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CE 2310 – Mechanics of Materials

3rd Semester B.Tech.

Course instructor:
Dr. Phanisri Pradeep Pratapa
Assistant Professor
Department of Civil Engineering
Indian Institute of Technology Madras

31 July 2019

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Outline
• Instructor – Students intro

• Mechanics of Materials vs. Engineering Mechanics

• Motivational examples

• Course overview

• Course objectives and pre-requisites

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Instructor background
Education
Dr. Phanisri Pradeep • Ph.D., Georgia Tech, 2016
Pratapa • M.S., UT Austin, 2011
(www.pppratapa.com) • B.Tech., IIT Madras, 2010

Research
• Metamaterials
• Origami engineering
• Lattice structures
• Computational mechanics

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Mechanics of Materials vs. Engineering Mechanics

Mechanics: The set of principles governing the displacement of a body.

P
Deformable rod

Rigid rod
(idealization)

Deformable body: Distance Rigid body: Distance


between any two points in between any two points in
the body CAN change due the body CANNOT change
to application of force. due to application of force.

Fig. courtesy: https://quizlet.com/238108452/chapter-6-structure-analysis-flash-cards/


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Mechanics of Materials vs. Engineering Mechanics

Why consider a body to be deformable?


OR
Why consider deformable bodies?

• Rigid members can resist infinite load!!


• In reality no body is perfectly rigid (relative..) P
• Typically high rigidity means high cost
• Sometimes deformation is good
• Can design structural members
• Can analyze indeterminate structures

Need extra equation!


(Relate force and displacement)
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Course overview – concepts & eqns

?
Force Displacement

Strain-
Equilibrium Compatibility Displacement
relation

Stress Strain
Constitutive
relation

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Motivational Example – Buildings/Bridges
• Sizing/Geometry
BEAMS • Failure/Strength
• Serviceability/Deformation

COLUMNS
Ref: https://www.mdpi.com/2075-5309/3/1/173 7/16
Motivational Example – Buildings/Bridges
• Sizing/Geometry
• Failure/Strength
• Serviceability/Deformation

Refs: https://mapio.net/pic/p-16507357/ 8/16


https://www.livescience.com/29391-eiffel-tower.html
Motivational Example – Airplane fuselage

Refs:
http://www.traveller.com.au/airbus-a321xlr-plane-narrowbody-jet-on-longer-hauls-presents-comfort-problem-h1fgrh
https://i.stack.imgur.com/TIeeu.jpg 9/16
https://aviation.stackexchange.com/questions/19291/what-is-the-pressure-in-a-civil-aircraft-fuselage-at-flight-ceiling
https://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/airbus-sofa-airplane-seat/index.html
https://www.compositesworld.com/news/spirit-aerosystems-debuts-next-generation-composite-fuselage-panel
Motivational Example – Flexible electronics

Refs:
http://theconversation.com/making-flexible-electronics-with-nanowire-networks-76260
https://blogs.wsj.com/venturecapital/2012/12/17/are-wearable-flexible-electronics-the-
https://www.dezeen.com/2013/03/28/biostamp-temporary-tattoo-wearable-electronic-circuits-john-rogers-
mc10/next-big-thing-mc10-says-so/

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Motivational Example – Nanotechnology

Carbon atom

≈1 nanometer

Carbon nanotube pillars between sheets of


graphene may create hybrid structures with a
unique balance of strength, toughness and ductility
throughout all three dimensions, according to Rice
University scientists.

Refs:
https://scitechdaily.com/pillared-graphene-structures-gain-strength-toughness-and-ductility/
https://phys.org/news/2012-06-flattened-nanotubes-full-potential-reveal.html
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Motivational Example – Metamaterials

Metamaterials: Artificial materials that can exhibit exotic engineering properties.

3D printed metallic lattice structure Wave guiding

Ref: http://engatech.com/metal-3d-printing/
Ref: http://www.topopt.dtu.dk/?q=node/24 12/16
Course overview – contents/modules
• Chapter-1: Introduction
• Intro, mathematical preliminaries, force, body, motion, basic concepts
• Chapter-2: Stress
• Definitions, stress transformations, Mohr’s circle, types of stresses
• Chapter-3: Strain
• Deformation, strain transformations, strain rosette, compatibility, thermal
• Chapter-4: Constitutive relation
• Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio, shear modulus, bulk modulus, stress-strain
• Chapter-5: Axial
• Chapter-6: Bending
• Bending equation, stress distribution on beam cross-section, SFD, BMD, composite beam bending
• Chapter-7: Shear
• Connection design, shear center
• Chapter-8: Torsion
• Twist, shear stress distribution
• Chapter-9: Pressure vessels
• Thick, thin walled
• Chapter-10: Yield/Failure criteria
• Failure modes, Tresca condition, von-Mises
• Chapter-11: Buckling
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• Euler-buckling, elastic
Course objectives & pre-requisites
Analysis: We perform analysis of structures to calculate strength and
displacement and to find support reactions.

Failure: A structure is said to be failed if it does not fulfil its intended use
- Strength: stresses exceed a limit
- Serviceability: Displacement exceeds a limit

OBJECTIVES
• Relate stresses and forces
• Relate strains and displacements
• Solve 1D engineering problems – axial, bending, torsion, pressure vessels
• Predict failure load and mode of failure

SKILLS REQUIRED
• Calculus: Differentiation, Integration, Differential Equations
• Linear Algebra: Matrix multiplication/operations, vectors

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Textbooks and References
• R C Hibbeler, Mechanics of Materials
• E Popov, Engineering Mechanics of Solids
• NPTEL lectures on Mechanics of Materials
• S Timoshenko, Strength of Materials

NOTE:

• Please submit homeworks on A4 sheets only.


• Grading: Assignments(10%), Tutorials(20%),
Quiz-1,2(15%+15%), End Sem (40%).

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Test your background

• Draw Shear force and Bending moment diagrams:


• Simple supported beam
• Cantilever beam
• This will NOT be graded.

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