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Vinoba Bhawe University, Hazaribag

B.A/B.Sc.-B.Ed. Integrated B.Ed. Course

Syllabus
Syllabus for Education Courses
Semester –I
Language skills and Development

Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:
➢ To make student familiar in different skills of Language.
➢ To make the learners competent in dealing with most routine tasks, classroom situation
and social situation.
Course Content:
Developing Basic concepts and terminology –
form and meaning in language and language use ;Grammar – grammatical frameworks: rules and
conventions relating to words, sentences, paragraphs and texts ;Lexis: word formation,
meaning and use in context ; Phonology: the formation and description of English phonemes;
features of connected speech ;The practical significance of similarities and differences between
languages ;Reference materials for language awareness ;Key strategies and approaches for
developing learners’ language knowledge

Developing Language skills in Learner: reading, listening, speaking and writing -


Reading Basic concepts and terminology used for describing reading skills, Purposes of
reading , Decoding meaning , Potential barriers to reading ; Listening - Basic concepts and
terminology used for describing listening skills -Purposes of listening - Features of listening
texts - Potential barriers to listening ; Speaking - Basic concepts and terminology used for
describing speaking skills , Features of spoken English, Language functions ,Paralinguistic
features , Phonemic systems ; Writing - Basic concepts and terminology used for
describing writing skills ,Sub skills and features of written texts , Stages of teaching writing
,Adult literacy , English spelling and punctuation

Developing Language Proficiency in Learner -


Listening to Speeches to identify and understand individual word pronunciation, Dictionary
usage, Speaking and understanding common phrases, Vocabulary, Reading comprehension,
Reading basic to intermediate texts to learn skimming (reading the text quickly for general
information) and scanning (Searching quickly for a specific piece of information or a
particular word), Basic composition skills: Sentence construction, paragraph writing, letter
writing, essay writing, etc.

Suggested Readings:
1) Basic grammar in use. CUP./ William R. Smalzer
2) Beginning to write. CUP./ Peter Grundy
3) Cambridge academic English.CUP/ Martin Hewings
4) Cambridge story books for young Readers (INDIA). 2 books for each level CUP
5) Classroom English. OUP/Gardner
6) College English / T. sriraman
7) Collins Improve Your writing skills by Graham King
8) Common mistakes… and how to avoid them. CUP. (intermediate).
9) Communicative activities for EAP. CD Rom.
10) Conversation. OUP./Rob Nolasco
BASICS IN EDUCATION

Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:
➢ To make student familiar with fundamental concepts of Education
➢ To Develop in Learner understanding regarding education and its concern aspects in
present scenario.
Course Content:
➢ Basic Concept:
Concept and Meaning of Education; Goals of Education; Processes and Modes of
Education; Education in Present context: issues and Challenges
➢ Education and Knowledge :
Knowledge: Meaning and Facets; Process of Knowing; Organisation of Knowledge in
Schools, Relation knowledge and Education
➢ Autonomy and Accountability;
Teacher Autonomy and Accountability, Learner Autonomy, Freedom vs Autonomy

➢ Education and Values :

Values: Concept and Context; Values in the Emerging Social Context; Education and
Values.

Suggested Readings:
• Basics in Education NCERT
• Taneja,V.R.(1990), Educational Thought and Practices,Sterling ,New Delhi
• Taneja,V.R. and Taneja .S (2004), Educational Thinker,Atlantic Publishers and
Distributers (P) Ltd. ,New Delhi
CONTEMPORARY DEBATES IN EDUCATION

Total Marks 100


External assessment 80
Internal assessment 20

Course Objectives:
➢ To make student familiar with emerging issues in Education
➢ To Develop in Learner understanding regarding education and its concern issues in
present scenario.
➢ Evaluate and arbitrate between different positions in some contemporary debates
about issues in education.
➢ Use a range of sources to further extend your knowledge and understanding of
issues relating to education, and to critically examine contemporary debates and
issues in education.
➢ Supportively assess and critique the work of your peers and yourself be competent
and capable of responding rationally and developmentally to such critiques of your
work.
Course Content:
Contemporary Issues (Social, Political, Economic, Environmental and Developmental)
Globalisation; Sustainability; Poverty; Unemployment; Discrimination; Human Rights
Violation; Marginalisation; Privatization; Climate Change etc. with reference to India and
World.
Education and Contemporary Social Issues:
Social Change and Social Mobility ; Education – Sex and Gender; Education and Social equity;
Education and Social Justice; Education and Human Rights; Education and rural transformation;
Education and Modernisation; Education and Empowerment of women; Education and
Empowerment of Tribal people; Education and Empowerment of Weaker section, social
inclusion and exclusion, religion in the education system and curriculum policy.
Education and Contemporary Economic and Developmental Issues:
Education for Sustainability; Education for Peace and Harmony; Education and Technology,
Politics of Education; Pluralistic Education in present context; Education and Privatization;
Globalisation of Education; Digital Education.
Contemporary Issues in Educational Studies:
School effectiveness; student academic freedom; educational inequality; The role of
home and parent ; National goals for schools; Home schooling; Preparing new
teachers; accreditation; certification; Students Rights and Responsibilities.

Suggested Readings:
➢ Anand, C,L.(1993). Teacher and Education in the Emerging IndianSociety, New Delhi,
NCERT.
➢ Durkheim, E. (1966). Education and Sociology, New York, The Free Press.
➢ Freire, Paulo. (1970) Pedagogy of the oppressed. New York: Herder and Herder.
➢ Gore, M. S. (1984). Education and Modernization in India. Jaipur: Rawat Publishers
➢ Havighurst, R. (1995). Society and Education, Boston: Allyn and Bacon
➢ Kumar,Ramchandra and Chandra,M.(2018) “Contemporary Debates in Education
Human Rights and Democracy in India”,Victorious Publications.
➢ Yunus,T. and Kumar,R. (2018) “Education and Sustainablity :An Emerging Paradigm”
in Kumar,R. and Chandra,M. (Eds) Contemporary Debates in Education Human Rights
and Democracy in India,Victorious Publications.
➢ Kumar, Ramchandra et. All (2017), “Inclusive Education in India in the Context of
Poverty, Inequality and Exclusion” Victorious Publishers ,New Delhi.
➢ Chandra, M.,Bharat Ratna Dr. Bhimrao Ambedkar: Dharmik ewam Samajik Chintan
(Co-Editor) Sangrah Times Publication, 2018, ISBN: 978-93-83315-10-9
➢ Chandra, M.,Samkaleen Vimarsh: Muddein, Chunautiyan ewam Samadhan (Co-Editor)
Anu Books, 2018, ISBN: 978-93-87922-43-3
➢ Chandra, M.,Bharat mein Uchch Shiksha ka Gair-samaveshi Charitra (Author),
Victorious Publishers (India), 2017, ISBN: 978-93-84224-20-2
➢ Chandra, M.,Bharatiy Loktantra ka Samajik aur Rajneetik Pariprekshya (Co-Editor),
Victorious Publishers (India), 2016, ISBN: 978-93-84224-62-2
➢ Chandra, M.,Social and Political Aspects of Community Conciousness (Co-Editor),
Victorious Publishers (India), 2016, ISBN: 978-93-84224-56-

➢ N. R. Swaroop Saxena, Philosophical And Sociological Foundation of Education, R. Lall Book


Depot, Meerut.
➢ Saraswati, T.S.(1999). Culture, Socialization and Human Development, Sage Publication
➢ कुमार,रामचंद्र (२०१७) , “भारत में समावेशी शशक्षा :वततमान स्थितत , चुनौततयां एवं समाधान” ,ववक्टोररयस
पस्लिशसत नई दिल्िी l
➢ कुमार,रामचंद्र (२०१८ ) , “इक्कीसवीं सिी का भारत एवं डॉ भीम राव अम्बेडकर की प्रासंगिकता ”
,ववक्टोररयस पस्लिशसत नई दिल्िी l

➢ आचायत ,प्रमेश (२००० ),िे शज शशक्षा औपतनवेशशक ववरासत एवं जाततय ववकल्प ,ग्रन्ि शशल्पी इंडडया
प्राइवेट शिशमटे ड , नई दिल्िी l
➢ जोशी ,रामशरण (१९९७),आदिवासी समाज और शशक्षा, ग्रन्ि शशल्पी इंडडया प्राइवेट शिशमटे ड , नई दिल्िी l
➢ कुमार,कृष्णा (१९९८),शैक्षक्षक ज्ञान एवं वचतथव , ग्रन्ि शशल्पी इंडडया प्राइवेट शिशमटे ड , नई दिल्िी l
➢ कुमार,कृष्णा (१९७८ ),राज समाज और शशक्षा , ग्रन्ि शशल्पी इंडडया प्राइवेट शिशमटे ड , नई दिल्िी

Semester –II
FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:
➢ To make student familiar with basics of computer
➢ To Develop in Learner understanding regarding use of computer in teching and learning
process

Course Content:
Introduction to Computer
Computer: Definition, Characteristics of Computers, Basic Applications of Computer,
Generations of computers; Components of Computer System; Data processing; ;Definition of
Information and data; Representation of data/Information.
Operating system-MS-Windows
Operating system- Definition & functions, Basics of Windows. Basic components of windows;
icons, types of icons, task-bar, activating windows, using desktop & Laptop, title bar, running
applications, exploring computer, managing files and folders, copying and moving files and
folders; Control panel ;Using windows accessories.
Word Processing-MS Word
Word Processing Basic: An Introduction to Word Processing and MS-Word, Working with
documents, using tables, pictures, and charts, using mail merge and sending a letter to a group of
people, creating form letters and labels, collaborating with workgroups, modifying a report,
macros.
Presentation software-MS Power Point
Creating and enhancing a presentation, creating and publishing a web presentation, modifying a
presentation, working with visual elements, delivering a presentation and designing a template.

Suggested Activities
➢ Prepare a Power Point Presentation in any topic of Education

Suggested Readings:

➢ Sharma, R. N. (2008). Principles and Techniques of Education. Delhi: Surjeet


Publications.
➢ Sharma, R. A. (2008). Technological foundation of education. Meerut: R.Lall Books.
Depot
➢ Agarwal J. C. (2006). Essential of educational technology. Teaching and learning. New
Delhi: Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd.
➢ Sambath, K., Paneerselvam, A., & Santhanam, S. (2006). Introduction of educational
technology. New Delhi: Sterling Publishers Private Limited.
➢ Vanaja, M. (2006). Educational technology. Hyderabad: Neelkamal Publications Pvt.
Ltd.
➢ Goel, H. K. ( 2005). Teaching of Computer Science. New Delhi: R.Lall Book Depot.
➢ Krishnamurthy, R. C. (2003). Educational technology: Expanding our vision. Delhi:
Authors Press.
➢ Srinivasan, T. M. (2002). Use of computers and multimedia in education. Jaipur:
Aavisakar Publication.
➢ Alexis, M. L. (2001). Computer for every one. Leon: Vikas Publishing house Ltd: New
Delhi.
➢ Norton, P. (1998). Introduction to computers. New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill Publishing
Co Ltd.
➢ Kumar, K. L. (1997). Educational technology. New Delhi: Angel International (P) Ltd.
➢ Stone, E. (1996). How to use microsoft access. California: Emergyville.
➢ Stephen, M. A., & Stanely, R. (1985). Computer based instruction: Methods and
development. NJ: Prentice Hall.
➢ एस ० के ० मंिि ,शशक्षा तकतनकी ,PHI Learning Private Ltd. New Delhi.
ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION AND LEARNING FOR SUSTAINABILITY
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:
➢ To make student familiar with Concept of environmental Education and Learning for
Sustainability.
➢ To Develop in Learner understanding regarding environmental education and its concern
issues in present scenario.
➢ To Appreciate various movements, projects and laws for conservation and protection of
environment
Course Contents
Understanding the Environment:
Environment and its components; Ecosystem :Structure and Function; Natural Resources :
Renewable and Non – Renewable Resources; Loss of Bio –Diversity; Environmental Pollution :
Causes, effects and remedies of air, water, soil, noise and radiation pollution; Global
Environmental Issues -Global Warming ,Climate Change ,Desertification, Deforestation
,Depletion of Ozone layer, Green House Effect; Environmental Issues in India; Critical
Environmental Issues in Jharkhand ;Environmental Ethics and Legislation in India .
Environmental Education and Learning for Sustainability:
Concept, Principles, need and objective of Environmental Education; Relationship between
Education and Environment; Strategies of Transecting ; Integrating environmental education
through co-curricular activities ,Field Trip, Project, Environment Survey, Eco Magazines, Eco
Club ;Environmental Education and role of teacher; Evaluation of Learning for environment and
Sustainability.
Suggested Activities

➢ A Case Study on Environmental awareness of Students in nearby schools.


➢ Organisation of workshop ,Symposia or Seminar on any Environmental Issues

Suggested Readings:
➢ Joshi, P.C. & Joshi, N. (2012) A Text Book of Environmental Science, A.P.H. Publishing
Corporation, New Delhi.
➢ Kumar, A. (2013) A Text Book of Environmental Science, A.P.H. Publishing House, New
Delhi.
➢ World Commission on Environment and Development (1987) Our Common
Future,Oxford University Press ,Oxford
➢ Arvill,R(1967)Man and Environment ,Crisis and the Strategy of Choice,Penguin.
➢ Detwyer,T.R.(1971) Man’s Impact on Environment,Mc Graw-Hill New York.
➢ Jackas,G.V. and White,R.O.(1939) The Rape of the Earth,Fabev,London.
➢ Singh,H.H. Et al.(1986) Geography and Environment ,Concept,New Delhi.
➢ Saxena,H.M. (1999) Environmental Geography,Rawat Publications,New Delhi.
➢ Kumar,R. and Chandra,M.(2018) Contemporary Debates in Education Human Rights and
Democracy in India,Victorious Publications.
➢ Kumar,R. and Ynush,T. (2018) Education and Sustainability :An Emerging Paradigm in
Kumar,R. and Chandra,M. (Eds) Contemporary Debates in Education Human Rights and
Democracy in India,Victorious Publications.
➢ Mohanty, S.K. (2013), Universal Law Publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.
➢ Shrivastava,K.K (2010). Environmental Education: Principles, Concepts and
Management,Kanishka Publishers, New Delhi.
➢ Singh, Y.K. (2013). Teaching of Environmental Science, A.P.H. Publishing House, New
Delhi.
➢ हररश्चंद्र व्यास, पयातवरण शशक्षा ,ववद्या ववहार नई दिल्िी l
➢ आर ० ए ० शमात , पयातवरण शशक्षा,बक
ू मेन , नई दिल्िी l
➢ अनप
ु ी समैया ,पयातवरण शशक्षा,अग्रवाि पस्लिकेशन, आिरा उत्तर प्रिे श l
PSYCHOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING

Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:
➢ To make student familiar with Concept, theory and practices of Psychology of
Development and Learning.
➢ To Develop in Learner understanding regarding application of knowledge of psychology
of development and learning in teaching –learning process.

Course Contents
Educational Psychology:
Meaning and Nature; Methods of Studies of Human behavior- Introspection, Observation,
Experimental, Case study; Use of psychology to the teacher; Growth & development of the
learner-Nature & importance of heredity and environment - social heredity; Stages of growth &
development - later childhood & adolescence (physical, mental, emotional, social). Role of
school in growth & development of the learner; Individual Differences-nature, cause , types
;Individual differences with reference to - personality, self concept achievement motivation.
Psychology of Learning:
Nature of learning process; Theories of learning & their educational importance: Trial& Error,
introduction to cognitivism, Behaviorism, & constructivism and learning application of
constructivism; Transfer of Learning - Concept & types. Role of Teacher in school; Higher
Mental Processes-Sensation, Perception, Imagination, Concept formation, mind mapping;
Thinking: Types and Nature; Intelligence: Meaning, Types, and Various theories.
Suggested Activities: At least one of the following
➢ Conduct experiment on retention of memory and prepare the project report
➢ Comparative Study of Whole v/s Part Method of Learning
➢ Perceive a particular stimuli in the environment and write a report
➢ Experiment on division of attention
➢ Generalize a particular concept by using inductive reasoning
➢ Select a particular problem from your day to day life, solve the problem using the
steps and write a brief report and present in the classroom
➢ Any other relevant activity
Suggested Readings
➢ Aggrawal, J.C. (2002). Essential of Educational Psychology, Delhi: Doaba Book
House.
➢ Chauhan, S.S. (2001). Advanced Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Vikash
Publishing House.
➢ Dandapani, S. (2001).Advanced Educational Psychology. Anmol Publication, New
Delhi.
➢ Mangal, S.K. (1994).Advanced Educational Psychology, New Delhi: Prentice Hall
of India Pvt. Ltd.
➢ Kumar, Ramchandra et. All (2017), “Inclusive Education in India in the Context of
Poverty, Inequality and Exclusion” Victorious Publishers, New Delhi.

➢ Panda,P.K. (2010),Measurement, Evaluation, Statistics and Guidance in Education,


Agarwal Publications ,Agra.
➢ युनूस, टी ० एवं रोशन शमात (२०१३),शशक्षा मनोववज्ञान ,िायत्री पस्लिकेशन ,रीवा
,मध्य प्रिे श l
Educational Management: Theory and Practices

Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:
➢ To make student familiar with Concept, theory and practices of Educational Managment
➢ To Develop in Learner understanding regarding application of knowledge of Educational
management in teaching –learning process.
➢ To motivate the students to carry out field work assignments to develop understanding
about the reality in actual situation.
➢ To develop in student leadership quality for educational development of nation .

Course Contents
Introduction to Management
Concept, Meaning, Types & Characteristics of Management; Functions of Management; Concept
of quality Management & Excellence in Education, Institutional Planning-Structural and
Functional; Types of School Management ;
Concept & training of human resource development; Leadership importance /Need,
Characteristics, Types, Managerial Trainings, Functions and Quality of a Teacher
,Administrator, Head etc Resource Personals.
School Education System in India and Jharkhand
Administrative Setup of School Education System in India and Jharkhand; Structure and
Functions of Different Agencies –MHRD (Central and State); NCTE, CBSE, NCERT, SCERT,
District Education Officer, Block Education Officers etc. Relevant Educational Policies with
specific reference to India. (Since 1947);
Management of various issues & problems : Centre- State Relationship, Centralization-
Decentralization, Control-Autonomy, Accountability; Role of Macro level Authorities in
management of Education at each level; Wastage & stagnation; Enrolment in Urban &
Enrolment Rural area; Discipline problem in school; Location of Higher Secondary Education;
Mid Day Meals Scheme, Vocationalization of Education; Internship :Issues and Challenges.

Suggested Readings
➢ K.S. Bhat, S. Ravishankar - Administration of Education, Seema Publication , Delhi
07.
➢ Dr. J.S. Walia - Foundation of school administration and organization, Paul
Publisher, N - N 11 Gopal Nagar Jalandhara City (Panjab)
➢ Kochhar S.K. - Secondary School administration
➢ Agarwal J.C. - School organization, Administration and management, Doaba House,
Delhi 06.
➢ Agarwal J.C. - Development and Planning of Modern Education.
➢ Mathur S. S.(1990) - Educational Administration and Management, The Indian
Publications, Ambala Cantt.
➢ Richard D. Freedman (1982) - Management Educaiton ,John Walia & sons, New
York.
➢ Rai B.C. - School Organization and Management, Prakashan Kendra, Lucknow.
➢ रजनी जोशी ,ववद्यािय प्रशासन एवं प्रबंधन ,शारिा पुथतक भवन ,इिाहबाि l
➢ आर ० ए ० शमात ,शशक्षा प्रशासन एवं प्रबंधन, R. Lall Book Depot, मेरठ l
➢ एस ० पी ० सखु िया ,शैक्षक्षक प्रशासन एवं ववद्यािय प्रबंधन ,अग्रवाि पस्लिकेशन,आिरा l
Semester -III
KNOWLEDGE AND CURRICULAM

Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:
➢ To make student familiar with how knowledge and curriculum both are interrelated
➢ To Develop in Learner understanding regarding application of knowledge on
development of curriculum.
➢ The courses intends to inform student-teachers that how knowledge and curriculum –
making plays a critical role in a heterogeneous and plural society like India.
➢ To realise the role of school organization and culture, as well as of the teacher, in
operationalizing and developing a contextually responsive ‘curriculum’ and ‘critical
pedagogy.

Course Contents

Epistemological contribution of educational thinkers

Education, concept meaning and relationship with philosophy; Epistemological analysis of


following educational thinkers-Western Educators: Plato, Rousseau, R S Peter Indian Thinkers-
Swami Vivekanand, M K Gandhi, R N Tagore, Aurobindo Ghosh, Dr. Bhim Rao Ambedkar;
Maulana Abul Kalam Azad, Acharya Vinoba Bhave.
Evolving knowledge base in education-Meaning and Nature of Knowledge ,Source of
Knowledge, concepts, statements, viewpoints, metaphors and theories, emerging knowledge
base in education, difference between information, knowledge, belief, and opinion interfaces
with cognate disciplines such as physical, natural and social sciences

Concepts of curriculum

Understanding the meaning and nature and Types of curriculum: need for curriculum in schools.
Differentiating curriculum framework, curriculum and syllabus; Curriculum determinants and
considerations (Social political cultural geographical economic diversity, Social political
aspirations, including ideologies and educational vision, Economic necessities, Technological
possibilities, National priorities, System of governance and power relations and, International
context)
Considerations in curriculum development-Forms of knowledge and its characterization in
different school subjects; Relevance and specificity of educational objectives for concerned
level; Social-cultural context of students – multi-cultural, multilingual aspects; Learner
characteristics , Teachers experiences and concerns; Critical issues: environmental concerns,
gender difference, inclusiveness, value concerns and issues social.

Suggested Readings
➢ Schilvest, W.H. (2012), Curriculum: prospective paradigm and possiilty.M.C
MLLAN publication.
➢ Hirst, Paul, H. Knowledge and the curriculum. Routledge publication.
➢ Letha ram mohan (2009). Curriculum instrchon and evaluation. Agerwal
publication, Agra.
➢ Scolt, dand (2003). Curriculum studies: curriculum knowledge. Routledge falmes,
m.y.
➢ Kelly, AV. (2009). The curriculum: theory and practice sage publication Singapore.
➢ Shulman L. S. (1986) those who understand: knowledge growth in teaching.
educational researcher, 4-14 9.
➢ Kumar,Ramchandra( 2017) “Dr Ambedkar ka shiksha vishayak darshan” in Chandra,
M.,Bharat Ratna Dr. Bhimrao Ambedkar: vichar ewam darshan , Victorious Publication
(India )New,Delhi
➢ Chandra, M.(2017) ,Bharat Ratna Dr. Bhimrao Ambedkar: vichar ewam darshan ,
Victorious Publication (India )New,Delhi
➢ Sinha, S. (2000) Acquiring literacy in schools, seminar, 38-42 10.
➢ Sternberg, R.J. (2013). intelligence, competence, and expertise, in A.J. Elliot & C.S.
Dweck (Eds), handbook of competence and motivation (pp 11.
➢ Tagore, R. (2003) Civilization and progress. in crisis in civilization and other essays.
new delhi: rupa &co.
➢ Pathak, A (2013) Social implications of schooling: knowledge pedagogy and
consciousness. Aakar books
➢ JhokLro] ,p-,l-,oa prqosZnh] ,e- th ¼2010½- ikB~;p;kZ vkSj f’k{k.k fof/k;kW] f’k{kk
izdk’ku] t;iqj
➢ कुमार ,रामचंद्र (२०१८), समकािीन भारत में शशक्षा ,िोकतंत्र एवं अशभशासन की चुनौततयां
(सम्पादित) में “ िााँधी एवं टै िोर के शशक्षा िशतन का ति
ु नात्मक अध्यन” ववक्टोररयस
पस्लिशसत इंडडया नई दिल्िी l

➢ कुमार,रामचंद्र (२०१८ ) , “इक्कीसवीं सिी का भारत एवं डॉ भीम राव अम्बेडकर की प्रासंगिकता ”
,ववक्टोररयस पस्लिशसत नई दिल्िी l
➢ ;kno] f’k;kjke] ikB~;dze fodkl vxzoky izdk’ku-2011
➢ िाि एवं तोमर , “शशक्षा के िाशततनक आधार” , आर ० िाि ० बुक० डडपो, मेरठ l
➢ पचौरी, जी ० “शशक्षा के िाशततनक आधार” , आर ० िाि ० बक
ु ० डडपो, मेरठ l

➢ त्यािी ,शाशिनी , “ज्ञान एवं पाठ्यक्रम” , आर ० िाि ० बुक डडपो ,मेरठ ,उत्तर प्रिे श l
SCHOOL EDUCATION IN INDIA
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:
➢ To make student familiar with school education setup its structure and Function
➢ To Develop in Learner understanding regarding Primary, Secondary and Senior
Secondary level school education and its concern issues.
➢ To make student aware of different educational provisions, policies for promoting and
ensuring quality education for all.
Course Content
Evolution of Educational Network and Universalisation of Education
Constitutional provisions for Secondary Education and Policies and programmes for realizing the
constitutional obligations; Evolution of educational network over the past two centuries (1800s
to 21st century): a brief overview of historical development of learning systems that resulted in
the present network of schools; Univesalization of Education

Critical Evaluation of Ongoing Central and State Assisted School Educational Policies at
Different Level-Problems of School Education in India and Jharkhand : Access, Equity, Quality
and Relevance, Curriculum, Assessment, Teaching, Technology, Financing and Governance;
Mid Day Meals ,Sarwa Shiksha Abhiyan(SSA); Rastriya Madhyamik Shiksha Abhiyan (RMSA)
; Kasturba Gandhi Awashiya Balika Vidyalaya, Common School System ; Samgra Shiksha.
Right to Education Act (RTE): Ground Reality and Challenges of its Implementation;

Concerns of Quality in School education


Indicators of quality: related to learning environment, Student Outcomes
Outcome improvement through: Setting standards for performance; supporting inputs known to
improve achievement, Adopting flexible strategies for the acquisition and use ofinputs, and
Monitoring performance ;Enhancement of quality in secondary schools; Best Practices and
Innovations in Secondary Education: CCE, Optional Board Examination etc. ;Teacher’s Critical
role in guiding adolescents, inculcating values like peace, gender equality and respect;
Government efforts in ensuring quality education in India ,Role of NGOs and Self Helf Groups
for Quality education for all.

Suggested Activities: A Case Study Report on any one Ongoing Educational


Policies/Programme.
Suggested Readings:
➢ Anand, C.L. et.al.(1983). Teacher and Education in Emerging Indian Society, NCERT,
New Delhi.
➢ Govt. of India (1986). National Policy on Education, Min. of HRD, New Delhi.
➢ Govt. of India (1992).Programme of Action (NPE).Min of HRD.
➢ Ministry of Law and Justice (2009) Right to Education.Govt of India
➢ Ministry of Education.‘Education Commission “Kothari Commission”.1964-1966.
Educationand National Development. Ministry of Education, Government of India 1966.
➢ Mohanty, J., (1986). School Education in Emerging Society, sterling Publishers.
MacMillan, New Delhi.
➢ Kumar, Ramchandra et al. (2017). “Bharat mein Samaveshi Shiksha: Vartaman Sthiti,
Chunautiyan ewam Samadhan”, Victorious Publishers (India).
➢ Kumar, Ramchandra et al. (2017). “Inclusive Education in India in the Context of
Poverty, Inequality and Exclusion”, Victorious Publishers (India).
➢ National Policy on Education. 1986. Ministry of HRD, Department of Education, New
Delhi.
➢ NCERT (1993). Teacher and Education in Emerging Indian Society, New Delhi
➢ NCERT (1986). School Education in India – Present Status and Future Needs, New
Delhi.
➢ Ozial, A.O. ‘Hand Book of School Administration and Management’, London,
Macmillan.
➢ Salamatullah, (1979).Education in Social context, NCERT, New Delhi.
➢ Seventh All India School Education Survey, NCERT: New Delhi. 2002
➢ UNDPA.Human Development Reports.New Delhi. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
➢ UNESCO. (2004) Education for All: The Quality Imperative. EFA Global Monitoring
Report.Paris.
Measurement of Human Abilities
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives
➢ To Understand the basis of categorizing the human abilities into different cognitive
and non-cognitive areas
➢ Demonstrate his/her understanding of different cognitive and non-cognitive measures
of ability testing
➢ Develop ability of administration, scoring and interpretation of various psychological
tests
Course Contents:
Cognitive measures of Ability Testing
Achievement - concept, purposes and functions of Achievement tests, Achievement tests in
specific areas- reading, mathematics, Language, Social studies, Science, Music and Art etc.;
Intelligence- Types of Intelligence Tests- individual and group, verbal, Non-verbal and
performance test, Applicability of Intelligence tests for the students in the classroom;
Creativity - verbal and Non-verbal tests of creativity, measures for fostering creativity of the
students; Aptitude - Difference between ability, achievement and aptitude.
Non-cognitive measures of Ability Testing
Concept and Measurement of Interest: specific Interest Inventories used in the teaching
learning process; Measurement of Attitude : methods of measuring Attitude- Thurstone
Scale, Likert Scale, Guttman Scale, Analysis on specific Attitude Scales; Concept and
Measurement of Adjustment; Adjustment Inventory for School, College Students and
Teachers.
Suggested Readings
➢ Aggrawal, J.C. (2002). Essential of Educational Psychology, Delhi: Doaba Book
House
➢ Aiken, L.R. Psychological Testing and Assessment. Allyn and Bacon, Boston,
London, Toronto, Sydney, Tokyo
➢ Chauhan, S.S. (2001). Advanced Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Vikash
Publishing House.
➢ Dandapani, S. (2001).Advanced Educational Psychology.Anmol Publication, New
Delhi.
➢ Freeman, F.S (2002). Theory and Practice of Psychological Testing, Oxford and IBH
Publishing Co. Private Limited. New Delhi
➢ Mangal, S.K. (1994).Advanced Educational Psychology, New Delhi: Prentice Hall of
India Pvt. Ltd.
➢ Woolfolk,A. E. (2009). Educational Psychology (11th Edition) (My Education Lab
Series) Prentice Hall.
➢ Panda,P.K. (2010),Measurement, Evaluation, Statistics and Guidance in Education,
Agarwal Publications ,Agra.
➢ युनूस, टी ० एवं शमात ,रोशन (२०१३),शशक्षा मनोववज्ञान ,िायत्री पस्लिकेशन ,रीवा
,मध्य प्रिे श l
➢ शसंह ए ० के ० , “ शशक्षा मनोववज्ञान” मोतीिाि बनारसीिास ,पटना बबहार l
➢ चौबे ,एस ० पी ० , “सामान्य मनोववज्ञान के मि ं कंपनी
ू तत्व”, कांसेप्ट पस्लिशशि
,नई दिल्िी l
Practicum in Measurement of Human Abilities

Course Objectives Total Marks 50


External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

➢ Be acquainted with different terminology of psychological testing


➢ Be trained in handling different psychological instruments and tools
➢ Develop ability of administration, scoring and interpretation of various psychological
tests
Course contents
Administration, Scoring and Interpretation of at least one of each
Achievement Test; Diagnostic Test ; Intelligence Test - Verbal and Non-verbal; Creativity Test;
Differential Aptitude Test (DAT); Attitude Scales; Rating Scale ; Adjustment Inventory;
Interest Inventory ; Measurment of Personality.
Suggested Readings
➢ Agrawal, J.C. (2002). Essential of Educational Psychology, Delhi: Doaba Book
House
➢ Aiken, L.R. Psychological Testing and Assessment. Allyn and Bacon, Boston,
London, Toronto, Sydney, Tokyo
➢ Chauhan, S.S. (2001). Advanced Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Vikash
Publishing House.
➢ Dandapani, S. (2001).Advanced Educational Psychology.Anmol Publication, New
Delhi.
➢ Freeman, F.S (2002). Theory and Practice of Psychological Testing, Oxford and IBH
Publishing Co. Private Limited. New Delhi
➢ Mangal, S.K. (1994).Advanced Educational Psychology, New Delhi: Prentice Hall of
India Pvt. Ltd.
➢ Woolfolk,A. E. (2009). Educational Psychology (11th Edition) (My Education Lab
Series) Prentice Hall.
➢ युनूस, टी ० एवं शमात ,रोशन (२०१३),शशक्षा मनोववज्ञान ,िायत्री पस्लिकेशन ,रीवा
,मध्य प्रिे श l
➢ शसंह ए ० के ० , “ शशक्षा मनोववज्ञान” मोतीिाि बनारसीिास ,पटना बबहार l
ं कंपनी
➢ चौबे ,एस ० पी ० , “सामान्य मनोववज्ञान के मूितत्व”, कांसेप्ट पस्लिशशि
,नई दिल्िी l
Semester-IV
Learning through Information and Communication Technology
Total Marks 100
External assessment 80
Internal assessment 20

Course Objectives:
➢ To make student familiar with Concept of ICT and to develop understanding regarding
different aspects of ICT with reference to Teaching and Learning.
➢ To enable student-teachers to recognise, understand and appreciate ICT as an effective
learning tool for learners and an enormous functional support to teachers.

Course Contents

Introduction to ICT
Concept and History of ICT; Relevance of ICT in Education (Radio, Television, Computers);
Role of information technology in ‘construction of knowledge’; Possible uses of audio-visual
media and computers; Visualising Learning Situations using Audio-Visual and Other media; Use
of radio and audio Medias: script writing, storytelling, songs, etc.; Use of television and video in
education; Use of newspaper in education

Use of Computers in Schools

Functional knowledge of operating computers-on / off, word processing, use of power point,
excel; Computer as a learning tool; Effective browsing of the internet for discerning and
selecting relevant information; Survey of educational sites based in Indi; Downloading
relevant material; Cross collating knowledge from varied sources; Competencies in
developing original software.

Visualising technology-supported learning situations

Preparation of learning schemes; Interactive use of audio-visual programme; Developing PPT


slide show for classroom use; Use of available software or CDs with LCD projection for subject
learning interactions; Generating subject-related demonstrations using computer software;
Enabling students to plan and execute projects (using computer based research); Engaging in
professional self-development; Collaborative learning tasks; Interactive use of ICT: Participation
in Yahoo groups, Creation of ‘blogs’ etc.

Indian and International Experience in ICT Aided Learning


Innovative usage of technology: some case studies; Use of technology integration in resource-
plenty as well as resource-scarce situations; Critical issues in ‘internet usage’ – authenticity of
information, addiction, plagiarism, downsides of social networking group.

Suggested Reading
➢ Bharihok Deepak. (2000). Fundamentals of Information Technology. Pentagon Press:
New Delhi
➢ Conrad, Keri (2001). Instructional Design for Web based Training. HRD Press
➢ Crumlish Christian (1999). The Internet No Experience Required. BPB Publications:
New Delhi
➢ Evant, M: The International Encyclopedia of Educational Technology.
➢ Jain Amit; Sharma Samart; &BanerjiSaurab (2002). Microsoft Word for Beginners.
NISCOM, CSIR: New delhi
➢ Jain Amit; Sharma Samart; &BanerjiSaurab (2002). Microsoft Excel for Beginners.
NISCOM, CSIR: New delhi
➢ Jain Amit; Sharma Samart; &BanerjiSaurab (2002). Microsoft PowerPoint. NISCOM,
CSIR: New delhi
➢ James,K.L. (2003). The Internet: A User’s Guide. Prentice Hall of India Pvt.Ltd: New
Delhi
➢ Lee, William W., Dianna, L. Owens, (2001) Multimedia based Instructional design:
Computer Based Training. Jossey-Bass
➢ Sanders Donald, H. (1998). Computers Today. McGraw Hill Book Company: New Delhi
➢ Sarkar, S.K. & Gupta, A.K.(1998). Elements of Computer Science. S.Chand& Company:
New Delhi
➢ Saxena Sanjay. (2000). A First Course in Computers. Vikas Publishing House Pvt.Ltd:
New Delhi
➢ एस ० के ० मंिि ,शशक्षा तकतनकी ,PHI Learning Private Ltd. New Delhi.

➢ कुिश्रेष्ट ,एस ० पी ० एवं शसंघि ,अनुपमा “शैक्षक्षक तकतनकी के मूि आधार” अग्रवाि
पस्लिकेशन्स ,आिरा ,उत्तर प्रिे श l
***********************
ASSESSMENT FOR LEARNING
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:
➢ To enable student-teachers to gain a critical understanding of issues in assessment and
evaluation (from a constructivist paradigm)
➢ To enable student-teachers to become cognisant of key concepts, such as formative and
summative assessment, evaluation and measurement, test, examination.
➢ Become the use of a wide range of assessment tools, and learn to select and construct
these appropriately.
➢ Enable student-teachers to evolve realistic, comprehensive and dynamic assessment
procedures that are able to keep the whole student in view.

Course Contents
Evaluation, Assessment and Measurement

Concept of evaluation, assessment and measurement, similarities and difference; Types of scale:
- Normal, ordinal interval and ratio scale; Characteristics of measuring instruments, concept
reliability and validity, their procedure of estimation.
Measurement procedures in respect of cognitive and non-cognitive testes-
Ability testing procedures; Disability testing procedures; Uses of cognitive and non-cognitive
tests; Norm referenced and criterion referenced testing; Concept of norm-referenced and
criterion referenced testing; Difference between norm-referenced and criterion reference testing;
Developing tests under norm-referenced and criterion referenced testing approaches; Assessing
the differently and discriminating indices of test items; Estimation of reliability and validity for
norm-referenced and criterion referenced testing

Evaluation concept and approaches

Definition need and importance; Characteristics of evaluation; Formative placement, diagnostic


and summative evaluation; External and internal evaluation advantages and dis-advantage;
Techniques and tools of evaluation; Testing concept and purpose; Observation techniques;
Projective techniques; Type of evaluation tools rating scale, intelligence tests, aptitude tests,
attitude scales interest inventories the anecdotal record
Continuous and comprehensive evaluation and credit based evaluation-
Continuous evaluation concept purpose and use in teaching learning process; Comprehensive
evaluation concept, purpose and use in teaching learning process; Credit based evaluation;
Function strength and limitation.
Suggested Readings:
➢ Anastasi, A. and Urbina, S. (2005). Psychological Testing. Singapore: Pearson
Education.
➢ Ebel,R.L and Frisbie (1979). Educational Achievement. Singapore: Pearson
Education.
➢ Gronlund, N.E and Linn R.L.(2003). Measurement and Assessment in Teaching,
Singapore: Pearson Education.
➢ Nitko, A.J. (2001). Educational assessment of students (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River,
NJ: Prentice Hall.
➢ Reynolds,C.R, Livingston, R.B and Willson Victor(2005). Measurement and
Assessment in Education, New York: Pearson
➢ Singh H.S.(1974). Modern EducationalTesting. New Delhi: Sterling Publication
➢ Stanley, J.C and K.D Hopkins(1978). Educational and Psychological Measurement
and Evaluation. New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India.
➢ Thorndike, Rober, L and Hagen, Elizabeth, (1955).Measurement and Evaluation in
Psychology and Education. New York: John Wiley and Sons.
➢ कुिश्रेष्ट ,एस ० पी ० एवं शसंघि ,अनुपमा “शैक्षक्षक तकतनकी के मूि आधार”
अग्रवाि पस्लिकेशन्स ,आिरा ,उत्तर प्रिे श l
➢ शसंह ,हररशंकर , “शशक्षण एवं अगधिम” ,आर ० िाि ० बक
ु डडपो ,मेरठ ,उत्तर प्रिे श
l

****************
Statistical Applications in Education
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:
➢ To make student familiar with Statistical Application in Education

➢ Understand the essential characteristics of a set of data by representing in tabular and


graphical forms
➢ Compute and use relevant measures of central tendency and measures of variation
➢ Demonstrate competence in calculating correlation coefficient by product moment and
rank difference method
➢ Develop an understanding of the concept, characteristics and application of Normal
Probability curve
➢ Examine the relationship between Z score, T score and standard scores
Course Contents
Fundamentals of Statistics
Meaning, nature and scope of educational statistics, Frequency distribution, tabulation and
graphical representation of data (Histogram, Frequency Polygon, Ogives, Pie-Diagram); Scales
of measurement.
Measures of central tendency- computation and uses of mean, median and mode; Measures of
variability- computation and uses of range, quartile deviation, average deviation and standard
deviation.
Correlation and Normal Probability Curve
Correlation- concept, types and interpretation; Rank difference and Product Moment method of
measuring correlation coefficient; Normal Probability Curve- concept, Characteristics and
application; Interpretation of Standard scores- Z score.
Suggested Activities: At least one of the following
➢ Prepare the frequency distribution table of the last semester marks of the students in
different subjects and represent graphically through histogram, frequency polygon and
ogives
➢ Compute the average performance of the students of your class in Education and show
the deviation of the marks from average
➢ Find out correlation coefficient between the marks of students of Mathematics and
Science; History and Mathematics etc. and interpret the result
➢ Study the normality of the marks of the students in a particular class and its divergence
➢ Any other relevant activity
Suggested Readings
➢ Aggrawal, Y.P.(1990). Statistical Methods: Concepts, Application and Computations,
New Delhi: Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd.
➢ Ferguson, G. (1981). A Statistical Analysis in Psychology and Education, New York:
McGraw Hill. Gibbons,
➢ Guilford, J.P., and B. Fruchter.(1987). Fundamentals of Statistics in Education and
Psychology. Tokyo: McGraw Hill (Student-Sixth edition).
➢ Mangal, S.K.(2012). Statistics in Psychology and Education, PHI Learning Private
Limited, NewDelhi
➢ Cononver, W.J. (1971). Practical Non-Parametric Statistics. New York: John Wiley &
Sons Inc.
➢ J.D. (1971).Non-Parametric Statistical Inference. New York: McGraw Hill.
➢ Glan, G.V., & Hopkins, K.D. (1996).Statistical Methods in Education and Psychology,
(3rd edition). Boston: Allyn& Bacon.
➢ Henry, G.T. (1995). Graphing data: Techniques for display and analysis. Thousand
oaks, CA: Sage.
➢ Howell, D.C. (1997). Statistical Methods for Psychology. Belmont, CA: Duxbury Press.
➢ Huck, S.W. (2007). Reading Statistics and research. Boston: Allyn& Bacon. 81
➢ Popham and Sirohic (1993).Educational Statistics-Use and Interpretation, New York:
Harper and Row.
➢ Siegal, S. (1956).Non-parametric Statistics for Behavioural Science, New York:
McGraw Hill.
➢ यन
ु स
ू , टी ० एवं शमात ,रोशन (२०१३),शशक्षा मनोववज्ञान ,िायत्री पस्लिकेशन ,रीवा ,मध्य
प्रिे श l
➢ शसंह ए ० के ० , “ शशक्षा मनोववज्ञान” मोतीिाि बनारसीिास ,पटना बबहार l

*****************
Yoga Education and Community Awareness
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:
➢ To make student familiar with the concept and different aspects of yoga education and
community awareness.
➢ To enable in students skills of meditation, self management.
➢ To make student aware of importance of community awareness and its role in teaching –
learning process.

Course Contents:
Yoga Education :
Philosophy of yoga, goals of life and yoga, fundamental concepts common to all ; Physiology
of yoga : Chitta (mind) and the metod of chitta vriti (chitta control), vritti patyahar, dharna,
samndhi; Physiology of socio – moral bases – kinds of dhyana : sthula, a shukshma and
jyotimaya, nirmal chita nand the final goal; Socio – moral base of yoaga. The five ymas and
five niyamas, the universal code of social- roal restaints and personal observances leading to
ides adjustment in social and personal life; Classification of yoga ;some important aasanas.
Community Awareness:
Concept and Meaning of Community; Types of Community; Community as an agency of
education; Role community in educational process; Concept ,meaning and need of community
awareness; School-community interaction and engagement ; need of parent –teacher meet;
school –community organisation.
Suggested Activity:
Practices of Some important asanas : Shavasana, Sarvingasan, Halsana Paschimottanasana,
Bhujangasana, Shalbhasana, Dharnurasans, Chakrasana, Vajrasana, Gomukhasana,
Matsyasana, Janusirasana, Ardhamststyasana, Padmasana, Ans, Sirasana, Neti, Kapalbhati
and Trastak, Anulom-vilom, Bhramari, Shitali, Ujjai, Pranayams

Suggested Reading:

➢ B.K S Iyengar (1976) Light on Yoga, New York, Schocken Books.


➢ Muni Mahendra Kumar (1994) Prekksha Meditation, Ladnun, Jain Vishva Bharathi.
➢ Pathak, A. (2013). Social implications of schooling: Knowledge, pedagogy
and consciousness. Aakar Books.
➢ Uni Kishan Lal (1997) Preksha Dhyan Yogic Kriyayen, Ladnun, Tulsio
Adhyatma Nigam.
➢ Seetharam A.R. (1996) Yoga for Healthy Living. Mysore; Paramahamsa Yogashram.
➢ कुमारी,रं जना , “व्यस्क्तत्व के ववकास में योि का महत्व” वातायन पस्लिकेशन,पटना
,बबहार l
Semester- V
Curriculum Development
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objective
➢ To make student familiar with the meaning of Curriculum and its associate concepts
➢ To develop in students understanding of the components of Curriculum and the various
principles of curriculum development
➢ To enable in students skills of curriculum construction and Development.
Course Contents:
Introduction to Curriculum Construction and Development
Meaning and Concept of curriculum; Components of curriculum – objectives, content, learning
experiences and evaluation; Types of curriculum – subject cantered, learner cantered, core
curriculum and integrated curriculum, the hidden curriculum; Contemporary Curriculum: Trends
and Issues; National Curriculum Framework-2005.
Principles and Process of Curriculum Development
Understanding different approaches to curriculums development: subject cantered; behaviourist;
competency-based; learner – cantered and constructivist; Tylor’s and Taba’s Models of
Curriculum Development.
Process of curriculum making-Formulation aims and objective; Criteria for selecting knowledge;
representing knowledge in the forms of thematic questions in different subjects; Organizing
fundamental concepts and themes vertically across levels and integrating themes within and
across different subjects; Implementation of Curriculum; Curriculum Renewal and Evaluation.

Suggested Reading:
➢ Aggarwal, Deepak (2007): Curriculum development: Concept, Methods and Techniques. New Delhi.
Book Enclave.
➢ Aggarwal J.C. (1990) Curriculum Reforms in India: World Overview, Doaba House, New Delhi.
➢ Diamond Robert M. (1986) Designing and Improving Courses in Higher Education: A Systematic
Approach, California, Jossey-Bass Inc. Publication.
➢ Arora G.L. (1998) Curriculum and Quality in Education, NCERT, New Delhi.
➢ Joseph, P.B. et al; (2000): Cultures of Curriculum (studies in Curriculum Theory). New York.
Teacher College Press.
➢ MaitreyaBalsara (2004) Principles of Curriculum Construction, Kanishka Publishers, New Delhi.
➢ Marlow Ediger&DigumartiBhaskar (2006) Issues in School Curriculum, Discovery Publishing
House, New Delhi.
➢ त्यािी ,शाशिनी , “ज्ञान एवं पाठ्यक्रम” , आर ० िाि ० बक
ु डडपो ,मेरठ ,उत्तर प्रिे श l
*******************
Pedagogy of English Language

Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10
Course Objectives
➢ To make the student-teachers able to understand the different roles of language;
understand the relation between literature and language; understand and appreciate
different registers of language; to be able to develop creativity among learners;
understand role and importance of translation.
➢ To make the student-teachers to be able to examine authentic literary and non-
literary texts and develop insight and appreciation; understand the use of language in
context, such as grammar and vocabulary; to be able to develop activities and tasks
for learners; understand the importance of home language and school language and
role of mother tongue in education.
➢ To make the student-teachers to be able to use multilingualism as a strategy in the
classroom situation; develop an understanding of the nature of language system;
understand about the teaching of poetry, prose and drama.
➢ To make the student-teachers to be able to identify methods, approaches and
materials for teaching language at different levels.
➢ To make the student-teachers to be able to develop an insight into the symbiotic
relationship between curriculum syllabus and textbooks;
➢ To familiarise students with our rich culture, heritage and aspects of our
contemporary life. Language classroom and texts have a lot of scope to make
students sensitive towards surroundings, people and the nation.
➢ To sensitise teacher students about emerging issues such as right to education for
children, peace and environment education in context with language teaching.
Course Contents:
Introduction to English Language Education
The function of a second language in multilingual society; general principles of teaching
English as a second language; Aims and objectives of teaching English at secondary level and
senior secondary level with special reference to NCF 2005, Place of English in the school
curriculum of India and Jharkhand; English as a link language in global context; challenges of
teaching and learning English.
Approaches of Teaching Learning of English Language
Constructive approach; multilingual approach to language teaching ;Critical analysis of various
methods of language teaching-Field trip, role play, dramatization, exploratory, concept
mapping, self-learning strategies, assignment, multimedia, collaborative approaches to learning,
simulation and Games, Debate and Quiz; Grammar-Translation method, Direct Method,
Functional Communication approach, Structural approach, Teaching of Prose and Poetry,
Teaching of Grammar- Inductive and Deductive method
ACQUISITION OF LANGUAGE SKILLS in Teaching/ Learning English
-Listening, speaking, reading and writing-
Listening and Speaking: Sub skills of listening: Tasks; Storytelling, dialogues, situational
conversations, role plays, simulations, speech, games and contexts, language laboratories,
pictures, authentic materials and multimedia resources
Reading: Sub skills of reading; Importance of understanding the development of reading skills;
Reading aloud and silent reading; Extensive and intensive reading; Study skills, including using
thesauruses, dictionary, encyclopaedia, etc.
Writing: Stages of writing; Process of writing; Formal and Informal writing, Reference skills;
Study skills; higher order skills.
Suggested Activities: At least one of the following
➢ Comparative study on the teaching practices in terms of adoption of approaches
and methods used in English class rooms of both Government and private schools
and write the report
➢ Any other relevant activity
➢ Talk to the students and find out the different languages that they speak. Prepare a
plan to use multilingualism as a strategy in the English classroom.

Suggested Readings
• Billows, F. L. (1975). The Techniques of Language Teaching, London Longman,
• Bista, A.R. (1965). Teaching of English. Sixth Edition. Agra: Vinod PustakMandir,
• Bright, J.A. (1976). Teaching English as Second Language. London: Long Man
Group.
• Brown, G. et al (2001). The Principal Portfolio. Sage Publications.
• Chaudhary, N.R. (1998). Teaching English in Indian Schools. New Delhi: H.
Publishing Corporation,. Munby, John, (1978). Read and Think. London: Long Man
Group Ltd.
• Newton and Handley. (1971). A Guide to Teaching Poetry. London: University of
London Press.
• NCERT: Reading in Language and Language Teaching Book I, Publication div.
NCERT, New Delhi.
• Norton, B. &Toohey, K. (2004). Critical Pedagagies and Language Learning.
Cambridge University Press.
• Catarby, E. V.( 1986). Teaching English as a Foreign Language in School
Curriculum India, New Delhi, NCERT.
• Doughty, Peter. (1994). Language “English” and the Curriculum. Schools
Counselling Programme in Linguistic and English Teaching.
• Eckman, F.et al. Eds.(1995). Second language acquisition theory and
pedagogy.Lawrence Erlbaum.
• Ellis,R.(1997). SLA Research and language teaching.OUP
• Jain, R.K.( 1994). Essentials of English Teaching. Agra: Vinod Pustak Mandir,
Agra.
• Joyce, B. & Weil, M. (1979). Models of Teaching. Prentice Hall Inc., New Jersey.
Pedagogy of Hindi Language
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

mís'; &
➢ izLrqr ikB;Øe ds ek/;e ls fgUnh f'k{k.k lEcU/kh fof/k;ksa] ;qfDr;ksa] iz;ksxksa ,oa
iz.kkfy;ksa dk laKku fodflr dj fgUnh f'k{kdksa esa Hkk"kk;h n{krk ,oa Hkk"kk&f'k{k.k dh
uohure jpuk dkS'kyksa esa ikjaxfr ykuk izeq[k mís'; gSA
➢ Hkk"kk dh izd`fr] Hkk"kk lh[kus dh izfØ;k] Hkk"kk ds fofo/k i{kksa ,oa fgUnh Hkkf"kd
rRoksa ds f'k{k.k dh n`f"V ls mPpkj.k] orZuh] 'kCn] okD; jpuk ,oa O;kdj.k f'k{k.k ds lkFk
lkfgfR;d fo/kkvksa dh n`f"V ls x|] nzqrikB] dgkuh] jpuk] ukVd] dfork vkfn dh f'k{k.k
fof/k;ksa esa izoh.krk ykuk Hkh bl ikB;Øe dk izeq[k iz;kstu gS ftlls dq'ky] izHkkoh ,oa
vk/kqfud izfof/k;ksa esa lgtrk j[kus okys fgUnh&f'k{kd rS;kj gksa ldsaA
➢ izLrqr ikB;Øe ds ek/;e ls mPp ek/;fed Lrj ¼2 Lrj ½ ij fgUnh O;k[;krkvksa dks fgUnh f'k{k.k
ds dkS'kyksa ,oa izoh.krkvksa ls lfTtr djuk eq[; /;s; gSA blds varxZr fgUnh O;kdj.k] jpuk ,oa
lkfgfR;d fo/kkvksa ;Fkk% x|] dfork] dgkuh ,oa ukVd vkfn ds f'k{k.k gsrq mi;qDr j.kuhfr;ksa
rFkk izfof/k;ksa esa n{krk fodflr djuk fo'ks"krkSj ij js[kkafdr fd;k x;k gS ftlls fgUnh ds f'k{kd
uohu fof/k;ksa ,oa 'kSf{kd izkS|ksfxdh ds v|ru izfrekuksa ds vuqiz;ksx esa fu".kkr gks
ldsaA ikB~;Øe ds rgr LofunsZf'kr vf/kru ,oa v/;;u ;qfDr;ksa ds fodkl dh i)fr;ksa ij Hkh cy
fn;k x;k gSA

Course Contents:
भाषा शशक्षण के आधार
Hkk"kk dh izd`fr ,oa Hkk"kk dk ekuoh; ewY;ksa ds fodkl dh n`f"V ls egRo; ekr`Hkk"kk ,oa
vU; Hkk"kk dh vf/kxe izfØ;k% nksuksa esa varj rFkk Hkk"kk f'k{k.k dh izHkkoh O;oLFkk ds
l`tu gsrq mudk fufgrkFkZA ; Hkk"kk lh[kus dh izfØ;k; Hkk"kk ds O;kogkfjd :i; Hkk"kk ds
vk/kkj;
दहंिी भाषा पररचय :
भारत में दहंिी भाषा ; दहंिी भाषा का अन्य भाषाओँ से सम्बन्ध ; भारत में दहंिी भाषा की
वततमान स्थितत ; fgUnh dk ekr`Hkk"kk ds :i esa egRo; ikB;Øe esa mldk LFkku ,oa ekr`Hkk"kk
f'k{k.k ds mís';; भारत में दहंिी भाषा शशक्षण की चुनौततयां l

fgUnh Hkkf"kd rRoksa dk f'k{k.k % fgUnh Hkk"kk esa /ofu foKku] :i foKku ,oa okD; foU;kl;
fgUnh ds 'kCn & i;kZ;okph] rRle ,oa rn~Hko] buds f'k{k.k gsrq visf{kr ;qfDr;k¡; orZuh f'k{k.k] okD;
jpuk f'k{k.k] ekSf[kd ,oa fyf[kr jpuk f'k{k.k; l`tu'khy jpuk gsrq f'k{k.k dh fof/k;k¡; iBu f'k{k.k&lLoj
,oa ekSu iBu & mís'; ,oa f'k{k.k dh fof/k;k¡A

l=h; dk;Z

➢ fgUnh ds /ofu foKku ,oa :i foKku esa O;kogkfjd izf'k{k.k ¼nl l=ksa esa½
➢ gUnh dh lkfgfR;d fo/kkvksa ij vk/kkfjr vkn'kZ ikB&;kstukvksa ,oa fØ;kRed vuqla/kku dh
;kstukvksa dk fuekZ.k ,oa mudk fØ;kUo;uA
➢ izR;sd izf'k{kq dks nl ,slh ;kstukvksa dk fuekZ.k ,oa mudk fØ;kUo;u l=h; dk;Z ds :i esa
lqfuf'pr djuk gksxkA

Suggested Readings
➢ Bhai Yogendrajeet: Hindi BhashaShikshan, Vinod PustakMandir, Agra.
➢ Joyce, B. & Weil, M. (1979). Models of Teaching. Prentice Hall Inc., New Jersey.
➢ Kshatriya, K.: Matra Bhasha Shikshan, Vinod Pustak Mandir, Agra.
➢ Lal, Raman Bihari: Hindi Shikshan, Rastogi Publications, Meerut.
➢ Pal, H.R and Pal, R.( 2006). Curriculum – Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow. Kshipra,
New Delhi,.
➢ Pal, H.R.( 2003). Speech Communication – Hindi. Bhopal: M.P.Granth Academy.
➢ Pal, H.R. (2000). Methodologies of Teaching & Training in Higher Education. Delhi:
Directorate of Hindi Implementation, Delhi University,.
➢ Sansanwal, D.N. & Singh, P.( 1991). Models of Teaching. Society for Educational
Research &Development, Baroda,
➢ Sansanwal, D.N. and Tyagi, S.K. (2006). Multiple Discriminant Type Item. MERI
Journal of Education, Vol.1, No. 1, pp. 18 – 25.
➢ Satya, Raghunath : Hindi ShikshanVidhi, Punjab Kitabghar, Jullundur.
➢ Sharma, Dr.Laxminarayan :Bhasha 1, 2 Ki Shikshan-VidhiyanAurPaath-Niyojan
Vinod PustakMandir, Agra.
➢ Singh, Savitri : Hindi Shikshan, Lyall Book Depot, Meerut.
➢ Weil, M & Joyce, B. (1979). Information Processing Models of Teaching. Prentice
Hall Inc.,New Jersey,.

**********************
Pedagogy of Urdu Language
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives
➢ To make the student-teachers able to understand the different roles of language;
understand the relation between literature and language; understand and appreciate
different registers of language; to be able to develop creativity among learners;
understand role and importance of translation.
➢ To make the student-teachers to be able to examine authentic literary and non-
literary texts and develop insight and appreciation; understand the use of language in
context, such as grammar and vocabulary; to be able to develop activities and tasks
for learners; understand the importance of home language and school language and
role of mother tongue in education.
➢ To make the student-teachers to be able to use multilingualism as a strategy in the
classroom situation; develop an understanding of the nature of language system;
understand about the teaching of poetry, prose and drama.
➢ To make the student-teachers to be able to identify methods, approaches and
materials for teaching language at different levels.
➢ To make the student-teachers to be able to develop an insight into the symbiotic
relationship between curriculum syllabus and textbooks;
Foundations of Urdu Education
Origin and development of Urdu language and its status in India; Mother Tongue Learning Role
& Importance of Mother Tongue; Objectives of Teaching Urdu – as First language; as second
language; and as third language; Place of Urdu in the school curriculum, aims and objectives of
teaching Urdu at secondary and senior secondary level with special reference to NCF 2005;
Qualities and Role of the Urdu Teachers.
Approaches of Teaching Learning of Urdu Language
Critical analysis of various methods of language teaching-Field trip, role play, dramatization,
exploratory, concept mapping, self-learning strategies, assignment, multimedia, collaborative
approaches to learning, simulation and Games, Debate and Quiz; Grammar-Translation method,
Direct Method, Functional Communication approach, Structural approach, Teaching of Prose
and Poetry, Teaching of Grammar- Inductive and Deductive method
ACQUISITION OF LANGUAGE SKILLS in Teaching/ Learning English
-Listening, speaking, reading and writing-
Listening and Speaking: Sub skills of listening: Tasks; Storytelling, dialogues, situational
conversations, role plays, simulations, speech, games and contexts, language laboratories,
pictures, authentic materials and multimedia resources
Reading: Sub skills of reading; Importance of understanding the development of reading skills;
Reading aloud and silent reading; Extensive and intensive reading; Study skills, including using
thesauruses, dictionary, encyclopaedia, etc.
Writing: Stages of writing; Process of writing; Formal and Informal writing, Reference skills;
Study skills; higher order skills.

Suggested Activities: At least one of the following


➢ Critically analyse the problem of effective teaching of Urdu in Jharkhand and
prepare a report on the same
➢ Critical study of any one Urdu textbook prescribed for classes VIII, IX or X
Suggested Readings
➢ Ahemed Hussain: Tadress – Urdu
➢ Farooq Ansari: Instructional Material for Teachers on the New Techniques and
Approaches of Teaching Urdu at Secondary level.
➢ Her Majesty’s Publication: Teaching the Mother Tongue in Secondary Schools.
➢ JaleesAbidi: Ibtiayee School Mein taleemKeTariqey.
➢ Moinuddin: Hum Urdu KaiseParhayen.
➢ Rafiqa Kareem: Urdu ZabankaTariqa-e-Tadrees.
➢ SalamatUllah: BuniyadiUstadkeLiye.
➢ SalamatUllah: Hum KaiseParhayen
➢ Saleem Abdullah: Urdu KaiseParhayen.
➢ Yunus ,T. & Siddiqui,A.M., “Pedagogy of Urdu Language” Jama Milia
Publications,New Delhi 25

*******************
Pedagogy of Sanskrit Language
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives
➢ To make the student-teachers able to understand the different roles of language;
understand the relation between literature and language; understand and appreciate
different registers of language; to be able to develop creativity among learners;
understand role and importance of translation.
➢ To make the student-teachers to be able to examine authentic literary and non-
literary texts and develop insight and appreciation; understand the use of language in
context, such as grammar and vocabulary; to be able to develop activities and tasks
for learners; understand the importance of home language and school language and
role of mother tongue in education.
➢ To make the student-teachers to be able to use multilingualism as a strategy in the
classroom situation; develop an understanding of the nature of language system;
understand about the teaching of poetry, prose and drama.
➢ To make the student-teachers to be able to identify methods, approaches and
materials for teaching language at different levels.
➢ To make the student-teachers to be able to develop an insight into the symbiotic
relationship between curriculum syllabus and textbooks;
➢ To familiarise students with our rich culture, heritage and aspects of our
contemporary life. Language classroom and texts have a lot of scope to make
students sensitive towards surroundings, people and the nation.
➢ To sensitise teacher students about emerging issues such as right to education for
children, peace and environment education in context with language teaching.
Course Contents:
Introduction to Sanskrit Language Education
The function of a second language in multilingual society and the general principles of
teaching English as a second language; Aims and objectives of teaching Sanskrit at
secondary level and senior secondary level with special reference to NCF 2005, Place of
Sanskrit in the school curriculum of India and of Jharkhand; Challenges of teaching Sanskrit
in India .
Approaches of Teaching/ Learning of Sanskrit Language
Critical analysis of various methods of language teaching-Field trip, role play, dramatization,
exploratory, concept mapping, self-learning strategies, assignment, multimedia, collaborative
approaches to learning, simulation and Games, Debate and Quiz; Grammar-Translation method,
Direct Method, Functional Communication approach, Structural approach, Teaching of Prose
and Poetry, Teaching of Grammar- Inductive and Deductive method
ACQUISITION OF LANGUAGE SKILLS in Teaching/ Learning Sanskrit
-Listening, speaking, reading and writing-
Listening and Speaking: Sub skills of listening: Tasks; Storytelling, dialogues, situational
conversations, role plays, simulations, speech, games and contexts, language laboratories,
pictures, authentic materials and multimedia resources
Reading: Sub skills of reading; Importance of understanding the development of reading skills;
Reading aloud and silent reading; Extensive and intensive reading; Study skills, including using
thesauruses, dictionary, encyclopaedia, etc.
Writing: Stages of writing; Process of writing; Formal and Informal writing, Reference skills;
Study skills; higher order skills.
Suggested Activities: At least one of the following
➢ Comparative study on the teaching practices in terms of adoption of approaches
and methods used in English class rooms of both Government and private schools
and write the report
➢ Any other relevant activity
➢ Talk to the students and find out the different languages that they speak. Prepare a
plan to use multilingualism as a strategy in the English classroom.

Suggested Readings:
➢ Kshatriya, K.: Matra Bhasha Shikshan, Vinod Pustak Mandir, Agra.
➢ Pal, H.R and Pal, R.( 2006). Curriculum – Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow.
Kshipra, New Delhi,.
➢ Weil, M & Joyce, B. (1979). Information Processing Models of Teaching. Prentice
Hall Inc.,New Jersey.
➢ जैन ,सुध्यात्म प्रकाश , “संथकृत शशक्षण” रािी प्राकाशन प्राइवेट शिशमटे ड ,आिरा ,उत्तर प्रिे श
l

******************
Pedagogy of Bangla Language
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives
➢ To make the student-teachers able to understand the different roles of language;
understand the relation between literature and language; understand and appreciate
different registers of language; to be able to develop creativity among learners;
understand role and importance of translation.
➢ To make the student-teachers to be able to examine authentic literary and non-
literary texts and develop insight and appreciation; understand the use of language in
context, such as grammar and vocabulary; to be able to develop activities and tasks
for learners; understand the importance of home language and school language and
role of mother tongue in education.
➢ To make the student-teachers to be able to use multilingualism as a strategy in the
classroom situation; develop an understanding of the nature of language system;
understand about the teaching of poetry, prose and drama.
➢ To make the student-teachers to be able to identify methods, approaches and
materials for teaching language at different levels.
➢ To make the student-teachers to be able to develop an insight into the symbiotic
relationship between curriculum syllabus and textbooks;
➢ To familiarise students with our rich culture, heritage and aspects of our
contemporary life. Language classroom and texts have a lot of scope to make
students sensitive towards surroundings, people and the nation.
➢ To sensitise teacher students about emerging issues such as right to education for
children, peace and environment education in context with language teaching.
Course Contents:
Introduction to Bangla Language Education
The function of a second language in multilingual society and the general principles of
teaching Bangla as a second language; Aims and objectives of teaching Bangla at secondary
level and senior secondary level with special reference to NCF 2005, Place of Bangla in the
school curriculum of India and of Jharkhand; Challenges of teaching Bangla in India .
Approaches of Teaching/ Learning of Sanskrit Language
Critical analysis of various methods of language teaching-Field trip, role play, dramatization,
exploratory, concept mapping, self-learning strategies, assignment, multimedia, collaborative
approaches to learning, simulation and Games, Debate and Quiz; Grammar-Translation method,
Direct Method, Functional Communication approach, Structural approach, Teaching of Prose
and Poetry, Teaching of Grammar- Inductive and Deductive method
ACQUISITION OF LANGUAGE SKILLS in Teaching/ Learning Sanskrit
-Listening, speaking, reading and writing-
Listening and Speaking: Sub skills of listening: Tasks; Storytelling, dialogues, situational
conversations, role plays, simulations, speech, games and contexts, language laboratories,
pictures, authentic materials and multimedia resources
Reading: Sub skills of reading; Importance of understanding the development of reading skills;
Reading aloud and silent reading; Extensive and intensive reading; Study skills, including using
thesauruses, dictionary, encyclopaedia, etc.
Writing: Stages of writing; Process of writing; Formal and Informal writing, Reference skills;
Study skills; higher order skills.
Suggested Activities: At least one of the following
➢ Comparative study on the teaching practices in terms of adoption of approaches
and methods used in English class rooms of both Government and private schools
and write the report
➢ Any other relevant activity
➢ Talk to the students and find out the different languages that they speak. Prepare a
plan to use multilingualism as a strategy in the English classroom.

Suggested Readings:
➢ Kshatriya, K.: Matra Bhasha Shikshan, Vinod Pustak Mandir, Agra.
➢ Pal, H.R and Pal, R.( 2006). Curriculum – Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow.
Kshipra, New Delhi,.
➢ Weil, M & Joyce, B. (1979). Information Processing Models of Teaching. Prentice
Hall Inc.,New Jersey.
➢ Bhattacharya and Sinha, “Pedagogy of Bengali (Bengali Version)” Alpna Pub.
Kolkata (West Bengal) .
***********************
Pedagogy of Tribal Language (Khortha/Kurukh/Nagpuri/Santhali etc. Languages in
Jharkhand )

Total Marks 50
Course Objectives
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

➢ To make the student-teachers able to understand the different roles of language;


understand the relation between literature and language; understand and appreciate
different registers of language; to be able to develop creativity among learners;
understand role and importance of translation.
➢ To make the student-teachers to be able to use multilingualism as a strategy in the
classroom situation; develop an understanding of the nature of language system;
understand about the teaching of poetry, prose and drama.
➢ To make the student-teachers to be able to identify methods, approaches and
materials for teaching language at different levels.
➢ To make the student-teachers to be able to develop an insight into the symbiotic
relationship between curriculum syllabus and textbooks;
➢ To familiarise students with our rich culture, heritage and aspects of our
contemporary life. Language classroom and texts have a lot of scope to make
students sensitive towards surroundings, people and the nation.
➢ To sensitise teacher students about emerging issues such as right to education for
children, peace and environment education in context with language teaching.
➢ To enabled in student skills of teaching Tribal language.
Course Contents:
Introduction to Tribal Language Education
Need of teaching Tribal language in India and Jharkhand ; Position of Tribal language in
India ; Various tribal language in Jharkhand and their Place in school education ; Role of
tribal language teaching in the empowerment of Tribes and Tribal state; Challenges of
teaching Tribal language in India and Jharkhand .
Approaches of Teaching/ Learning of Tribal Language
Critical analysis of various methods of language teaching-Field trip, role play, dramatization,
exploratory, concept mapping, self-learning strategies, assignment, multimedia, collaborative
approaches to learning, simulation and Games, Debate and Quiz; Grammar-Translation method,
Direct Method, Functional Communication approach, Structural approach, Teaching of Prose
and Poetry, Teaching of Grammar- Inductive and Deductive method
ACQUISITION OF LANGUAGE SKILLS in Teaching/ Learning Tribal Language
-Listening, speaking, reading and writing-
Listening and Speaking: Sub skills of listening: Tasks; Storytelling, dialogues, situational
conversations, role plays, simulations, speech, games and contexts, language laboratories,
pictures, authentic materials and multimedia resources
Reading: Sub skills of reading; Importance of understanding the development of reading skills;
Reading aloud and silent reading; Extensive and intensive reading; Study skills, including using
thesauruses, dictionary, encyclopaedia, etc.
Writing: Stages of writing; Process of writing; Formal and Informal writing, Reference skills;
Study skills; higher order skills.
Suggested Activity
➢ Prepare an Assignment on Tribal Language of Jharkhand and their present status.
➢ Find out Text books available for Teaching of Tribal Language.
➢ Prepare a critical Report on Status of Tribal Language in Compare to other language in
Jharkhand.

Suggested Readings:
➢ Kshatriya, K.: Matra Bhasha Shikshan, Vinod Pustak Mandir, Agra.
➢ Pal, H.R and Pal, R.( 2006). Curriculum – Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow.
Kshipra, New Delhi,.
➢ Weil, M & Joyce, B. (1979). Information Processing Models of Teaching. Prentice
Hall Inc.,New Jersey.

**********************
Pedagogy of Mathematics
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:

➢ To make the student familiar with nature and scope of mathematics.


➢ To develop in students Understanding of aims and objectives of learning mathematics at
secondary and higher secondary level.
➢ To make student familiar with different approaches of mathematics Teaching and enable
in them skills of effective teaching.
Course Contents:
Introduction to Mathematics as a Subject
Meaning of mathematics, the nature of mathematical propositions, Truth sets; Venn diagram; A
mathematical theorem and its variants—converse, inverse and contra positive, proofs and types
of proofs, Deductive nature of mathematics; History of mathematics with special emphasis on
teaching of mathematics, contribution of Indian mathematicians; Scope of mathematics.
General objectives for teaching mathematics; Study of the aims and general objectives of
teaching mathematics vis-a-vis the objectives of school education; writing specific objectives
and teaching points of various content areas in mathematics like Algebra, Geometry,
Trigonometry, etc.

EXPLORING LEARNERS AND CURRICULAM AT SCHOOL LEVEL

Encouraging learner for probing, raising queries, appreciating dialogue among peer - group,
promoting the student's confidence (Carrying out examples from various mathematical content
areas, such as Number Systems, Geometry, Sets, etc.).
Objectives of curriculum, principles for designing curriculum, designing curriculum at different
stages of schooling, some highlights of curriculum like main goal of mathematics education, core
areas of concern in school mathematics, Pedagogical analysis of various topics in mathematics at
various level of schooling—Arithmetic (Development of Number Systems), Algebra,
Trigonometry, Statistics and Probability, etc
APPROACHES AND STRATEGIES IN TEACHING AND L EARNING OF
MATHEMATICAL CONCEPTS

Nature of concepts, concept formation and concept assimilation, Moves in teaching a concepts.
Giving counter examples; Non-examples; Planning and implementation of strategies in teaching
a concept like teaching of algebra, geometry, trigonometry, mensuration, etc.; Problem posing
and solving, discovering or exploring various options for solving the problems formulation of
conjecture and generalisations through several illustrations; Difference between teaching of
mathematics and teaching of science.

Suggested activities: At least one of the following:


➢ Seminar Presentation on related themes/topic
➢ Assignment or term paper on themes related to mathematics
➢ A critical study of mathematics curriculum of secondary stage of nation/any state
➢ Any other relevant activity

Suggested Readings:
➢ Cooney, Thomas J. and Others (1975). Dynamics of Teaching Secondary
SchoolMathematics, Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
➢ Driscoll,M., Egan, M., Nikula, J., &DiMatteo, R. W. (2007). Fostering geometric
thinking: Aguide for teachers, grades 6-10. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
➢ Driscoll,M.(1999). Fostering algebraic thinking: A guide for teachers, grades 5-
10.Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
➢ Grouws, D.A. (ed) (1992). Handbook of Research on Mathematics Teaching and
Learning,NY: Macmillan Publishing.
➢ Lester, F.K (Ed) (2007). Second Handbook of Research on Mathematics Teaching
andLearning, Charlotte, NC: NCTM & Information Age Publishing.
➢ Mager, Robert (1962) Preparing instructional objectives. Palo Alto, CA: Fearon.
➢ Malone, J. and Taylor, P. (eds) (1993). Constructivist Interpretations of
TeachingandLearning Mathematics, Perth: Curtin University of Technology.
➢ Marshall, S.P.(1995) Schemes in Problem-solving. NY: Cambridge University Press.
➢ Moon, B. & Mayes, A.S. (eds) (1995). Teaching and Learning in Secondary School.
London:Routledge.
➢ NCERT, A Textbook of Content-cum-Methodology of Teaching Mathematics, New
Delhi:NCERT.
➢ NCERT and State textbooks in Mathematics for Class VIII to X
➢ Nickson, Marilyn (2000). Teaching and Learning Mathematics: A Guide to Recent
Researchand its Applications, NY: Continuum.
➢ Nunes, T and Bryant, P (Eds) (1997). Learning and Teaching Mathematics: An
InternationalPerspective, Psychology Press.
➢ Polya, George (1957) How to solve it, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

**************************
Pedagogy of BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:

➢ To make the student familiar with nature and scope of BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE.
➢ To develop in students Understanding of aims and objectives of learning
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE at secondary and higher secondary level.
➢ To make student familiar with different approaches of BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE
Teaching and enable in them skills of effective teaching.
Course Contents:
NATURE AND SCOPE OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Biological Science for environment and health, peace, equity; History of biological science, its
nature and knowledge of biological science independent of human application; Origin of life
and evolution, biodiversity, observations and experiments in biological sciences;
Interdisciplinary linkages, biological sciences and society.
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENC-Developing scientific attitude and
scientific temper; Nurture the natural curiosity, and creativity in biology; Imbibe the values of
honesty, integrity, cooperation, concern for life preservation of environment; Solving problems
of everyday life; its applications consistent with the stages of cognitive development of learners;
Specific objective of different content areas in biology.
EXPLORING LEARNERS
Generating discussion, involving learners in teaching-learning process, encouraging learners to
raise questions, appreciating dialogue amongst peer groups, encouraging learners to collect
materials from local resources and to develop/fabricate suitable activities in biological science
(individual or group work); Role of learners in negotiating and mediating learning in biology
Trends in Science curriculum; Consideration in developing learner -centred curriculum in
biology; Analysis of textbooks and biology syllabi of NCERT and JAC, secondary and higher
secondary stages; Analysis of other print and non-print materials in the area of biological
science used in various states.

APPROACHES AND STRATEGIES OF LEARNING BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Pedagogical shift from science as fixed body of knowledge to process of constructing


knowledge, scientific method - observation, enquiry, hypothesis, experimentation, data
collection, generalisation; Problem solving, investigatory approach, concept mapping,
collaborative learning, and experiential learning in biological science (teacher -learner will
design learning experiences using each of these approaches); Facilitating learners for self- study.

Suggested activities: At least one of the following:


➢ Seminar Presentation on related themes/topic
➢ A critical study of any two discoveries selected from different areas of mathematics to
illustrate the importance of history of mathematics
➢ Assignment or term paper on themes related to science
➢ A critical study of life science curriculum of secondary stage of nation/any state
➢ Any other relevant activity

Suggested Readings:
➢ Ameetha, A. (2004) Methods of Teaching Biological Science, Neelkamal, Hyderabad
➢ Esler, K. William & Mark. K.Esler (2001): Teaching Elementary Science (8thedition)
Wadsworth group, Thomas learning, Printed in the USA.
➢ Jennings, T. (1986): The young scientist investigates- Teacher’s Book of Practical work,
Oxford University Press, Oxford.
➢ Mangal S.K &Shubhra (2005) Teaching of Biological Sciences, International Publishing
House, Meerut
➢ Mason M & Ruth T. Peters, Teacher guide for Life sciences, Published by D. Van
Nostrand Company, Inc, New york.
➢ National Curriculum Frame Work 2005, NCERT, New Delhi.
➢ NCERT text books (2005) science for classes from VIII to X
➢ NCERT (1982) Teaching Science in Secondary Schools, NCERT, New Delhi.
➢ NCERT (2006) Science Text books of Classes, NCERT, New Delhi
➢ Sharma L.M (2003) Teaching of Science & Life Science, DhanpatRai Publishers, New
Delhi.
➢ Sharma, R.C (2005) Modern Science Teaching, Dhanpat Rai& Sons, Delhi.

*********************
Pedagogy of Social Science
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:
➢ To develop an understanding of the nature of Social Sciences, both of individual
disciplines comprising Social Sciences, and also of Social Sciences as an integrated/
interdisciplinary area of study;

➢ to acquire a conceptual understanding of the processes of teaching and learning


Social Sciences

➢ to enable student teachers examine the prevailing pedagogical practices in classrooms


critically and to reflect on the desired changes;

➢ to acquire basic knowledge and skills to analyse and transact the Social Sciences
curriculum effectively following wide-ranging teaching- learning strategies in order to
make it enjoyable and relevant for life;

➢ to sensitise and equip student teachers to handle social issues and concerns in a
responsible manner, e.g., preservation of the environment, disaster management,
promoting inclusive education, preventing social exclusion of children coming from
socially and economically deprived backgrounds, and saving fast depleting natural
resources (water, minerals, fossil fuels etc.).

Course Contents:
Foundations of Social Sciences Education
Meaning and nature of concepts of Social Sciences and Social Studies, place of Social Sciences
in the school curriculum, need for strengthening teaching of Social Sciences, Scope of Social
Sciences;Integration of different elements of Social Sciences (History, Geography, Economics,
Political Science), Relating content to child’s everyday life, learner as a constructor of
knowledge. Aims and objectives of teaching social sciences at different school levels.
Understanding Teaching
Teaching as a planned activity – elements of planning; Maxims of teaching ; Phases of teaching:
pre-active, interactive and post-active; The general and subject related skill and competencies
required in teaching; An analysis of teacher roles and functions in the three phases: pre-active
phase –visualizing; decision-making on outcomes, preparing and organization; interactive phase
-facilitating and managing learning; post-active phase – assessment of learning outcomes,
reflecting on pre-active, interactive and post-active process.
Approaches and methods to teaching/learning Social Sciences
project method, source method, demonstration method, lecture cum discussion method,
assignment method, inductive-deductive method, storytelling method, narration cum discussion
method, Field trip, role play, dramatization, exploratory, concept mapping, self-learning
strategies, map based learning, multimedia, collaborative approaches to learning, Games, Debate,
Quiz and Seminar
Suggested Activities:
➢ Select any one theme and identify integration of elements of Social Sciences.
➢ Analysis of any one text book of social sciences in terms of its relation in our
everyday life
➢ Interacting with the school teachers to understand about pedagogical issues
➢ Practice of teaching skills in a simulated situation
Suggested Readings:
➢ Bining, Arthur, Cand Bining, David, H.(1952). Teaching Social Studies in Secondary
Schools, McGraw, Hill Book Company, Inc., New York.
➢ Banks, James, A., (1977). Teaching Strategies for the Social Studies: Enquiry,
Valuing And Decision Making, Wesley Publishing Comp., Massachusetts.
➢ Dhamija, Neelam (1993), Multimedia Approaches in Teaching Social Studies,
Harmen Publishing House, New Delhi
➢ James, Hemming (1953), The Teaching of Social Studies in Secondary Schools.
Longman Green and Company, London
➢ NCERT textbooks in Social Sciences.
➢ UNESCO, New Source Book for Teaching of Geography, UNESCO 2005.
➢ Yagnik, K., S.(1966). The Teaching of Social Studies in India, Orient Longman Ltd.

***********************
Pedagogy of Physical Science
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:

After Completion of Course the Students will be able to

➢ gain insight on the meaning and nature of physical science for determining aims and
strategies of teaching-learning;

➢ appreciate that science is a dynamic and expanding body of knowledge;

➢ appreciate the fact that every child possesses curiosity about his/her natural
surroundings;

➢ identify and relate everyday experiences with learning physical science;

➢ appreciate various approaches of teaching-learning of physical science;

➢ understand the process of science and role of laboratory in teaching-learning situations;

➢ use effectively different activities/demonstrations/laboratory


➢ experiences for teaching-learning of physical science;

➢ integrate in physical science knowledge with other school subjects;

➢ analyse the contents of physical science with respect to its branches, process skills,
knowledge organisation and other critical issues;

Course Contents:
NATURE OF SCIENCE

Meaning ,Nature ,Type ,Scope and Importance of Physical Science; Relationship with other
subjects; AIMS AND OBJECTIVES OF PHYSICAL SCIENCE-Developing scientific attitude
and scientific temper, Nurture the natural curiosity and creativity in Science (secondary stage)/
Physics and Chemistry (higher secondary stage); Relate Science/Physics and Chemistry
education to the environment (natural environment, artefacts and people) and appreciate the
issues at the interface of science technology and society; Solving problems of everyday life;
Know the facts and principles of science/physics and chemistry and its applications consistent
with the stages of cognitive development of learners, Specific objective of different content areas
in science/physics and chemistry.

EXPLORING LEARNERS

Generating discussion, involving learners in teaching-learning process; Encouraging learners to


raise questions, appreciating dialogue amongst peer group; Encouraging learners to collect
materials from local resources (soil, water, etc.) and to develop/fabricate suitable activities in
science/ physics and chemistry (individual or group work); Role of learners in negotiating and
mediating learning in science/physical science.
SCHOOL SCIENCE CURRICULUM (PHYSICAL SCIENCE)
Trends in Science curriculum; Consideration in developing learner - centred curriculum in
physical science, Analysis of science/physics and chemistry syllabi and textbooks of NCER T
and States (at upper primary, secondary and higher secondary stage); Analysis of other print and
non- print materials used in various states in the area of physical science.

APPROACHES AND STRATEGIES OF LEARNING PHYSICAL SCIENCE

Pedagogical shift from science as fixed body of knowledge to process of constructing


knowledge, scientific method—observation, enquiry, hypothesis, experimentation, data
collection, generalisation; Communication in Science/Physical science, Problem solving,
investigatory approach, concept mapping, collaborating learning and experiential learning in
science/ physics and chemistry (teacher -learner will design learning experiences using each of
these approaches), facilitating learners for self-study.
Suggested Activities: At least one of the following

➢ Assignment/term paper on selected themes from the course.


➢ A critical study of any two discoveries selected from different areas of science to
illustrate the importance of history of science i.e. discovery of the electron; the
development of electromagnetism, theory of evolution, Newtonian calculus and its
importance to Physics, thermodynamics.
➢ A critical study of science curriculum of secondary stage of any state.

Suggested Readings:
➢ Buxton.A Cory.(2010) Teaching Science in Elementary and Middle School Sage
Publications, New Delhi.
➢ Bybee.w.Roger (2010) The Teaching of Science 21st Century Perspective National
Science Teachers Association, USA
➢ Fensham P.J. (1994) The content of Science: A constructive Approach to its Teaching
and Learning, The Falmer Press, Washington, D.C
➢ Joshi S.R (2005) Teaching of Science, A.P.H Publishing Corpn., New Delhi
➢ Journal of Research in Science Teaching (Wiley-Blackwell).
➢ International Journal of Science Education.
➢ Lawson.E. Anton.(2010) Teaching Inquiry Science in Middle School Sage Publications,
New Delhi
➢ Leckstein, John Murrey (1988) Basic Skills – Science, John Murrey Boston
➢ Mangal S.K &Shubhra (2005) Teaching of Biological Sciences, International Publishing
House, Meerut
➢ Minkoff, E.C. and Pamela J. Baker (2004). Biology Today: An issues Approach. Garland
Science New York pp. 1-32, Biology: Science and Ethics.
➢ Narendra Vaidya (2003) Science Teaching in Schools, Deep & Deep Publishers, New
Delhi
➢ NCERT (2006) Science Text books of Classes, NCERT, New Delhi
➢ NCERT, National Curriculum Framework- 2005, NCERT. New Delhi.
➢ NCERT, ‘Focus Group Report’ Teaching of Science (2005). NCERT New Delhi.

*********************
Pedagogy of Commerce
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:

➢ To enable the teacher trainees to understand the basic concepts of Commerce and their
wide applicability.
➢ To enable the teacher trainees to understand the importance of Commerce, it’s scope
and relationship with other school subjects.
➢ To enable the teacher trainees to understand the objectives of Commerce, at
higher secondary stage.
➢ To enable the teacher trainees to select appropriate methods, audio-visual aids
and techniques for teaching Commerce at higher secondary stage.
➢ To acquaint the teacher trainees with evaluation process in Commerce and prepare a
model question paper along with a Blue Print.
➢ To enable the teacher trainees to critically analyse the syllabus and textbooks of Commerce
at higher secondary stage.
➢ To enable the student teacher to perform his role effectively as Commerce teacher.
➢ To enable the teacher trainees to use Commercial Activities in teaching of Commerce.
➢ To enable the teacher trainees to use Community Resources in teaching of Commerce.

Commerce Subject & its Correlation with other subjects

Meaning, Nature and Scope of Commerce in School curriculum; Importance of Commerce


subject in School Curriculum; Aims of teaching Commerce at higher secondary stage; Objectives
of Teaching Commerce at Higher secondary stage; Correlation of Commerce subject with other
school subjects.
Curriculum design in Commerce
Curriculum design and syllabus framing in Commerce at the senior secondary stage;
Approaches to curriculum design-topical, co relational, integrated discipline ,problem
solving, conceptual design curriculum; Critical appraisal of text books in commerce from the
standpoint of curriculum design and syllabus framing , treatment and organization of subject
matter; Guidelines to teachers in transacting the curriculum and syllabus; Adequacy of
exercises, assignments activities, illustrations, data and conceptual clarity in the treatment of
the subject matter, language etc; Trend analysis in commerce in relation to quality human
life and sustainable development of society and conservation of environment.

Organization of co curricular activities and lesson planning

Importance of conducting Co-curricular Activities Types of Co-curricular Activities Principles


of organizing Co-curricular Activities Need & Importance of Co-curricular Activities Role of
Teacher in organizing Co-curricular Activities Field Trip : Importance , procedure & Role of
Teacher ; Planning of teaching: need and importance Types of Planning : Day plan, Lesson Plan,
Unit Plan Pedagogical analysis of a Unit Preparation of an achievement Test Development of
test items ,essay types, short answer types and objective types

Suggested Activities:
➢ Select any one theme and identify integration of elements of Commerce.
➢ Analysis of any one text book of Commerce in terms of its relation in our everyday
life
➢ Interacting with the school teachers to understand about pedagogical issues
➢ Practice of teaching skills in a simulated situation
Suggested Readings:
➢ Aggarwal, J.C. (2010) Teaching of Commerce, A practical approach, New
Delhi, Vikas Publication
➢ Khan, M.S. (1982). Commerce Education, New Delhi, Sterling Publishers
Private Limited.
➢ Kapoor, N.D. (1990). Principles and Practice of Accountancy, New Delhi,
Pitamber Publishing Company.
➢ Maheshwar; S.N., & Maheshwari, S.K. (1989) Element of Business Studies,
New Delhi, Asha Praka Greh.
➢ Musselman and Hanna (1960) Teaching Book Keeping and Accountancy, New
York, McGraw Hill Book Company.
➢ Rao, Seema (1995) Teaching of Commerce, New Delhi, Anmol Publications Pvt. Ltd.
➢ Venkateswarlu, K.; Methods of Teaching Commerce

***********************
Human Rights and Value Education
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:
On completion of this course the students will be able to:
➢ Understand the concept of value,
➢ Understand aims and need of value inculcation through education
➢ Identify various values required to be inculcated through education
➢ Apply different approaches and strategies to inculcate values among students through
education
➢ Understand the importance of school activities and programmes
➢ Elaborate the role of home-school-community partnership in inculcation of values
➢ Illustrate different issues related to mapping values context in schools
Human Rights :
Human rights in education; role of UNESCO, role of school, education up to 14 years as
fundamental rights fundamental duties, media and it’s role ; constitutional and institutional
safeguards to human rights, national human rights commission (NHRC) and associated
commissions with vital domain of human right.
Value Education:
Value and its acquisition; Aims of Value Education, Need of education for value; Values and the
contemporary Realities: Traditions vs. Modernity, Globalisation, Diversity , Inclusivity and
Environment; Value Concerns at School Stage: Justice, Liberty of thought and action, Equality,
Fraternity, Core Value Concerns: Health and Hygiene, Responsibility, Love Care and
Compassion, Critical and Creative Thinking, Appreciation for beauty and aesthetics.
Approaches and Strategies:
The Whole School Approach; Pedagogy of Values, Some General Strategies : Silent sitting,
Role Plays, Stories, Anecdotes, Group Singing, Group activities, Questioning, Discussion, Value
Clarification, Reflective Practices; The Stage Specific Focus
Some Dimensions for mapping Value context in schools
School Activities and Programmes; Teacher and Classroom Practices; Value context in teaching
of subjects; Evaluation System ; Home – School – Community Partnership
Suggested Activities: At least one of the following
➢ Analysis of School Curriculum for integrating value concerns
➢ Individual or Group project to visualize feasible school based strategies for inculcation of
values
➢ Preparation of question items reflecting values
➢ Seminar Presentation on a topic related to Value
➢ Preparation of Anecdotes
➢ Role Play
➢ Conducting Survey on the maintenance of Health and Hygiene
➢ Writing playcards related to value messages
➢ Any other relevant activity

Suggested Readings:
➢ NCERT.Education for Values in Schools – A Framework. Department of Educational
Psychology and Foundation of Education, New Delhi.
➢ Central Board of Secondary Education. Value Education: A Handbook for teachers, New
Delhi.
➢ Venkataiah,N. (1998). Value Education, A.P.H. Publishing, New Delhi.
➢ S.P.Ruhela 1986, Human values and Education, Sterling, New Delhi.
➢ Gawande, E.N (2004). Value Oriented Education, Sarup& Sons, New Delhi
➢ http://cbseacademic.in/web_material/ValueEdu/Value%20Education%20Kits.pdf

************************
GENDER SCHOOL AND SOCIETY
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:
This course will enable the students to

➢ develop basic understanding and familiarity with key concepts–gender, gender bias, gender
stereotype, empowerment, gender parity, equity and equality, patriarchy and feminism;

➢ understand the gradual paradigm shift from women's studies to gender

studies and some important landmarks in connection with gender and education in the
historical and contemporary period;

➢ learn about gender issues in school, curriculum, textual materials across disciplines,

pedagogical processes and its intersection with class, caste, religion and region; and

➢ Understand how gender, power and sexuality relate to education (in


terms of access, curriculum and pedagogy).
Corse Contents:
Concept of Sex and Gender

Psychology and sociological perspectives; Radical feminism, patriarchy, reproductive


technology and mother hood; Socialize class, gender, and division; Indian women – family,
caste, class, culture, religion and social system; Social construction of gender; socialization
Gender identity : the media, genderfoles, and stereotypes, class, caste community and gender
relation; Women education and law; Women access to and participation in formal education
; Women and in formal education; Non-formal (media)

Gender and School


Gender inequalities in schooling-Organization of schooling; Curricular choices and hidden
curriculum (teacher attitude, classroom interaction and peer culture); Gender schooling –
education for gender equality; Case studies of intervention in school education; The lok jumbish
experiences (movement for women equality); Education and empowered of women; Concept and
importance; Women an sustainable development; Special role of women as protector of
environment; Waste management and women worker.

SUGGESTED READING

➢ Aikman, S. & Unterhalter, E., Eds. (2007). Practising Gender Equality in


Education. Oxford, Oxfam GB.

➢ Aikman, S. & Unterhalter, E., Eds. (2005). Beyond Access: Transforming policy and
Practice for gender equality in education. Oxford: Oxfam GB.

➢ Amnesty International. (2008). Safe Schools: Every girls' right. London:


Amnesty International.

➢ Barker, G. (2005). Dying to be Men: Youth, masculinity and social exclusion. New
York: Routledge.

➢ Colclough, C. (2004). Achieving Gender Equality in Education: What does it take?


Prospects, 34(1): 3-10.

➢ Coombs, P.H (1994). Education Policy. In S.S. Nagel (Eds), Encyclopedia of


Policy Studies, 2nd ed., (pp.587-616). Marcel Dekker, New York, NY.

➢ Dunne, M. (2009). Gender as an Entry Point for Addressing Social Exclusion and
Multiple Disparities in Education. Technical Paper. UNGEI Global Advisory
Committee Technical Meeting. 2009, 27 May. New York.

➢ वमात ,मनोज एवं प्रसाि ,दिनेश , “शिंि ववद्यािय एवं समाज’’ न्यूिीप पस्लिकेशन
,पटना ,बबहार l
➢ शमात ,िीपक , “शिंि ववद्यािय एवं समाज’’ टं डन पस्लिकेशन ,िगु धयाना l
Semester-VI
Pedagogy of English Language
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives
➢ The course will enable the pupil teachers to
➢ Develop competency in preparing Unit plan and lesson plan
➢ Be trained in developing materials for teaching English as Second Language and
remedy the errors that the pupils make.
➢ Understand the fundamental concepts, principles and practices of language testing
➢ To train in using interaction mode to evaluate himself and pupils and inculcate right
language skills
Course Contents:
LANGUAGE, LITERATURE AND AESTHETICS:

Different Creative forms of English Language: Understanding different forms of


literature; Literature in the school curriculum: Needs, objectives and relevance; Role and
relevance of media in school curriculum; Translation: Importance and need, Translation as a
creative activity: through examples of translated texts into English from different Indian
languages.
Teaching of Different Forms of English Literature: Poetry, Prose, Drama: The relative
importance of Indian, classical, popular, and children’s literature in English; Developing
tasks and materials for study skills in English literary forms; Lessons planning in prose, poetry
and drama at various school levels.
DEVELOPMENT AND ANALYSIS OF SYLLABUS AND TEXTUAL MATERIALS:

Understanding the relationship between curriculum, syllabus and textbook; Selection of


materials; Development of activities and tasks; Moving away from rote-learning to
constructivism; Teacher as a researcher (Develop meaningful strategies keeping in view the
needs of the learners)
TEACHING-LEARNING MATERIALS AND AIDS:
Print media; Other reading materials. such as learner chosen texts, Magazines, Newspapers,
Class libraries, etc., ICT– audio-visual aids including CALL programmes; Radio, T.V., Films;
Planning co-curricular activities (discussion, debates, workshops, seminar etc.); Language labs,
etc.
ASSESSMENT, ITS ROLE AND IMPORTANCE:
Progress and assessment of development of language; Continuous and comprehensive
evaluation; Techniques of evaluation—oral, written, portfolio; Cloze test, Self-evaluation; Peer
evaluation; Group evaluation. Activities and tasks reflecting—Problem solving, creative and
critical thinking, Enhancing imagination and environmental awareness. Feedback to students,
parents and teachers.
Suggested Activities: At least one of the following
➢ Students engage in observation of teaching professionals in classes – work in pairs, fill
out a number of guided observation sheets, review with peers on impressions gathered.
➢ Based on their observations, students will prepare a reflective portfolio selecting one
particular area for improvement, development or change as a result of observation.
Research and explore this area and draw up an action plan for change.
➢ Students prepare learning designs to develop grade level language proficiency using
multiple texts, presentation, peer review; adaptation and changes based on peer/ group
suggestions.
➢ Through discussion with teachers/ practitioners students will arrive at benchmarks of
grade level language proficiency. They will construct a tool for assessing grade level
proficiency.
➢ Students prepare the lesson plan based on a particular aspect i.e. prose/ poetry/ grammar
➢ Any other relevant activity

Suggested Readings
➢ Allen & Campbell, (1972). Teaching English as a second language, TMH
Edition. New Delhi : Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Company,
➢ Chaudhary, N.R. (1998). Teaching English in Indian Schools. New Delhi: H.
Publishing Corporation,.
➢ NCERT: Reading in Language and Language Teaching Book I, Publication div.
NCERT, New Delhi.
➢ Sachdev, M.S.( 1983). Teaching of English in India. Ludhiana: Prakash Brothers
Educational Publishers. Baruah, T.C. (1984). The English Teacher’s Handbook.
New Delhi: Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd.

➢ Sharma, K.L.( 1970). Methods of Teaching English in India. Agra :Laxmi Narayan
Agrawal.
➢ Sharma, Kusum: A Handbook of English teaching, Radha Prakashan Mandir,
Agra.
➢ Shrivastava, B.D.( 1968). Structural Approach to the Teaching of English. Agra:
Ramprasad and Sons.
➢ Trivedi, R. S. Techniques of Teaching English, Balgovind Prakashan.
➢ Ellis,R.(1997). SLA Research and language teaching.OUP
➢ Jain, R.K.( 1994). Essentials of English Teaching. Agra: Vinod Pustak Mandir,
Agra.

******************
Pedagogy of Hindi Language
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

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Suggested Readings
➢ Bhai Yogendrajeet: Hindi BhashaShikshan, Vinod PustakMandir, Agra.
➢ Joyce, B. & Weil, M. (1979). Models of Teaching. Prentice Hall Inc., New Jersey.
➢ Kshatriya, K.: Matra Bhasha Shikshan, Vinod PustakMandir, Agra.
➢ Lal, Raman Bihari : Hindi Shikshan, Rastogi Publications, Meerut.
➢ Pal, H.R and Pal, R.( 2006). Curriculum – Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow. Kshipra,
New Delhi,.
➢ Pal, H.R.( 2003). Speech Communication – Hindi. Bhopal: M.P.Granth Academy.
➢ Pal, H.R. (2000). Methodologies of Teaching & Training in Higher Education. Delhi:
Directorate of Hindi Implementation, Delhi University,.
➢ Sansanwal, D.N. & Singh, P.( 1991). Models of Teaching. Society for Educational
Research &Development, Baroda,
➢ Sansanwal, D.N. and Tyagi, S.K.( 2006). Multiple Discriminant Type Item. MERI
Journal of Education, Vol.1, No. 1, pp. 18 – 25.
➢ Satya, Raghunath : Hindi ShikshanVidhi, Punjab Kitabghar, Jullundur.
➢ Sharma, Dr.Laxminarayan :Bhasha 1, 2 Ki Shikshan-VidhiyanAurPaath-Niyojan
Vinod PustakMandir, Agra.
➢ Singh, Savitri : Hindi Shikshan, Lyall Book Depot, Meerut.
➢ Weil, M & Joyce, B. (1979). Information Processing Models of Teaching. Prentice
Hall Inc.,New Jersey,.

**********************
Pedagogy of Urdu Language
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:
The course will enable the pupil teachers to
➢ Develop competency in preparing year Unit plan and lesson plan
➢ Be trained in developing materials for teaching Urdu as Second Language and identifying
the errors that the pupils make
➢ Understand the fundamental concepts, principles and practices of language testing
➢ To train in using interaction mode to evaluate himself and pupils and inculcate right
language skills
➢ Develop the skills of preparing and using effectively the instructional material related to
teaching of Urdu.
➢ Develop diagnostic & remedial skills in teaching of Urdu.
Course Contents:
LANGUAGE, LITERATURE AND AESTHETIC
Understanding different forms of literature; Literature in the school curriculum: Needs objectives
and relevance; Role and relevance of media in school curriculum; Translation: Importance and
need; Translation as a creative activity: Through examples of translated texts into Urdu from
different Indian languages; Introduction of various literary forms of Urdu language; Planning
lessons in prose; Planning lessons in poetry; Drama at various school levels.
DEVELOPMENT AND ANALYSIS OF SYLLABUS AND TEXTUAL MATERIALS
Understanding the relationship between curriculum, syllabus and textbook; Selection of
materials; Development of activities and tasks; Moving away from rote-learning to
constructivism; Teacher as a researcher.

TEACHING-LEARNING MATERIALS AND AIDS

Print media, other reading materials, such as learner chosen texts, magazines, news-papers, class
libraries, etc., ICT, audio-visual aids, Planning co-curricular activities (discussion, debates,
workshops, seminar etc.); Language labs, etc.
ASSESSMENT–ITS ROLE AND IMPORTANCE

Progress and assessment of development of language; Continuous and comprehensive


evaluation; Techniques of evaluation- oral, written, portfolio; Cloze test, Self- evaluation;
Peer evaluation; Group evaluation; Problem solving, creative and critical -thinking;
Enhancing imagination and environmental awareness; Feedback to students, parents and
teachers.
Suggested Activities: At least one of the following
➢ Students engage in observation of teaching professionals in classes – work in pairs,
fill out a number of guided observation sheets, review with peers on impressions
gathered.
➢ Based on their observations, students will prepare a reflective portfolio selecting one
particular area for improvement, development or change as a result of observation.
Research and explore this area and draw up an action plan for change.
➢ Students prepare learning designs to develop grade level language proficiency using
multiple texts, presentation, peer review; adaptation and changes based on peer/
group suggestions.
➢ Through discussion with teachers/ practitioners students will arrive at benchmarks of
grade level language proficiency. They will construct a tool for assessing grade level
proficiency.
➢ Students prepare the lesson plan based on a particular aspect i.e. prose/ poetry/
grammar
➢ Any other relevant activity
Suggested Readings
➢ Ahemed Hussain: Tadress – Urdu
➢ Farooq Ansari: Instructional Material for Teachers on the New Techniques
andApproaches of Teaching Urdu at Secondary level.
➢ Her Majesty’s Publication: Teaching the Mother Tongue in Secondary Schools.
➢ JaleesAbidi: Ibtiayee School Mein taleemKeTariqey.
➢ Moinuddin: Hum Urdu KaiseParhayen.
➢ Rafiqa Kareem: Urdu ZabankaTariqa-e-Tadrees.
➢ SalamatUllah: BuniyadiUstadkeLiye.
➢ SalamatUllah: Hum KaiseParhayen
➢ Saleem Abdullah: Urdu KaiseParhayen.
Pedagogy of Bangla Language
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives
➢ The course will enable the pupil teachers to
➢ Develop competency in preparing Unit plan and lesson plan
➢ Be trained in developing materials for teaching Bangla as Second Language and
remedy the errors that the pupils make.
➢ Understand the fundamental concepts, principles and practices of language testing
➢ To train in using interaction mode to evaluate himself and pupils and inculcate right
language skills
Course Contents:
LANGUAGE, LITERATURE AND AESTHETICS:

Different Creative forms of Bangla Language: Understanding different forms of


literature; Literature in the school curriculum: Needs, objectives and relevance; Role and
relevance of media in school curriculum; Translation: Importance and need, Translation as a
creative activity: through examples of translated texts into Sanskrit from different Indian
languages.
Teaching of Different Forms of Bangla Literature: Poetry, Prose, Drama: The relative
importance of Indian, classical, popular, and children’s literature in English; Developing
Tasks and materials for study skills in English literary forms; Lessons planning in prose, poetry
and drama at various school levels.
DEVELOPMENT AND ANALYSIS OF SYLLABUS AND TEXTUAL MATERIALS:

Understanding the relationship between curriculum, syllabus and textbook; Selection of


materials; Development of activities and tasks; Moving away from rote-learning to
constructivism; Teacher as a researcher (Develop meaningful strategies keeping in view the
needs of the learners)
TEACHING-LEARNING MATERIALS AND AIDS:
Print media; Other reading materials. such as learner chosen texts, Magazines, Newspapers,
Class libraries, etc., ICT– audio-visual aids including CALL programmes; Radio, T.V., Films;
Planning co-curricular activities (discussion, debates, workshops, seminar etc.); Language labs,
etc.
ASSESSMENT, ITS ROLE AND IMPORTANCE:
Progress and assessment of development of language; Continuous and comprehensive
evaluation; Techniques of evaluation—oral, written, portfolio; Cloze test, Self-evaluation; Peer
evaluation; Group evaluation. Activities and tasks reflecting—Problem solving, creative and
critical thinking, Enhancing imagination and environmental awareness. Feedback to students,
parents and teachers.

Suggested Activities: At least one of the following


➢ Students engage in observation of teaching professionals in classes – work in pairs, fill
out a number of guided observation sheets, review with peers on impressions gathered.
➢ Based on their observations, students will prepare a reflective portfolio selecting one
particular area for improvement, development or change as a result of observation.
Research and explore this area and draw up an action plan for change.
➢ Students prepare learning designs to develop grade level language proficiency using
multiple texts, presentation, peer review; adaptation and changes based on peer/ group
suggestions.
➢ Through discussion with teachers/ practitioners students will arrive at benchmarks of
grade level language proficiency. They will construct a tool for assessing grade level
proficiency.
➢ Students prepare the lesson plan based on a particular aspect i.e. prose/ poetry/ grammar
➢ Any other relevant activity

**************
Pedagogy of Sanskrit Language
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives
➢ The course will enable the pupil teachers to
➢ Develop competency in preparing Unit plan and lesson plan
➢ Be trained in developing materials for teaching Sanskrit as Second Language and
remedy the errors that the pupils make.
➢ Understand the fundamental concepts, principles and practices of language testing
➢ To train in using interaction mode to evaluate himself and pupils and inculcate right
language skills
Course Contents:
LANGUAGE, LITERATURE AND AESTHETICS:

Different Creative forms of Sanskrit Language: Understanding different forms of


literature; Literature in the school curriculum: Needs, objectives and relevance; Role and
relevance of media in school curriculum; Translation: Importance and need, Translation as a
creative activity: through examples of translated texts into Sanskrit from different Indian
languages.
Teaching of Different Forms of Sanskrit Literature: Poetry, Prose, Drama: The relative
importance of Indian, classical, popular, and children’s literature in English; Developing
Tasks and materials for study skills in English literary forms; Lessons planning in prose, poetry
and drama at various school levels.
DEVELOPMENT AND ANALYSIS OF SYLLABUS AND TEXTUAL MATERIALS:
Understanding the relationship between curriculum, syllabus and textbook; Selection of
materials; Development of activities and tasks; Moving away from rote-learning to
constructivism; Teacher as a researcher (Develop meaningful strategies keeping in view the
needs of the learners)
TEACHING-LEARNING MATERIALS AND AIDS:
Print media; Other reading materials. such as learner chosen texts, Magazines, Newspapers,
Class libraries, etc., ICT– audio-visual aids including CALL programmes; Radio, T.V., Films;
Planning co-curricular activities (discussion, debates, workshops, seminar etc.); Language labs,
etc.
ASSESSMENT, ITS ROLE AND IMPORTANCE:
Progress and assessment of development of language; Continuous and comprehensive
evaluation; Techniques of evaluation—oral, written, portfolio; Cloze test, Self-evaluation; Peer
evaluation; Group evaluation. Activities and tasks reflecting—Problem solving, creative and
critical thinking, Enhancing imagination and environmental awareness. Feedback to students,
parents and teachers.

Suggested Activities: At least one of the following


➢ Students engage in observation of teaching professionals in classes – work in pairs, fill
out a number of guided observation sheets, review with peers on impressions gathered.
➢ Based on their observations, students will prepare a reflective portfolio selecting one
particular area for improvement, development or change as a result of observation.
Research and explore this area and draw up an action plan for change.
➢ Students prepare learning designs to develop grade level language proficiency using
multiple texts, presentation, peer review; adaptation and changes based on peer/ group
suggestions.
➢ Through discussion with teachers/ practitioners students will arrive at benchmarks of
grade level language proficiency. They will construct a tool for assessing grade level
proficiency.
➢ Students prepare the lesson plan based on a particular aspect i.e. prose/ poetry/ grammar
➢ Any other relevant activity

****************
Pedagogy of Tribal Language (Khortha/Nagpuri/Kurukh/ Santhali)
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives
➢ The course will enable the pupil teachers to
➢ Develop competency in preparing Unit plan and lesson plan
➢ Be trained in developing materials for teaching Tribal Language as Second Language
and remedy the errors that the pupils make.
➢ Understand the fundamental concepts, principles and practices of language testing
➢ To train in using interaction mode to evaluate himself and pupils and inculcate right
language skills
Course Contents:
LANGUAGE, LITERATURE AND AESTHETICS:

Different Creative forms of English Language: Understanding different forms of


literature; Literature in the school curriculum: Needs, objectives and relevance; Role and
relevance of media in school curriculum; Translation: Importance and need, Translation as a
creative activity: through examples of translated texts into Tribal language from different
Indian languages.
Teaching of Different Forms of Tribal Literature: Poetry, Prose, Drama: The relative importance
of Indian, classical, popular, and children’s literature in English; Developing
Tasks and materials for study skills in English literary forms; Lessons planning in prose, poetry
and drama at various school levels.
DEVELOPMENT AND ANALYSIS OF SYLLABUS AND TEXTUAL MATERIALS:

Understanding the relationship between curriculum, syllabus and textbook; Selection of


materials; Development of activities and tasks; Moving away from rote-learning to
constructivism; Teacher as a researcher (Develop meaningful strategies keeping in view the
needs of the learners)
TEACHING-LEARNING MATERIALS AND AIDS:
Print media; Other reading materials. such as learner chosen texts, Magazines, Newspapers,
Class libraries, etc., ICT– audio-visual aids including CALL programmes; Radio, T.V., Films;
Planning co-curricular activities (discussion, debates, workshops, seminar etc.); Language labs,
etc.
ASSESSMENT, ITS ROLE AND IMPORTANCE:
Progress and assessment of development of language; Continuous and comprehensive
evaluation; Techniques of evaluation—oral, written, portfolio; Cloze test, Self-evaluation; Peer
evaluation; Group evaluation. Activities and tasks reflecting—Problem solving, creative and
critical thinking, Enhancing imagination and environmental awareness. Feedback to students,
parents and teachers.

Suggested Activities: At least one of the following


➢ Students engage in observation of teaching professionals in classes – work in pairs, fill
out a number of guided observation sheets, review with peers on impressions gathered.
➢ Based on their observations, students will prepare a reflective portfolio selecting one
particular area for improvement, development or change as a result of observation.
Research and explore this area and draw up an action plan for change.
➢ Students prepare learning designs to develop grade level language proficiency using
multiple texts, presentation, peer review; adaptation and changes based on peer/ group
suggestions.
➢ Through discussion with teachers/ practitioners students will arrive at benchmarks of
grade level language proficiency. They will construct a tool for assessing grade level
proficiency.
➢ Students prepare the lesson plan based on a particular aspect i.e. prose/ poetry/ grammar
➢ Any other relevant activity

****************
Pedagogy of Commerce
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:

➢ To enable the teacher trainees to understand the basic concepts of Commerce and their
wide applicability.

➢ To enable the teacher trainees to understand the importance of Commerce, it’s scope
and relationship with other school subjects.

➢ To enable the teacher trainees to understand the objectives of Commerce, at


higher secondary stage.

➢ To enable the teacher trainees to select appropriate methods, audio-visual aids


and techniques for teaching Commerce at higher secondary stage.

➢ To acquaint the teacher trainees with evaluation process in Commerce and prepare a
model question paper along with a Blue Print.

➢ To enable the teacher trainees to critically analyse the syllabus and textbooks of Commerce
at higher secondary stage.

➢ To enable the student teacher to perform his role effectively as Commerce teacher.

➢ To enable the teacher trainees to use Commercial Activities in teaching of Commerce.

➢ To enable the teacher trainees to use Community Resources in teaching of Commerce.

Course Contents:

Teaching Methods and Teaching Aids


Methods of teaching commerce, discussion method, Lecture method, Team Teaching, Project
Method, Discussion Method; Inductive and Deductive Approach; Computer assisted
instruction; Use of teaching aids; Text books, ,supplementary materials, workshops, teacher
hand books, teaching learning materials, reference materials- news paper, periodicals;
Selecting and using teaching aids; Need and importance of A.V Aids; Types of A.V Aids;
Role of the Economics teachers for use and development of these teaching aids; Computer
based Instruction in commerce-concepts, use and application; Downloading of instructional
materials from websites through Internet, power point presentation.

Evaluation in Commerce Teaching


Meaning, Need and Importance of Evaluation; Characteristics of Good Evaluation; Types of
Test; Achievement Test, Diagnostic test Evaluation Devices: Oral tests, Essay type test,
Objective type tests, Observation; Preparation of Unit Test along with Blue print.
Community Resources and Commercial Activities

Meaning of Community Resources; Types of Community Resources; Uses of Community


Resources in the teaching and learning of Commerce; Importance of Community Resources in
the teaching and learning of Commerce; Field Trips for teaching of Commerce: Importance,
procedure & Role of Teacher; Commercial Activities- Meaning of Commercial Activities;
Types of Commercial Activities in teaching of Commerce; Importance of Commercial Activities
in teaching of Commerce

Suggested Activities:
➢ Select any one theme and identify integration of elements of Commerce.
➢ Analysis of any one text book of Commerce in terms of its relation in our everyday
life
➢ Interacting with the school teachers to understand about pedagogical issues
➢ Practice of teaching skills in a simulated situation
Suggested Readings:
➢ Aggarwal, J.C. (2010) Teaching of Commerce, A practical approach, New
Delhi, Vikas Publication

➢ Khan, M.S. (1982). Commerce Education, New Delhi, Sterling Publishers


Private Limited.

➢ Kapoor, N.D. (1990). Principles and Practice of Accountancy, New Delhi,


Pitamber Publishing Company.

➢ Maheshwar; S.N., & Maheshwari, S.K. (1989) Element of Business Studies,


New Delhi, Asha Praka Greh.

➢ Musselman and Hanna (1960) Teaching Book Keeping and Accountancy, New
York, McGraw Hill Book Company.

➢ Rao, Seema (1995) Teaching of Commerce, New Delhi, Anmol Publications Pvt. Ltd.

➢ Venkateswarlu, K.; Methods of Teaching Commerce

***********************
Pedagogy of Mathematics
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:
➢ explore the use and relevance of different learning resources and materials in learning
different mathematical concepts and themes..
➢ develop learning materials on selected units/themes that facilitate learning of
mathematics in the classroom
➢ identify the mathematics themes for which community can be used as a learning site.
➢ organise mathematics related activities through mathematics club during school
attachment.
➢ study the mathematics laboratories in schools – lay out, facilities, equipments, materials
and other learning aids available that facilitate learning of Biology.
➢ familiarize with the different types of curricular projects in biology and their purposes
,themes, learning materials, resources etc
➢ reflect upon his/her own experiential knowledge in the different processes of becoming a
Life science teacher.
Course Content:
PLANNING FOR TEACHING-LEARNING
MATHEMATICS

Selecting the content for instruction; Identifying concepts to be transacted at various level with
special emphasis on content (Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Coordinate Geometry; Statistics
and Probability, etc.); Organisation of concepts for teaching-learning of mathematics; Stating
instructional objectives, identifying learning experiences, appropriate strategies, teaching aids
(Using low-cost material – preparation of various activities, such as verification of algebraic
identities, surface areas and volumes of cube, cuboids, cylinder, cone, sphere, conic sections, etc.
); ICT applications; Evaluation tools and learners participation in developing instructional
materials

Learning Resources and Preparation of Materials


Mathematics laboratory – concept and need, space and equipment for setting up a mathematics
laboratory; Utilization of learning resources in Mathematics: Charts and pictures, weighing and
measuring instruments, drawing instruments, models, concrete materials, surveying instruments;
Bulletin boards, Mathematics club, field trips and visits; Abacus, Cussionaire rods, Fractional
discs, Napier strips; Calculators, Computers, Smart boards, Multimedia presentations;
Mathematics outside the classroom; Websites on Mathematics content

Assessment of and for learning Mathematics


Comprehensive and continuous evaluation in Mathematics; Construction of different types of
test items and questions to assess content specific- simple factual knowledge, higher order
thinking and application abilities; preparation of blue print/table of specifications;Diagnostic test
and remedial measures

Suggested Activities: At least one of the following


➢ Planning of at least 2 lessons plan
➢ Teaching mathematics in real classroom /simulated situation.
➢ Preparation of teaching aids
➢ Analysis of mathematics text books, and other curricular materials.
➢ Project work using ICT on any mathematics lesson
➢ School visits to study existing Lab facilities for learning mathematics
➢ Construction of Unit test

Suggested Readings:
➢ Cooney, Thomas J. and Others (1975). Dynamics of Teaching Secondary
SchoolMathematics, Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
➢ Driscoll,M., Egan, M., Nikula, J., &DiMatteo, R. W. (2007). Fostering geometric
thinking: Aguide for teachers, grades 6-10. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
➢ Driscoll,M.(1999). Fostering algebraic thinking: A guide for teachers, grades 5-
10.Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
➢ Grouws, D.A. (ed) (1992). Handbook of Research on Mathematics Teaching and
Learning,NY: Macmillan Publishing.
➢ Lester, F.K (Ed) (2007). Second Handbook of Research on Mathematics Teaching and
Learning, Charlotte, NC: NCTM & Information Age Publishing.
➢ Mager, Robert (1962) Preparing instructional objectives. Palo Alto, CA: Fearon.
➢ Malone, J. and Taylor, P. (eds) (1993). Constructivist Interpretations of
TeachingandLearning Mathematics, Perth: Curtin University of Technology.
➢ Marshall, S.P.(1995) Schemes in Problem-solving. NY: Cambridge University Press.
➢ Moon, B. & Mayes, A.S. (eds) (1995). Teaching and Learning in Secondary School.
London:Routledge.

************************

Pedagogy of Physical Science


Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course objectives:
On completion of the course, student will be able to
➢ explore the use and relevance of different learning resources and materials in learning
different concepts and themes of physical science.
➢ develop learning materials on selected units/themes that facilitate learning of physical
science in the classroom
➢ identify the themes related to physical science for which community can be used as a
learning site.
➢ organise physical science related activities through science club during school
attachment.
➢ study the science laboratories in schools – lay out, facilities, equipments, and materials,
specimens, models, and other learning aids available that facilitate learning of physical
science.
➢ reflect upon his/her own experiential knowledge in the different processes of becoming a
Life science teacher.
Course Content:
LEARNING RESOURCES IN PHYSICAL SCIENCE

Identification and use of learning resources in physical science from immediate environment
(e.g. Natural pH Indicators, Soaps and Detergents, Baking Soda, Washing Soda, Common Salts,
Fruits, Fibre, Pulleys, Projectiles, Lenses and Mirrors, Inter-conversion of one Form of Energy to
other, Propagation of waves in Solid, Liquid and Gas etc.), Improvisation of apparatus
developing science kit and laboratory in science (secondary stage), physics and chemistry
(higher secondary stage); Designing laboratories, textbooks, audio-visual materials; Multimedia–
selection and designing;
TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES OF ASSESSMENT FOR LEARNING PHYSICAL SCIENCE

Performance-based assessment, learners' records of observations, field diary; Portfolio;


Assessment of project work in science/physical science; Assessment of participation in
collaborative learning; Construction of test items in science/physical science and

administration of tests; Assessment of experimental work in science/physics and chemistry;


Encouraging teacher -learners to examine variety of methods of assessments in science/ physical
science; Continuous and comprehensive evaluation.

PLANNING FOR TEACHING-LEARNING OF PHYSICAL SCIENCE

Concepts for teaching-learning of science/ physics and chemistry; Instructional materials


required for planning teaching- learning of science/physics and chemistry and learners'
participation in developing them; Identifying and designing teaching-learning experiences;
Organising activities, laboratory experiences, making groups; Planning ICT applications in
learning science/physics and chemistry.

PHYSICAL SCIENCE–LIFELONG LEARNING

Identification and application of physical and chemical phenomenon in day-to-day life and
human welfare, facilitating learning progress of learners with various needs in science/physics
and chemistry; Organising various curricular activities, such as debate, discussion, drama,
poster making on issues related to science/ physics and chemistry; Organising events on specific
day, such as Science Day, Environment Day, etc.; Planning and organising field experiences ,
Science club, Science exhibition, nurturing creative talent at local level and exploring linkage
with district/state/central agencies.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF SCIENCE/PHYSICS/CHEMISTRY


TEACHERS

Participation in seminar, conferences, online sharing, membership of professional organisations;


Journals and other resource materials in science/physical science education; Field visit to
industries, mines, refineries; National Laboratories, power stations, science centres; etc.;
Teacher as a researcher: Learning to understand how children learn science—action research in
physical science.

Suggested Readings:
➢ ArchanaTomar (2005) Teaching of Biology, Kalpaz Publications, New Delhi.
➢ Buxton.A Cory.(2010) Teaching Science in Elementary and Middle School Sage
Publications, New Delhi.
➢ Bybee.w.Roger (2010) The Teaching of Science 21st Century Perspective National
Science Teachers Association, USA
➢ Fensham P.J. (1994) The content of Science: A constructive Approach to its Teaching
and Learning, The Falmer Press, Washington, D.C
➢ Joshi S.R (2005) Teaching of Science, A.P.H Publishing Corpn., New Delhi
➢ Lawson.E. Anton.(2010) Teaching Inquiry Science in Middle School Sage Publications,
New Delhi
➢ Leckstein, John Murrey (1988) Basic Skills – Science, John Murrey Boston
➢ Mangal S.K &Shubhra (2005) Teaching of Biological Sciences, International Publishing
House, Meerut
➢ Narendra Vaidya (2003) Science Teaching in Schools, Deep & Deep Publishers, New
Delhi
➢ NCERT (1982) Teaching Science in Secondary Schools, NCERT, New Delhi.
➢ NCERT (2006) Science Text books of Classes, NCERT, New Delhi
➢ NCERT, National Curriculum Framework- 2005, NCERT. New Delhi.
➢ NCERT, ‘Focus Group Report’ Teaching of Science (2005). NCERT New Delhi.
➢ Novak, J.D. & Gown, D.B. (1984). Learning how to learn; Cambridge University Press.
➢ P. Ameetha (2004) Methods of Teaching Biological Science, Neelkamal, Hyderabad
➢ Ralph, E. Martin & Others (1994) Teaching Science for all Children, Allyn and Bacon
➢ Rao, V.K. (2004) Science Education, APH Publishing Corpn. New Delhi
➢ Sharma L.M (2003) Teaching of Science & Life Science, DhanpatRai Publishers, New
Delhi
➢ Sharma, R.C (2005) Modern Science Teaching, DhanpatRai& Sons, Delhi.
➢ Siddiqui .H.Mujibil(2007) Teaching Science Balaji offset, N.Delhi
➢ Siddiqui N.N & Siddiqui M.N (1994) Teaching of Science Today & Tomorrow, Dooba
House, Delhi
➢ Science & Children (NSTA’s peer reviewed journal for elementary teachers).
➢ Science Teacher (NSTA’s peer reviewed journal for secondary science teachers).
➢ Steve Alsop & Keith Hicks (2003). Teaching Science. Kogan Page India Private Limited.
➢ Sutton, C. (1992). Words, Science and Learning. Open University Press, Buckingham.

➢ TripathiSahil (2004) Teaching of Physical Science, Dominant Publications, Delhi.


➢ UNESCO (1966) Source Book for Science Teaching, UNESCO, Paris.
➢ Vanaja M. (2006) Teaching of Physical Science, Neelkamal Publications, Hyderabad
➢ Alan J. McCormack. Trends and Issues in Science curriculum in Science Curriculum
Resource Handbook: A practical guide to k12 science curriculum. Kraus International
Publications
************************

Pedagogy of Social Science


Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives
The course will enable the pupil teachers to
• Plan lessons based on different approaches to facilitate learning of Social Sciences.
• Realize her/his role as facilitator in enhancing Social Sciences learning in the real
classroom situation.
• Explore the use and relevance of different learning resources and materials in learning
different units in Social Sciences.
• Develop learning materials on selected units to facilitate learning in Social Sciences
• Identify themes in Social Sciences in which community can be used as a learning
resource
• Use Social Science Laboratory to facilitate learning of Social Science
• Reflect upon her/his own experiential knowledge in the process of becoming a Social
Science teacher
• understand different ways of assessing learners’ performance and providing
additional support to the learners
Course Contents:
Pedagogic planning in Social Sciences
Designing of objective based learning outcomes in cognitive, affective and psychomotor domain;
Content analysis of a particular unit; Various steps and planning of Lesson plan and Unit plan;
Need for updating content and pedagogical competencies for the professional development of the
social science teachers
Learning Resources and Preparation of Materials
Importance and functions of social science room, social science club and social science text
book; Audio Visual Materials - charts, models, maps, supplementary materials, preparation of
low cost teaching aids for teaching social sciences; Community as a resource site, use of library
resources. ICT in learning Social Sciences – Websites on learning Social Sciences, interactive
websites, on line learning and developing ICT based learning materials.
Assessment of Learning in Social Sciences
Continuous and comprehensive evaluation in social science; Construction of objective based test
items ; Evaluating and recording procedures to assess student performance; Self-assessment by
students, by teachers, peer assessment, assessment of teachers by students; Use of rubrics and
portfolio in assessment of learning Social Sciences; providing feedback to the learner, diagnosis
of learning difficulties and providing additional support to the learners.

Suggested Activities: At least one of the following


• Planning of Lessons on the Social Sciences units/themes of class VIII, IX and X
• Writing Reflective Journals based on teaching experiences – simulated
• Preparation of improvised teaching aids
• content analysis of a unit from social science content
• Analysis of Social Science Textbooks/Curriculum.
• Project work using ICT on any Social Science lesson
• Construction of Test items – objective based
• Any other relevant activity

Suggested Readings:
• Learning Without Burden, Report of the National Advisory Committee, 1993,
Ministry Of Human Resource Development, Government of India.
• National Curriculum Frame Work 2005, NCERT, New Delhi
• National Curriculum for Elementary And Secondary Education, A Frame Work,
1988, NCERT, New Delhi.
• NCERT (1971). Report of the Committee on Examinations, CABE, Ministry of
Education on Social Welfare, India, New Delhi.
• NCERT textbooks in Social Science.
• Position Paper by National Focus Group on Teaching of Social Sciences.
• Report of the Secondary Education Commission, 1953, Ministry of Education,
Government of India, New Delhi.
• Report of the Education Commission, 1964 – 66, Ministry of Education, Government
of India, New Delhi.
• The Curriculum for the Ten Year School – A Frame Work, 1975, NCERT, New
Delhi.
• UNESCO, New Source Book Teaching of Geography, UNESCO 2005.

***************
Pedagogy of Biological Science
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:

➢ explore the use and relevance of different learning resources and materials in learning
different Biological concepts and themes..
➢ develop learning materials on selected units/themes that facilitate learning of life science
in the classroom
➢ identify the biological themes for which community can be used as a learning site.
➢ organise life-science related activities through eco or science club during school
attachment.
➢ study the science laboratories in schools – lay out, facilities, equipments, and materials,
specimens, models, and other learning aids available that facilitate learning of Biology.
➢ familiarize with the different types of curricular projects in biology and their purposes
,themes, learning materials, resources etc
➢ reflect upon his/her own experiential knowledge in the different processes of becoming a
Life science teacher.

Course Content:
Pedagogic planning in learning life science
Designing of objective based learning outcomes in cognitive, affective & psychomotor
domains; Content analysis of a unit/lesson; Lesson Planning – Importance and Basic steps.
Learning Resources and Preparation of Materials
Importance and use of teaching aids, Types of teaching aids ; Biology Museum, Science Club,
Field Trips, Exhibitions, Aquarium , Herbarium, Vivarium,; ImprovisedTeaching Aids;
Laboratory management and organization of life science lab; Websites on life science content
Assessment of and for learning Life Science
Continuous and comprehensive assessment in life science: preparation and use of worksheets;
use of observation techniques, self and peer assessment; assessment of worksheets; students’
journals; use of rubrics in assessing students’ performance based activities; feedback for
improving learning;Diagnosing learning difficulties in life science and providing additional
support to the learner; Planning for Portfolio assessment in life science ; Construction of
different types of test items and questions to assess content specific- simple factual knowledge,
higher order thinking and application abilities; preparation of blue print/table of specifications;
Diagnostic test and remedial measures.
Suggested Readings:
➢ Ameetha, A. (2004) Methods of Teaching Biological Science, Neelkamal, Hyderabad
➢ Esler, K. William & Mark. K.Esler (2001): Teaching Elementary Science (8th edition)
Wadsworth group, Thomas learning, Printed in the USA.
➢ Jennings, T. (1986): The young scientist investigates- Teacher’s Book of Practical work,
Oxford University Press, Oxford.
➢ Mangal S.K &Shubhra (2005) Teaching of Biological Sciences, International Publishing
House, Meerut
➢ Mason M & Ruth T. Peters, Teacher guide for Life sciences, Published by D. Van
Nostrand Company, Inc, New york.
➢ National Curriculum Frame Work 2005, NCERT, New Delhi.
➢ NCERT text books (2005) science for classes from VIII to X
➢ NCERT (1982) Teaching Science in Secondary Schools, NCERT, New Delhi.
➢ NCERT (2006) Science Text books of Classes, NCERT, New Delhi
➢ New UNESCO Source Book for teaching science, UNESCO, Paris, Richardson, J.S.
Science teaching in secondary schools; New York; prentice hall.
➢ Novak. D.J & D.BobGowin (1984): Learning how to Learn, published by the press
syndicate of the University of Cambridge, Printed in the USA.
➢ Robin Millan (1984): Doing Science: Images of Science in Science education, the Falmer
Press, London.
➢ Sharma L.M (2003) Teaching of Science & Life Science, DhanpatRai Publishers, New
Delhi
➢ Sharma, R.C (2005) Modern Science Teaching, DhanpatRai& Sons, Delhi.
➢ Siddiqui .H.Mujibil(2007) Teaching Science Balaji offset, N.Delhi
➢ State text Books for classes VIII to X.
➢ Steve Alsop, Keith Hicks (2007): Teaching Science: A Handbook for Primary and
Secondary school teachers, Kogan Page, New Delhi
➢ Tomar, A. (2005) Teaching of Biology, Kalpaz Publications, New Delhi
➢ Turner,T&W.Dimarco (1988); learning to teach science in the secondary school – a
companion to school experience, Published by Routledge,
➢ Vaidya, N. (2003) Science Teaching in Schools, Deep & Deep Publishers, New Delhi
***********************

School observation
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:
Upon completion of the course student will be able to
➢ Reflect upon and make the most of their previous school experiences
➢ Develop an understanding of the nurturant and deterrent aspects of the school environment
➢ Develop conceptual understandings about teaching and learning in school environment

Workshop 1: School Reflections


➢ The Student teachers will be divided into groups of four or five. Each student teacher will
reflect upon the nurturant and deterrent factors of the learning environments of the schools
they attended. One student from each group will present the identified factors of their group.

Workshop 2: School as an Organized System


➢ The student teacher will learn the functioning of the school as an organized system.
➢ In groups of four or five the students will reflect upon arrangements in the school for
coordinated functioning of the school like morning assembly , time table, academic calendar
work allocation, responsibility roasters , liasoning activities like parent teachers meetings ,
interaction with community with local authorities etc. One student will present the reflections
of the group.

Workshop 3: School as Learning Environment


➢ Students teachers in groups of four or five will reflect upon all thatthey have learnt in
Schools, from the School-community interactions, from parents and from teachers. They will
discuss these in groups, record their reflections and present in a seminar.

**********************

Microteaching
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Introduction to Micro Teaching:


Concept, Meaning and Nature of Micro-Teaching; Assumptions ,Principles and Process of Micro
Teaching; Models of Micro teaching; Indian Models of Micro Teaching; Advantages,
Limitations and uses of Micro –Teaching.
Micro Teaching Practices:
The student will demonstrate any five skills of teaching through one micro lesson cycle on each
skill from the following as decided by the teacher:
Introducing a lesson, probing question, stimulus variation, reinforcement, blackboard writing,
illustrating with examples (Explanation) etc.

*********************
Creating an inclusive school
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:

The students will be able to

➢ demonstrate knowledge of different perspectives in the area of education of


children with disabilities;
➢ reformulate attitudes towards children with special needs;
➢ identify needs of children with diversities;

➢ plan need-based programmes for all children with varied abilities in the
classroom;
➢ use human and material resources in the classroom;

➢ use specific strategies involving skills in teaching special needs children in


inclusive classrooms;

➢ modify appropriate lear ner -friendly evaluation procedures;

➢ incorporate innovative practices to respond to education of children with


special needs;
➢ contribute to the formulation of policy; and
Course Contents:
Introduction to inclusive education / school
Concept, meaning and need; Transition from serge ration to inclusion; Principles models;
National policy for person with disabilities 2006 with reference to inclusive education; Sarva
shiksha abhiyan – 2002 with reference to inclusive school.
Special education needs (SEN) of learners in inclusive school
Identification of diverse needs of SEN learners and referrals; Disabilities in children and their
SEN : Hearing impairment, visual impairment, hearing low vision, orthopedic impairment,
intellectual impairment cerebral palsy, learning disabilities and multiple disabilities; Types and
use of assistive devices for learners with SEN; Education concessions and facilities; Special
needs in terms of Murielle in the context of different disabilities and their learning styles.

Planning and managing inclusive curriculum in schools


School readiness and school transition; Individualized education plan (IEP) : development and
implementation; Practices and classroom management in inclusive education : seating
arrangement, whole class teaching, collaborating teaching, activity – based learning , peer –
tutoring and co-operative learning; Curricular and instructional accommodation.
Facilitators for inclusive education-Need for multidisciplinary approach; Role and
responsibilities : general, special and resource teacher; Role and responsibilities : family and
community; Prepare at professional partnership : need and relevance.

SUGGESTED READING
➢ Jangira, N. K. (2002) Special educational needs of students and young adults: an
unfinishedagenda, in: M. Alur & S. Hegarty (Eds) Education and students with special
needs: from segregation to inclusion New Delhi, Sage.

➢ Jhulka, A. (2006) ―Including students and youth with disabilities in education – a


guide for practioners” NCERT, New Delhi

➢ Hallahan, D.P., Kauffma, J.M., Pullen, P.C. (2009). Exceptional Learners – An


Introduction to Education (11th Ed) Allyn & Bacon, Pearson Education, Inc. USA.

➢ Kauffman, J. M. & Hallahan, D. P. (Eds): (1982). ‗Handbook of Special Education‘,


NewYork: Prentice Hall Inc.

➢ King S. & Margaret. E. (1994). ‗Curriculum based assessment in special education‘,


California: Singular Publishing group Inc.

➢ Mani, M.N.G. (2000). Inclusive Education in Indian Context. International Human


Resource Development Center (IHRDC) for the Disabled, Coimbatore: Ramakrishna
Mission Vivekannanda University
➢ Mangal, S.K. (2007). Educating Exceptional Students – An Introduction to
Special Education. New Delhi: Prentice hall of India Pvt. Ltd.

➢ Ministry of Human Resource Development (2005) Action plan for inclusion in


education of students and youth with disabilities (New Delhi, Government of India).

➢ Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment (2006) National Policy for persons
with disabilities (New Delhi, Government of India).

➢ शसंह ,मिन , “ समावेशी थकूि का सज


ृ न” ,आर ० िाि बक
ु डडपो ,मेरठ ,उत्तर
प्रिे श l

*************************

Semester-VII
Human Development
Total Marks 100
External assessment 80
Internal assessment 20

Course Objectives
The course will enable the pupil teachers to
➢ Develop an understanding about the impact/ influence of socio cultural context in
shaping human development
➢ Appreciate inter-relatedness and interdependence of individual and society in the
context of human development
➢ Visualize the multiple dimensions and stages of human development and
developmental tasks
➢ Gain an understanding of different theoretical perspectives of human development
➢ Understand the dynamics of human development
➢ Acquire competencies and skills required for meeting the classroom dynamics
Fundamentals of Human Development
Concept and nature of human development, Social context of human development- families,
peers, school, ethnicity, culture and gender, Socioeconomic status and language; Learner as a
developing individual, Development as a resultant of interactions between and among
individual’s potentials (Innate, inherited and acquired) and external environment (Physical,
social, cultural, economic, political and technological)
Dimensions of Development and their Educational Implication
Developmental characteristics of a child and an adolescent: physical, cognitive, social,
emotional, moral and language; their interrelationships ; Developmental tasks of childhood and
adolescence and their educational implications; Adolescence in the Indian context-
characteristics and problems, their needs and aspirations, educational support required for
adolescent development; Theories of development- Piaget’s cognitive development theory,
Erickson’s psychosocial development theory, Kohlberg’s moral development theory
Dynamics of Human Development
Concept of self, self-concept, self-esteem, self-efficacy and self-realization; Determinants of
personality development of an individual-biological and socio-cultural; Personality assessment ;
Mental Health: concept, characteristics, factors affecting mental health of the students, Role of
the teacher in fostering good mental health of the students; Role of teacher in managing
frustration, conflict and stress of the students
Group Dynamics and Individual
Concept and characteristics of group dynamics, Dynamics in the classroom, Effect of group
process and interpersonal relations on learning conditions, measures to improve human relations
and interaction, social skills required for maintaining human relations; Socio-emotional climate
of the classroom and role of teacher in developing socio-emotional climate of the classroom
Suggested Readings
➢ Aggrawal, J.C(2002). Essential of Educational Psychology, Delhi: Doaba Book
House
➢ Chauhan, S.S. (2001). Advanced Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Vikash
Publishing House.
➢ Dandapani, S. (2001).Advanced Educational Psychology. Anmol Publication, New
Delhi.
➢ Mangal, S.K. (1994).Advanced Educational Psychology, New Delhi: Prentice Hall of
India Pvt. Ltd.
➢ Woolfolk,A. E. (2009). Educational Psychology (11th Edition) (My Education Lab
Series) Prentice Hall.
➢ Brown, J.S., Collins A and Dugrid, P (1989).Situated Cognition and the Culture of
Learning, Educational Researcher; 32-42.
➢ Erickson, E.H. (1968). Identity, Youth and Crisis. New York: W.W. Norton
➢ Jeanne, Ellis Ormrod. Educational Psychology : Developing Learners. Fourth Edition
➢ Jeffrey Arnett (2007), Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood: A Cultural Approach.
(3rd. ed.). Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Pearson.
➢ Klausmeier, Herbert J (1985). Educational Psychology. Harper and Row, Pub. New
York.
➢ Kohlberg, L., & Gilligan, C. (1974). The Adolescent as a Philosopher: The Discovery
of the Self in a Post-Conventional World. In H.V. Kraemer (Ed) Youth and Culture: A
Human Development Approach. Monterey, CA: Brooks/Cole.
➢ Kohlberg, L., Levine, C., &Hewer, A. (1983). Moral Stages: A Current Formulation
and a Response to Critics. New York: S. Karger.
➢ Lindgren, H.C. (1980). Educational Psychology in the Classroom Oxford University
Press, New York.
➢ Morgan, C. T., King, R. A., Weiss, J. R., &Schopler, J. (2001).Introduction to
Psychology (7th Edition). New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill.
➢ Patricia A. Alexander, Philip H. Winne (2006) Handbook of Educational Psychology
➢ Rathus,S.A.(2012). Psychology Concepts and Connections (11th Edition).Wadsworth
Cengage Learning, Nelson Education Limited, Canada.
➢ Rathus,S.A.(2012). Psychology Concepts and Connections (11th Edition).Wadsworth
Cengage Learning, Nelson Education Limited, Canada.
➢ Sarangapani M. Padma(2003). Constructing School Knowledge :An Ethnography of
learning in an Indian Village, Sage Publication
➢ Sturt Mary, Oakden, E.C. (1999) Modern Psychology and Education, Routledge.
➢ Vygotsky, L.S. Mind in Society, Harvard University Press: Cambridge, 1978.
*******************

School Experience Programme – I


Total Marks 200
External assessment 100
Internal assessment 100

Course Objectives
On completion of the course the student will be able to
➢ Understand the content and pedagogical principles, issues and problems related to
teaching
➢ Acquire competencies and skills required for effective classroom teaching, class
management and evaluation of student learning, organization of co-curricular activities,
working with the community
➢ Develop proper professional attitudes, values and interests
➢ Understand the role of a teacher
➢ Familiarize with the existing educational scenario of the respective states.

Activities
Getting acquainted with various aspects of cooperating schools- The student will teach at least 15
Lessons in each method/subject. Out of 15 lessons in each subject, 20% will cater to the
needs of slow learners, enrichment for talented children, in-group learning set up and on
self-learning models
The student will observe 5 lessons in each subject/method of peer group.
Participating in school activities and organisation of activities
Administering of diagnostic tests and identifying of learning difficulties
Organizing curricular and co-curricular activities

Post- School Experience Activities


Follow-up activities (remedial and enrichment activities) to be taken up by the Institute
Finalization of records and reports related to curricular and co-curricular activities

Evaluation and Scheme of Assessment


Evaluation of performance during school experience programme- I will be done on the basis of
assessment by institute supervisors, cooperating teachers, headmasters, records, reports and
student activities/assignments. The scheme of assessment will based on the following Areas:
Areas
1. Teaching
2. Record of Lesson Observation
3. Evaluation Record
4. Preparation and presentation of teaching aids
5. Record of participation in school activities

***************
Semester-VIII

School Experience Programme– II


Total Marks 200
External assessment 100
Internal assessment 100

Course Objectives
On completion of the course the student teacher will be able to
➢ Understand the content and pedagogical principles, issues and problems related to
teaching
➢ Acquire competencies and skills required for effective classroom teaching,
classmanagement and evaluation of student learning, organization of co-curricular
activities,working with the community
➢ Develop proper professional attitudes, values and interests
➢ Understand the role of a teacher
➢ Familiarize with the existing educational scenario of the respective states.
Activities
Getting acquainted with various aspects of the cooperating schools- The student will teach 15
Lessonsin each method/subject. Out of 15 lessons in each subject, 20% will cater to theneeds of
slow learners, enrichment for talented children, in-group learning set up and onself-learning
models
Participating in school activities and organisation of activities
Administering of diagnostic tests and identifying of learning difficulties
Conducting a case study/action research
Organizing curricular and co-curricular activities

Post-School Experience Programme Activities


Follow-up activities (remedial and enrichment activities) to be taken up by the Institute
Finalization of records and reports related to curricular and co-curricular activities

Evaluation and Scheme of Assessment


Evaluation of performance during School Experience Programme - II will be done on the basis
of assessment byinstitute supervisors, cooperating teachers, headmasters, records, reports and
studentactivities/assignments. The scheme of assessment will based on following areas

Area
1. Teaching
2. Record of Lesson Observation
3. Evaluation Record
4. Preparation and presentation of teaching aids
5. Record of participation in school activities

Reflective Journal
Total Marks 50
Internal

The students will prepare a diary analyzing their work and learning progress critically throughout
the School Experience Programme. It will include their critical, analytical and reflective writing
about their awareness of the cultural context (setting) of the school, class, prevalent practices of
teaching - learning activities and the curriculum. It may include their reflections on the journey
of the School Experience programme. It may include research notes, personal
comments/reflections, notes, images, videos, quotes extracts from the parents, students, teachers,
principal and other working staff of the school, books, journals and photos/sketches.
*****************

TRIBAL EDUCATION
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:
➢ To enable the student teachers to understand the concept of Tribe and their status.
➢ To provide a deeper understanding of Tribal Welfare programmes in India & Jharkhand.
➢ To provide insights into the growth and development of Tribal Education in India &
Jharkhand
➢ To enable the student teachers to understand the issues and trends in contemporary Tribal
➢ To give a practical experience to students in Tribal Education programmes.

Course Contents:
Introduction to Tablas India and Jharkhand :
Concept of Tribe (Meaning and Definition) Historical development of Tribes in India;
Characteristics of Tribes; Classification of Tribes in India; Welfare in India-
Constitutional provisions to Tribal Development of India; Status of Tribal Population;
Development policies and programmes formulated for Tribal Development in India; Tribal
Welfare in Jharkhand -Tribal Welfare Programme in Jharkhand (Health, Social and Economic
programmes)
Tribal Education policies and programmes in Jharkhand.
a. Higher Education b. Secondary Education c. Primary Education d. Pre-Primary Education
3.2 Recent Trends & Issues in Tribal Education.
Education and Welfare of Tribal Women -Educational Status of Tribal Women ; Problems of
Adolescent Tribal girls; Empowerment of Tribal Women
Health Education and Tribal Welfare - Health Status of tribes in Jharkhand; Common Health
Problems in Tribal communities 5.3 Government Initiatives for the development of health in
tribal areas; Role of NGOs in improvement of health status of tribes
Practicum
Activities
➢ Helping at least five (5) illiterate tribals to become literates.
➢ Participation in literacy or other development awareness programmes in tribal
Settlements.
➢ Visiting ashram/tribal welfare residential school/tribal welfare department/ITDA and
studying its functions.
➢ Participation in bridge school Programmes in Tribal settlement / village / area /
neighblourhood.
➢ Participation in Sarva Shikshan Programmes in tribal areas.
**************************
Optional Papers
Any one from given four Options (For Semester VIII Only)

Guidance and Counselling


Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives
The course will enable the pupil teachers to
➢ Understand the concept, nature, need and principles of guidance and counselling
➢ Know the different types of guidance and counselling
➢ Understand the various stages involved in the process of counselling
➢ Develop an understanding of the procedures of organizing various guidance services
➢ Be aware of the role of parents, teachers, guidance workers and counsellors for
organising guidance services in schools
➢ Understand the concept, need and guidance for the children with special needs
Course Contents:

Introduction to guidance & Counselling

Meaning, nature scope and functions of guidance, principles of guidance; Need of guidance at
various stages of life, types of guidance : educational, vocational personal guidance (their
meaning, objectives, needs and importance )

Procedure of guidance-Individual and group procedures of guidance, their nature and advantage

Group guidance techniques – class tasks, career – task, career – conference – group discussion
field – visits, career – exhibition, audio – visual techniques Role of various community
agencies in school guidance program

Concept of counseling: theories of counseling; theory of self (rogers); Types of counseling:


directive, non-directive and eclectic; Process of counseling (initial disclosure in depth
exploration and commitment to action); Skills in counseling (listening, questioning, responding
and communicating); Role of teacher as a counselor and professional ethics associated with it

Understanding the individual, Job Analysis and Guidance Service:

Studying and appraising and individual –its need and importance in EVG; Testing and non –
testing devices for the study of an individual; Testing: intelligence, aptitude, attitude, interest,
achievement and personality; Techniques used in guidance: questionnaire, anecdotal records,
interview scheduled, case study diary and autobiography cumulative – record cards

Job analysis: concept and need; Job satisfaction: concept an factor affecting job satisfaction

Concept of occupational information and sources of collection ; Career counseling and


discrimination of occupational information; Guidance services and the organization in schools

Types of guidance services; role of school personnel’s in organizing guidance services


Suggested Readings
➢ Agarwal, J.C. (2004). Educational, Vocational Guidance and Counselling, New
Delhi: Doaba House.
➢ Bhatia, K.K. (1993). Educational and Vocational Guidance, Ludhiana, Vinod
Publications.
➢ Bhatnagar, Asha and Gupta, Nirmala (Eds.) (1999). Guidance and Counselling: A
theoretical Perspective. Volume-I, New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd.
➢ Bhatnagar, Asha and Gupta, Nirmala (Eds.) (1999). Guidance and Counselling: A
theoretical Perspective. Volume-II, New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd.
➢ Gupta, M. (2003).Effective Guidance and Counselling- Modern Methods and
Techniques. Jaipur, Mangal Deep Publishers.
➢ Kochhar,S.K.(1992). Educational and Vocational Guidance in secondary schools.
New Delhi: Sterling Publishers Private Ltd.
➢ Kochar, S.K. (2007). Educational Guidance and Counselling. New Delhi: Sterling
Publishers Private Ltd.
➢ Pandey, K.P. (2000). Educational and Vocational Guidance in India. Varanasi:
ViswavidyalayaPrakashan
➢ Sharma, R.A. (2004). Fundamentals of Guidance and Counselling. Meerut: R Lall
Book Depot.

Education of Children with Special needs


Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives
The course will enable the pupil teachers to
➢ Acquire essential knowledge about the social needs of children with sensory and intellectual impairments
in the context of education for all.
➢ Identify and assess special needs in classroom.
➢ Be aware of curriculum adjustments and adaptation of instructional procedures to improve access of
children with special needs to different curricular areas.
➢ Acquire the skills to Identify children with special needs; Work with other professional, wherever
necessary to assess special needs;
➢ Plan and implement instructional procedures adapted to special needs and handle special aids and
equipment used for overcoming disable children
➢ Analyse the role of teachers in implementing reforms in assessment and Evaluation in special education

Fundamentals of Education of Children with Special Needs


Concept and meaning of exceptionality, special needs and Education for all, Difference between Impairment,
Disability and Handicap; Difference between special education, integrated education and inclusive education; Need
for early identification, The Identification Process (Who should do and how?) ; Characteristics and educational
requirements of children with Learning disability, Hearing Impairment, Visual Impairment, Orthopedically
Handicapped, Mental Retardation, Gifted and Creative
Planning and Management of Special Education
Adaptations in instructional objectives , curriculum and co-curricular activities for meeting special needs of children
; Creating conducive environment in special schools: physical, social and emotional; Practices and Classroom
Management in Special Education- Seating arrangement, Whole class teaching, Collaborative teaching, Activity-
Based Learning, Peer-Tutoring and Co-operative learning; Utilisation of records/ case profiles for identification,
assessment, and intervention for special classrooms ; Role of parents, headmasters and teachers in ensuring equal
educational opportunities for these students; Teachers’ role in implementing reforms in assessment and evaluation in
special education
Suggested Readings
➢ Bhalerao, Usha. (1985). Madhya Pradesh KeShikshitDarishtiHinKaSamajikAdhyan. Delhi: Gourav
Publishing House,.
➢ Jangira, N.K. et al.( 1992): Education of Children with Seeing Problems. New Delhi: Central Resource
Centre.
➢ John, M. Hughes. (1983). The Slow Learner in your Class. London: Thomas Nelson & Sons Ltd.
➢ Krishna, M.( 1991). Gifted Underachievers. New Delhi: Discovery Publishing House.
➢ Krishna, M. (1993). Gifted and Talented – a Developmental Perspective. New Delhi: Discovery Publishing
House.
➢ Krishna, B.; Prasad, V.; Rao, D.B. (2004). Reading Disabilities. New Delhi: Sonali Publication
➢ Mani, M.N.G.( 1992). Techniques of Teaching Blind Children. New Delhi: Sterling Publication Pvt. Ltd.
➢ Pal, H.R. & Sharma, M.( 2007). Education of Gifted. New Delhi: Kshipra Publication.
➢ Pal, H.R. and Pal, A.( 2007). Education of Learning Disabled. New Delhi: Kshipra Publication,
➢ Raina, M.K.( 1996). Talent Search in the Third World. New Delhi: VikassPublihing House,.
➢ Rao Sujatha, A.( 1998). Dear Teacher: The Gifted Child Needs you. Secundarabad: A.K.Sujatha,
➢ Reddy, G. L. et al.( 1997). Slow Learners Their Psychology and Instruction. New Delhi: Discovery
Publishing House.
➢ Uday, Shankar. (1991). Exceptional Children. New Delhi: Enkay Publishers Pvt. Ltd.
➢ Upadhaya, Usha. (1985). Sense of Deprivation Among High School Students. Varanasi: Yajna Prakashan.

➢ बबष्ट ,अभारानी एवं सक्सेना ,थवातत , “ववशशष्ट बािक” ,अग्रवाि पस्लिकेशन ,आिरा l
Distance Education and Open Learning
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives:
On completion of this course the students will be able to:
➢ Understand the concept of distance education and Open learning
➢ Reflect on the growth of distance learning system in India
➢ Discuss the present status of distance education in India
➢ Understand the nature of distance learner and their problems
➢ Understand the role of Distance educators
➢ Develop an understanding of the intervention strategies in D.E & O.L
Distance Education and Open Learning: An Introduction
Concept, Need and Importance, Scope; Growth of Distance Learning System in India at the level of School
Education and at Higher Education; Present Status of Distance Education in India; National Institute of Open
Schooling (NIOS) and Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU); Distance Educators : Meaning and their
types; Distance Learners : Nature, Characteristics, Types and their Problems

Intervention Strategies in D.E and O.L


Media in Distance Education : Print, Audio - Visual, Computer based Media, Online and Web based media; Self
Learning Material (SLM) : Meaning , Importance, characteristics and types; Instructional Material in Distance
Education : SLMs, assignments, audio visual aids, use of ICT; Student Support Services : Concept, Need and
Importance; Management of Student Support Services; Curriculum and Instruction; Evaluation and Assessment;
Library and Learning Resources; Student Services: Information dissemination, help desk, addressing students’
grievances, handling queries etc.; Facilities and Finances; Counselling Services in Distance Education
Suggested Readings:
➢ Education Commission Report (1948-1949) Ministry of Education, Government of India.
➢ ICDE (1995), 17th World Conference for Distance Education, One World, Many voices,
Conference Papers, (ed) David Sewart (All references to Eastern Europe are form Vol. 1).

➢ IGNOU (1988): Distance Teaching: Prerequisites and Practices (Block 1,2& 3). IGNOU, New
Delhi.
➢ IGNOU (1988): Reading in Distance Education (Block 1,2& 3). IGNOU, New Delhi.
➢ Keegan, D.J. (1986): The Foundation of Distance Education. Croom Helm, USA.
➢ Kaye, A. & Rumble, G. (1981): Distance Teaching for Higher and Adult Education. Croom
Helm, USA.
➢ Parmaji, S. (Ed.) (1984): Distance Education. Sterling Publishers, New Delhi.
➢ Pentz, M.J. & Neil M.W. (1981): Education of Adults at a Distance. Kogan Page, London.
➢ Power et al; (2000): Quality in Distance Education in performance indicator in Higher Education.
Aravali, New Delhi.
➢ Reddy, G.R. (1988): Open Universities: The Ivory Towers Thrown open. Sterling Publishers,
New Delhi.
➢ Rountree, D. (1986): Teaching through Self-Instruction. Kagon Page, London.
➢ Rumble, G. &Herry, K. (1982): The Distance Teaching Universities. Croom Helm, USA.
➢ Rumble, G. (1992): The Management of Distance Learning. UNESCO and IIEP. Paris.
➢ Sewart, D. Keegan D. & Holmberg, B. (Eds.) (1988): Distance Education: International
Perspectives. Routledge, Chapman and Hall, London.
Population Education
Total Marks 50
External assessment 40
Internal assessment 10

Course Objectives
The course will enable the pupil teachers to
➢ Understand the meaning, need, objective and scope of population education
➢ Familiarise the students with the important causes, effects and problems of population
growth in India
➢ Understand the place of curricular and co-curricular activities in the organisation of
population education programme
➢ Know about the trends and issues in population education
➢ Develop awareness about the role of teacher in organising population education
programme

Introduction to Population Education


Population education- concept, need, objectives and scope ; Issues and trends in population
education; Misconceptions about population education; National Population Education
Programme in India;
Population dynamics in India- causes and effects of population growth on economic
development, social development, educational development, urbanisation, environment and
natural resources, family life, health and nutrition and policies
Planning and Management of Population Education
Need for population studies in an analysis of educational growth and quality of life; Role of
government and non-government agencies concerning population educations; Integrating
population concept in different school subjects; Place of curricular and co-curricular activities in
organisation of population education programmes; Methods and approaches of population
education- Inquiry approach, Observation, Self-study, Discussion, Assignment; Role of teacher
in population education problems while imparting population education and suggestions
Suggested Readings
➢ Aggarwal, J. C. Population Education. Shipra publication New Delhi
➢ Aggarwal, S.N. India’s Population Problems, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing, New Delhi.
➢ Bhatia, K. Population Education. Ankar Publication Educational Publisher Tajpur Road,
Ludhiana
➢ D. Gopal. Population Education: A Guide to curriculum and Teacher Education, Sterling
Publishers, New Delhi.
➢ Ghosh, B.N. Fundamentals of Population Geography (Urbanization) Density,
Demographic Termination, Sterling Publishers, New Delhi.
➢ Gupta, V.K. Population Education, Ankur publication, Ludhana
➢ Khan, A.R. Population Education. Gulshan publication, Srinagar.
➢ Saikia, A; Ali, L; Kishore, K (Eds) (2012). Population Education: Issue and challenges,
APH Publishing Corporation, New Delhi.
➢ Sharma, R.C. Population Trends, Resources and Environment, Dhanpat Rai and Sons,
New Delhi.
➢ Tiwari, R.P. Concept of Population Education: Urban Population Education, Prakash
Publishers, Ludhiana.
➢ U.K. Singh & K. N. Sudershan, Population Education. Discovery Publishing House,
New Delhi
➢ Venkataiah,S. Population Education. Anmol publication Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi

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