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COMPARISON OF MATURITY

MODELS
ASSINGMENT NO#01
Introduction:
In this assignment I took three maturity models foe their comparison:
1) Centre for business practices
2) Kerzner’s project management maturity model
3) SEI’s Capability maturity model integration.
First of all, the project maturity model is based on a two dimensional framework. The first
dimension reflects the level of maturity. It is based on the structure of software engineering
institute- capability maturity model. The second dimension depicts the key areas of project
management addressed. This dimension adopts the structure of PMI’s ten knowledge areas
(project management institute 1996).

 Centre for business practices


There are five Maturity levels in center for business practices maturity model
1) Initial process
2) Structured process and standards
3) Organizational standards and institutionalized process
4) Managed process
5) Optimizing process

Level 1: initial process


There is a recognition that there are project management process, there are not established
practices or standards. Documentation is loose and ad-hoc.

Level 2: structured process and standards


Many project management processes exist in the organization, but they are not considered an
organizational standards. Documentation exists on these basic processes. Management supports
the implementation of project management, but there is neither consistent understanding,
involvement, nor organizational mandate to comply for all project. Functional management is
involved in the project. There are basic metrics to track project cost, schedule, and technical
performance, although data may be collected and correlated manually.

Level 3: organizational standards and institutionalized process


All project management processes are in place and established as organizational standards.
These processes involve the clients as active and integral members of project team. Nearly all
project use theses processes with minimal exception- management has institutionalized the
processes and standards with formal documentation existing on all processes and standards. The
project management processes are typically automated. Each project is evaluated and managed
in light of other projects.
Level 4: managed process
Project are managed with the consideration to how the project performed in the past what is
expected for the future. Management uses efficiency and effectiveness metrics to make the
decisions regarding the project and understands the impact on other projects. All projects,
changes, and issues are evaluated based upon metrics from cost estimates, baselines estimates,
and earned value. Project information is integrated with other corporate system to optimized
business decisions. Process and standards are documented and in place to support the practice
of using such metrics to make project decisions. Management clearly understands its role in the
project management maturity.

Level 5: optimizing process


Process are in place and actively used to improve project management activities. Lesson learned
are regularly examined and use to improve project management processes, standards, and
documentation.
Management and the organization not only focus on effectively managing projects but also on
continuous improvement. The metrics collects during execution are used to understand the
performance of not only a project but also for making organizational management future
decisions

 Kerzner’s Project Management Maturity Model


In PMMM there are five levels
1) Common language
2) Common processes
3) Singular methodology
4) Benchmarking
5) Continuous improvement

Level 1: common language


The first level of maturity, which is called “common language,” the importance of project
management has been raised and, also, the need for developing a common language for project
management among project team members is becoming obvious. In other words, project team
members do not share the same jargon to be understood by others, and there is no project
management methodology in place to address basic processes of managing projects. This means
that projects: 1) are hero driven, 2) do not follow a certain method, and 3) are faced with a
number of challenges

Level 2: common processes


There are some basic processes to address fundamental project management practices, such as
time and cost management, for managing project activities. Also, senior managers have realized
the importance of project management so they support the development of the PMO to reach
upper level maturity

Level 3: Singular Methodology


A comprehensive project management methodology should be utilized as the “Singular
Methodology” among all project team members. This means that the PMO has developed the
previous project management standard to the level by which both basic and some advanced
project management practices have been properly addressed. In other words, PBOs have
reached the level that: 1) all utilized project management practices have been integrated at one
project management standard; 2) all various project management methodologies have been
combined in one organizational-wide project management methodologies; 3) project team
members actively adhere to the developed project management standard

Level 4: Benchmarking
At the “Benchmarking” stage, fourth level, the focus is to both improve the current project
management processes and, ultimately, address all knowledge areas of PMBOK® Guide – Sixth
Edition. This means that PBOs have achieved a level in which all project management processes
have been integrated at the organizational level and, therefore, projects could be interrelated to
organizational strategies.
Level 5: Continuous improvement
The project management methodology is continuously improved through “benchmarking
information,” and the main focus of this is to enhance the organizational competitive advantages

 Capability maturity model integration


In CMMI there are five maturity levels.
1) Initial
2) Managed
3) Defined
4) Quantitatively managed
5) Optimizing

Level 1: Initial
Processes are usually ad hoc and chaotic. The organization usually does not provide a stable
environment. Success in these organizations depends on the competence of the people. Level 1
organizations often produce products and services that work; however they frequently exceed
the budget and schedule of their projects. Organizations are characterized by a tendency to over
commit, abandon processes in the time of crisis, and not be able to repeat their past successes.

Level 2: Managed
The project of organization have ensured that requirements are managed and that processes are
planned, performed, measured and controlled. Projects are performed and managed according
to their documented plans. The status of the work products and the delivery of services are visible
to managed at defined point. Commitment are established among relevant stakeholders and are
revised as needed. The work products and services satisfy their specified requirement, standards,
and objectives.

Level 3: Defined
Processes are well characterized and understood, and are described in standards, procedures,
tools, and methods. The standards, process description, and procedures for a projects are
tailored from the organization’s set of standards processes to suit a particular project or
organizational unit. The processes are typically described in more detail and more rigorously.
Processes are managed more proactively using an understanding of interrelationships of the
process activities and detailed measures of the process, its work products, and its services.

Level 4: Quantitatively Managed


At maturity level 4 sub processes are selected that significantly contribute to overall process
performance. These selected process are controlled using statistical and other quantitatively
techniques. Quantitative objectives for quality and process performance are established and
used as criteria in managing processes. Quantitative objectives are based on the needs of the
customer, end users, organization, and process implementers. Quality and process performance
are understood in statistical terms and are managed throughout the life of the processes. For
these processes, detailed measures of process performance are collected and statistically
analyzed. Special causes of process variation are identified and, where appropriate, the sources
of special causes are corrected to prevent future occurrences Quality and process performance
measures are incorporated into the organization’s measurement repository to support fact-
based decision making in the future. The performance of processes is controlled using statistical
and other quantitative techniques, and is quantitatively predictable.

Level 5: Optimizing
Processes are continually improved based on a quantitative understanding of the common
causes of variation inherent in processes. Maturity level 5 focuses on continually improving
process performance through both incremental and innovative technological improvements.

Quantitative process-improvement objectives for the organization are established, continually


revised to reflect changing business objectives, and used as criteria in managing process
improvement.

The effects of deployed process improvements are measured and evaluated against the
quantitative process-improvement objectives. Both the defined processes and the organization's
set of standard processes are targets of measurable improvement activities.

Optimizing processes that are agile and innovative depends on the participation of an
empowered workforce aligned with the business values and objectives of the organization. The
organization's ability to rapidly respond to changes and opportunities is enhanced by finding
ways to accelerate and share learning. Improvement of the processes is inherently part of
everybody's role, resulting in a cycle of continual improvement.

Processes are concerned with addressing special causes of process variation and providing
statistical predictability of the results. Though processes may produce predictable results, the
results may be insufficient to achieve the established objectives. Processes are concerned with
addressing common causes of process variation and changing the process (that is, shifting the
mean of the process performance) to improve process performance (while maintaining statistical
predictability) to achieve the established quantitative process-improvement objectives.
CBP VS PMMM VS CMMI

LEVEL-1

CBP
INITIAL PROCESS

 INITIAL: AD HOC PROCESS


 MANAGEMENT AWARENESS

PMMM
COMMON LANGUAGE
 SPORADIC USE OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT
 SMALL POCKECTS OF INTERST IN THIS DISCIPLINCE

CMMI
INITIAL
 AD HOC
 CHOATIC PROCESSES

LEVEL-2
CBP
STRUCTURE PROCESS AND STANDARDS

 BASIC PROCESS
 MANAGEMENT SUPPORT
 MIX OF INTERMEDIATE AND SUMMARY LEVEL INFORMATION
 ESTIMATES, SCHEDULE BASED ON EXPERT KNOWLEDGE

PMMM
COMMON PROCESSES
 TENGIBLE BENEFITS MADE APPARENT
 PROJECT MANAGEMENT SUPPORT THROUGH OUT THE ORGANIZATION
 DEVELOPMENT OF A PROJECT MANAGEMENT CURRICULUM
CMMI
MANAGED
 REQUIRMENT MNAGEMENT, PROJECT PLANNING, PROJECT MONITORING AND
CONTROL OCCUR
 PROCESS AND PRODUCT QUALITY ASSURANCE TAKE PLACE
 CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT IS PRESENT

LEVEL- 3
CBP
ORGANIZATIONAL STANDARDS AND INSTITUTIONALED PROJECT MANAGEMENT
 ALL PROCESSES, STANDARDS FOR ALL PROJECTS REPEATABLE
 MANAGEMENT HAS INSTITUTIONALIZED PROCESSES
 SUMMARY AND DETAILED INFORMANTION
 ESTIMATES, SCHEDULE BASEDON INDUSTRY STANDARDS AND ORGANIZATION SPECIFICS

PMMM
SINGULAR METHODOLOGY
 INTEGRATED PROCESSES
 CULTURE AND MANAGEMENT SUPPORT
 FINANCIAL BENEFITS FROM PROJECT MANAGEMENT TRAININGS

CMMI
DEFINED
 REQUIREMENT DEVELOPMENTAND PRODUCT INTEGRATION INITIATED
 VERIFICATION AND VALIDATION OF PROCESSES
 EFFORTS TOWARDS INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT
 RISK MANAGEMENT EMPHASIZED WITH DECISION ANALYSIS AND RESOLUTION

LEVEL- 4
CBP
MANAGED
 PROCESS INCORPORATE WITH COPORATE PROCESSES
 MANAGEMENT MANDATE COMPLIANCE
 ANALYSIS OF PROJECT PERFORMANCE
 ESTIMATED SCHEDULES ARE BASE ON ORGANIZATIONAL SPECIFICS
 MANAGEMENT ACTIVELY ENGAGED IN MANAGEMENT OF PORTFOIO AND PROJECT
PMMM
BENCHMARKING
 QAULITATIVE AND QUATITATIVE ANALYSIS AND EVALUATION OF PRACTICES
 PROJECT OFFICE ESTABLISHED

CMMI
QUALITATIVELY MANAGED
 ORGANIZATIONAL PROCESS PERFORMANCE GAUGED
 QUALITATIVE PROJECT MANAGEMENT HIGHLIGHTED

LEVEL- 5
CBP
OPTIMIZING
 MEASUREMENT OF PROJECT EFFECTIVENESS AND EFFICIENCY
 PROCESS INPLACE TO IMPROVE PROJECT PERFORMANCE
 MANAGEMENT FOCUS ON CONTINOUS IMPROVEMENT

PMMM
CONTINOUS IMPROVEMENT
 LESSON LEARNED CREATED
 KNOWLEDGE TRANFER BETWEEN PROJECT AND TEAM
 MENTORSHIP PROGRAM ESTABLISHED

CMMI
OPTIMIZING
 ORGANIZATIONAL INNOVATION AND DEPLOYEMENT ACCENTUATED
 CAUSAL ANALYSIS AND RESOLUTION PERFORMED