Sie sind auf Seite 1von 8

PREVIOUSLY published studies of rotameters have been confined almost entirely to

considerations of their operation under conditions of constant liquid flow-rate and the
relationship between the flow-rate and the height of the float in the tube. WHITWELL and
PLUMB [l] derived a correlation between the flow-rate and the rotameter scale reading, using
a modified form of Bernoulli’s equation. This method involved the graphical determination of
two functions, whereas the now generally accepted correlation, first proposed by
SCHOENBORN and COLBURN [2], requiresthegraphical evaluation of only the rotameter
coefficient K,, in the expression :

This expression was derived by assuming that the flow between the float and tube was
equivalent to that through an annular orifice. Using the same basic assumptions, MARTIN [8]
derived a slightly modified version of the above equation by substituting a function of the
Reynolds number for K,. The work of FISCHER et. al. [4] was concerned with the design of a
rotameter float which would have a calibration independent of the viscosity of the metered
liquid. Using equation (l), FRITSCHE [5] found that KR was very nearly constant for different
values of a socalled “ viscous influence number.” This method was suggested as a means of
correlating the calibrations of rotameters metering different liquids. VITOVE~: and I%E~~BEK,
[6] by dimensional analysis, obtained an expression similar to that derived by MARTIN [3].
These authors all concerned themselves only with the steady-state operation of the rotameter.
MACMILLAN [?'I, on the other hand, suggested an expression for the transient response of a
rotameter but this would be applicable only in cases of laminar flow through the annulus
between the float and the tube wall.

THE DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION OF THE UNSTEADY OPERATION OF A ROTAMETER The forces


acting on a rotameter float, displaced from its equilibrium position, are : (1) The upward forces
due to the drag of the fluid in the annulus, the pressure difference across the float and the
buoyancy of the liquid. (2) The downward force due to the weight of the float;. The forces due
to the drag and the pressure drop will be some function of the fluid velocity in the annulus and
the vertical velocity of the float. Thus a force balance across the float may be written :

where

M = the mass of the float,

V = the linear velocity of the liquid in the annulus.

h = the height in the rotameter tube,

t = time, and the other symbols have the same significance as before.

The force, F, acting on a body due to form drag is usually expressed by an equation of the
form:
Assuming that the pressure drop across the annulus may be expressed in the same form as
pressure drop across an annular orifice, the force acting on the float, due to the pressure
difference across it, may be written :

Thus it is to be expected that the function f (V, dh/dt) in equation (2) would be of the same
form as equations (3) and (4). By analogy with a body falling through an infinite fluid, the
obvious choice for a first attempt would be the substitution of the difference between the
float velocity and the mean velocity of the fluid in the annulus, for V in equation (2). This
substitution gave results which are not in agreement with experimental results, so that it was
necessary to devise a means of investigating the nature of the function f. An experimental
study was made of the terminal velocities of steel and duralumin floats and steel and bronze
spheres (up to lin. diameter) in cylindrical tubes through which liquids flowed at various rates
(see Table 1). It was found that the experimental results could be expressed in the form :

where V = volume flow-rate/minimum annular area between the float (or sphere) and the
tube,

u = velocity of float or sphere in the tube.

u,, = value of u when V = 0.

BASIC PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION OF A ROTAMETER

The variable-area flow meter is a kind head type flow sensor because its functioning depends
on the pressure across it. In a conventional head type device the orifice is fixed and variation in
the pressure drop across it is measured to compute the flow. In rotameters the pressure drop
is kept relatively constant, and the orifice area varies for flow measurement. As the area is
varied for flow measurement the rotameter is also referred to as a variable flow meter.
Therefore, this variable area flow meter (rotameter) consists of a tapered upright measuring
tube with a variable area, i.e., starting with a narrow tube at the bottom, it ends up in a wider
opening. Naturally, the flow has to be in a vertical plane from the bottom to the top. In the
tube there is one specially shaped float which moves up and down based on amount of flow
increase and decrease. Based on flow from the bottom to top, the float rises until there is an
annular gap between the tube wall and the float, i.e., when the equilibrium of forces acting on
the float is reached. With reference to Fig. II/9.1.1-1A, it can be seen that there are three
forces acting on the float.

These forces are:

Upward force: The flow force; which changes with flow until equilibrium is reached. With a
change in inlet pressure, the flow force also changes.

Upward force: The buoyancy force, which is in line with Archimedes principle, depends on the
volume of the float (i.e., the volume of the fluid displaced by the float) and the density of the
fluid medium. It is constant unless the fluid is changed or the float is changed.
Downward force due to gravity: The weight of the float which is dependent on the mass of the
float. Based on the application the flow can be manufactured from stainless steel, aluminum,
or hard rubber to name a few materials normally used.

ROTAMETER FLOW SIZING

The tapered tube’s gradually increasing diameter provides a related increase in the annular
area around the float, and is designed in accordance with the basic equation for volumetric
flow rate:

where q ¼ volumetric flow rate; K ¼ a constant; A ¼ annular area between the float and the
tube wall; g ¼ force of gravity; and h ¼ pressure drop (head) across the float (hence also
related to the density of the fluid).

As stated earlier, “h” head loss across the float is kept relatively constant and the annular area
is varied. Generally, head loss is kept constant over an operating range 10:1, so linearity is true
for this operating range. Also, a drop across the rotameter is quite low at around 6.89 KPa [1].
For low pressure drop applications, a special low-pressure float in conjunction with a bead
guided tube are used. This means that, in a variable area flow meter the annular area “A”
needs to be varied with variations in the flow rate. Therefore, during design, a tube taper area
is determined so that the height of the float in the tube gives a measurement of the flow rate.
The float is very important in rotameters. The reading of a rotameter is dependent on the
nature of the fluid being metered. Normally rotameters are calibrated with calibration data for
air and water. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the water equivalent and air equivalent
for the fluid and float combination. If q is metered volume then for liquid applications:

Applications:

Rotameters have a wide range of applications in instrumentation engineering, the major


application areas are:

Direct flow measurement for liquid or gas e.g. oxygen supply to patient;

Process analysis system for sample flow rate, e.g., steam and water analysis system in power
plant;

Rotating equipment flow measurement;

High-pressure flow on offshore oil platforms;

Chemical dosing and injection systems;

Bypass or indirect flow measurement with restriction orifice;

Purge liquid or gas metering; Purge method of process parameter measurement (for example,
pressure or DP/level measurement).
Rotameters can also be classified from a functional point of view. One type is only for local
indications by scale pointer types. Scales may be on a vertical scale or a dial type indication
with the help of mechanical coupling/magnetic coupling. However, both are meant for local
indications. There may, however, be another version with transmission facility. In such cases
the float movement is magnetically coupled to the electrical circuit for long-distance
transmission in 4e20 mADC.

As stated earlier, rotameters can be deployed for direct flow reading. However, such an
application has some limitations for large pipe flow measurement or if the pipe is not laid
vertically. In such cases, bypass rotameters are deployed as shown in Fig. II/9.1.4-1A. In such
cases in the main line orifice plates are used to divert a proportionate flow through the bypass
line which is then measured to compute the flow in the main line.

Usually there will be a range orifice to decide the flow rangeability. The other type is a purge
rotameter as shown in Fig. II/9.1.4-1B. These

are deployed for measurement of pressure, differential pressure, and level measurements
where it is difficult to use a standard metering device for corrosion/choking, etc. Measurement
of mill DP in a power plant is an example of this. Normally air is sent to the measuring point

at slightly greater pressure than the measuring point pressure applied. Such excess air
pressure is maintained by the DP regulator shown. A constant-flow DP regulator is used to
maintain the purge flow rate at a desired level. In such a case, during commissioning, slightly
higher air pressure is ensured by the very small amount of air flow in the line. Such air flow is
ensured by the rotameter. Here the functions of needle valves are important. The location of
the needle valve(s) with respect to the rotameter, are dealt with later.

ANTERIORMENTE, los estudios publicados de rotámetros se han limitado casi por completo a
consideraciones de su funcionamiento en condiciones de caudal constante de líquido y la
relación entre el caudal y la altura del flotador en el tubo. WHITWELL y PLUMB [l] derivaron
una correlación entre la velocidad de flujo y la lectura de la escala del rotámetro, utilizando
una forma modificada de la ecuación de Bernoulli. Este método involucró la determinación
gráfica de dos funciones, mientras que la correlación ahora generalmente aceptada, propuesta
por primera vez por SCHOENBORN y COLBURN [2], requiere la evaluación gráfica de solo el
coeficiente de rotámetro K, en la expresión:
Esta expresión se derivó asumiendo que el flujo entre el flotador y el tubo era equivalente a
ese a través de un orificio anular. Usando los mismos supuestos básicos, MARTIN [8] derivó
una versión ligeramente modificada de la ecuación anterior sustituyendo una función del
número de Reynolds por K ,. El trabajo de FISCHER et. Alabama. [4] se ocupó del diseño de un
flotador de rotámetro que tendría una calibración independiente de la viscosidad del líquido
medido. Utilizando la ecuación (1), FRITSCHE [5] encontró que KR era casi constante para
diferentes valores de un llamado "número de influencia viscosa". Este método fue sugerido
como un medio para correlacionar las calibraciones de los rotámetros que miden diferentes
líquidos. VITOVE ~: y I% E ~~ BEK, [6] por análisis dimensional, obtuvieron una expresión
similar a la derivada por MARTIN [3]. Todos estos autores se preocuparon solo por el
funcionamiento en estado estable del rotámetro. MACMILLAN [? 'Yo, por otra parte, sugerí
una expresión para la respuesta transitoria de un rotámetro, pero esto sería aplicable solo en
casos de flujo laminar a través del anillo entre el flotador y la pared del tubo.

LA ECUACIÓN DIFERENCIAL DE LA OPERACIÓN INCREÍBLE DE UN ROTÓMETRO Las fuerzas que


actúan sobre un flotador del rotámetro, desplazadas de su posición de equilibrio, son: (1) Las
fuerzas ascendentes debidas al arrastre del fluido en el anillo, la diferencia de presión a través
del flotador y La flotabilidad del líquido. (2) La fuerza hacia abajo debido al peso del flotador.
Las fuerzas debidas al arrastre y la caída de presión serán una función de la velocidad del fluido
en el anillo y la velocidad vertical del flotador. Así, un balance de fuerza a través del flotador se
puede escribir:

dónde

M = la masa del flotador,

V = la velocidad lineal del líquido en el anillo.

h = la altura en el tubo del rotámetro,

t = tiempo, y los otros símbolos tienen el mismo significado que antes.

La fuerza, F, que actúa sobre un cuerpo debido al arrastre de la forma, generalmente se


expresa mediante una ecuación de la forma:

Suponiendo que la caída de presión a través del anillo puede expresarse de la misma forma
que la caída de presión a través de un orificio anular, la fuerza que actúa sobre el flotador,
debido a la diferencia de presión a través de él, puede escribirse:

Por lo tanto, es de esperar que la función f (V, dh / dt) en la ecuación (2) tenga la misma forma
que las ecuaciones (3) y (4). Por analogía con un cuerpo que cae a través de un fluido infinito,
la elección obvia para un primer intento sería la sustitución de la diferencia entre la velocidad
de flotación y la velocidad media del fluido en el anillo, por V en la ecuación (2). Esta
sustitución dio resultados que no están de acuerdo con los resultados experimentales, por lo
que fue necesario idear un medio para investigar la naturaleza de la función f. Se realizó un
estudio experimental de las velocidades terminales de los flotadores de acero y duraluminio y
las esferas de acero y bronce (hasta el diámetro de la línea) en tubos cilíndricos a través de los
cuales fluían líquidos a varias velocidades (consulte la Tabla 1). Se encontró que los resultados
experimentales se podían expresar en la forma:

donde V = caudal volumétrico / área anular mínima entre el flotador (o esfera) y el tubo,

u = velocidad del flotador o esfera en el tubo.

u ,, = valor de u cuando V = 0.

PRINCIPIOS BÁSICOS DE OPERACIÓN DE UN ROTÁMETRO

El medidor de flujo de área variable es un sensor de flujo tipo cabezal porque su


funcionamiento depende de la presión que lo atraviesa. En un dispositivo de tipo de cabeza
convencional, el orificio es fijo y la variación en la caída de presión a través de él se mide para
calcular el flujo. En los rotámetros, la caída de presión se mantiene relativamente constante, y
el área del orificio varía para la medición del flujo. Como el área varía para la medición de flujo,
el rotámetro también se conoce como un medidor de flujo variable. Por lo tanto, este medidor
de flujo de área variable (rotámetro) consiste en un tubo de medición vertical cónico con un
área variable, es decir, que comienza con un tubo estrecho en la parte inferior, termina en una
abertura más amplia. Naturalmente, el flujo tiene que estar en un plano vertical desde la parte
inferior a la parte superior. En el tubo hay un flotador de forma especial que se mueve hacia
arriba y hacia abajo según la cantidad de flujo que aumente o disminuya. En función del flujo
de abajo hacia arriba, el flotador sube hasta que hay un espacio anular entre la pared del tubo
y el flotador, es decir, cuando se alcanza el equilibrio de fuerzas que actúan sobre el flotador.
Con referencia a la figura II / 9.1.1-1A, c Se puede ver que hay tres fuerzas que actúan sobre el
flotador.

Estas fuerzas son:

Fuerza hacia arriba: la fuerza de flujo; que cambia con el flujo hasta alcanzar el equilibrio. Con
un cambio en la presión de entrada, la fuerza de flujo también cambia.

Fuerza hacia arriba: la fuerza de flotación, que está en línea con el principio de Arquímedes,
depende del volumen del flotador (es decir, el volumen del fluido desplazado por el flotador) y
la densidad del medio fluido. Es constante a menos que se cambie el fluido o se cambie el
flotador.

Fuerza hacia abajo debido a la gravedad: el peso del flotador que depende de la masa del
flotador. Según la aplicación, el flujo se puede fabricar de acero inoxidable, aluminio o goma
dura para nombrar algunos de los materiales que se usan normalmente.

TAMAÑO DE FLUJO DE ROTAMETRO


El diámetro gradualmente creciente del tubo cónico proporciona un aumento relacionado en
el área anular alrededor del flotador, y está diseñado de acuerdo con la ecuación básica para el
caudal volumétrico:

donde q ¼ caudal volumétrico; K ¼ una constante; Un área anular de ¼ entre el flotador y la


pared del tubo; g ¼ fuerza de gravedad; y h ¼ caída de presión (cabeza) a través del flotador
(por lo tanto, también relacionada con la densidad del fluido).

Como se indicó anteriormente, la pérdida de la cabeza en "h" a través del flotador se mantiene
relativamente constante y el área anular varía. En general, la pérdida de carga se mantiene
constante en un rango operativo de 10: 1, por lo que la linealidad es verdadera para este rango
operativo. Además, una caída en el rotámetro es bastante baja, alrededor de 6.89 KPa [1]. Para
aplicaciones de baja caída de presión, se utiliza un flotador especial de baja presión en
combinación con un tubo guiado por talón. Esto significa que, en un medidor de flujo de área
variable, el área anular "A" debe variarse con las variaciones en el caudal. Por lo tanto, durante
el diseño, se determina un área de estrechamiento del tubo de modo que la altura del flotador
en el tubo proporcione una medida del caudal. El flotador es muy importante en los
rotámetros. La lectura de un rotámetro depende de la naturaleza del fluido a medir.
Normalmente los rotámetros se calibran con datos de calibración para aire y agua. Por lo
tanto, es necesario determinar el equivalente de agua y el equivalente de aire para la
combinación de fluido y flotador. Si q es volumen medido entonces para aplicaciones líquidas:

Los rotámetros tienen una amplia gama de aplicaciones en ingeniería de instrumentación, las
principales áreas de aplicación son:

Medición de flujo directo para líquido o gas, p. suministro de oxígeno al paciente;

Sistema de análisis de proceso para la tasa de flujo de muestra, por ejemplo, sistema de
análisis de vapor y agua en planta de energía;

Medición de flujo de equipos rotativos;

Flujo de alta presión en plataformas petrolíferas marinas;

Sistemas de dosificación e inyección de productos químicos;

Medición de flujo indirecto o indirecto con orificio de restricción;

Medición de líquido o gas de purga; Método de purga de medición de parámetros de proceso


(por ejemplo, medición de presión o DP / nivel).

Los rotámetros también se pueden clasificar desde un punto de vista funcional. Un tipo es solo
para indicaciones locales por tipos de punteros de escala. Las escalas pueden estar en una
escala vertical o una indicación de tipo de dial con la ayuda de acoplamiento mecánico /
acoplamiento magnético. Sin embargo, ambos están destinados a indicaciones locales. Puede
haber, sin embargo, otra versión con facilidad de transmisión. En tales casos, el movimiento
del flotador está acoplado magnéticamente al circuito eléctrico para la transmisión a larga
distancia en 4e20 mADC.
Como se indicó anteriormente, los rotámetros se pueden implementar para la lectura de flujo
directo. Sin embargo, tal aplicación tiene algunas limitaciones para la medición de flujo de
tubería grande o si la tubería no está colocada verticalmente. En tales casos, los rotámetros de
bypass se implementan como se muestra en la figura II / 9.1.4-1A. En tales casos, en la línea
principal, las placas de orificio se utilizan para desviar un flujo proporcional a través de la línea
de derivación, que luego se mide para calcular el flujo en la línea principal.

Por lo general, habrá un orificio de rango para decidir la capacidad de rango del flujo. El otro
tipo es un rotámetro de purga como se muestra en la figura II / 9.1.4-1B. Estas

se implementan para medir la presión, la presión diferencial y las mediciones de nivel donde es
difícil usar un dispositivo de medición estándar para la corrosión / asfixia, etc. La medición del
DP del molino en una planta de energía es un ejemplo de esto. Normalmente se envía aire al
punto de medición.

a una presión ligeramente mayor que la medición Como se indicó anteriormente, los
rotámetros se pueden implementar para la lectura de flujo directo. Sin embargo, tal aplicación
tiene algunas limitaciones para la medición de flujo de tubería grande o si la tubería no está
colocada verticalmente. En tales casos, los rotámetros de bypass se implementan como se
muestra en la figura II / 9.1.4-1A. En tales casos, en la línea principal, las placas de orificio se
utilizan para desviar un flujo proporcional a través de la línea de derivación, que luego se mide
para calcular el flujo en la línea principal.

Por lo general, habrá un orificio de rango para decidir la capacidad de rango del flujo. El otro
tipo es un rotámetro de purga como se muestra en la figura II / 9.1.4-1B. Estas se implementan
para medir la presión, la presión diferencial y las mediciones de nivel donde es difícil usar un
dispositivo de medición estándar para la corrosión / asfixia, etc. La medición del DP del molino
en una planta de energía es un ejemplo de esto. Normalmente se envía aire al punto de
medición a una presión ligeramente mayor que la presión del punto de medición aplicada.
Dicho exceso de presión de aire es mantenido por el regulador de DP mostrado. UNA

El regulador DP de flujo constante se usa para mantener el caudal de purga en un nivel


deseado. En tal caso, durante la puesta en servicio, un poco más alto de aire.

La presión es asegurada por la muy pequeña cantidad de flujo de aire en la línea. Dicho flujo de
aire está asegurado por el rotámetro. Aquí las funciones de las válvulas de aguja son
importantes. La ubicación de la (s) válvula (s) de aguja con respecto al rotámetro se tratará
más adelante.