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BINGE EATING DISORDER

A Written Report in

PE -101: Movement Enhancement

BALAGON, DINMARK A.

COMENDADOR, ROGINA MAE L.

LOPEGA, REALYN S.

PRICE, ROBERT BRYLE C.

BSHM MH1-9

TF 2:30 - 4:00 PM

MIGUEL LEMUEL EMMANUEL T. DUMAS

Instructor

September 27, 2019


BINGE EATING DISORDER

Binge Eating Disorder


Binge eating disorder (BED) is a severe, life-threatening, and treatable eating
disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of eating large quantities of food (often very
quickly and to the point of discomfort); a feeling of a loss of control during the binge;
experiencing shame, distress or guilt afterwards; and not regularly using unhealthy
compensatory measures (e.g., purging) to counter the binge eating. It is the most common
eating disorder in the United States.

What Causes Binge Eating Disorder?


The causes of BED are not well understood but likely due to a variety of risk factors:
Genetics: People with BED may have increased sensitivity to dopamine, which is
responsible for feelings of reward and pleasure. There is also strong evidence that the
disorder is inherited
Gender: BED is more common in women than men. In the US, 3.6% of women experience
BED at some point in their lives, compared to 2.0% of men. This may be due to underlying
biological factors
Changes in the brain: There are indications that people with BED may have changes in
brain structure that result in heightened responses to food and less self-control
Body size: Almost 50% of people with BED are obese, and 25–50% of patients seeking
weight loss surgery meet the criteria for BED. Weight problems may be both a cause and
consequence of the disorder.
Body image: People with BED have a very negative body image. Body dissatisfaction,
dieting and overeating contribute to the development of the disorder.
Binge eating: Those affected often report a history of binge eating as the first symptom of
the disorder. This includes binge eating in childhood and the teenage years.
Emotional trauma: Stressful life events, such as abuse, death, separation from a family
member or a car accident, have been found to be risk factors. Childhood bullying due to
weight may also contribute. Other psychological conditions: Almost 80% of people with
BED have at least one other psychological disorder, such as phobias, depression, post-
traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), bipolar disorder, anxiety or substance abuse.

Other signs of BED include:

BALAGON•COMENDADOR•LOPEGA•PRICE
BINGE EATING DISORDER

Secret behavior: You binge when you're alone. This may be late at night or in the parking
lot of a fast food restaurant. You may "get rid of the evidence" and hide wrappers or food
containers.
Food hoarding: You may stockpile bags of chips or cookies in your closet or under your
bed.
Lack of control: You have no power over how much you eat or when to stop. You feel
uncomfortably full after a binge.
Abnormal eating pattern: You may eat lightly throughout the day without set meal times.
Or you eat a small bit at meals or skip them all together.
Food rituals: You may chew too much or not let foods touch on a plate. You might only
eat certain foods or groups -- eating only yogurt, for example.
No purging: You don't do things to get rid of extra calories, like make yourself throw up,
over-exercise, or take laxatives.

BALAGON•COMENDADOR•LOPEGA•PRICE