioning in all areas of
the professional practice: from musical orchestras to big bands through to jazz, fusion, pop and Latin
ensembles, both live and recorded. Students gain experience in a variety of musical situations, with ensemble
playing, solo performance and improvisation as focal points. Separate courses are offered for lead trumpet and
lead alto, these are unique in Europe.

The members of the trombone section are Bert Boeren, Martijn Sohier, Ilja Reijngoud, Erik van Lier, Martin van
den Berg and Jilt Jansma. Bill Reichenbach, Bart van Lier, Adrian Means and Robin Eubanks were guest teachers
in the past years.

Co-ordinator: Erik van Lier

Study programme

Objective

The objective of the course is to train musicians to be as versatile as possible. The programme offers students
various means of specialization, which corresponds to the individual talents of the student. This objective is
accomplished by allowing the student to take part in various musical situations in which good ensemble skills
and the development of soloistic qualities (improvisation) are key; additionally, the student's own contribution
(creativity) is stimulated to the greatest extent possible.

28
Propaedeutic Year

Principal subject
In the principal private lessons, the following issues will be addressed:
* becoming acquainted with basic musical structures on which improvisation is based. Attention is paid to tone
production, articulation, phrasing, timing and an understanding of harmony in relation to improvisation.
* the development of a personal musical language
* playing all major and minor scales
* acquainting the student with II-V-I progressions, also unaccompanied over two bars
* learning themes by heart and their accompanying chord charts
* collecting jazz repertoire on LP records, CDs and cassette tapes

These lessons are given by the improvisation teacher.

Technique
In the technique lessons, attention will be given to:
* improving general horn technique: posture, breath, breath support, embouchure, slide technique, tone
production, articulation, range and flexibility
* becoming acquainted with various practice methods and warm-up exercises
* a practical introduction to various trombone schools and the methods and various styles (solo pieces)
* improvement/development of reading accidentals and clefs in common trombone material
* improvement of tone conception (tone production) by listening to trombonists (CD, LP)

Both classical and jazz. The jazz teacher will also check technique using material by Remington, Slokar, Van Lier,
Bequet and Kleinhammer. These technique books will continue to be explored and discussed throughout the
four-year period.

Ensembles
In this year, the following ensembles are required:
* ensemble skills
* jazz group
* trombone group

Examination (summary)

* playing four pieces of different character from memory


* playing two études requiring different articulation
* playing two classical solo pieces of different character

Second and third year

Principal subject
In the lessons in improvisation, the following points will receive extra attention:
* ear-training in conjunction with the instrument
* stimulating creativity and helping to develop the student's own individual style
* the analysis of solo transcriptions
* knowledge of the repertoire
* further exploration of scalar material in various intervals and with various articulations
* continuing to develop stamina for lead parts; range should extend up to a high D at least

29
* becoming aware of different types of tone and being able to produce these as well
* developing dynamic ability (pp?ff)
* refining the conditioning routines and learning the effect of the various exercises
* being able to execute the solos of Dick Nash, J.J. Johnson and Carl Fontano
* studying the old bands and their trombone sound, as well as classical trombone soloists

In his/her lesson plan, the student will draw up his/her own improvisation teaching method to be implemented
at three different levels: for amateurs, music schools and conservatories.

Technique
First-year material will be taken to a higher level. In the lessons, attention will be given to playing classical
études and concert pieces.

Ensembles
* jazz group in year 2 and 3
* trio plus soloist in year 3
* crossover group and/or other traditions are a required elective in year 3 or 4
* trombone group in year 2 and 3
* big band in year 2 and 3 and year 1 and/or year 4

This phase will be concluded with a recital. This recital will constitute the last assessment before the final
examination and will take place during the second term of year 3.

Examination (summary)

The student will prepare no more than six pieces. For more information, please see the section on the
propaedeutic year.

Fourth year

Principal subject
Preparation for the final examination. Extending the student's range on the instrument up to a high F. Increase
dynamics and stamina.

Technique
In late January, a final technique examination will be held in which the student will perform classical études and
concert pieces.

Ensembles
Two ensembles are required: trio plus soloist and one ensemble of the student's choice.

Final examination
The examination will last at least 50 and no more than 60 minutes. All students will be responsible for putting
together the repertoire that they will perform for the final examination so that they can present themselves to
the best of their ability

Teachers
Erik van Lier bastrombone, co-ordinator
Bert Boeren
Ilja Reijngoud
Martijn Sohier technique, co-ordinator

30
Martin van den Berg technique (bass trombone)
Jilt Jansma methodics
Nils Wogram regular guest teacher – artist in residence

Admission requirements

1. Playing skill
a. The committee will choose from three pieces from the standard jazz repertoire (theme and
improvisation) of different character, tempo and key, prepared by the candidate, in which he/she shows
the committee both command of the instrument and a reasonable rhythmic, harmonic and melodic
understanding. In playing these pieces improvisation must be an important factor. For candidates who
give priority to playing in an orchestra there are also possibilities. In this case improvisatorial skills are
less important.
b. The candidate must also play written material, e.g. jazz solos, jazz etudes and/or classical etudes
(bring four copies of sheet music for the examination committee).
c. Being able to play all major and minor scales and triads at a reasonable tempo.

The committee reserves the right to interrupt the candidate's playing as according to the committee,
he/she has supplied enough information (because of the limited time of 30 minutes). Therefore it is
important for the candidate to show his/her skills as quickly as possible: not too many and/or too long
solos of fellow players, no unnecessary repetitions.

2. Hearing, tempo/timing and reading skills


This may consist of:
* repeating by ear a sung or played line
* filling in (playing solo) of a harmonic progression of given chord symbols
* playing of a written melody a prima vista

The committee supplements the examination with some exercises which must show the candidate's
skills which have not been sufficiently disclosed up till then.

3. Assessment
The possibilities to follow a principal subject study will be discussed by the committee. Important issues
for the assessment are:
1. musicality, hearing and melodic understanding
2. feeling for rhythm and tempo
3. affinity with jazz or derived forms is supposed to be present

but besides these also:


4. harmonic understanding, reading chords
5. technique and tone quality
6. sight reading

31
Guitar
The bachelor programme for guitarists provides training in jazz from all periods. Students are
encouraged to develop their own style. They can be taught by various principal-study teachers throughout
the study and there are opportunities to play in a wide range of ensembles (Latin, fusion etc.).

The teaching staff consists of Maarten van der Grinten, Martijn van Iterson, Jesse van Ruller, Durk Hijma
(Methodology and Technology I and II) Reinier Baas (guest teacher) George Dumitriu (guest teacher) and Eric
Varzon Morel (Flamenco). A selection from the international guest teachers: John Scofield, Mike Stern, Leonardo
Amuedo and Peter Bernstein (regular guest teacher- Artist in Residence)

Co-ordinator: Maarten van der Grinten

Study programme

Objective

The objective of the course is twofold: the greatest possible development of the student's musical
potential on the one hand, and the greatest possible development of the student as a musician ready to
enter the professional music world on the other. In the course, an approach focusing on jazz and related
music has been chosen. Consequently, students will be fully equipped to deal with all styles upon
entering the professional world.

32
Propaedeutic Year

Principal subject
In the principal private lessons, the following issues will be addressed:
* the playing of melody (single note): tone production, left-hand technique (legato without overlapping
notes), right-hand technique (plectrum, hybrid picking), knowledge and analysis of melodies from the
repertoire, timing, notion of swing, varying melody through rhythm, transposition
* improvisation:
1. rhythmic awareness, timing, notion of swing, tempo (metronome, foot), phrasing, rests, feel for
four- and eight-measure phrases (also without chord chart)
2. playing in a key, melodic variation, auxiliary notes (diatonic and chromatic suspensions and passing
notes), arpeggios, diatonic non-harmonic tones, altered non-harmonic tones, scales (church modes,
harmonic and melodic minor, octatonic, altered, whole-tone, pentatonic), awareness of intervals,
sequences
3. dynamics and amplification
4. chord charts for repertoire pieces
5. the transcribing and playing of recordings (of an improvisation by a guitarist and by a wind player)

* Accompaniment: knowledge of chords, terminology, use of the left thumb, omitting fifths, playing
rhythm and comping like on the piano, one- and two-voice accompaniment (fills), creating intros and
codas, becoming aware of the difference between two- and four-beat accentuation, knowledge of
chord charts, functional analysis of these charts with variations and non-harmonic notes, scale degrees
(of the major and harmonic minor scales), ensemble skills and concentrating on listening to one's
fellow players, amplification and dynamics, tempo
* solfège in relation to the instrument: repeating melodies, improvising on chords by ear, learning a
standard without using music, working out solos on the instrument without having to notate them
* sight-reading: (although dealt with in the principal subject, is focused on particularly in Sight reading I
and II) melodies (jazz and pop standards, classical work for clarinet, classical work for violin), chords,
chords with melody in the upper voice

The principal private lesson is given on an individual basis. Much of this time will be spent playing pieces
with the principal study teacher (melody, improvisation and accompaniment); the student's initiative with
respect to the choosing of pieces is encouraged. During the course, the student will switch principal
study teachers at least once.

Second and third year

Principal subject
* taking the lesson material worked on during the propaedeutic year to a higher level
* dealing with the components of the étude examination and all related issues
* dealing with the pieces to be played during the performance examination and all related issues
* developing an awareness of different styles of the repertoire and of composers, familiarization with the origin
of the pieces
* bass lines
* being able to accompany a melody with chords
* sweeping
* transposing chord charts

Technique
* Basic Technique II (second-year group lesson taught by Peter Mingaars) is a continuation of Basic Technique I.
The following will also be addressed: classical études (single-string: inventions and partitas by Bach, Perpetuum
mobile by Paganini, etc.); transcribing and playing along with solos chosen by the student; and a list of solos

33
from which the student must choose one to perform.
* Sight-reading II (if not completed in the propaedeutic year)

Ensembles
* guitar quintet, Henk Sprenger: arrangements for five guitars plus rhythm section in big-band style. To enrol,
students must first have completed Sight-reading I and II.
* guitar group III (taught by Maarten van der Grinten): the pieces for the étude examination are dealt with
from a practical perspective; in this respect, communication with the rhythm section is one of the focal points
* big band (optional)
* trio plus soloist (optional in the third year)
* other traditions and/or crossover group (students must choose at least one term of both of these)

Examination (summary)

Étude examination (third year, second term)


A list of required repertoire pieces in the following styles:
* medium two-beat
* up-tempo (bop or 'cool' four-beat composition)
* chord arrangement of a ballad (partly rubato)
* Coltrane piece (parallel thirds relationship)
* Brazilian (emphasis on accompaniment)
* modal (one or no chord in improvisation chart)
* post-bop (chart with non-functional chords)

Performance examination (fourth year, first term)


A precursor to the final examination; the programme will last approximately 40 minutes. The student is free to
choose the pieces that he/she will perform. One piece must have been composed recently-a piece that exhibits
other influences in addition to jazz and/or Latin influences.

Students are expected to perform at least once a year on an evening group recital; they are responsible for
finding their own rhythm section.

Fourth year

Performance examination in the first term; please see above.

Principal subject
Everything related to the repertoire of the final examination. Preparing to function independently
in the musical arena.

Ensembles
* ensembles as described in the third-year section, based on choice and availability.

Final examination
Students are free to choose the pieces that they will perform; they are, however, expected to choose
pieces that illustrate their technical versatility. The candidate must demonstrate good organizational
skills, skill in arranging (at least for small ensemble) and possess musical expressivity. Length of the
programme: 50 minutes.

Teachers

Maarten van der Grinten coordinator

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Martijn van Iterson
Jesse van Ruller
Reinier Baas guest teacher
Peter Bernstein regular guest teacher – artist in residence
Durk Hijma technique, methodology

Admission requirements

1. Playing skill
a. Repertoire: the committee will choose from three pieces from the standard jazz repertoire prepared
by the candidate including one (jazz-) blues theme and at least one jazz standard. The candidate will be
expected to play the chosen jazz standard melody single stringed (without the underlying chords).
Each piece must contain theme, improvisation and accompaniment. The candidate will be accompanied by
one of the guitar teachers unless he/she has brought own accompaniment.
The committee reserves the right to interrupt the candidate's playing as according to the committee,
he/she has supplied enough information (because of the limited time of 30 minutes).

b. Technique: the candidate must show sufficient knowledge of chords and major and minor scales in
position. When this is not evident in the chosen repertoire, the candidate may be asked to provide
further prove.
The course assumes the use of a plectrum. When the candidate does not use a plectrum, the
committee will give special attention to the quality of the single string melody) playing.

2. Hearing, tempo/timing and reading skills


This may consist of:
* repeating by ear a played line
* accompanying by ear a played harmonic progression without having received any indication
* playing of a written melody; after a short preparation, also in position
* playing of a harmonic progression to given chord symbols

The committee supplements the examination with some exercises which must show the candidate's skill
which have not been sufficiently disclosed up till then.

3. Assessment
The possibilities to follow a principal subject study will be discussed by the committee.

Important issues for the assessment are:


1. musicality, hearing and melodic understanding
2. feeling for rhythm and tempo
3. affinity with jazz

but besides these also


1. harmonic understanding, reading chords
2. technique, tone quality
3. sight reading

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Piano
Principal-study pianists are trained as soloists, orchestra musicians and accompanists in all spheres of the
musical profession and as improvisers in modern jazz settings as well. Alongside the principal study there are
special technical courses which focus on composed music, piano technique and sight-reading.

Teachers are Rob van Bavel, Karel Boehlee, Hans Vroomans, Harmen Fraanje; techinque teachers are Matthijs
Verschoor and Gert jan Vermeulen. Over the past years guest teachers have included Brad Mehldau, Jason
Moran, Joey Calderazzo, Larry Goldings, Danilo Perez and Vijay Iyer.

Coordinator: Karel Boehlee

Study programme

Objective

The objective of the course is twofold: the greatest possible development of the student's musical potential on
the one hand, and the greatest possible development of the student as a musician ready to enter the
professional music world on the other. In the course, an approach focusing on jazz and related music has been
chosen. Consequently, students will be fully equipped to deal with all styles upon entering the professional
world.

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Propaedeutic Year

Principal subject
In the principal private lessons, the following issues will be addressed:
* the development of the ear
* the development of a sense of rhythm and tempo
* harmony: developing an understanding of harmonic progressions
* reading notes and chord symbols
* developing musical memory
* improvising
* technique
* accompanying/ensemble playing
* learning how to practice

Technique
In addition to the principal subject, special technique lessons will focus on composed music, piano technique,
sight-reading, etc.

Ensembles
In this year, the following ensembles are required:
* ensemble skills
* jazz group
* crossover group

For the remaining subjects, please see the credit list.

Examination (summary)

Playing ability
Programme:
* three pieces of different character, two of which are set for trio and one with a soloist, because of the
accompanimental aspect
* one composed piece (concert piece, polyphonic or étude), which demonstrates mastery of the basic
technique
* demonstrating knowledge of major and minor scales, pentatonic, octatonic, chromatic scales, church modes

Ear and reading ability


Reflex, sight-reading, ear-training.

Assessment
The following will be assessed:
* musicality: ear, understanding of melody/harmony, sense of rhythm and tempo
* affinity with the instrument
* technique, tone production, reading ability

Second and third year

Principal subject
The approach outlined in the propaedeutic year will be continued.

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Technique
In the third year, a final examination will take place. Requirements: one concert piece, one polyphonic piece,
two études and one piece to be sight-read

Ensembles
* jazz group in year 2
* trio plus voice in year 2
* trio plus soloist in year 3
* crossover group and/or other traditions are a required elective in year 2 or 3
* principal subject group in year 2 or 3
* big band optional

This phase will be concluded with a recital. This recital will constitute the last assessment before the final
examination and will take place during the second term of year 3.

Examination
* candidates should present a well-prepared and varied programme lasting approximately 40 minutes; it is also
recommended that candidates include on the programme a piece that they have composed
* a solo piece: a long, rubato solo introduction to an ensemble piece is also acceptable
* the programme should be performed mainly at the piano; the use of electronics (e.g. synthesizers) for
colouring is permitted
* various settings in which the student can be heard as a soloist and as an accompanist.

Fourth year

This final year will be devoted to preparations for the final examination.

Principal subject
Individual development is particularly emphasized at this point.

Ensembles
Two ensembles are required unless the student has fulfilled all his/her obligations. For more information,
please see the ensemble overview.

Final examination
* performance of at least 50 minutes, not to exceed one hour
* the student will choose the setting(s) and the repertoire; the programme will be as varied as possible and
chosen in consultation with the principal study teacher
* the quality of the arrangements, the student's own compositions and originality will all weigh heavily in the
assessment
* students may deviate from the above should they have devoted themselves to the study of a style to such an
extent that they have mastered it (to be assessed by the department).

Throughout the programme, all piano students are required to perform at least once each year on an evening
group recital.

Teachers

Karel Boehlee coordinator


Rob van Bavel
Harmen Fraanje

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Hans Vroomans
Matthijs Verschoor technique
Gert-Jan Vermeulen technique
Jaco Benckhuijsen methodology

Admission requirements

1. Playing skill
a. The committee will choose from three pieces from standard jazz repertoire prepared by the candidate
(among which one blues and one ballad), in which the candidate shows the committee that he/she both
masters the instrument and has a reasonable rhythmic, harmonic and melodic understanding.

b. Two pieces from the classical repertoire, or written out jazz etudes and solos (bring 4 copies of sheet music
for the committee).
The committee reserves the right to interrupt the candidate's playing as according to the committee, he/she
has supplied enough information (because of the limited time of 30 minutes). Therefore it is important for the
candidate to show his/her skills as quickly as possible: not too many and/or too long solos of fellow players, no
unnecessary repetitions.

2. Hearing, tempo/timing and reading skills


This may consist of:
* repeating by ear lines and chords
* accompanying by ear an unknown, simple piece, without any previous information
* filling in (with a logical bass line) of a harmonic progression to given chord symbols
* being able to play a given piece (melody and chord symbols)

The committee supplements the examination with some exercises which must show the candidate's skills
which have not been sufficiently disclosed up till then.

3. Assessment
The possibilities to follow a principal subject study will be discussed by the committee. Important issues for the
assessment are:
1. musicality, hearing and melodic understanding
2. feeling for rhythm and tempo
3. affinity with the instrument and the music styles which are directly connected with this instrument

but besides these also:


4. creative skills (arrangements and improvisation)
5. knowledge of chords (major, minor, dominant seventh and half diminished chords with their augmentations)
and playing skill of chords (two-hand voicing)
6. technique, among which fingering, toucher, major and minor scales, broken chords
7. sight reading (chords, notes and rhythm)

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Double Bass
The double bass faculty offers a world-class training programme with teachers Frans van der Hoeven, Ernst
Glerum en Ruud Ouwehand. Students are trained to become good accompanists and improvisers in any jazz
style. Over the past years guest teachers have included Joyn Clayton, John Pattituci, Buster Williams, Larry
Grendier and Matt Penman.

Co-ordinator: Frans van der Hoeven

Study programme

Objective

The objective of the course is twofold: the greatest possible development of the student's musical potential on
the one hand, and the greatest possible development of the student as a musician ready to enter the
professional music world on the other. In the course, an approach focusing on jazz and related music has been
chosen. Consequently, students will be fully equipped to deal with all styles upon entering the professional
world.

Propaedeutic Year

Principal subject
In the principal private lessons, the following issues will be addressed:
* musical development. Naturally, not every student will develop in the same way; nothing is more personal

41
than this development! The approach adopted will therefore have to be quite individual. Students' musical
development can, in any event, be broken down into the following components: harmonic, rhythmic, melodic
and auditory.
* technical development. Technical development can be broken down into the development of left-hand
technique and the development of right-hand technique. Good posture is crucial for an effective technique.
Relaxation is of primary importance in this regard.
* reading ability. Mastery of musical notation, begun during the preparatory course, will be further developed.
In addition, students will be trained in the swift analysis and playing of chord symbols.

Technique
In the technique lessons, which will focus primarily on bowing, the following issues will be addressed:

Technical:
* three bow speeds (slow-medium-fast)
* simple bow division (whole-half)
* consistently playing on the string and changing bows
* applying the above techniques in a piece of music, playing legato, bowing technique

Conceptual: being able to distinguish between so-called functional bass-playing and more soloistic approaches.

Ensembles

In this year, the following ensembles are required:


* ensemble skills
* jazz group
* trio plus voice (optional)

Participation in certain ensembles may be required throughout the entire programme. As regards the
additional subjects, please see the credit list.

Examination (summary)

Playing ability
Three pieces that clearly demonstrate the student's rhythmic, harmonic and melodic capabilities. During the
propaedeutic examination, the student's technical ability to provide support (bowing) will also be assessed, in
addition to the application of the aforementioned techniques in a piece that he/she is free to choose.

Ear, tempo/timing and reading ability


The following will be evaluated: technique and acoustic tone production, understanding of melody, reading
notes and rhythm, development of the ear and knowledge of the repertoire.

Assessment
The assessment will focus on musicality, sense of rhythm and tempo, ear, understanding of melody/harmony,
affinity with the instrument, ensemble playing and improvisatory skills, technique, reading ability and tone
production.

Second and third year

Principal subject
The approach outlined in the propaedeutic year will be continued.

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Technique
First-year subjects will be studied in greater detail.

Ensembles
Each year, three ensembles are required, each lasting at least one term. Jazz group (in the second year), jazz
group and/or big band (in the third year), guitar trio and/or trio with voice (second year) and with soloist (third
year) and at least one term of saxophone, trumpet or trombone group. Students may additionally elect
crossover, Brazilian and/or Latin group and contemporary music employing non-Western techniques.

This phase will be concluded with a recital. This recital will constitute the last assessment before the final
examination and will take place during the second term of year 3.

Examination (summary)

Playing ability
The candidate will prepare approximately six pieces that best demonstrate his/her ability. Total duration
including the assessment and setting up is approximately 45 minutes. In at least one piece, the potential of the
bass as a string instrument must be accentuated. For the most part, the recital must consist of pieces from the
jazz and improvisation repertoire. Although the student is not required to perform his/her own compositions,
this is looked upon quite favourably.

Techniques

* accompanying soloists
* playing themes
* soloing at a reasonably high level (on a chart)
* tone, intonation and timing will all be important factors in the assessment
* convincingly skilled in arco (bowed) bass-playing

Assessment
Provided that fundamental aspects like rhythmic and harmonic interpretation are found to be in order,
attention will be paid primarily to the student?s all-round musicianship (with respect to musical styles,
techniques, pizzicato, arco, accompanying as a specialization, playing solos, functionality, intensity and taste).
Specialization and originality are looked upon favourably.

Fourth year

Principal subject
As the final examination approaches, the principal study teacher will play an increasingly advisory role in
relation to the make-up of the programme and the group(s) and the musical choices made.

Ensembles
Two ensembles are required unless the student has fulfilled all his/her obligations. For more information,
please see the ensemble overview.

Examination (summary)

Playing ability
In consultation with the principal study teacher, candidates will prepare a varied programme in which they can
present themselves as accompanists and soloists to the best of their ability. The teacher must receive the draft
programme at least three months before the examination. Students' own views are highly valued. Techniques
and assessment: please see the section on the recital.
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43
Teachers

Frans van der Hoeven coordinator


Ruud Ouwehand
Ernst Glerum technique + methodology
John Clayton regular guest teacher – artist in residence

Admission requirements

1. Playing skill
a. The committee will choose from three pieces (one blues or one rhythm scheme) prepared by the candidate,
which show the committee that he/she both masters his/her instrument and has a reasonable rhythmic,
harmonic and melodic understanding.

b. Being able to play the most important major (G, C, F, B flat, E flat, A flat) and minor (E, A, D, G, C, F) scales,
preferably bowed, reasonable knowledge and command of the chords major, minor, diminished and
augmented at a reasonable tempo.

The committee reserves the right to interrupt the candidate's playing as according to the committee, he/she
has supplied enough information (because of the limited time of 30 minutes). Therefore it is important for the
candidate to show his/her skills as quickly as possible: not too many and/or too long solos of fellow players, no
unnecessary repetitions.

2. Hearing, tempo/timing and reading skills


This may consist of:
* repeating by ear a sung or played line
* accompanying by ear an unknown, simple piece, without any previous information
* filling in (with a logical bass line) of a harmonic progression to given chord symbols
* playing of a written bass line/melody

The committee supplements the examination with some exercises which must show the candidate's skills
which have not been sufficiently disclosed up till then.

3. Assessment
The possibilities to follow a principal subject study will be discussed by the committee.

Important issues for the assessment are:


1. musicality, hearing and melodic understanding (also in bass lines)
2. feeling for rhythm and tempo
3. affinity with the instrument and the music styles which are directly connected with this instrument

but besides these also:


4. harmonic understanding, reading chords
5. technique, tone quality, playing in tune
6. sight reading

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Bass Guitar
This section provides training in all styles with elements of improvisation available for this relatively young
instrument: from the early years with blues, jazz, rock, latin, soul, funk and fusion to comtemporary styles
including electronic jazz, rhythmically advanced jazz and contemporary music. The course aims to train
students to become creative all-round bass guitarists with a personal style and awareness of the traditions.

In addition to teachers Charly Angenois, Theo de Jong, David de Marez Oyens, Lené te Voortwis and Jeroen
Vierdag, such guest teachers as Gary Willis, Jef Berlin, Tim Le Fevbre, Domonique DiPiazza, Reggie Washington
and Kai Eckhardt, Glenn Gaddum and Paedra Kwant have also contributed considerably to the course.

Co-ordinator: David de Marez Oyens

Study programme

Objective

The objective of the programme is to produce creative, all-round bass guitarists with their own personalities
who can also teach at various levels. In other words, 'after graduation, the bass player should be able to
perform his role adequately in a great number of different professional situations and to play an active role in
the creative process whenever the opportunity should arise'. Moreover, bass players should be able to
continue independently to develop technically and musically after having completed the programme.

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Propaedeutic Year

Principal subject
Assuming that students will be brimming with all sorts of musical ideas, the principal private lessons will initially
be devoted to structuring these ideas. On the one hand, this will entail working on songs and bass parts with
which the student is familiar with a view to refining and, where necessary, correcting these; on the other hand,
this will involve bringing the student's own ideas to the surface. The skill of making associations between chord
progressions and the positions of the hand will be addressed nearly every week. On the basis of music with
which the student is already familiar, the student will gradually acquire new ideas which run parallel to the
theory lessons and the ensembles to which the student has been assigned. As the year progresses, the student
will increasingly devote his/her attention to preparing for the propaedeutic examination, focusing on areas
such as ear-training, sense of tempo, understanding of harmony and melody, and reading ability. He/she will
also devote attention to the repertoire to be prepared: three pieces with band, to be arranged by the student,
and at least the bass part to seven additional pieces; students must perform all music from memory. Attention
will be devoted in the lessons to the standard jazz repertoire, the traditional bass guitar styles, such as soul
(Motown), R&B and fusion.

Reading skills
To develop reading skills, students will follow the online course ‘Reading Bass Guitar’. In five modules of six
weeks each, the students can download an exercise sheet. In addition to reading skills, aspects such as style
awareness, developing your own bass lines or certain rhythmical, harmonic or technical challenges will be
covered.

Studio test-exam: The Song


In december the first studio test-exam takes place. This consists of a track and a sheet with contains only form
and harmonic details. The student is expected to create and record in 30 minutes a bass line based on the
backing track.

Technique
The technique lessons will focus, based on the programme by Jan Hollestelle, on tone production, steady beat,
string-dampening and position-playing. The first-year technique will be completed with an etude which will
incorporate all aspects that have been addressed.

Ensembles
In this year, the following ensembles are required:
* ensemble skills
* jazz group
* crossover group

All bass guitar students perform in the propaedeutic year in January, in connection with the binding
recommendation regarding the continuation of the study. At the end of the year there will be a propaedeutic
exam.

Examination (summary)

Playing ability
A list of ten pieces which the student has worked on, with a short description, should be handed in a week
before the exam at the latest. Of these ten pieces, three should be pepared with ensemble, pieces which allow
the players to interact and to present different characters, tempos, rhythms (binary and ternary) and keys. At
least the bass part to seven additional pieces is also required.

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Ear, tempo/timing and reading ability
The following will be evaluated: playing along and repeating by ear, tempo test, reading chord symbols, notes
and rhythm.

Assessment
The assessment will focus on musicality, ear, understanding of melody/harmony, tone and fingering, sense of
rhythm and tempo, affinity with the instrument, ensemble playing and improvisatory skills, technique, reading
ability and tone production, and the progress on these items.

Second year

Principal subject
Student enrichment will continue in conjunction with the theory lessons and the ensembles. Students will
develop their rhythmic awareness to an even greater extent now by inventing drum and bass grooves within a
song structure; this is put into practice during the studio examination (first- and third-year Song). From a
harmonic perspective, the interpretation of chord charts and reharmonizations are emphasized. Additionally,
attention is devoted to styles such as Latin, Brazilian and fusion, as well as to slightly more difficult jazz
standards and jazzblues. Throughout the year, students will also work on the new repertoire for the interim
examination.

Reading skills
Continuation of the online course ‘Reading Bass Guitar’; five modules of six weeks each, with new material
every week. In addition to reading skills, aspects such as style awareness, developing your own bass lines or
certain rhythmical, harmonic or technical challenges will be covered. The end-of-year exam will contain a
selection of this material.

Studio test-exam: The Jingle


The studio exam also focuses on reading skills. A one-minute jingle will be written out. The students are
expected to record this accurately within 30 minutes.

Technique
First-year subjects will be studied in greater detail, such as playing patterns on the entire finger-board and
harmonic progession. Students will now be expected to invent their own exercises to solve the problems that
they face while working on their own repertoire. They will also devote attention to the production of an even
more refined tone, various means of attack, e.g. placement, slapping, playing with the mute. Approximately
one month before the final technique examination, the student will hand out the sheet music for the pieces to
be played, which will incorporate various aspects that have been addressed. The student's own exercises will
also be included in the assessment. Additionally, the student may choose to study the double bass as a
subsidiary subject. The student is required to purchase his/her own double bass and should plan to conclude
studying the subject within two to three years.

Ensembles
* jazz group in year 2
* trio plus voice (optional)
* crossover group and other traditions are required electives in year 2 or 3
* bass guitar group in year 2 for the entire year or for one term (in the event of high demand)
* big band optional

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Examination (summary)

Playing ability
Same as for the propaedeutic examination, with a new list of ten pieces, one of which should be a jazzblues in
an interpretation of the student's choice, and an extensive reading ability test. The other exercises will no
longer be tested unless the committee considers this necessary.

Assessment
The assessment will focus on musicality, ear, understanding of melody/harmony, sense of rhythm and tempo,
ensemble playing and improvisatory skills, style awareness, technique and tone production and the progression
on these parts.

Third year
Principal subject
Students will increasingly be encouraged to arrange and even compose pieces themselves so that their ideas
can be placed within a broader context. Along the way, they will also be guided in their preparations for a
recital in which their own views will be given free rein. Naturally, requirements will be set in respect of the
breadth of the programme to ensure the student's all-round musicianship. If necessary, time will be devoted in
the principal subject lessons to preparing for the studio exam. As regards rhythmic development, irregular
metres and the phenomenon of cross-rhythm will now be addressed, among other things. The student's
capacity to maintain a steady tempo will be assessed during the recital in a fragment to be played without
drums or percussion. Harmonic, melodic and rhythmic ideas will continue to crystallize in the student's
improvisations.

Studio exam: Song and Jingle


Students have 50 minutes to record a song and a short piece like those used for the examinations held in the
second and third years

Ensembles
* trio plus voice (optional)
* advanced jazz/improvisation group (optional)
* crossover group and other traditions are required electives in year 2 or 3
* big band optional

At least three ensembles are required. Jazz group and/or trio with voice (preferably double bass), improvisation
group, guitar quintet, fusion group and/or Latin group and/or Brazilian group, bass guitar group or a student
group

Examination

Guidelines for the recital, the practical exam. This is the last exam before the final exam and should therefore
be prepared thoroughly.

The programme
In consultation with the principal study teacher, candidates will prepare a varied programme in which they can
present themselves as accompanists and soloists to the best of their ability. Students must submit their draft
programme to the teacher before Christmas break. As was the case with previous examinations, the student's
own views in this regard are highly valued. The student should not simply 'mimic' existing arrangements, as
these demonstrate relatively little of the candidate's ability and personality. Students should consider the
following aspects when choosing repertoire: rhythm, melody, harmony and technique. It is extremely
important that these aspects be reflected throughout the programme in a balanced way. The duration of the
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exam, including the assessment, is 45 minutes (max. 30 minutes of music).

The following is expected from the candidate:


* a broad repertoire with at least:
− one jazz standard with complex harmonies in swing
− one crossover piece (or jazz rock or fusion)
− one piece from another musical tradition (Brazilian, latin, flamenco etc.)
* playing solos at a reasonable level in at least two pieces in contrasting styles, one of which should be the jazz
standard
* one piece for solo bass guitar and/or
* accompanying a soloist (rubato)
* one rhythmic fragment without drums/percussion

Although the student is not required to perform his/her own compositions, this is looked upon quite
favorably, as is the playing of his/her own arrangements and irregular metres.

The assessment
Provided that the student has no more problems regarding rhythm and harmony, the committee will pay
attention to the level of being an 'all round' musician (in choice of musical styles, techniques, acccompanying,
playing solos), intensity, taste, interaction and progress. Specializing and originality will be appreciated, but are
not deciding in the committee's final assessment.

Fourth year

Principal subject
As the final examination approaches, the principal study teacher will play an increasingly advisory role in
relation to the make-up of the programme and the group(s) and the musical choices made. Nearing the end,
things like a stage plan and a programme booklet may also be discussed during the lessons. Additionally, the
first term will focus on preparations for the final studio exam.

Studio exam: The bass player - producer - arranger


During this exam, the canditate is not only bass player, but also arranger and producer. A week before the
exam, the candidate will get a lead-sheet with the melodic/harmonic basic material, for instance 1st and 2nd
theme. The candidate has a week to make their own version, which should be recorded wit a live band within
60 minutes. Upon arrival in the studio, the band should be ready to start.

Ensembles
Two ensembles are required unless the student has fulfilled all his/her obligations. For more information,
please see the ensemble overview. Jazz group and/or trio with voice (preferably double bass), improvisation
group, big band (only in the case of double bass as a subsidiary instrument), fusion group and/or Latin group
and/or Brazilian group and bass guitar group and/or a student group.

Examination (summary)

The final exam requires a broad repertoire in which all the parts of the recital have been developed into a full
concert programme.

Playing ability
In consultation with the principal study teacher, candidates will prepare this varied programme in which they
can present themselves as accompanists and soloists to the best of their ability. Students must submit their

49
draft programme to the teacher before Christmas break. As was the case with previous examinations, the
student's own views in this regard are highly valued. The student should not simply 'mimic' existing
arrangements, as these demonstrate relatively little of the candidate's ability and personality. Students should
consider the following aspects when choosing repertoire: rhythm, melody, harmony and technique. It is
extremely important that these aspects be reflected throughout the programme in a balanced way.

Additionally, the following is expected from the candidate:


* an improvisation in at least two pieces of contrasting styles, one of which at least should be based on a
harmonic progression
* one piece for solo bass guitar
accompanying asoloist (rubato)
* one rhythmic fragment without drums/percussion

Although the student is not required to perform his/her own compositions, this is looked upon quite
favourably, as is the playing of his/her own arrangements, various tempi and irregular metres. The concert may
not exceed 60 minutes, including announcements and stage changes.

Assessment
The committee will decide if all exam components have been performed sufficiently and will take into
account the measure in which the candidate has developed into an all-round bass guitarist with a
distinghuished own style who will be able to make a professional career for him/herself.

Teachers

Charly Angenois
Theo de Jong
David de Marez Oyens coordinator + methodology
Jeroen Vierdag
Lené te Voortwis

Admission requirements

1. Playing skill
a. The committee will choose from three pieces prepared by the candidate which show that he/she both
masters his/her instrument and has a reasonable rhythmic, harmonic and melodic understanding. This means
that a complete repetition of existing arrangements or classic pieces is not appreciated, because this shows
little of the candidate's skill (take this into account especially when selecting pop and fusion pieces).

b. Being able to play all major and minor scales and triads at a reasonable tempo.

Future students often think they are obliged to play 'swing' at the entrance examination. This is not the case;
we would like to hear you play the music that you feel related to.

The committee reserves the right to interrupt the candidate's playing as according to the committee, he/she
has supplied enough information (because of the limited time of 30 minutes). Therefore it is important for the
candidate to show his/her skills as quickly as possible: not too many and/or too long solos of fellow players, no
unnecessary repetitions.

It is not required to play 'swing'; the committee prefers to hear candidates play the music they feel related to.

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2. Hearing, tempo/timing and reading skills
This may consist of:
* accompanying by ear an unknown simple piece, without any previous information
* repeating by ear a sung or played line
* playing of a self-selected part at a given tempo (clicktrack)
* filling in (accompanying/solo playing of a harmonic progression to given chord symbols)
* playing of a written bass line/melody

The committee supplements the examination with some exercises which must show the candidate's skill which
have not been sufficiently disclosed up till then.

3. Assessment
The possibilities to follow a principal subject study will be discussed by the committee.

Important issues for the assessment are:


1. musicality, hearing and melodic understanding (also in bass lines), and the ability to relate this to the
instrument
2. feeling for rhythm and tempo
3. affinity with the instrument and the music styles which are directly connected with it

but besides these also:


4. harmonic understanding, reading chords
5. technique, tone quality
6. sight reading

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Drums
The drums faculty is characterized by versatility. Students are trained all-round, acquiring experience both in
the studio and on stage, with all kinds of ensembles: big band, jazz combo, Latin and fusion ensembles and rock
bands.

Teachers are Lucas van Merwijk, Marcel Serierse and Martijn Vink. Guest teachers have included John Riley,
Adam Nussbaum, Brian Blade, Jeff Ballard and Bill Stewart.

Co-ordinator: Lucas van Merwijk

Study programme

Objective

The objective of the course is twofold: the greatest possible development of the student's musical potential on
the one hand, and the greatest possible development of the student as a musician ready to enter the
professional music world on the other. In the course, an approach focusing on jazz and related music has been
chosen. Consequently, students will be fully equipped to deal with all styles upon entering the professional
world.

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Propaedeutic Year

Principal subject
In the principal private lessons, the following aspects will, in theory, be addressed:
1. Perfecting those style(s) with which the student has less affinity; the most important styles can be roughly
divided into three categories: jazz, fusion and Latin. The characteristic features of each style will be dealt with,
as well as well-known standards and grooves. Much attention will be given to playing along with influential
drummers of the 20th century, listening to CDs and watching DVDs and videos. In addition, it is important that
students be allowed to continue developing their own talents to boost their motivation and self-confidence.
Therefore students will bring their own recordings of concerts, studio sessions etc. tothe lesson to be
discussed.

2. Playing a tempo both with a click track (drum computer) and with play-along recordings, such as duos
without drums and recordings that are especially developed for timing exercises.

3. Technique:
* jazz coordination (important for all styles)
* the rudiments of the drums
* sound production and striking a good balance between the various percussion elements
* brushes

4. Style/knowledge of repertoire: attention will be focused primarily on jazz repertoire beginning in the 1920s
(Warren 'Baby' Dodds, Zutty Singleton, Philly Joe Jones, Jimmy Cobb, Kenny Clarke, Max Roach), in addition to
the other styles).

5. Sight-reading in the various style disciplines. Ensemble parts will be dealt with in the lessons.

6. Playing, learning to recognize and working with form charts (12- and 32-bar charts, irregular form, e.g. 40
bars). Students will also work on dynamics, soloing and accompanying soloists.

7. Ensemble playing: at least twice a year, lessons will be combined with those of the bass students.
Additionally drum students may play with their own ensemble in the lessons.
* Evening performance (late January) in preparation for the propaedeutic examination.
* A number of methods will be used, as well as a great deal of the students' own material.

Side drum technique


Supplementary to the principal private lessons.
Side drum (private lessons given by Haye Jellema). Objective: to improve the student's overall technique and
sound. For a detailed objective, material covered and examination requirements, please consult the side drum
syllabus.

Ensembles
All ensembles in this year are required:
* jazz group
* ensemble skills
* fusion group

Examination

Playing ability
Programme: three pieces in the three styles mentioned above will be played with a group put together by the

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student. Repertoire will be chosen in close consultation with the principal study teacher(s); the rehearsals must
be recorded and the tapes will be listened to and gone over during the lessons.

N.B. As a general rule, examinations may take place only if the student has submitted his/her recorded
rehearsals for review well before the examination, and the teacher has given his approval.

Assessment
The following will be assessed:
* musicality: ear, understanding of melody/harmony, sense of rhythm, tempo and dynamics
* affinity with the instrument
* technique and sound

N.B. The committee can decide (generally on the basis of the propaedeutic examination) that an interim
examination is necessary to check the student's progress in the second year before he/she continues with the
third. To receive as broad an education as possible, the student must switch principal study teachers at least
once during the entire course.

Second and third year

Principal subject
First-year material will be studied in greater depth; additionally, the specific role(s) of the drummer in various
groups will be addressed; functioning as the band's motor will constitute the unifying element throughout the
lessons.
* jazz: 3/4, 6/8 and 12/8 metres, practising switching from Latin rhythms to jazz time ('Green Dolphin Street'),
focus on the bebop and hard bop periods, including Roy Haynes, Art Taylor, Elvin Jones, Tony Williams and Jack
deJohnette, in addition to the young generation of top drummers including Bill Stewart, Jeff Watts, Victor Lewis
and Brian Blade. Transcription and execution of simple solos. Part of the big band repertoire will be dealt with.
* fusion: focus on funk, soul, rock, jazz rock, second line, reggae
* Latin: mainly the Brazilian and Afro-Cuban repertoire will be dealt with here. Brazilian: samba, bai'o, bossa
and partido alto; Afro-Cuban: mambo, rumba, mozambique and songo. An important aspect relating to the
Brazilian and Afro-Cuban repertoire is that the student must know how to hold back when playing with one or
more percussionists.
* irregular metres
* working in the studio. Adjusting drums, placement of microphones, click track, ensemble playing and
dynamics.
* sight-reading, writing out and playing drum parts and drum solos
* rhythm-section lessons
* in the third year, polyrhythms and metric modulations (Dennis Chambers, David Garibaldi and Royal Hartigan)
and preparation for the recital

Technique
The subsidiary subject of side drum will be concluded in the third year unless the student wishes to continue
studying it for one additional year.

Ensembles
* trio plus voice (required in the second year, optional in the third)
* trio plus soloist (required in the third year, optional in the second)
* Latin group, Brazilian group, fusion group (student may elect at least two of the three, one term each)
* big band: third year optional, provided that the student has developed sufficiently and has an affinity with the
repertoire. In addition to the tutti rehearsals, separate rhythm-section rehearsals will be held.
* jazz group, optional

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Examination

* final examination: the student's ability to play and function in the studio will be assessed (at the end of the
first term)
* the recital will be given at the end of the second term. In this phase, it is expected that the student gradually
develop his/her own style and identity, preferably in all style disciplines; this must be demonstrated during the
recital. The recital must be seen as a blueprint of the final examination to be held in the following year.
* if elected, final big band examination (stated on the diploma). If the student completes the course
successfully: opportunity to play with the big band during the final examination as well.

Fourth year

Principal subject
During this year, any shortcomings in all areas will be addressed and improved; much of this period will be
devoted to preparing for the approaching final examination. Depth and musical experience will constitute
particularly important areas, as will the intensity of the student's playing; additionally, students will work on
becoming mentally prepared for a possible professional career. Finally, instructional videos of a higher level will
be shown during the lessons.

Ensembles
As described in the third-year section, based on choice and availability.

Final examination

Students are asked to choose as varied a selection from the repertoire as possible, but they are also welcome
to demonstrate a particular specialization, of course; they should, however, ensure that the programme does
not become too monotonous. The examination must be seen as a concert and the student should bear this in
mind when putting together the programme.
Length of the programme: 50 minutes.

Teachers

Lucas van Merwijk + coordinator


Marcel Serierse
Martijn Vink
Haye Jellema technique
Joost Lijbaart technique, methodology

Admission requirements

Candidates from abroad for the principal subject drums jazz will be selected beforehand by means of a
recording of three pieces to be sent in by the candidate. The candidate is free in his choice of the pieces. If the
candidate's playing on the recording does not match the required level, the candidate will not be invited to the
entrance examination.

N.B. Nobody will be admitted on the basis of the recording only, and being invited to the entrance exam does
not mean the candidate is admitted to the school.

During the entrance examination the candidate is tested for:

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1. Playing skill
a. The committee will choose two pieces from three pieces prepared by the candidate in which the candidate
shows the committee both command of the instrument and musical understanding, preferably in various styles
such as jazz, latin or fusion.
b. Playing à vue of a short little drum etude at the level of Mitchell Peters' Intermediate Snare Drum Studies no.
14.
The committee reserves the right to interrupt the candidate's playing as according to the committee, he/she
has supplied enough information (because of the limited time of 30 minutes). Therefore it is important for the
candidate to show his/her skills as quickly as possible: not too many and/or too long solos of fellow players, no
unnecessary repetitions.

2. Hearing, tempo/timing and reading skills


This may consist of:
* playing by ear an unknown, simple piece, without any previous information
* playing of some rhythms at a given tempo (clicktrack)
* playing à vue of some rhythms for percussion. In these rhythms some rudiments have been incorporated.
* playing a simple 'play along' of 8 bars, including written part

The committee supplements the examination with some exercises which must show the candidate's skills
which have not been sufficiently disclosed up till then.

3. Assessment
The possibilities to follow a principal subject study will be discussed by the committee.

Important issues for the assessment are:


1. musicality and hearing
2. feeling for rhythm and tempo
3. affinity with the instrument and the musical styles that are connected with this instrument

but besides these also:


4. technique and tone quality
5. reading of rhythms

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Percussion
The principal study Percussion at the CvA offers a many-sided program which focuses on various musical styles,
such as jazz, crossover, rock, pop, salsa, flamenco and music of African, Cuban and Brazilian origin. These styles
are a model for the many musical styles in which an all-round percussionist in contemporary Western-
European/US must be able to express himself.

The objective of the course is to train students to become all-round percussionists with optimum possibilities
for a successful career. Besides the ability to play a large number of instruments - like timbales, conga,
repenique as well as cajon, udu and miscellaneous small percussion instruments - the all-round percussionist
must also be aware of each instrument's cultural background and its individual qualities. The creative
development of the student is also of great importance for (future) performing, studio sessions, and/or a
possible teaching position. This enables him/her to combine instruments and techniques in such a way that
they will come up with unique grooves and sound.

Teachers are Bart Fermie and Lucas van Merwijk. Ensembles will be taught by Abel Marcel and Danny van
Kessel.

Study programme

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Teachers

principal subject
Bart Fermie
Lucas van Merwijk
Niti Ranjan Biswas tabla

ensembles
Abel Marcel
Danny van Kessel

Admission requirements

1. Playing skill
a. The committee will choose from three pieces prepared by the candidate in which the candidate shows the
committee, in addition to command of the instrument and a reasonable rhythmic understanding, a distinct
musical understanding, preferably in various styles such as Cuban/Brazilian/African.
b. The student is to prove in these pieces that he has mastered sufficient skills on different instruments, played
by hand as well as sticks. The committee can ask for this, if necessary.
The committee reserves the right to interrupt the candidate's playing as according to the committee, he/she
has supplied enough information (because of the limited time of 30 minutes).

2. Hearing, tempo/timing and reading skills


This may consist of:
* playing by ear an unknown, simple piece, without any previous information
* singing and playing by ear a sung and played rhythm
* playing of a part of the student?s choice at a given tempo (clicktrack)
* playing à vue of a written rhythm

The committee supplements the examination with some exercises which must show the candidate's skills
which have not been sufficiently disclosed up till then.

3. Assessment
The possibilities to follow a principal subject study will be discussed by the committee. Important issues for the
assessment are:
1. musicality, hearing and rhythmic understanding
2. feeling for rhythm and tempo
3. affinity with the instruments and the musical styles that are connected with the instruments

but besides these also:


4. sense of form
5. technique and tone quality
6. reading of rhythms, sight reading

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Voice
Students are trained to be professional vocalists capable of functioning in any branch of the musical profession,
both on the stage and in the studio. Therefore they learn to interpret and improvise in various jazz styles and in
black music, rock, fusion, pop and Latin (Brazilian). All this is made possible by the vocal faculty's broad range of
teachers, and guest teachers such as Kurt Elling, Peter Eldridge, Deborah Brown, Dianne Reeves, Nancy Marano
(Manhattan School of Music) and Anne-Marie Speed.

Each student is taught by two principal teachers, for vocal-technical and artistic aspects respectively. The two
teachers are jointly responsible for the end result. It is possible for vocal students to study with various
teachers in the course of their four-year study. Candidates are requested to ascertain that the study will not
present medical problems. Candidates will be selected beforehand by means of an audio or video recording to
be sent in by the candidate.

Co-ordinator: Sylvia Langelaan

Study programme

Objective

The principal subject of jazz voice is a course designed to train students to become vocalists and vocal teachers
in the broad field of jazz and popular music. The programme focuses on the student's musical development -
particularly through exposure to jazz music - and vocal development. There are two principal study teachers,
one of whom focuses on technical issues pertaining to the voice, and the other on artistic aspects. Together,
they are responsible for the end result. In their four years of study, students may study with several teachers.

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Propaedeutic Year

Principal subject, interpretation class


In these classes, the following subjects are addressed:
* timing
* introduction to American 'standard' repertoire

Consequently:
* a few other genres, e.g. Brazilian or fusion, are addressed (please see second and third year)
* there are as yet no requirements involving the use of the voice (please see vocal development class)
* students will demonstrate what they have learnt by taking part in evening group performances

Vocal development class


The vocal development teacher initially works on vocal development and/or repair independently of other
classes. In time, a link with the repertoire studied in the interpretation class will be established; please see
second and third year. The objective of these lessons is to instil in the student a solid vocal technique; this is
accomplished by means of:
* developing and maintaining the health of the student's voice
* providing insight into and instruction with respect to the use of the voice and the workings of the vocal
apparatus: correct breathing, diction, treatment of the text, keeping the voice supple, etc.

Ensembles, choirs, workshops


In this year, the following ensembles are required:
* choir
* ensemble skills
* trio with voice

Examination (summary)

Playing ability (the practical component)


* at least two pieces on the basis of which the quality and use of the voice will be assessed; students may not
use a microphone
* at least two pieces from the 'standard' repertoire with microphone

Ear and reading ability


An aural skills test and possibly a sight-reading test.

Assessment
The following checklist will be used:
* musicality: ear, understanding of melody/harmony, sense of rhythm and tempo
* affinity with singing and with vocal styles
* technique and tone production, presentation and reading ability
* intonation and vocal material
* dealing with accompaniment

Second and third year

Principal subject, interpretation class


Continuation of the material studied during the propaedeutic year. Beginning the second half of the second
year:
* more contemporary popular music and fusion
* Brazilian repertoire, see also workshops

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* continuation of the jazz repertoire

Vocal development class


The repertoire will consist of:
* standard repertoire to be sung straight
* repertoire addressed in the interpretation classes
* repertoire aimed at developing the voice

Where possible, the projects scheduled for the academic year will be prepared in relation to the choice of
repertoire and language.

Ensembles, choirs, workshops


* jazz/improvisation (optional) in the third year
* trio with voice, required in the second year, optional in the third year
* Latin, optional
* Brazilian, required in the second and third years
* crossover, required for one term, to be concluded with a crossover evening in the second, third or fourth year
* choir, required in the second and third years
* big band, one unit (three rehearsals) required in the third or fourth year
* workshop on stage presence

Examination (summary)

Transition from the second to the third year


− Vocal development component

Repertoire: one vocalise, one ballad, one chanson


− Interpretation component

Repertoire: three songs. Assessment will be carried out as it was in the propaedeutic year. Repertoire and
timing are particularly important.

Transition from the third to the fourth year (recital)


Repertoire: six songs, choice by analogy with the repertoire of the final examination, q.v. The overall
performance will carry more weight with respect to the assessment than it did in previous examinations. The
propaedeutic checklist will remain in effect.

Fourth year

Principal subject, interpretation class


The student is free to choose the teacher and the repertoire. Preparation for the final examination.

Vocal development class


The objective - a solid vocal technique - will serve as the guiding principle in the course and in the preparations
for the final examination. The vocal development examination will be held in December or January.

Vocal development examination (= technique examination)


Evaluation of the technique necessary for singing and teaching jazz/popular music repertoire. Checklist: broken
thirds, scales, articulation, singing legato, breathing, staccato, necessary vocal colours. These are evaluated by
means of exercises, vocalises and three standards.

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Ensembles
All ensembles are optional unless big band or crossover has not yet been concluded.

Final examination (summary)

* jazz/swing repertoire
* fusion/popular repertoire
* Brazilian repertoire

The candidate must demonstrate good organizational skills and must perform as part of various kinds of
groups; the programme may also consist partly of the candidate's own arrangements. For practical reasons,
certain components may be concluded before the actual final examination is held.

Teachers

principal subject
Sylvi Lane coordinator
Lydia van Dam
Humphrey Campbell
David Linx regular guest teacher – Artist in Residence
Lieve Geuens technique
Wiebe-Pier Cnossen technique
Esther Kuiper technique
Sanna van Vliet improvisation
Michelle Mallinger English/American pronunciation
Lilian Vieira Brazilian
Bodhi Sykora methodology

Audition

The first qualifying round


For foreign candidates
Please send in a recording of yourself of three songs on CD, or put the recordings on your myspace-site and
send us the url. Two songs are to be chosen from the jazz-songlist
(http://www.ahk.nl/en/conservatorium/study-programmes/bachelor/bachelor-jazz/voice/list/#c23695): one jazz-
swing and one jazz-ballad. The third song is a free choice.
The accompaniment should be bass, drums and piano or guitar, but piano or guitar only will do. The recording
doesn’t have to be made in a professional studio as long as the sound is clear enough to give a good impression
of the performer.

On the basis of this recording candidates will be selected for the audition. It is not possible to correspond about
the assessment of the recordings.

Audition
The candidates will prepare the following songs and a solo:
1. one jazz-swing
2. one jazz-ballad
3. one ong of the candidate’s own choice
4. one ong chosen from the technique- songlist: www.ahk.nl/en/conservatorium/study-
programmes/bachelor/bachelor-jazz/voice/technique-list/#c25081

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5. perform a transcribed improvisation/solo. This can be either a existing solo transcribed from the recording or
self-written one.
One of the songs has to be chosen from the the jazz-songlist (http://www.ahk.nl/en/conservatorium/study-
programmes/bachelor/bachelor-jazz/voice/list/#c23695); this must be another song than the ones you have
sent for the qualifying round.

The audition committee chooses from this list at least three songs for the candidate to perform.

The conservatory will provide accompaniment by a trio of piano, drums and bass. Please bring charts of your
songs, in the right key, for each instrumentalist.

At the end of the audition the candidate will be told if he/she may be admitted to the first year of the
bachelor’s programme and will be put on the waiting list.

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Composition / Arranging
This faculty's programme centres on writing music for both small and large ensembles. A well-equipped studio
helps students prepare themselves for a diversity of situations they may encounter as professional musicians.
The size of the Jazz Department, in terms of numbers of students, offers ample opportunity for students’ works
to be performed in almost any instrumental or vocal setting.

Principal teachers are Jurre Haanstra and Henk Huizinga. Over the past years guest teachers have included John
Clayton, Tom Trapp and Florian Ross.

Coordinator: Bram Strijbis

Study programme

Objective

The Composition/Arranging course focuses on developing the student's musical personality to the greatest
extent possible, thus enabling him/her to develop into a versatile composer/arranger, by teaching him/her
many practical skills. In addition to the principal subject, the course of study includes the subjects of
instrumentation, counterpoint, harmony at the piano, music history, general theoretical subjects and
solfège/ear-training.

The course focuses on jazz and jazz-based music, offering students the possibility to extend the programme to
symphonic music. Various ensembles made up of different combinations of instruments, choirs and big bands
are all available to perform approved arrangements.
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During the entrance examination, the student must convince the committee of his/her merit by means of
his/her own compositions and/or arrangements, which will be evaluated on the basis of their notation, form,
instrumentation, playability, etc.

Although exceptions are possible, candidates should first have completed the basic theory subjects as part of
an instrumental principal study.

Propaedeutic Year

Principal subject
In the principal lessons, the following issues will be addressed:
* harmony, developing insight into harmonic and melodic progessions and
* writing for saxophones
* writing for brass
* writing of combination scores of saxophones and brass
* writing for rhythm section
* dynamics and phrasing
* outlining arrangements and compositions: form, treatment of themes/motifs, dosage (climax, dynamics) etc.
* writing of arrangements for octet and/or big band

Assessment
* after the first term: the progress will be discussed with the teacher and the coordinator
* after the propaedeutic year: assessment by a committee on the basis of a number of arrangements for octet
and/or big band written by the student

Important issues for the assessment are melodic and harmonic insight, rhythm, form, instrumentation,
inventiveness.

Second and third year

Examination according to the procedures as outlined in the propaedeutic year. Additional subjects during the
principal subject lessons are:
* writing for strings
* analysis of existing scores

Fourth year

Preparation for the final examination. The student chooses his/her repertoire in consultation with the principal
subject teacher.

Final examination
The student prepares a well thought-out and varied programme, lasting approximately forty minutes, in which
he/she presents some works for bigband, and possibly some works for octet and/or chamber music ensemble
with guest soloist(s).

Additional subjects based on the principal subject

Instrumentation, Year 1, 2, 3
This course explains in a practical way the history of writing for orchestras. Students make piano extracts of
orchestra scores and score piano pieces for orchestra. The first year ('about 1800') focuses on the composers
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Haydn, Beethoven and Schubert, the second year ('the 19th century') on Wagner, Brahms and Franck. The third
and final year centres on, among others, the composers Debussy, Stravinsky and Xenakis.

Harmony and analysis of Classical music, Year 1, 2


This two-year course centres on the Classical repertoire from the Baroque period to the early twentieth
century. The course follows a chronological plan, in which analysis and harmony run parallel. Theory of
harmony is based on the Classical fourpart writing, which originates from the early counterpointal styles.
During the first year, the course covers the period from the Baroque style up to the simple chromatic writing of
the early nineteenth century. The second year centres on more complex chromatics, enharmonics, new
modality, octotonic writing, etc. as used in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, on which the jazz
closely follows.

The analysis course centres in the first year on the work of composers such as Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven
and Schubert, in the second year on e,g, Chopin, Schumann, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Debussy, Ravel and
Stravinsky.

Counterpoint, Year 2, 3
Arrangers will begin with the two-year counterpoint course in the second year. This course centres on the
period of modal counterpoint, the 16th century. Objective of this course is to learn to write two-, three- and
fourpart compositions, in which the student distinguishes between cantus firmus scores and pieces with
imitations. It is possible to follow the course Baroque counterpoint after the first year, this should be discussed
with the coordinator of the Classical Department first. This course also takes two years.

Elective - Composing for Film


Third-year students may choose as an elective this unique and comprehensive theoretical and practical course.

Teachers

Jurre Haanstra
Henk Huizinga
Theo Verbey instrumentation
Walther Stuhlmacher harmony and analysis Classical music
Lucas Vis conducting
Paul Scheepers counterpoint

Admission requirements

The candidate is to send in three arrangements one month prior to the examination. These works will be
assessed as to their artistic possibilities and technical standard. Strength: big band or at least four wind
instrument players and a rhythm section. In addition to this there will be an interview. If possible, a recording
can be supplied.

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Theory of Music
Students are trained to teach theoretical subjects at conservatories. The course aims to provide students with
the necessary and thorough knowledge of all theoretical aspects of jazz, jazz-related styles and their practical
applications. Admission normally takes place after the third year of an instrumental or vocal principal study,
though theye may be exceptions. Regular teachers are Barbara Bleij, Clemens Kemme and Henk Huizinga
(arranging).

The course includes as principal subject the items harmony/analysis, ear training ('solfège'), harmony at the
piano, arranging, methodology (including jazz 'solfège') and history of jazz.

As additional subject the lessons include classical music theory (harmony/analysis and modal counterpoint) and
analysis of twentieth-century music. Writing a thesis which in principle can be published is an important
feature of the final examination.

Co-ordinator: Barbara Bleij

Study programme

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The Jazz Music Theory principal study (course intended to prepare candidates to become teachers of
theory subjects within a jazz degree programme) is a Postgradutate Course programme and should, in
principle, be seen as an opportunity for candidates already having completed or about to complete an
instrumental or vocal principal study in jazz to continue this study.

Although exceptions are possible, this instrumental programme is crucial for gaining insight into and
developing a bond with the music world. Before candidates may take the entrance examination to
participate in the first trial year of the principal study, they must have completed the theory and
additional subsidiary subjects. This entrance examination will consist of a written and an oral part.

The study includes the following principal subject components:


* harmony/analysis (1.5 lesson units)
* harmony at the piano (0.5 lesson unit)
* arranging (1 lesson unit)
* methodology (also of jazz solfège) and thesis supervision (0.5 lesson unit)
* history of jazz (1 lesson unit for one year)

The study includes the following subsidiary subject components:


* classical harmony/analysis
* modal counterpoint (two-year course up to and including three voices)

These subsidiary subjects must be completed satisfactorily by the student. The student may also elect to
take other theory subjects in the Classical Department.

Teachers

Barbara Bleij coordinator


Walther Stuhlmacher additional study classical music
Henk Huizinga arranging
Paul Scheepers counterpoint

Admission requirements

The entrance examination focuses especially on:


* affinity with jazz
* knowledge of jazz history
* aptitude towards and proficiency in the specific rhythm and harmony of jazz
* ear perception (harmonic, rhythmic and melodic hearing)* harmony at the piano
* certain knowledge of classical music theory
* readiness to do music-theoretical research

The aspiring jazz theorist is expected to play at an acceptable level an instrument customary within jazz or to
follow a study program that can lead to that level.

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Other subjects
Other principal subjects, such as violin, viola, cello, flute, clarinet and French horn, follow the general
study programme adapted to the instrument.

69
3. Ensembles and choirs
The Jazz department focuses on jazz and all types of music related to it. The objective of the
ensembles is to provide students with the necessary practical experience with their instrument and
to stimulate their individual creativity so that they can successfully function in the various types of
music common to their instrument. Because instrumental and individual needs can be rather diverse,
a wide variety of ensembles are offered. In addition to the various jazz and improvisation groups,
big bands and choirs, students can participate in rhythm and blues, Brazilian, Afro-Cuban, flamenco,
pop and various crossover groups.

During the first year, the emphasis in all principal subjects will be on ensemble skills in jazz and
related types of music. All students are assigned to one of the ensemble-skills groups. Additionally,
all instrumentalists are assigned to one of the jazz groups and in some cases to one of the principal
subject-based groups, such as the trumpet group, the trombone group, the guitar group, or one of
the choirs. For bass guitarists, guitarists, pianists and percussionists, these are supplemented by a six-
month-long funk/crossover group.

Overview of ensembles

Jazz ensembles coordinator: David de Marez Oyens; tel: 020-5277533

While a number of ensembles are required, students can sometimes choose the teacher. In addition,
students can take certain ensembles as electives, thereby determining the direction of their studies.
By choosing 'Student Ensemble', students can put together an ensemble themselves, determine an
objective and/or repertoire, and choose a teacher. In this case, it is important that they consult all
those involved before signing up before the summer. Such an ensemble can, with the coordinator's
consent, serve as an alternative to one of the required ensembles. Students in a partially or fully
formed group may also register for one of the regular ensembles and, in that case, will be given
priority.

Please consult the undefinedEnsemble Diagram by Principal Subject when you make your choice. The
diagram shows which ensembles you are required to take (v) and the type of ensemble from which
you can (f), and sometimes are required to (k), choose. Credits are awarded per ensemble; be sure
that your choice will indeed allow you to earn the credits that you need. Wherever possible, please
indicate a second choice so that you can be placed in another ensemble if your preferred group is
already full.

Prior to final assignment, the student's principal study teacher and/or department head is sometimes
consulted. Under certain circumstances, students may even be assigned to a particular ensemble for
the purpose of completing the group.

NB: Participating in an ensemble constitutes a commitment; students' attendance is always required.


If a student is truly unable to attend a session or rehearsal, he/she will be responsible, in consultation
with the teacher, for finding an adequate replacement whom he/she must instruct in advance for the
purpose of ensuring continuity. Afterwards, he/she will then ask the replacement to inform him/her
of the agreements and headway made. Failure to do so could lead to the withholding of credits.

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71
Principal Subject Piano
Year ssv Ja12 Trioi-v Od1er Cro - P ubj BB Credits
impr trJditions over •3 28

VOP v+

1 v+2 V v2 6

2 v2 v2 v2 f V-
8

3 v +3 k2 k2 k k k(3) 8

4 f f f f f f 6

*3 Special groups related to other prmc1pal subjects like sa,.;ophone-, trombone-, gu1targroup etc..

Principal subject drums


Year ssv Jazz Trioi-v OU1er Cross- P ubj BB Credits
impr traditions over •3 28

VOP v+
6
1 v+2 v2 v2

2 v2 v2 L k v2 8

3 v2 k2 v2 k 8
V-

4 f f f f f f 6

*3 Special groups related to other prmc1pal subjects ltke saxophone-, trombone-, g111targroup etc..

Principal subject Voice


Year ssv Jazz Trioi-v Oilier Tra,lilions Cross- Vocal BB Credits
impr (Brasil) over groups 28

VOP v+

I v+2 v2 v+3 7

2 v2 r v2 r v+ 7

3 k2 k k v_ v2 v+3 f 9

4 f f f f f f 5

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74

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1. Jazz and Improvisation Groups

Ensemble skills

In this ensemble the improvising ensemble playing is highlighted. The alert registration and
response to impulses as well as the development of initiatives are central to this.
The various aspects of ensemble playing as volume / sound choice, dynamic course, improvised
section play, choice of style and the like are isolated and discussed in these lessons. The
imagination will also be trained: participants are instructed to choose a composition themselves
and then lead the group. During these classes, the teacher also pays attention to the interest of a
student in subjects such as arranging and leading of ensembles.

Course details

Teacher Maarten van der Grinten


period 1st and 2nd period, 1.0 hours
group size approx. 8
assessment Attendance (at least 80%), performance during class
credits 2 for an entire year
code GPS

Jazz group first year, by Simon Rigter

On the basis of a "Scale Outline", pieces from the jazz repertoire are taught.
There is no sheet music used in the lesson, in this lesson everything is played by heart. "Tools" are
dealt with, such as "Voice leading", "6th Dim Scales," "Chromatic Major Scale", etc., which are
released on the pieces, and contrastfacts are treated and, often together with the students, head
arrangements are made.

Course details

Teacher Simon Rigter


period 1st or 2nd period, 1.5 hours
group size approx. 8
assessment attendance (at least 80%), performance during class and a final concert
credits 2 for a period, 3 for a whole year
code 1SR

Jazz group first year, by Rob van Bavel

On the basis of various jazz pieces we work on interplay, interaction, improvising and guiding.

Course details

Teacher Rob van Bavel


period 1st or 2nd period, 1.5 hours
group size approx. 8
assessment attendance (at least 80%), performance during class and a final concert
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credits 2 for a period, 3 for a whole year
code 1RB

Second-Year Jazz Group, taught by Ruud Ouwehand


These lessons are based on the 'standard' jazz repertoire, and will cover group skills, improvisation,
transposing, reading, modulating, practical ear training, instant arranging and playing by heart,
among other things.

Course details

teacher Ruud Ouwehand


period 1st or 2nd semester, 1.5 hour per week
class size around 8
examination being present (min 80%), evaluations during the lessons, and a final concert
credits 2 for one semester, 3 for the whole year
code 1RO

Contemporary Jazz Ensemble, taught by Yuri Honing


In this ensemble, the focus lies on the music of Wayne Shorter, Herbie Hancock, Dave Holland and
Ornette Coleman. While playing the compositions, emphasis is put on the use of substitute harmony
and the technique of modal improvisation.

Course details

teacher Yuri Honing


period 1st or 2nd semester, 1.5 hours per week
class size around 8
examination being present (min. 80%), evaluations during the lessons, and a final concert
credits 2 for one semester, 3 for the whole year
code 1YHHJ’

'A tune a Week': How to deal with composing as an exercise, taught by Yuri Honing
Inspired by the publication A Tune a Day by the Brazilian composer Hermeto Pascoal the objective of
this course is to exercise your composing skills in a very practical fashion. Every week one of the
members of the ensemble has to compose a piece for the whole group.

No genre limitations will be set, and a lot of attention will be given to how to produce a good
melody, a good set of signature chords and how to re-arrange a piece to a level of unexpected
quality.

Course details

teacher Yuri Honing


term 1st or 2nd term, 1,5 hours
class size around 8
examination being present (min. 80%) and performance during the lessons and a final
concert
credits 2 for a term
code 1YHTW

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Jazz Octet taught by Juan Martinez
The octet gives all the band members much opportunity to solo. The existing repertoire consists of
composers such as Rob van Bavel, Cees Slinger, Chuck Israels and Phil Woods, but students can also
bring their own arrangements.

Course details

teacher Juan Martinez


period 1st and 2nd semester, 1.5 hours per week. 1 semester for rhythm section
class size 8 (trpt, alt.sax, ten.sax, trb, bar.sax, pno, cbs, perc.)
requirements for advanced students
examination being present (min 80%), evaluations during the lessons, and a final concert
credits 2 for one semester, 3 for the whole year
code 1ELd

Jazz Ensemble taught by Berend van den Berg


With the use of instrumental jazz pieces and song standards from 1930-1965, the following skills are
practised
* dynamics in walkin' bass: how can the rhythm-section keep playing a strong and ongoing pulse and
at the same time give the music an open and dynamic character
* interpretation of melody
* interaction between the soloist and the rhythm section
* a well-written chord chart
* improvised arranging - intro's and outro's included
* structure, build-up in solo's.

The line up is a rhythm section and guitar - piano and guitar sound great together! - and max. four
horn players, everybody learns all the pieces, sometimes we will make an arrangement for a bigger
ensemble. We will focus on jazz music.

Course details

teacher Berend van den Berg


period 1st or 2nd term, 1.5 hours per week
class size around 8
examination being present (min. 80%), evaluations during the lessons, and a final concert
credits 2 for one term 3 for the whole year
code 1BB

Jazzgroup, taught by Rob van Bavel


In this ensemble, the focus lies besides hardbop, modal jazz and the music of Herbie Hancock and
Chick Corea mainly on compositions made by the students and the teacher.

Course details

teacher Rob van Bavel


period 1st and 2nd semester, 1.5 hours per week
class size 6-8

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examination being present (min 80%), evaluations during the lessons, and a final concert
credits 2 for one semester, 3 for the whole year
code 1RB

Tristano Clinic Ensemble taught by Jasper Blom


Lennie Tristano was a jazz pianist and composer who became a very influetial teacher designing his
own method for jazz improvisation. Many great jazz musicians such as Lee Konitz, Warne Marsh, Bill
Evans and many others have spent years studying with Tristano. His influence is still present in the
playing of musicians like Mark Turner and others and his method offers an endless variety of ways to
approach jazz- harmony.

In this course we will listen to his music, study some of his exercises, we will transcribe and study
exemplarary jazzsolos that Tristano gave as homework to his students and of course we will be
playing his compositions, mainly alternative themes on existing chord changes.

The requirements for this ensemble are affinity with jazz, an advanced playing level and enough time
(one hour a day) to study themes, exercises and transcriptions and practice.

Course details

teacher Jasper Blom


period 1st or 2nd term, 1,5 hours per week
class size 8-11
requirements passing Jazz Theory level 2, higher year levels and master programme
examination attendance (min. 80%), evaluations during the lessons, and a final concert
credits 2
code 1JBLT

Monk Group, taught by Jasper Blom


Monk was one of the founders of bebop and is considered to be one of the giants of jazz. His playing
and writing were unique and he made some major contributions to the standard jazz repertoire.

This ensemble focuses entirely on Monk compositions, there is no sheet music, everybody will play
from memory. Additionally we will study and transcribe some of his voicings, listen to his music and
watch the documentary Straight no Chaser about the life and music of Thelonious Monk.

Course details

teacher Jasper Blom


period 1st or 2nd semester, 1.5 hours per week.
class size 8-11
requirements passing Jazz Theory level 2 (higher year levels and master programme)
examination being present (min. 80%), evaluations during the lessons, and a final concert
credits 2
code 1JBTM

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Composition Group, taught by Yaniv Nachum
In this lesson, students compose or arrange their own music along with accompaniment. Different
composition techniques are addressed and diverse forms are used, from the traditional jazz forms to
the structured/free improvisation forms. Students are also encouraged to give suggestions about the
compositions of others in the group. This ensemble is only open to students of the higher years who
have the time and discipline to take part actively every week. Students are expected to write a new
composition every three weeks, each one in a new style. Credits are only awarded if the assignments
are completed within the given time frame.

Course details

teacher Yaniv Nachum


period 1st semester 1.5 hours per week
class size 8-11
requirements passing Jazz Theory level 2 (higher year levels and master programme)
examination presence (min. 80%), evaluations during the lessons, and a final concert
credits 2 for a semester, 3 for the whole year
code 1YN1

The music of Joe Henderson, taught by Yaniv Nachum


Jazz saxophonist and composer Joe Henderson is well known for his distinct powerful yet warm and
graceful sound. Although Henderson’s earliest recordings were marked by a strong hard-bop
influence, his playing encompassed not only the bebop tradition, but rhythm and blues, latin, and
avant-garde as well.

This ensemble will explore Henderson's style and composition and give an overview of his musical
development from his early recordings to his trademark recordings during the 90s.

Course details

teacher Yaniv Nachum


term 1st or 2nd term, 1,5 hours per week
class size 8-11
requirements passing Jazz Theory level 2,higher year levels and master programme
examination attendance (min. 80%) and performance during the lessons and a final
concert
credits 2
code 1YNJH

John Coltrane Group, taught by Yaniv Nachum


This group focuses on the music of the John Coltrane Quartet (especially the classic quartet years,
1962-1965). Compositions such as Afro Blue, Impressions, Love Supreme, My Favorite Things en
Meditations will be covered, as well as Coltrane's approach to modal jazz and super imposed
changes.

Course details

teacher Yaniv Nachum


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period 1st or 2nd term, 1.5 hours per week
class size 8-11
requrements passing Jazz Theory level 2 (higer year levels and master programme) examination
being present (min. 80%), evaluations during the lessons, and a final concert
credits 2
code 1YNJC

Ornette Coleman, The shape of Jazz to come, taught by Yaniv NachumSaxophonist Ornette
Coleman is unarguably one of most important figures in the avant-garde and what became to be
known as 'free jazz' style. Coleman's approach to improvisation and composition brought a new
sounds, new colors and new attitude to what jazz has became.

This ensemble will look into Coleman's approach to composition, improvisation and Coleman's use of
time and rhythm. The material will revolve mostly around the 'Atlantic period'.

Course details

teacher Yaniv Nachum


term 1st or 2nd term, 1,5 hours per week
class size 8-11
requirements passing Jazz Theory level 2, for higher year levels and master programme
examination attendance (min. 80%) and performance during the lessons and a final
concert
credits 2
code 1YNOC

Out of the box

Out of what f***ing box anyway


The students will get weekly composition assignments focusing on various composition and arranging
techniques. This will invite them to explore new ways of composing and arranging and to discover
new and fresh views. As a result students will build up authentic repertoire and a more personal
approach to music.

During the lessons the students will be introduced to several techniques. They will get ample
opportunity to play together and to analyze their playing thoroughly.

Course details

teacher Harmen Fraanje


term 1st and/or 2nd term, 1,5 hours
class size about 8
examination attendance (min. 80%) and performance during the lessons and the concerts
credits 2 for a semester, 3 for the whole year
code 1HFR

Instant composing
Instant composing. The skills vital to playing this music are worked on, as well as general skills
required for playing music together. For example Musical awareness: This is the ability to introduce,

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develop and convey music which is unfamiliar to fellow band members (initiative), and the ability to
be able to play music from the initiative of others (following).
Focused Listening is also worked on: The ability to listen to certain aspects which are important for
the music.

Course details

teacher Arnold Dooyeweerd


period 1st and/or 2nd semester, 1.5 hours per week
class size 10 maximum
requirements for 3rd and 4th-year students. Participants must be prepared to play by ear
examination being present (min. 80%) and evaluations during the lessons, and a final
concert
credits 2 for 1 semester, 3 for a whole year
code 1ADW

'Amsterdam Real Book' Group


In the 1970s and 1980s in Amsterdam there was a lot of research done into the relationship between
composition and improvisation. The composers involved, Misha Mengelberg, Willem Breuker, Guus
Janssen, Theo Loevendie, Maarten van Regteren Altena, Maurice Horsthuis, etc., were trained in
both the classical and, to some extent, the jazz traditions. They developed their own aesthetics and
systems of organization.

In this group you will experience some of their pieces as well as those of later generations (Ab Baars,
Cor Fuhler, Eric Boeren, Joost Buis), and others who influenced and were influenced by these
developments (Sean Bergin, Franky Douglas, John Zorn, Michael Moore).

Course details

teacher Michael Moore


term 1st and/or 2nd term, 1.5 hours per week
class size about 8
exam attendance (min. 80%) and performance during the lessons and the final
concert
credits 2 for a term, 3 for the whole year
code 1MMAR

Sixties Miles: A modal approach, taught by Yuri Honing


At the end of the fifties Miles Davis set the trend by reintroducing the modal approach with Kind of
Blue. With his second great quintet, with Shorter, Hancock, Carter and Williams he recorded many
new tunes with this approach, mainly new works by Shorter.

During the live concerts though, Miles kept using the American Songbook as a source for repertoire
but used the new modal techniques to find alternative ways to play these familiar songs. With Live at
the Plugged Nickel as main source this course will provide more insights in a way of playing that
became pretty rare.

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Course details

teacher Yuri Honing


term 1st or 2nd term, 1,5 hours
class size 8 - 11
examination attendance and performance during the lessons and a final concerts
credits 2 for a semester
code 1YHSM

2./3. Piano trios

Piano Trio/Quartet with Voice, taught byHans Vroomans and Berend van den Berg
During these lessons both vocalists and accompaniment get the chance to choose songs, to study
and play solos with song standards from the jazz repertoire. Included are: being attentive, musical
interaction and arranging for and within a group. The divergent styles and voices of the singers in the
group demand a very specific approach in the accompaniment. What is the relation between the
lyrics of the song and the accompaniment? How to play a rubato verse?
Guitarists can also participate.
NB: It is also possible to sign up with an existing trio, as long as this is discussed with all involved.

Course details

teacher Berend van den Berg (BB); Hans Vroomans (HVR)


period 1st or 2nd term 1.5 hours per week
class size about 7 (3x voice, pno, git, bas, drs)
exam being present (min. 80%), evaluations during the lessons and the vocal night
credits 2 for a semester, 3 for a whole year
code 2TZBB; 2TZHV

Piano Trio: The Art of the Trio, taught by Frans van der Hoeven
The practical and analytical aspects of the 'Classical' repertoire, such as Bill Evans, Brad Mehldau,
Herbie Hancock and Keith Jarrett, is the focus for this piano trio.
NB: It is also possible to sign up with an existing trio, as long as this is discussed with all involved.

Course details

teacher Frans van der Hoeven


period 1st or 2nd semester, 1.5 hours per week.
class size 3
requirements passing Jazz Theory level 2 (higher year levels and master programme)
examination being present (min. 80%), evaluations during the lessons
code 3FVH

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4. Music from other cultures

Latin Crossover Group, taught by Bart Fermie


Starting point for this group is: Afro-Brazilian, -Caribbean, and -American music and instruments.
Traditional elements from this music are placed in a modern setting. The ensemble is used in a
conventional and percussive context.

Course details

teacher Bart Fermie


period 1st and/or 2nd term 1.5 hours per week
class size around 8
examination being present (min. 80%), evaluations during the lessons, and a final concert
credits 2 for a semester, 3 for a whole year
code 4BF

New York Salsa Group, taught by Danny van Kessel and Abel Marcel
Salsa group in the style of Willie Colon, Ruben Blades and other bands from the Fania All-Star label
that work with more singers and a horn section.

Course details

teacher Danny van Kessel (1st term), Abel Marcel (2nd term)
period 1st and/or 2nd semester, 1.5 hours per week
class size ± 10 (pno, bas, conga, timb, bongo, 2 trp, 1 or 2 sax, 1 or 2 trb, 3 voc)
requirements for higher years' instrumentalists and vocalists
examination being present (min. 80%), evaluations during the lessons, and a final concert
credits 2 for a semester, 3 for a whole year
code 4Las1, 4Las2

Latin Jazz Group, taught by Danny van Kessel and Abel Marcel
Latin jazz is a genre of music combining Latin-American rhythms with American jazz. In these lessons
compositions by great latin jazz icons will be analyzed and played. Danny's lessons will focus on
bands and musicians such as Nueva Manteca, Eddie Palmieri, Paquito D’Rivera, Jerry Gonzales and
Gonzalo Rubalcaba; Abel's lessons will focus on Irakere, Emiliano Salvador, Maraca and Timbalaye.

Course details

teacher Danny van Kessel (1st term), Abel Marcel (2nd term)
period 1st and/or 2nd semester, 1.5 hours per week
class size ± 8 (pno, bas, drs, conga, timb, 2 trp, ten/trb)
requirements for higher years' and master programme instrumentalists
examination being present (min. 80%), evaluations during the lessons, and a final concert
credits 2 for a semester, 3 for a whole year
code 4Laj1, 4Laj2

Latin Rhythm Section, taught by Danny van Kessel and Abel Marcel
These classes take a more in-depth look at ensemble playing within the rhythm section in the various
latin styles. Topics covered in these classes are, for instance: the role of the clave, patterns for for each
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member of the rhythm section, jazz comping using latin rhythms, bass tumbaos, the role of the guitar player
when playing with or without piano, for the drummer when to play 'up' or 'down', and piano montunos.

Course details

teacher Danny van Kessel (1st term), Abel Marcel (2nd term)
period 1st and/or 2nd term, 1 hour per week
class size about 5
requirements for higher years' and master programme instrumentalists
examination being present (min. 80%) and evaluations during the lessons
credits 2 for a semester, 3 for a whole year
code 4Lar1, 4Lar2

Flamenco Group, taught by Eric Vaarzon Morel


The complex rhythmical structures are brought into practice after several introductory lessons. This
course is focused on contemporary flamenco: 'flamenco de hoy', which shares musical dimensions
with latin, jazz, North African and Eastern music cultures.

Especially for: 1) guitarists from the master programme who specialise in flamenco, 2) bass guitarists,
3) percussionists. Also for saxophonists or pianists, and anyone willing to clap along with the palmas.

Course details

teacher Eric Vaarzon Morel


period 1st or 2nd term, 1,5 hrs per week
group ±8
examination being present (min. 80%), evaluations during the lessons and a final concert
credits 2
code 4FLG-1 (1st term); 4FLG-2 (2nd term

Advanced Rhythm
The jazz of today asks for a radical new approach in rhythmical training. Every student will eventually
come in contact with music from, (or music which has been influenced by) Dave Holland, Zappa and
Irakere. Or elements of music from the Balkans, India, or Africa. With the help of the South-Indian
system of rhythmical syllables (Solkattu), students learn how to play poly-rhythm and phrases in
quint- and septuplets, and strengthen their feel for time.

Practical exercises bring students to a higher level of rhythmical accuracy without losing the feel for
phrasing or musical emotion.

Course details

teacher Jos Zwaanenburg, David de Marez Oyens


period 1st or 2nd semester, 2 hours per week
class size 8-12
requirements passing Solfege-Practicum 1 with at least an 8
work form ensemble
examination presence (minimum 80%) and an oral exam at the end of course
credits 3
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code 4ADVR

Contemporary Improvisation through Non-Western Techniques, taught by Rafael Reina, Jos


Zwaanenburg and David de Marez Oyens
For students who want to develop a wider view on the developments of the structural and
rhythmical possibilities of improvisation, and a strong internal feel for time. The rhythmical elements
of South Indian music theory give a starting point to the flexible yet structured incorporation of
polyrhythmic, poly-timing, anti metric and variation with permutation systems. But also the
development of a feeling for form and structure. The syllabus can span one to four course years. The
raga-system, from the second year, shows the way to a more open use of pitch and tone colour
within improvisation. During the last two months of the year students will organize a group, or
participate in one (trio - quintet), with which will they prepare a guided improvisation, which will be
performed at the end-of-year concert.

Course details

teacher Jos Zwaanenburg, Rafael Reina, David de Marez Oyens


period whole year, 2 hours per week
class size 6-8
requirements course in Advanced Rhythm or students with a proven suitable level
examination being present (min. 80%), quality of work (including homework), evaluations
during the lessons, a theory exam and a final concert
credits 9 per year NB: In connection with this study load, the credits can be partly
collected in students' 'free space', and the course can also count as a second
Jazz Theory subject
code 4NWT1, 4NWT2, 4NWT3, 4NWT4

Javanese Gamelan, taught by Elsje Plantema


A gamelan orchestra consists of bronze gongs and supporting sounds, tuned in pentatonic
progressions. The sound-culture of Javanese ensembles is decided through the different instruments,
each with its own function: main melody, decorations, punctuation by the gongs, and musical
coordination by the percussion. Gamelan music was cultivated around the Javanese dynasty and has
expanded to become the basis of a many-faceted music culture with classical, light-classical and
popular music. The gamelan is inseparably connected with forms of Javanese theatre such as wajang
theatre, dance drama and cabaret. The aim of this course is to teach students to be alert and react to
the musical 'cues', to be able to recognise South East Asian tunings and to try out the new ways of
playing together.

Course details

teacher Elsje Plantema


period 2nd term
room 708
work form study group of roughly 10 students
examination being present (min. 80%), evaluations during the lessons and a final concert
credits 2
code 4GAM

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African percussion fusion group
In this ensemble students play and improvise West-African rhythms on jembes, sabars and their own
instruments. With the traditional percussion music from countries such as Senegal and Mali as a
starting point students will experience music in this fusion band in a new way. The West-African
traditional music offers many opportunities to explore polyrhythm, grooves and cyclic patterns.
Students will learn in this group to adapt African traditional music to their own instrument or voice.
All participants get to arrange and orchestrate these rhythms for the group, thus creating a new and
unique fusion of African and Western traditions. Instrumentalists and singers develop skills in
adapting African traditional music to their own instruments or voices.

Course details

teacher Achim Heine


period 2nd term
class size 8-10
examination attendance (80%) evaluations during the lessons and a final concert
credits 2
code 4APF

Tabla Fusion Group, taught by Niti Ranjan Biswas


In this group students will discover and experiment with North Indian rhythms and melodies on tabla
or on their own instruments, and with singing the tala and rhythmic compositions. The multi-layered
complex rhythms will allow students to experience rhythm and music in a new way. Instrumentalists
and vocalists will develop skills in translating Indian traditional music to their own instruments and
gain insight into the music from North India.

Course details

teacher Niti Ranjan Biswas


period 2nd term, 1.5 hours per week
class size 4-8
examination being present (min. 80%), evaluations during the lessons and a final concert
credits 2
code 4TFG

Anatolian makam ensemble


In this group students will play on their own instruments. The lessons are based on the makams
(keys) of Anatolian folkmusic. In practice sessions the basic elements of the makams will be
explained, played and improvised on. Also, Anatolian rhythms will be explored in these practice
session. Thus students will acquaint themselves with various aspects of Turkish-Anatolian music.

Course details

teacher Emirhan Tuga


period 1st term, 1.5 hours per week
day t.b.a.
examination attendance, evaluations during the lessons and a final concert
credits 2
code 4TUG
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Tango group, taught by José Luis Lopretti
Music from Río de la Plata, the river between Argentina and Uruguay. Folkloric music from both sides
and fusiones such as tango, milonga and candombe in a contemporary approach. Inspired by
musicians like Piazzolla, in this class music will be played with the use of traditional rhythms,
melodies, harmonies, and form, in a new setting.

Course details

teacher José Luis Lopretti


period 2nd term, 1.5 hours per week
class size max. 8 (also open for students from the classical department)
examination being present (min. 80%), evaluations during the lessons, and a final concert
credits 2
code 4JLL

5. Music from other cultures, Brazilian

Brazilian Singing Workshop, taught by Lilian Vieira


This course is meant for 2nd and 3rd year singing students. During the course, students are
introduced to the Brazilian repertoire in gradually increasing levels of difficulty. Various styles are
used, including bossa nova, samba, partido alto and baião. Brazilian is the only language used for
singing, because the rhythm of the language is vital to the music.

Students are judged on:


* pronunciation of Brazilian Portuguese
* how the lyrics are 'experienced'
* timing and articulation appropriate to the style being sung in
* how well percussive patterns are translated into singing
* ensemble skills
* level and execution of repertoire
* stage presentation

Course details

teacher Lilian Vieira


period 1st term, 1 hour per week. Two year course.
class size max. 5. Besides the singing/language lessons, there are also weekly
rehearsals with the accompanying ensemble
accompaniment Maurice Rugebregt
requirement the Brazilian language course (Portuguese) is compulsory and required
because of the pronunciation. Students may only continue with the 2nd year
(5LV2) if they passed the 1st year (5LV1)
examination being present (min. 80%), evaluations during the lessons and a final concert.
The closure of the 1st year consists of several tutti-pieces with small solo
fragments. At the end of the 2nd year students will perform a self-chosen

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solo piece as well as the tutti songs.
credits 2 per year
code 5LV1 (first year) / 5LV2 (second year)

Brazilian Accompaniment Group, taught by Maurice Rugebregt


The main focus of these lessons is to accompany the vocalists who take part in Lilian Vieira's
workshop, and also during the final concert. The instrumentalists come in contact with a wide range
of typical Brazilian styles, harmonies and rhythms.

Course details

reference cd
teachers Maurice Rugebregt
period 1st term, 1.5 hours per week
class size around 6
examination being present (min. 80%), evaluations during the lessons and a final concert
credits 2
code 5MR1

Brazilian Fusion Group, taught by Hans Vroomans


In this instrumental group, the newer Brazilian fusion (Música Popular) is studied, among other
things. Additionally, the blending of forms will be covered, as they are now played under European,
African and North American influence.

Course details

teachers Hans Vroomans


term 1st or 2nd term, 1.5 hours per week
class size around 8
examination being present (min. 80%), evaluations during the lessons and a final concert
credits 2
code 5HVR

6. Special principal subjects

Third-Year Guitar Group, taught by Maarten van der Grinten


The pieces for the etude exams (as is written in the Guitar learning schedule) are brought into
practise. Communication with the rhythm section is one of the skills focused on.

Course details

teacher Maarten van der Grinten


period 1st and 2nd semester, 1.5 hours per week
class size ± 7 (5 git, bas, drs)
examination being present (min. 80%), evaluations during the lessons, and the etude exam
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credits 2
code 6g3MG

Guitar Quintet, taught by Henk Sprenger


With the use of material especially written for this setting (five guitars and rhythm), skills such as
reading, accompanying, improvising and mixing in this unusual setting are focused on, among others.
The repertoire consists of a wide range of styles, from jazz and latin to fusion. Students are also
invited to write their own arrangements/compositions for this ensemble.

Course details

teacher Henk Sprenger


period 1st and/or 2nd semester, 1.5 hours per week
class size ± 7 (5 git, bas, drs)
requirements compulsory for 3rd year guitar students. 2nd year students may participate
only with exceptional reading skills
examination being present (min. 80%) and performance during the lessons, and a final
concert
credits 2
code 6g3HS

Bass Guitar Group, taught by David de Marez Oyens


During these lessons, material written or adapted especially for this unusual setting is played. With
the help of this music, all sorts of issues are focused on such as special techniques, mixing and
colouring the sound in unusual situations, alternative functions that you can achieve in an ensemble,
keeping the tempo without drums or percussion and sight reading. Aside from that, there is plenty of
room for improvisation and learning to write for this setting.

Course details

teacher David de Marez Oyens


period 1st or 2nd semester, 1.5 hours per week
class size about 4
examination being present (min. 80%) and evaluations during the lessons, a self-written
arrangement and a final concert
credits 2
code 6DMb

Saxophone Group, taught by Albert Beltman


The objective of this ensemble is to learn to play together in a saxophone section, and as a
preparation for playing in a bigband among other things. (Mainly for first and second year saxophone
students).
Course details

teacher Albert Beltman


period 1st and/or 2nd semester, 1.5 hours per week
class size ±5
examination being present (min. 80%) and evaluation during the lessons, and a final
concert
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credits 2 for one semester, 3 for a whole year
code 6sd

Saxophone Group with Rythm Section, taught by Albert Beltman


Two things are focused on: working on specific repertoire for a sax-section with rhythm, and pieces
from the bigband repertoire of Ellington, Basie, Glenn Miller and especially the challenging Thad
Jones/Mel Lewis repertoire. Saxophone quartets are also included.

Course details

teacher Albert Beltman


period 1st and 2nd semester, 1.5 hours per week
class size 8
requirements saxophonists, piano, bass and drums from higher year levels
examination being present (min. 80%) and evaluation during the lessons, and a final
concert
credits 2 for one semester, 3 for a whole year
code 6sc

Trombone Group, taught by Martijn Sohier


With the help of material especially written for this setting (± 7 trombones with rhythm section),
skills such as reading, section playing and improvising are worked on.

Course details

teacher Martijn Sohier


period 1st and 2nd semester, 1.5 hours per week (rhythm for 1 semester)
class size ± 10
examination being present (min. 80%) and evaluations during the lessons, and a concert
credits 2
code 6TRB

Vocal Groups
Taking part in one of the vocal groups is compulsory for all vocalists for the duration of at least three
years. Aside from that, an accompanying trio is also needed to be able to accompany the choirs for
concerts.

Students of the jazz voice study programme may participate in four vocal groups: Vocal Basic, Vocal
Inchoiry, Vocal Top and Vocal Summit. The composition of the groups depends on the student's year
of study and level. This will enable students to chose their groups according to their principal subjects
(Vocal Basic) and find a challenge in groups of a higher level, such as Vocal Top.

The student will have two vocal group lessons per week in the second term. This means that there
will be extra time scheduled, which the group may use to work independently, to work with the
ensembles teacher or with the Vocal Summit group. The theme per group will be chosen depending
on the composition of the group and the experience and interests of the students.

The vocal groups will present themselves at a combo evening in December and the Open Day in
January. The groups will complete the study year in April/May with a final concert in school.
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Vocal Basic
A vocal group for all first-years of the voice study programme. This ensemble will work on the
beginnings of close harmony in the broadest sense. The students will become acquainted with close
harmony is and how to apply it in this ensemble.
The students will participate in this group for one year.

Course details

teacher Eva Baggerman


period 1st and 2nd semester, 1.5 hours per week
class size about 7
examination being present (min. 80%) and evaluations during the lessons, and several
concerts
credits 2
code 6EBVB

Vocal Inchoiry
Vocal groups for second- and third-years of the voice study programme.
In addition to singing in the group, there is the possibility in the second term to form larger or smaller
groups in order to work on musical preferences, level, etc. This will enable students to find their
challenges in the field of ensemble singing.
The students will participate in this group for two years, unless they are asked to join or audition for
Vocal Top.

Course details

teacher Eva Baggerman


period 1st and 2nd semester, 1,5 hours per week
class size 6 to ± 12
requirements Vocal Basic must be completed with sufficient results
examination being present (min. 80%) and evaluations during the lessons, and several
concerts
credits 2
code 6EBV2; 6EBV3

Vocal Top
This ensemble consists of four to five voice students from the jazz department and possibly the
classical department, who have been asked to join or have auditioned for the group. The students in
this ensemble are greatly responsible themselves for selecting music, rehearsing and performing, for
creating and developing musical ideas. A large amount of self-discipline and independence is
required. Vocal Top is the starting point of a professional attitude necessary to work in the
profession.
In 2014-2015 there are plans for a Swingle Singers project.
The students who have been selected will participate in this group for one year.

Course details

teacher Eva Baggerman


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term 1st and 2nd term, 1-2 x 1,5 hours per week
class size 4-5
requirements for Vocal Top students have to audition, please contact Eva Baggerman for
an appointment.
examination attendance (at least 80%), evaluations during the lessons and a final concert
credits 2
code 6EBVT

Vocal Summit
This vocal group consists of all students from the abovementioned groups. Singing in a group of this
size, instead of smaller groups, gives singing a special dimension. This group works intensively within
an arranged period of a number of weeks. All students will participate in Vocal Summit for three
years.

Course details

teacher Eva Baggerman


term 2nd term, within arranged periods a number of weeks, 1,5 hours per week
class size approx. 20
examination presence (min 80%) and performance during the lessons and concerts
credits 1
code 6EBVS

Voice Lab, taught by Sylvia Langelaan


Especially for instrumentalists. There is a weekly rehearsal, during which instrumentalists get the
chance to experience music in a totally different way. Close harmony, backing vocals, building up
chords together and having a completely different function within a group than usual. Technique,
intonation, blending and presentation are also included. Open to everyone.
NB If you sign up, you must complete the year.

Course details

teacher Sylvia Langelaan


period 1st and 2nd semester, 1.5 hours per week
class size 2-33
examination being present (min. 80%) and evaluations during the lessons, and a final
concert
credits 2
code 6NVC

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7. Crossover groups

Second-Year Funk/Crossover Group, taught by Lené te Voortwis and Henk Sprenger


Rhythm section, chord conception, melody and improvisation within the jazzrock/fusion repertoire is
worked on during these lessons, with the aim of creating a complete piece of resounding music out
of written notes. If students want to introduce pieces from their own repertoire, this is possible
through discussion with their teacher.

Course details

teacher Lené te Voortwis (LV), Henk Sprenger (HS)


period 1st and/or 2nd term 1.5 hours per week
class size ±6
examination being present (min. 80%) and evaluations during the lessons, and a final
concert
credits 2 for one semester, 3 for a whole year
code 7LV, 7HS

Advanced Fusion Group, taught by Hans Vroomans


This ensemble focuses on the music composed by jazzrock/fusion groups such as Weather Report,
Return to Forever and Brecker Brothers, and musicians such as Pat Metheny, Herbie Hancock and
Chick Corea.

Course details

teacher Hans Vroomans


period 1st or 2nd term 1.5 hours per week
class size 6-8
requirements passing Jazz Theory level 2, higher year levels and master programme
examination being present (min. 80%), evaluations during the lessons, and a final concert
credits 2 for one term
code 7AFG

Zappa And Associates Group taught by Jos Zwaanenburg


This ensemble focuses on transciptions of music composed by Frank Zappa, Tim Smith (Cardiacs),
David Vorhaus (White Noise) and others. Compositions by participating students may also be played,
provided they have been inspired by one of the abovementioned musicians or their associates.

Course details

teacher Jos Zwaanenburg


period 1st semester, 1,5 hours per week
class size 6-8
requirements passing Jazz Theory level 2, higher year levels and master programme
examination attendance (min. 80%), evaluations during the lessons and a final concert
credits 2
code 7JZ

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Advanced Crossover Group, taught by Lené te Voortwis and David de Marez Oyens
The objective of these groups is to allow students to bring their own ideas into styles of music that
are related to jazz, such as pop and latin. Singers must bring their own pieces, and instrumentalists
can bring their own pieces if they choose to. Students are required to arrange their chosen piece, and
this occurs under supervision. This is completed by a performance at the end of each semester.

Course details

teacher Lené te Voortwis (LV), David de Marez Oyens (DM)


period 1st and/or 2nd term 1.5 hours per week
class size 8-10
examination being present (min. 80%) and evaluations during the lessons, and a final
concert
credits 2 for one semester, 3 for a whole year
code 7LV, 7DMa

Funk/Rock/R&B Group, taught by David de Marez Oyens and Sylvia Langelaan


The repertoire and arrangements will be decided on in consultation with all participants. From a
small basis-repertoire, students strive towards an expansive programme which is directed towards
stage/performance. Suitable for the higher year levels of the bachelor programme, and students of
the master programme.

Course details

teachers David de Marez Oyens, Sylvia Langelaan (vocal coaching)


period whole year, 1.5 hours per week
class size ± 12 (4-6 vocalists, 4 horns and an extensive rhythm section)
requirements for vocalists and instrumentalists from the higher year levels and the master
programme
examination being present (min. 80%) and evaluations during the lessons and the concerts
credits 3 for a whole year
code 7DMc

8. Big bands

Monday Band and Tuesday Band


The years in which students can sign up for these ensembles vary depending on their principal
subject. Sectionals are held in addition to weekly rehearsals.

Course details

teachers Erik van Lier, Johan Plomp and several guest teachers
period 1st and/or 2nd term, 3.5 hours per week. Horns are required the whole year,
and rhythm section for one term
class size 17-18
examination being present (min. 80%) and evaluations during the lessons, workshops and
concerts

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credits 3 for one semester, 5 for a whole year (including section rehearsals)
code 8BBM or 8BBT

Section rehearsals
instrument teacher
saxophone Albert Beltman
trumpet Jan Oosthof
trombone Erik van Lier
rhythm Johan Plomp

9. Student ensemble

Student Ensemble
Students have the possibility to organise a band themselves (before signing up to this course). Please
discuss this with the group before signing up. This group may be part of your DOK project.

The student who signs up will be considered as the group leader. He/she is responsible for all
communications to the group members, the band coach, the Bookings Department for booking a
rehearsal room, and the ensembles coordinator for the half-term and final concerts. The group leaser
is also responsible for preparing, organizing and leading the rehearsals.

The group may get a set weekly rehearsal time, and can choose from a selection of teachers every
year. The teacher is not the leader who decides what happens, but more of a coach who gives
feedback roughly six to eights times a year. After one semester the progress of the group is reviewed,
and depending on the development, they will be allowed to continue to do the next semester.

Course details

teachers choice of Berend van den Berg (EEBvB), Jasper Blom (EEJB), Arnold
Dooijeweerd (EEADW), Bart Fermie (EEBF), Harmen Fraanje (EEHF),
Ernst Glerum (EEEG), Frans van der Hoeven (EEFH), Sylvia Langelaan
(EESL), Hans Mantel (EEHMA), David de Marez Oyens (EEDM), Yaniv
Nachum (EEYN), Ruud Ouwehand (EERO), Martijn Sohier (EEMS), Jan
Wessels (EEJW). Other teachers can be chosen through discussion.

period 1st term; a whole year is possible, dependent on progress shown at a mid-year presentation;
1.5 hours per week

class size own choice

requirements a clear written summary of:


* the ensemble setting (names and instruments)
* the objective and repertoire
* the desired teacher

examination being present (min. 80%) and evaluations during the rehearsals and a final
concert

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credits 2 for a semester, 3 for a whole year

code Berend van den Berg (EEBvB), Jasper Blom (EEJB), Arnold
Dooijeweerd (EEADW), Bart Fermie (EEBF), Harmen Fraanje (EEHF),
Ernst Glerum (EEEG), Frans van der Hoeven (EEFH), Sylvia Langelaan (EESL),
Hans Mantel (EEHMA), David de Marez Oyens (EEDM), Yaniv Nachum (EEYN),
Ruud Ouwehand (EERO), Martijn Sohier (EEMS), Jan Wessels (EEJW)

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4. Music Theory Subjects Jazz Programme
The final examination for all instrumental and vocal principal subjects, as well as the principal
subjects of arranging and music theory will all include the music-theory subjects of general music
theory, ear-training, harmony, analysis, arranging, harmony at the piano and the subject of music
history, with one exception: the subject of harmony at the piano will not be included in the final
examination for the principal subject of piano.

Jazz propaedeutic programme

The propaedeutic phase includes the following subjects:


* General Music Theory
* General Theoretical Subjects (ATV)
* Ear Training
* Rhythmic Training
* Harmony at the Piano
* Jazz History

These subjects will be continued in the post-propaedeutic phase, with two exceptions: general music
theory and rhythmic training. In the third year students will get the chance to study three subjects in
depth; one of the courses on arranging, one of the analysis courses and additional subjects, and one
of the music-history courses.

Additional information can be found in the jazz post-propaedeutic programme.

General Provisions
* Class attendance and sitting for examinations is required of every student unless the Board of
Directors has granted him/her exemption (please see (7) below).

* The coordinator of the music-theory subjects/music history will ensure that a complete
examination schedule for the music-theory subjects and music history is available no later than 15
April of every course year. Students are responsible for acquainting themselves with the examination
dates applicable to them by consulting a yearly overview published at the beginning of each year and
the aforementioned examination schedule. Students will not be notified individually of the
examination dates. The coordinator will also be responsible for organizing the examinations.
Committees will always consist of two members - as a rule, the student's own teacher and a fellow
teacher, who will also function as chairman. The assessment and results ('satisfactory' or
'unsatisfactory') will be entered on an examination report to be signed by the chairman. The
candidate will be provided with the original report and a copy will be filed with the study secretariat,
who keeps a file for every student.

* If, at the end of the course year, a student has not successfully completed one of the courses or
course components for one of the subjects referred to in these provisions, he/she will be assigned to
the relevant course or course component again in the following course year. Students will be allowed
such an opportunity only once. In the case of excessive and unexcused absence, however, the Board
of Directors - or the coordinator in consultation with the Board - may decide not to allow the student

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to take the course a second time, in which case, he/she will be permitted only to resit the
examinations.

* Students may be exempted from attending classes and taking examinations in one of the courses or
course components referred to in these provisions by:
a. the coordinator of theoretical subjects or a relevant teacher, in consultation with the coordinator,
if a student can produce evidence showing that he/she has completed the course or course
component in question at another conservatory or by having taken a state examination
[staatsexamen]
b. the coordinator and a relevant teacher if, despite a student's inability to produce the evidence
required under (a), they believe that the student otherwise demonstrates sufficient knowledge
and/or skills with respect to the course/course component for which exemption has been requested.

Exemption is granted by the Board of Directors. Once granted, exemption will be considered
equivalent to the student having completed the course component in question. Exemption will be
granted by means of the form provided for that purpose, which is available from the study
secretariat. Any documentary evidence will be added, along with the exemption form which has
been signed by the coordinator and/or the relevant teacher, to the student's file.

General Music Theory

Learning Objective
The objective of the course is to provide underpinning for both the principal subject and the
additional music-theory subjects by providing students with knowledge of and skills relating to the
musical material and the corresponding terminology.

Contents
The following are addressed: tonal system and notation; metre, rhythm, tempo; scales, keys, tonality
and modality; overtones, consonance and dissonance; intervals, triads, seventh chords; articulation
and phrasing; dynamics; organology; theory of musical forms; terminology in various languages.

Course details

teacher Bram Strijbis


period 1st and 2nd semester
work form one-hour lecture per week
material to be announced by the teacher
examination written exam at the end of each course item
exam periods October, December and April
credits 2

General Theoretical Subjects


The subjects of ear-training, analysis, harmony and arranging are all taught in parallel in the General
Theoretical Subjects course.

Learning objective
The objective of the course is to develop students' musical and inner ear (ear training),
understanding of musical structure (analysis ), harmonic understanding and skill (harmony) and

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arranging skills (arranging). These four subjects will be taught using an integrated approach
whenever possible on the basis of representative pieces from the jazz repertoire.

Course details

teachers Barbara Bleij, Jan Faas, Henk Huizinga, Patrick Schenkius, Walter Stuhlmacher
period whole year
work form study group, 3 hours per week
material to be announced by the teacher
examination 1. test in December/January consisting of an ear-training assingnment and an
analysis/scoring assignment

2. propaedeutic exam late May/early June. This exam takes place on two
days, with two assignments of 60 minutes each per day. The four
components are:
a. ear-training assignment with an MP3 and earphones on the computer
b. analysis
c. scoring
d. harmonizing a given melody. The student may use a keyboard and
earphones once to play the harmonization through
All components must be assessed as sufficient, before the final mark can be
given.

credits 8

Ear Training Skills

Skills
To make a transcription of the following components:
1. leadsheet (melody and chord symbols) of the (part of a) theme from a jazz-related piece
2. solo improvisation
3. a simple arrangement

Contents
The contents of the analysis and harmony components will be put in practice and examined during
the ear training lessons.

Analysis

Skills
To perceive (visually and/or auditively) and to analyse in writing form, melody, harmony, sheet music
and arrangements/instrumentation.

Contents
1. form: all usual forms of the standard repertoire as well as familiar different, irregular forms (also
originals)
2. melody: melodic structure. The relationship between melody and harmony.
3. harmony: chord functions, the relationship between chords, vertical structures. The harmonic

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idiom is the 'classical jazz harmony', pieces from The American Songbook, Real Book and the bebop
era.
4. sheet music: to interpret arrangements and/or chord symbols from song books and lead sheets
from uit fake and real books.
5. arrangement/instrumentation: to analyze by ear the composition of an arrangement, to recognize
different instruments.

Harmony

Skills
To write an arrangement with given chord symbols:
1. arrangement of an accompaniment (close arrangement)
2. arrangement with the melody (given melody)

Arranging

Skills
To invent and write a harmonization:
1. harmonization with chord symbols under a given melody
2. reharmonization of standards

Contents
To present a method with which a harmonization can be made.

Ear Training

Learning Objective
The objective of this course is to develop the student's musical ear by training the musical
imagination and to form a broad and solid base for sight-reading, sight-playing and sight-singing.

Contents
The exercises cover various techniques for the singing of melodies, chord progressions and separate
chords. On the basis of well-known pieces from the jazz repertoire students will develop their
musical imagination.

Course details

period whole year


work form study group 1.5 hours per week
material to be decided and handed out by the teacher
examination an individual oral exam in which the contents of the lessons will be tested
exam period May
credits 4

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Rhythmic Training

Learning objective
The objective of this course is to learn how to write down rhythms, how to interpret this notation,
how to perform this 'swing feel' and to train rhythmical sight-reading.

Contents
Exercises in writing down swing rhythms and singing exercises from the lesson book.

Course details

teacher Johan Plomp


period 1st or 2nd semester
work form study group of one hour per week
material to be decided and handed out by the teacher
examination * written: to be able to write down rhythmical fragments
* oral: to be able to sight-sing jazz rhythms
exam period December and April
credits 1

Harmony at the piano

Learning Objective
The objective of this two-year course is to teach students how to use the piano to assist them in
developing their understanding of harmony and harmony-related skills.

Contents
The exercises consist of playing:
* chords and chord progressions
* settings/arrangements with a given melody in the soprano

In the first year, students begin with keyboard-orientation exercises followed by simple progressions
in the most usual keys. All this is then applied to simple pieces - melody with simple accompaniment
− within the context of representative pieces from the jazz repertoire. Subsequently, the number of
keys, setting, choice of chords and repertoire will be gradually expanded.

Course details

teachers Berend van den Berg, Örjan Graafmans, Dirk Keijzer, Walther Stuhlmacher
period whole year
work form study group of one hour per week
material to be decided and handed out by the teacher
examination practical exam: this exam is taken individually and takes 20 minutes.
Requirements
1. prepared: to be able to play a piece with the melody as top voice, and to be
able to play accompaniment to a melody
2. unprepared: to figure out at the piano melody and a simple
accompaniment of a not too difficult piece

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exam period May
credits 3

Jazz History
In this course three strongly interrelated subjects are discussed:
1) The origins and development of jazz in both the narrow and the wider sense.
2) The development of the skills needed to listen to recorded music intelligently and to swiftly and
efficiently decode the material.
3) Introduction to philosophical aspects connected to becoming a good jazz musician and how
discography has documented this.

ad 1) This is the backbone of the course. Starting with its African roots, the course deals with specific
black aspects that, in close conjunction, eventually gave rise to a totally new music and a new way of
doing things. The historic line is followed and underlined by information about racial strife and
connected socio-economic aspects that propelled the music and without which jazz would not have
existed.
The strictly historic line of development is followed until the seventies, when lines between jazz and
other types of music began to fade. More recent developments are discussed against this backdrop.
Apart from CD’s, this course uses unique material on film and the Ken Burns videoseries.

ad 2) Next to mastering an instrument, 'understanding what you’re hearing' is of paramount


importance. Comprehension only through aural information is vital for any jazz musician. A recording
is a documentation of a way of doing things; much of that can be transcribed, but every record
contains (at least) as much important information that cannot be transcribed. This becomes clear by
developing 'Creative Listening' and 'Aural Awareness' whereby historical and sonological details are
combined with aspects of style, form, harmony, melody and rhythm to quickly and effectively
'decode' and understand the material. In other words: listening to records is a skill.

ad 3) Being a good instrumentalist or vocalist is one thing; being a good jazz musician is another.
Playing jazz is a stylized form of social behavior which involves (collectively and creatively) solving a
constantly changing problem of coordination in which just technical skills are not the most important
factor.
Both live and on record, jazz history shows us how great musicians excel at precisely that. This course
discusses and demonstrates the awareness and musical empathy the student needs for this, how to
achieve and maintain development thereof and find out which questions will always need to be
asked.
What connects these three subjects is the importance of understanding what has been, what is now,
and what has yet to be accomplished. Study, through recordings, of the tradition in all its forms is
therefore essential.

Course details

teacher Hans Mantel


period whole year
work form lecture
material to be decided by the teacher
examination written exam which consists of a questionnaire pertaining to four of five
recordings played at the exam.

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exam period latter half of May
credits 4

Jazz postpropaedeutic programme

These pages contain information on the required course components and electives for theory,
ensembles and other electives following the propaedeutic year, as well as information on 'free
space'.
A limited number of second-year theory courses are available; students will be signed up by the
coordinator or scheduler. As regards the third-year theory courses and ensembles, students can
largely determine the course of their studies themselves.

In an effort to control class size and make-up of the ensembles, we request that you always list a first
and second choice. Students wishing to take both classes should state this clearly. NB: Please indicate
'additional choice' instead of 'second choice'.

Please use the post-propaedeutic electives form (on the right side of this page) for indicating your
choice, and submit it no later than 14 June 2015. Forms received after this date will not be
processed.

If you think that you may not need to take a course because of previous study, please state this on
the form, or get in touch with one of the relevant contacts.

When choosing your electives, it is important that you keep in mind that, before being allowed to
take the final examination, you must have completed all the subjects making up your course of study
(i.e. required courses and electives)!

Second-year theory courses

Choices in the second academic year are limited, since all subjects are required. Students are
scheduled to take the following courses:

* General Theoretical Subjects


* Solfege practicum
* Introduction to Classical Western-Culture Music
* Music History Classical Music 20th Century
* English (only for the principal subject Voice)
* Theoretical subjects for the principal subject Arranging

Students may only choose a teacher for Harmony at the Piano.

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General Theoretical Subjects
The material which was covered in the first year is expanded on in the second year.

Topics
Harmony topics ('advanced jazz harmony') that may be covered:
* modulations (with and without common chord)
* more complex harmonicies, such as octotonics, subdominant alterations, leading-tones, parallel
harmony, chromatic basses and minor line-clichés
* open harmonies that cannot be explained by scale degrees
* block chords
* slash chords
* Coltrane changes
* analysing arrangements with three parts or more
* comparative analysis
* writing an arrangement (with block chords, for instance) for saxophone section (which can
eventually be recorded)

Course details

teachers see first-year General Theoretical Subjects


period the whole year, 3 hours per week
day to be decided
class size 6-7
requirements propedeuse (1st year) Jazz Theory
work form study group
examination a. handing in three assignments (May). The student is free to choose the
music for each assignment. The assignments comprise:
1. transcription of a solo, including melody and chord symbols. Written
analysis of the important parts of the solo (e.g.
motifs/arpeggios/scales/patterns).
2. transcription of an arrangement of a melody of three parts or more (the
'head'). Written analysis of a harmony and types of voicings (e.g.
close/open/upper structure/triads/seventh chords).
3. comparative analysis. Transcription of a standard or original will be
analysed and compared to the song sheet or a recording of an early version.
Written analysis: harmonic differences, rhythmical alterations, new
groove/style etc).
The teacher may adapt the abovementioned examples to the level of the
group. Furthermore, the teacher may ask for more work to be handed in.
b. written exam (May/June)
1. ear-training exam
2. arrangement/analysis
3. harmonization
4. block chords
The teacher may adapt the abovementioned examples to the level of the
group.
c. oral exam (June)
The assignments and the written exam will be discussed with the student

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during an indiviual exam. The student will answer questions about their work.
The course will be completed with a general mark of 6 or higher.
credits 8

Solfege practicum
The material which was covered and practised in the first year is explored at a higher level in the
second year.

Course details

teacher Patrick Schenkius, Walther Stuhlmacher


period whole year, 1 hour per week
day to be decided
class size 12-14
requirements propedeuse (1st year) solfege
work form study group
examination oral exam in June
credits 4

Introduction to Classical Western-Culture Music


This course is an introduction to the history of western classical music. The emphasis is on the music
between 1600 and 1900, the period when tonality was developed.

Course details

teacher Walter van de Leur


period 1st semester, 1.5 hours per week
day to be decided
class size 24
requirements propedeuse jazz music history
work form lecture
examination exam in December
credits 2

20th Century Music History


This course gives an insight into the modern-classical music of the 20th century. In addition to a
comprehensive introduction to some of the most innovative composers, their work and techniques,
the course looks at what motivated important trends. In order to gain knowledge and understanding,
much time is spent listening to musical examples.

Course details

teacher Walter van de Leur


period 2nd and 3rd term, 1.5 hours per week
day to be decided
class size 24
requirements Classical music history 1600-1900
work form lecture

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examination exam in June
credits 3

English (only for the principal subject Voice)


The material covered in the first year is explored at a higher level. More time is spent on the analysis
and interpretation of song lyrics. The exam consists of a written section (the content of the whole
syllabus) and an oral section (reading out the lyrics for two songs, and a longer piece of prose). This
exam takes place at the end of the course year.

Course details

teacher Eileen Fiss


period whole year, 1 hour per week
day to be decided
class size 10
requirements propedeuse
work form study group
examination an oral exam in May (handing in a cassette tape), a written exam in June
credits 2

Theory subjects for the principal subject Arranging

Instrumentation
During this course, the history of writing for the orchestra is taught in a practical way. Orchestra
scores are turned into piano extracts, and piano extracts are orchestrated. The emphasis lies mainly
on listening to orchestra pieces while reading along with the score.

In the first year ('Around 1800') the composers Haydn, Beethoven and Schubert are central. In the
second year ('The 19th Century') the central composers are Wagner, Brahms and Franck. In the third
year the composers focused on are Debussy, Stravinsky and Xenakis, among others. The final exam of
this course takes place in the third year.

Course details

teacher André Douw


term whole year, 1 hour per week
work form study group
day t.b.a.
class size 4
requirements propaedeuse
examination review of the work completed during the course
credits 5

Harmony and analysis of classical music


This two-year course covers the classical repertoire from the baroque era until the early 20th
century. Analysis and Harmony are followed chronologically. The harmony taught in this class is
based on the classical 4-voice notation that arose from the old contrapuntal styles. In the first year
the course includes material up to the simple chromaticism of the early 19th century. In the second

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year this is expanded and more complex topics are introduced: chromaticism (at a harder level),
enharmonicism, new modality etc. which were used in the 19th and early 20th century. This is where
it connects with jazz music.

In the first year of the analysis course, works of composers such as Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven
and Schubert are covered. In the second year composers such as Chopin, Schumann, Brahms,
Tchaikovsky, Debussy, Ravel and Stravinsky.

Course details

teacher Clemens Kemme


term whole year, 2 hours per week
work form study group
day t.b.a.
class size 6-7
requirements propaedeuse
examination review of work completed during the course
credits 6

Counterpoint
In the second year, arranging students begin the course counterpoint. This course is two years long,
and focuses on the music from the 16th century (modal counterpoint).

The aim is to create compositions with two, three and four voices and to show the difference
between cantus-firmus settings and those with imitations.

After the first year it is also possible to follow the course 'Baroque Counterpoint' - although this
needs to be discussed with a teacher of the Classical department. This course also takes two years.

Course details

teacher t.b.a.
term whole year, 2 hoursper week
work form study group
day t.b.a.
class size 5-10
requirements propaedeuse
examination review of the compositions
credits 4

Harmony at the Piano (not for principal subject Piano)


The material practised in the first year is expanded and explored at a higher level in the second year.
The final exam takes place at the end of the course year. You can select your own teacher.

Course details

teachers Berend van den Berg, Dirk Keijzer, Örjan Graafmans, Walther Stuhlmacher
period whole year, 1 hour per week

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class size 3-4
requirements propedeuse (1st year) harmony at the piano
work form study group
examination final exam in June
credits 3
code BVB: Berend van den Berg; DK: Dirk Keijzer; OG: Örjan Graafmans; WS:
Wather Stuhlmacher

Third-year theory courses

After having completed the General Theoretical Subjects at the end of the second year, students are
required to study at least three subjects in depth: one from the selection of 'courses in arranging',
and two from 'courses in analysis and other subjects'. Students must earn a total of eight credits for
the elected components.

Instead of choosing a second subject from the 'Analysis/Other subjects' category, students may enrol
on a theory course given in the Classical Department. Please consult the classical post-propaedeutic
programme or contact the coordinators of classical theory courses undefinedJohn Koslovsky and
Michel Khalifa.

In addition to the required electives, students may also sign up for extra subjects, which can be used
to earn 'free space' credits. Students should remember that by electing to enrol on a course, they are
making a commitment to attend and to complete that course.

Elected component: arranging


* Arranging for small and large ensembles
* Arranging for octet
* Arranging for big band
* Arranging for vocal group
* Arranging/songwriting: pop music

Elected component: analysis and other subjects


* Analysis/composition: film music
* Analysis: big band
* Analysis: solo vocabulary
* Analysis: What Is Hip? The 'Cool' Styles in Jazz
* Analysis: Clare Fischer
* Analysis: pop music
* Analysis: Debussy, Ravel, Stravinsky
* Analysis: John Scofield and Pat Metheny
* Composition

Arranging for small and large ensembles


This course focuses on making arrangements for small and large ensembles in different styles. The
emphasis is in the practical aspects such as notation, the use of guitar, synthesizer and horns, and the
accompaniment of singers.

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Course details

teacher Dirk Keijzer, Rik Elings


period whole year, 1.5 hours per week
day to be decided
class size 5-8
requirements passing Jazz Theory level 2
work form study group
examination an arrangement made during the course; ultimate deadline for hand-in:
April,1.
credits 4
code ARKGk; ARKGe

Arranging for octet


This course is focused on making arrangements for 5 horns (trumpet, alto sax, tenor sax, trombone,
baritone sax) plus rhythm section. You have a choice of two teachers: Henk Huizinga or Johan Plomp.

Course details

teachers Henk Huizinga, Johan Plomp


period whole year, 1.5 hours per week
day Mon/Tue/Thu (H. Huizinga); Mon/Tue/Wed (J. Plomp)
class size 10
requirements passing Jazz Theory level 2
work form study group
examination an arrangement for octet that is made during the course, which may be
performed depending on the availability of musicians; ultimate deadline for
hand-in: April,1.
credits 4
code OCTh (H. Huizinga), OCTp (J. Plomp)

Arranging for big band


This course consists of learning to make arrangements of representative jazz pieces for bigband. It is
preferable to follow this course in combination with the course 'Analysis: Bigband'. You have a choice
of two teachers: Henk Huizinga or Johan Plomp.

Course details

teachers Henk Huizinga, Johan Plomp


period whole year, 1.5 hours per week
day Mon/Tue/Thu (H. Huizinga); Mon/Tue/Wed (J. Plomp)
class size 10
work form study group
requirements passing Jazz Theory level 2
examination an arrangement for bigband that will be performed depending on theavailability of
musiscians; ultimate deadline for hand-in: April, 1
credits 4
code ARBBh (H. Huizinga), ARBBp (J. Plomp)

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Arranging for vocal group
In this course, students learn to make three-six voice arrangements for vocal groups, with or without
a rhythm section while exploring different styles. This course is compulsory for all singers.

Course details

teacher Rik Elings


period whole year, 1.5 hours per week
day to be decided
class size 5 - 10
work form study group
requirements passing Jazz Theory level 2
examination an arrangement for a vocal group; ultimate deadline for hand-in: April,1.
credits 4
code ARVOC

Arranging/songwriting: pop music


In this course we will deal with popsongwriting in all its stages: putting together chords, melodies
and words, making grooves, arranging for backing vocals, horns and strings, recording and
production, synth programming, etcetera. The student can pick the main topic of his interest, but the
end goal is to get a more or less complete overview of the skills required for pop songwriting.

Two events will be organized for a practical presentation of our work: a presentation concert in the
Amsterdam Blue Note, where you can perform your own songs, and an excursion to a pop recording
studio, where we will go into the technique of studio sounds and production (amps, microphones,
positioning, compressors, mixing etc.), while recording one of our songs.

Students are expected to collect little ideas on a regular basis. In the lessons we investigate how
these ideas can be worked out into songs with a good balance between expressive value, musical
content and taste. You will also be stimulated to think about the basis of your songwriting: creativity,
motivation, musical philosophy. Originality and experimentation is encouraged!

It is important that you have the possibility to experiment with your material, e.g. with a computer or
a rehearsing band. Written music is only used as a tool: students are invited to bring recordings or to
perform the song in class. The subject of writing lyrics will also be covered, but only in the context of
the whole songwriting process.

If writing in the pop idiom it quite new to you, it is strongly recommended that you take the course
of Analyse Popmuziek in combination with this course.

Course details

teacher Jaco Benckhuijsen


day to be decided
class size 5-8
requirements passing Jazz Theory level 2
work form private lessons
examination a recording of a song resulting from a creative process during the course
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credits 4
code ARPOP

Analysis/composition: Film music


This course consists of the study of film music by composers such as John Barry, Jerry Goldsmith,
Bernard Herrman, Ennio Morricone, Nino Rota, John Williams and Hans Zimmer. Different style
characteristics and composition techniques will be analysed with the help of examples. The analysis
is accompanied by several small composition and arranging assignments. For the final assignment,
students are required to write a piece of film music for a certain scene.

Course details

teacher Walther Stuhlmacher


period 1st or 2nd semester, 2 hours per week
day Thursday
class size 5-8
work form study group
requirements passing Jazz Theory level 2
examination a transcription and an arrangement/composition
credits 2
code FILM

Analysis: big band


This course consists of looking at different big band arrangements from Thad Jones, Sammy Nestico
and Duke Ellington (among others) in an analytical way. Arrangements of the same piece but by
different arrangers are compared, and connections are made with other works such as arrangements
for smaller groups and classical pieces.

Course details

teacher Patrick Schenkius


period 1st or 2nd semester, 2 hours per week
day Thursday
class size 5-8
work form study group
requirements passing Jazz Theory level 2
examination an analysis assignment of a bigband arrangement
credits 2
code ANBB

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Analysis: Solo vocabulary
This course consists of analysing solos by authoritative jazz soloists such as Charlie Parker, Clifford
Brown, Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane, Wayne Shorter and Herbie Hancock.

Course details

teacher Barbara Bleij


period 1st or 2nd semester, 2 hours per week
day to be decided
class size 5-8
work form study group
requirements passing Jazz Theory level 2
examination a discussion about a transcription of your own choice, with the
accompaniment of self made transcriptions and analyses
credits 2
code SOLO

Analysis: What Is Hip? The 'Cool' Styles in Jazz


Cool jazz has its roots in the 1940s. The term is used frequently, but it is by no means evident what
the characteristics of this 'style' or 'genre' are. Additionally, the word is also used to denote a certain
esthetical attitude in jazz.
This analysis class features the work of some of the artists which are usually considered to be 'cool'.
The course does not take a chronological-historical approach. Rather the work of a selection of
musicians will be considered. For a large part of the course the focus will be on the Lennie Tristano -
Lee Konitz school, including Tristano's teaching method, on Gil Evans and on Miles Davis, and also on
their collaboration.

For every class students will fulfill analytical assignments; short individual presentations may be part
of the assignments.

Course details

teacher Barbara Bleij


period 1st or 2nd semester, 2 hours per week
day to be decided
class size 5-8
work form study group
requirements passing Jazz Theory level 2
examination analysis of a piece of the student's choice, followed by a discussion of the
analysis
credits 2
code COOL

Analysis: Clare Fischer


Clare Fischer is really a 'Musicians Musician'. His fascinating harmonies are what he is typically known
for. Fischer writes for diverse musicians such as Gillespie, Prince, the High-Lo's, Robert Palmer and
Diane Schuur, as well as for his own group. During this course, the main focus will be the pieces for
small ensembles, which includes well-known compositions such as Morning and Pensativa.

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Course details

teacher Barbara Bleij


period 1st or 2nd semester, 2 hours per week
day to be decided
class size 5-8
work form study group
requirements passing Jazz Theory level 2
examination the analysis of a self-chosen piece (on the basis of a self-made transcription)
followed by a discussion of the analysis
credits 2
code CF

Analysis: pop music


Since the Beatles, pop music has developed a unique musical language through a new approach to
older musical structures, heavliy influenced by technology, pop culture and the non-academic
musical education of its makers. And however simple the music may sound, it is in fact a musical
language rich in styles, quotations, sounds, and production techniques.

The objective of the course is to learn to recognize and appreciate the musical structures that pop
musicians have used. We will get there by listening to (non-commercial) recorded pop music from
the 1960s until now and analyzing it.

We will not only look at the traditional musical parameters like melody, harmony and form, but also
the typical 'pop' elements: studio production, use of instruments, lyrics, historic context. What is the
origin of these rhythms? How did they make the guitar sound like that? What production techniques
were used? What are the lyrics about?

It is a good idea to take this course together with the course of Pop Songwriting/arranging, especially
if pop music writing is relatively new to you.

Course details

teacher Jaco Benckhuijsen


period 1st or 2nd semester, 2 hours per week
day to be decided
class size 5-8
work form study group
requirements passing Jazz Theory level 2
examination a self made analysis/transcription
credits 2
code ANPOP

Analysis: Debussy, Ravel, Stravinsky


Debussy, Ravel, and Stravinsky lived in a time of rich cultural exchange as well as rising political
tensions, like ours. All three composers had their own fascinating way of reacting creatively to these
trends, combining the western musical tradition with the rhythms and modalities of foreign cultures,
from Spain to East Asia. And all of them strongly contributed to the development of new techniques

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like modal mixture, chordal extension, harmonic parallellism, whole-tone and octatonic harmony,
and bitonality.

These composers were also keenly aware of the rise of jazz, as can be heard in Debussy’s Golliwog’s
Cakewalk, Stravinsky’s Ragtime, and Ravel’s two piano concertos. And they, in turn, have inspired
many jazz musicians, as can be heard in Billy Strayhorn’s Chelsea Bridge, John Coltrane’s Giant Steps
and the piano styles of Bill Evans and Herbie Hancock.

In the course, we will closely study about ten representative works of these composers (Stravinsky:
only his ‘Russian period’). The goal is to develop a thorough insight in the musical languages of three
key composers from the first half of the twentieth century.

Course details

teacher Clemens Kemme


period 1st or 2nd term
day Monday or Tuesday
work form study group (max. 10), 1,5 hours per week)
requirements Analysis II (classical) / ATV 2 (jazz)
examination analytical paper (annotated score + essay of 500-1500 words), presentation,
interview
credits 2
code DRS

Analysis: John Scofield and Pat Metheny


This course focuses on compositions and improvisations by Scofield and Metheny.

Course details

teacher Patrick Schenkius


period 2nd semester
day to be decided
class size 5-8
work form study group
requirements passing Jazz Theory level 2
examination transcription of two compositions and an exam based on those two
compositions
credits 2
code JSPM

Composition
In this course various composition techniques will be discussed and analyzed. Students will practise
various methods and approaches to writing music. Additionally students will get feedback on their
own work and assignments.

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Course details

teacher Johan Plomp


term 1st or 2nd term, 2 hours per week
work form study group
day t.b.a.
class size 5-8
requirements passing Jazz Theory level 2
examination handing in one newly composed piece with a recording and a short
description of the composition process and the techniques used
credits 2
code CMP

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5. Education and Entrepreneurship
The Education and Entrepreneurship course is spread out over all the academic years making up the
bachelor’s degree programme.

Education consists of the Music Education, Methodology and Internship components.

Entrepreneurship consists of Mentoring, Introduction to Education and Career, and Music


Management.

Learning objectives

The Education programme gives students an understanding of the most important aspects of
teaching their own principal subject and small ensembles. They may also specialize in certain aspects
of teaching, such as organizing workshops, working in a community setting (e.g. community music),
working with schoolchildren or writing a method or lesson plan.

Entrepreneurship introduces students to an important component that will play a part in his/her
future career. They will design their own individual project representing all aspects of the profession,
including project-based methodology, giving presentations, networking, organizational skills, identity
investigation and financial management.

Programme structure:

Year Semester Course Credits


1 1 Introduction to Education and Career 1
2 2 Music Education 1 1
2 2 Methodology 1 1
3 1 Music Education 2 2
3 1 Methodology 2 2
3 1 Internship 2
3 1 Music Management 1 3
4 1 Music Management 2 6

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Mentoring and Introduction to Education and Career

Propaedeutic year

In the first semester of the first year, students receive guidance from senior students (mentors) in
organizing their study (enrolment, study skills, networking, etc.), the ins and outs of life in
Amsterdam (jam sessions, concert venues, housing, etc.) and a short Introduction to Education and
Career, which covers such topics as hearing protection, injury prevention, organizing the study, and a
basic course to prepare them for the professional world.

Music Education, Methodology and the Internship

Bachelor year 2

The Music Education and Methodology courses get under way in the second half of the second year.

Music Education 1
In Music Education 1, students learn to lead their own band (band coaching).

Theoretically, the course is divided into two specialist fields: didactics and communication skills. The
course covers teaching group and ensemble lessons. The course is taught in an ensemble setting.
Band leaders work on a rotational basis and coach students on works they perform in rehearsals.
Particular emphasis will be placed on flexibility and the consistent application of various didactic
methods.

A number of learning theories will also be addressed. Various forms of learning will be covered, as
will a number of learning styles. Other topics include memory, intelligence and talent. The course will
also focus on several communication principles, including

* observation and interpretation,


* non-verbal behaviour,
* listening,
* summarizing and
* giving feedback.

Conclusion 1: examination on the material, which students can access using a compilation of
various texts.
Conclusion 2: twenty-minute-long mock lesson.

Methodology 1
The methodology class is taught in groups and focuses on the key aspects of individual lessons:

* outlook on teaching;
* compiling teaching material;
* an analysis of multiple beginners’ methods;

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* working from repertoire, songs;
* designing a lesson plan for beginners (first ten lessons); and
* an analysis of important players who changed history.

Conclusion: oral discussion, portfolio of materials collected using a checklist.

Bachelor year 3
Both courses are continued in the first semester of the third year.

Music Education 2
In Music Education 2, students can specialize in certain types of teaching by enrolling on short
modules. These include music psychology, leading an amateur pop band, leading an amateur jazz
band, conducting, playing a different instrument in a pop setting, community music, outside
internships and e-learning.

Methodology 2
In the second half of the Methodology course, students will
* focus on instrument building and history,
* analyse multiple jazz methods,
* present their own papers on specific topics,
* design a lesson plan for advanced students (first ten lessons) and
* develop their own teacher profile.

Conclusion: oral discussion of student’s own curriculum framework (using a checklist).


Conclusion of instrument building and history: written test and listening test.
Additional option: presentation using an e-learning video.

Internship (first semester, third year)


The internship involves a small group of instrumentalists giving lessons to an amateur pupil. The
internship will consist of several students giving private lessons on their own instruments to an
individual pupil for a short time. This activity will be overseen by the methodology and pedagogy
teachers.

Structure: the students are divided into groups by principal instrument; each group will give lessons
to an internship pupil, who will be available for that term and will receive lessons free of charge.

The students in a particular group will set up a joint lesson plan and take turns teaching the pupil.
The teachers’ observations will serve to guide the process.

Conclusion: twenty-minute-long mock lesson. Both the group as a whole and the individual
students will be assessed.

Music Management 1
In the first half of the third year, an introduction will be held during which individual students and all
relevant teachers (the Music Management team and principal subject teachers) will jointly draw up a
plan outlining how the student will complete the Music Management programme and meet his/her

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further study goals. Examples include starting his/her own band and organizing a tour, recording a
CD, organizing an event, and developing and giving a workshop.

The Music Management programme gets under way in the second semester of the third year.

Students take their first steps in drawing up a project plan (a business plan). Each student is
responsible for his/her own project.

Teaching in this semester is practically oriented and project-based with a great deal of individual
input from the student. Guest teachers will be invited to discuss business aspects of the professional
world. The Music Management programme is supported by the www.beroepkunstenaar.nl website.

The main objective of Music Management is to teach students entrepreneurial skills they will need in
the professional music world. Several qualities that will be developed are teamwork, leadership,
knowledge of project management, knowledge of recent developments, specializations in one’s own
field, the arts sector and the Internet, knowledge and skills relating to promotion, finances and law,
and establishing oneself as a performer. Students will be entrusted with the great responsibility of
putting together their own curricula. They will be guided by a personal mentor.

Required modules:
* presentation training;
* building a website;
* bookkeeping; and
* a module related to the student’s profile.

The course concludes in December simultaneously with Music Management 2.

Bachelor year 4

Music Management 2
The second half of Music Management (which takes place during the first half of the fourth year)
sees students completing their chosen project and the remaining required modules.

Conclusion in December: a project presentation which includes a PowerPoint slideshow


and a possible performance at the Amsterdam Blue Note.

Music Management 3
After the project has been concluded, students will complete a component in which a mentor helps
them organize and prepare for the final examination.

The conclusion of this course is integrated with the practical final examination.

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6. Electives
This course component allows students to earn a minimum of 10 credits by specializing in a particular
subject or focusing on a special interest in their second, third and fourth year of study. The electives
programme is published every year in May on MyAHK; students may then sign up for the subjects
they want to follow in the next study year.

An overview of the subjects that are offered in 2015-2016.

practical subjects
Writing Film Music
Advanced Rhythm
Music Notation
Music Technology
Music Production by Computer
Live Electronics
Introduction to Max/MSP
Private Subsidiary Subject
Pop Bass Guitar as a Subsidiary Subject
Improvisation as a Subsidiary Subject
Lyric Lab
Piano Accompaniment for Vocalists
Stage Skills
Flow on stage
History of pop and rock music
Adapting standards for trio/quartet

World Music
Group lessons in Afro-Caribbean and Latin American hand percussion
Indian tabla
Jembe
African Mbira
Flamenco: Music, Dance and Culture
Group lessons in Arab darbuka and singing
Lectures in World Music

Educational subjects
Music Internship in Day Care Centre
Musician in the Classroom
Introduction to Children's Choir Conducting

Other
an extra course from the 'third-year theory courses' category
accompanying principal private vocal lessons
an extra course from the 'ensembles' category
masterclasses, special projects

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a course from the Classical electives programme
a course from the Pop music electives programme, please contact Li Sang Ong

7. Jazz Preparatory Course


Not every musician who is ready for the entrance examination has already finished secondary
education. And not every musician having finished secondary education and considering a
conservatory education has reached the required level. For these students the preliminary training
programme constitutes of one or two years of preparatory work on the principal-study subject,
theory and ear training ('solfège'), all in combination with school or work.

There are no separate entrance requirements for the principal study; the examining board will assess
as to whether students show sufficient potential and development to attain the required level within
one or two years. The same applies to theoretical knowledge and ear training. In this case too, the
examiners will 'measure' potential and knowledge already acquired. Students who complete the
theoretical subjects during the preliminary training programme may - in consultation with the board
of directors - already start attending classes in theoretical subjects at first-year level.

8. Practical matters
Study advice
For information and advice regarding the contents and progess of your study, such as exemptions, extra
subjects, electives, individual credits, you may contact:

Bram Strijbis, study advisor


bram.strijbis@ahk.nl 020-
5277569
office hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays 10.30-12.30h, or by appointment

Student Counsellor
The Conservatory Student counsellor is Heleen de Kam, telephone 020-5277584, walk-in office hours: Tuesdays
and Thursdays 11.00-13.00h, and by appointment.

The student counsellor informs and guides students with respect to conditions of the course, i.e. all sorts of
practical and personal matters relating to the student’s situation and being a student (financial assistance, laws
and regulations, insurance, residence permits, etc.). The student counsellor can also be consulted about
personal matters, such as injuries, psychic problems, family matters, lack of motivation or other personal
problems which may cause students to fall behind in their studies.

The student counsellor’s objective is to try to help the student find ways to solve problems and resolve issues.
The student counsellor is also the contact person for foreign students and students with a handicap. In many
cases, the student counsellor can refer the student to other individuals or authorities at or outside the
conservatory. All consultations with the student counsellor are strictly confidential. Please find more
information on our intranet.

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Study secretariat
The study secretariat is housed on the 10th floor and is open every weekday from 10.00-12.00 and 14.00-
16.00h to help you with various study matters, For instance, they can print an overview of your study
results or help you get certain documents or certificates. You can also contact the office when you have
questions about exam dates of the exam schedule. For matters concerning the payment of your tuition
fee or your enrolment, you should contact the Central Student Registrar Office of the AHK,
Jodenbreestraat 3.

Annex:

The Education and examination regulations 2017-2018 Conservatorium van Amsterdam can be found on
the CvA intranet My AHK

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