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Anna Cole

A1 +
+ T eacher's R eso u rce C e n tre I D igital Student's Book I O n lin e w o rk b o o k
Teacher support
Teacher development tips index

There a re a n u m b e r of m e th o d o lo g ic a l a n d p ra c tic a l tips w h ic h a re s tra te g ic a lly


p la c e d w ithin th e T eacher's notes in th e G atew ay 2nd Edition T each er's Book to b e of
m ost use to th e te a c h e r n o t just d u rin g p la n n in g , setting up a n d e v a lu a tin g activities,
b u t also h e lp in g 'on th e sp ot' in c e rta in la n g u a g e or p ro n u n c ia tio n a re a s .

CLASSROOM TIPS AND PLANNING


Making mistakes p20 Flipped classroom videos p37 Using a video camera p79
Organising pairwork p20 Dictogloss p39 Error correction p81
Organising the board p20 Listening activities p40 Pyramid discussions p88
Giving instructions p20 Using video in the classroom p52 Debating in class p116
Model dialogues P 21 Testing before you teach p53 Setting time limits p140
Checking answers generally p21 Brainstorming p64 Buzz groups p147
Marking written work p21 Onion ring p65 Homework p151
Praise p22 Find someone who ... p67 Drilling p153
Classroom language p30 Information-gap activities p69 Teaching poetry in class p155
Monitoring p32

LANGUAGE
Compound nouns p29 would like to p75 Past simple affirmative - irregular
Nationalities p34 There is/There are p76 past forms p121
Grammar - contracted forms p37 Prepositions of place p76 Articles p126
Big numbers p39 Countable and uncountable nouns p80 Past simple - negative p127
have got p41 can/can't p89 Past simple questions P132
Spelling p42 Adverbs of manner p90 Comparative adjectives p141
Possessive's p49 The imperative p94 Superlative adjectives p145
Possessive pronouns p49 Present continuous p103 Contractions p146
Regular and irregular plurals p50 Present continuous questions and Word formation p151
Gradable adjectives p55 short answers p107 be going to p153
Present simple - negative p62 The present simple and present must, have to p157
Recycling vocabulary p63 continuous p107 should P 157
Present simple questions and
short answers p67

STUDENT TRAINING
Using a dictionary p21 Assessing oral presentations p93 Asking and answering personal
Critical thinking p36. 75, 89 Multiple-choice cloze activities p95 questions p133
Using pictures to make inferences p40 Conversation skills P97 Self-assessment p133
Reading quickly for gist p48 Writing a questionnaire p97 Text titles p140
Inference in listening: True/False/ Matching notices and prompt Spelling in listening exams p144
Not Mentioned p66 sentences p102 Agreeing and disagreeing p147
Writing for an audience p70 Before you listen p106 Writing a plan p148
Matching titles and paragraphs p74 Describing pictures p109 Completing the gaps in a cloze
Marking written work p81 Inference in reading p115 activity p158
Making and replying to offers p82 Listening for gist p120

PRONUNCIATION
Stress timing p22 Falling intonation p54 was/wasn't - Weak and strong
The /э/ sound p29 The /u:/ sound p60 forms p116
The alphabet - difficult pairs p30 The /iz/ sound p62 The -ed ending p121
The /0/ sound p31 /1/ and /ai/ p73 The /и/ sound p129
Word stress p35 The /ф/ sound p77 Saying did you ...?/didjo/ p132
Rising intonation p38 The /ае/ and /а:/ sound p90 be going to p153
The /аи/ sound p50 The /к/ sound p101 Intonation p159
----- —-—•
Teacher support ■■■
The CEFR and Gateway 2nd Edition

The C o m m o n E u ro p e a n Fram ew ork of R e fe re n c e (CEFR) is a w id e ly u sed s ta n d a rd


c re a te d by th e C o u n c il of Europe. G atew ay 2nd Edition is c a re fu lly m a p p e d to th e
CEFR h e lp in g te a c h e rs iden tify students' a c tu a l progress a n d h e lp in g th e m to set their
le a rn in g priorities.

Gateway 2nd Edition offers a wide range of teaching materials Within each unit, there are several opportunities for students
in various components which give teachers the opportunity to practise speaking and record their conversations for
to develop all aspects of their students' language ability. The the dossier in their portfolio. Students could record their
CEFR can be used to track their progress. conversations, date them and include them in their portfolio.
On pages 24-27 are the A1 and A2 descriptors (description They then assess their performance in each speaking activity
of competences) covered in the A1 + level of Gateway 2nd and give themselves a mark according to the following self-
Edition. A2 descriptors are also available in the Gateway A2 assessment criteria:
Teacher's Book.
A basic level of confidence with the A1 descriptors is CONTENT (1-5)
expected as students start using Gateway 2nd Edition A1 + Did I say what I wanted to say? Was I interesting? Did I speak
and, by the end of the course, students should be competent in English fora long time? Did I hesitate a lot?
with the A1 and some of the A2 descriptors.
VOCABULARY AND GRAMMAR (1-5)
In the Teacher's Resource Centre you will also find a list of
Did I use different words? Did I use words I've learned
unit-by-unit C EFR descriptors with suggested targets which
recently? Were my sentences well constructed? Did I make a
can be used for self-assessment. Students can use these at
lot o f errors?
any point to get a detailed picture of their own individual
progress. COOPERATION (1-5)
WHAT IS A EUROPEAN LANGUAGE PORTFOLIO (ELP)? Did I listen to my partner? Did we help each other if we had
problem s? Did we both speak for approximately the same
The European Language Portfolio (ELP) was developed by the
length o f time?
Language Policy Unit of the Council of Europe
■ to support the development of learner autonomy, IN ENGLISH! (1-5)
plurilingualism and intercultural awareness and When I didn't know how to say something, did I use English
competence; to solve my problem ? Did we use English to talk about whose
■ to allow users to record their language learning turn it was to speak?
achievements and their experience of learning and using The portfolio consists of three parts: the Language Passport
languages. with information about a student's proficiency in one or more
If you are using portfolios as a way of evaluating your languages, i.e. qualifications; the Language Biography
students' coursework over the year, you will find a wide where students reflect on their learning process and progress
variety of opportunities within each Gateway 2nd Edition unit and say what they can do in their foreign language(s); and
to provide material for the dossier. the Dossier, which is a collection of materials and data put
A portfolio is a means to document a person's achievements. together by students to document and illustrate their learning
Artists, architects or designers collect samples of their work experiences.
in portfolios and students are encouraged to do the same.
Although it may be a demanding task to set up in the
Most of the time, these samples will be texts created by the
beginning, the overall aim is for students to be involved in
students, but they could also include photos of classroom
planning, collecting and evaluating their own work, thereby
scenes, wall displays, audio recordings and videos. All these
taking responsibility for their own learning. This in turn may
documents provide evidence of a student's performance, e.g.
lead to increased participation and autonomy on the part of
during a discussion, an oral presentation or a role-play.
the learner.

Starter 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Listening page num ber

1can understand when someone speaks very slowly


to me and articulates carefully, with long pauses for 7 30
me to assimilate meaning.

1can understand simple directions how to get from X


44
to Y, by foot or public transport.

1can understand questions and instructions


r~
< addressed carefully and slowly to me and follow 7 30 44 54
short, simple directions.

Г“ 1can understand numbers, prices and times. 14


< 8 36 54 120
15

lirr?
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

p age num ber

I can understand the days of the week and months of


94 120
the year.

I can understand times and dates. 120

I can understand simple personal questions when


people speak slowly and clearly (e.g. 'What's your 18 108
name?', 'How old are you?', 'What's your address?').

I can understand what is said clearly, slowly and


directly to me in simple everyday conversation; it is
44 108
possible to make me understand, if the speaker can
take the trouble.

I can generally identify the topic of discussion around


44 108
me when people speak slowly and clearly.

I can understand the essential information in short 48 62 100 126


36 74 119
recorded passages dealing with predictable everyday 16 28 53 67 94 105 131
41 79 120
matters which are spoken slowly and clearly. 18 30 54 68 96 106 132
42 80 122
56 70 108 134

Re ading page num ber

1can understand information about people (place of


residence, age, etc.) in newspapers and articles. 13 89 127
37
< 62 91 106 120 133
49
15 95 135
19

I can recognise names, words and phrases I know 36


88 114 126
and use them to understand very simple sentences if 39 50 62 77 100
< 29 95 117 129
there are pictures. 17 40 51 64 81 102
97 122 133
44

I can identify important information in news summaries


115
CM or simple newspaper articles in which numbers and ^^ 40
< 23 63 89 101 118 127
names play an important role and which are clearly 53
119
structured and illustrated.

CM I can understand a simple personal letter in which the


< 31 45 109 127
writer tells or asks me about aspects of everyday life.

I can understand simple written messages from friends 75


СЧ
< or colleagues, for example saying when we should meet 45 76
to play football or asking me to be at work early. 83

CM I can find the most important information on leisure


< 40 123
time activities, exhibitions, etc. in information leaflets.

I can understand short narratives about everyday 11


CM 49, 127
< things dealing with topics which are familiar to me if 13 30 37 74 109 123
57 135
the text is written in simple language. 19

Speaking: Spoken Interaction page number

I can introduce somebody and use basic greeting and


56
leave-taking expressions.

I can ask and answer simple questions, initiate and 62


36 74 88
respond to simple statements in areas of immediate 10 22 49 63 100 126
37 75 89
need or on very familiar topics. 11 23 50 64 101 119 127
39 77 90
13 26 51 65 104 120 128
41 78 91
15 27 54 66 106 121 131
42 79 94
17 28 55 69 107 122 132
43 80 95
18 30 56 70 108 134
44 81 96
71

I can make myself understood in a simple way, but


I am dependent on my partner being prepared to
108
repeat more slowly and rephrase what I say and to
help me to say what I want.
The CEFR and Gateway 2nd Edition

I Sp eaking : Spoken Interaction


Starter 1

page number
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1can buy things in shops where pointing or other


< 74
gestures can support what 1say.

1can handle numbers, quantities, cost and time. 36


14 40 53 74
< 8 119
15 42 54 81
43

< 1can ask people for things and give people things. 56 74

1can ask people questions about where they live,


13 36
r— people they know, things they have, etc. and answer
< 17 28 42 48 77 90 108
such questions addressed to me provided they are
18 43
articulated slowly and clearly.

1can indicate time by such phrases as 'next week', 128


94
< 'last Friday', 'in November', '3 o'clock'. 81 108 129
95
134

CM 1can make simple transactions in shops, post offices


< 74
or banks.
CM
< 1can get simple information about travel. 127

СЧ 1can ask for and give directions referring to a map or


< 44
plan.
CM
< 1can make and accept apologies. 134

1can say what 1like and dislike. 63 100


CM 54
< 51 65 79 88 101
57
69 108

CM 1can discuss with other people what to do, where to


< 70 134
go and make arrangements to meet.

1can ask people questions about what they do 36


64 88
at work, school and in free time, and answer such 39
CM 65 89 107 128
< questions addressed to me. 11 28 41
69 94 108 129
42
71 95
43

I CM
<
1can ask and answer simple questions about a past
event, for example the time and place of a party, who
90
95
107
108
120 132
was at the party and what happened there.

CM 1can make and accept invitations, or refuse •


< 134
invitations politely.

Speaking: Spoken Production page number

I can give personal information (address, telephone 37


11
number, nationality, age, family and hobbies). 39 64
I— 13 88 107
< 28 41 65
17 94 108
42 69
18
43

I can describe myself, my family and other people. 13


CM 28 106
< 17 43 120
30 108
18
CM I can give short-, basic descriptions of events. 107 128
< 120
108 129

I can describe my hobbies and interests in a simple 36


way. 37 88
11
CM 39 65 89
< 17 108
41 69 94
18
42 95
43

CM I can describe past activities and personal


< 95 107 132
experiences (e.g. the last weekend, my last holiday).
CM
< I can describe my home and where I live. 18 39 48 108 133
Starter 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Sp eaking: Spoken Production p age num ber

1can talk about my plans for the weekend, my next 127


holiday or my future. 128
49 101
129
134

Speaking: Strategies p age num ber

I can say when I don't understand. 7 .


I can very simply ask somebody to repeat what they
7
said.

I can indicate when I am following. 108 122

I can say what exactly I don't understand and ask


7
simply for clarification.
_______

Vocab u lary: Lan g u ag e Q uality page number


■ 88
I have a very basic repertoire of words and simple 36 62
phrases about family and personal details, plus 13 24 89
39 64 74 107
simple everyday situations. 17 25 48 90 126
< 41 65 80 108
18 28 56 94 134
42 66 81 109
19 31 95
43 69
96

I can make myself understood using memorised 48 64


N 36 108
< phrases and single expressions. 50 65 74 122 134
44 109
51 69

N I can link groups of words with simple connectors like 36


< 57 97 126
'and', 'but' and 'because'. 45

I can use some simple structures correctly. 116


12 24 38 50 64 76 90 102 128
117
N 13 25 39 51 65 77 91 103 129
< 120
16 28 42 54 68 80 94 106 132
121
17 29 43 55 69 81 95 107 133
122

I have a sufficient vocabulary for coping with simple 39


128
N everyday situations. 42 74 108
< 56 95 129
43 76 109
134
44

•Vriting page number

I can fill in a questionnaire or form with my personal 18

В details (job, age, address, hobbies).


I can write sentences and simple phrases about
myself, for example where I live and what I do.
19
18
19
25
31
40 71

109

can write short, simple notes and messages. 31 45 83 109

I can describe an event in simple sentences and report


what happened when and where (for example a party 97 109 123 135
or an accident).
I can write about aspects of my everyday life in simple
phrases and sentences (people, places, job, school, 19 31 71 109 135
family, hobbies).
I can write a short letter using simple expressions for
31 45 83 109
greeting, addressing, asking or thanking somebody.
I can write simple sentences, connecting them with
31 45 57 97
words such as 'and', 'but', 'because'.
I can use the most important connecting words to
indicate the chronological order of events (first, then, 97 123
after, later).
I can write about myself using simple language, for
25
example information about my family, school, job, 19 45 57 109 123 135
31
hobbies, etc.
KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES l cef
Students will be able to:
| ■ talk about and describe basic classroom objects use cardinal and ordinal numbers
using colour tell the time and talk about time, using weekdays
| ■ spell words out loud and months of the year

&Я1

UNIT OVERVIEW DIGITAL OVERVIEW


The classroom
Presentation Kit s/ \
Vocabulary ► [v] Vocabulary tool: The classroom; Colours
The alphabet ► Interactive versions of Student's Book activities
PRONUNCIATION The letters of the ► Integrated audio and answer key for all activities
Speaking alphabet
► W orkbook pages with answer key
Classroom expressions
Colours
Teacher's Resource Centre TRC
Cardinal and ordinal numbers
Vocabulary ► Grammar communication activity Starter unit:
Days and months
Pens and pencils
Telling the time ► Worksheets for this unit, including:
- Everyday English worksheet Starter unit
Speaking

Student's App P
G ateway 2nd Edition wordlist for the award-winning
Sounds A pp (available for dow nload)

•J TESTING AND ASSESSMENT


Resources for exam preparation and measuring student progress

► Printable test (Diagnostic test)


Vocabulary Рб jg>T|y I TE AC H ER D E V ELO P M E N T: LANGUAGE

C om pound nouns
Talking about the classroom
A compound noun is usually made up of two nouns or an
adjective + noun, but there are other com binations. Each
WARMER
compound noun acts as a single unit and it is important
Start the first class of the year with a dynamic to understand and recognise them. There are three
warmer. This activity is called Snowball sentence. forms of compound nouns: separated (board rubber),
Before you begin, write down some hobbies on the hyphenated (twenty-one) and com bined (textbook).
board if necessary. Ask a student sitting on your Com pound nouns tend to have more stress on the first
right to say their name and their hobby. Point to the word; we consider board ru bb er to b'e a single noun and
board if they are not sure. Go around the room, each so it has a single main stress - on the first word. Stress
person saying the name and hobby of everyone who is important in compound nouns and can help avoid
has spoken on their right and then their name and confusion, e.g. a green house (a house that is painted
hobby. To get students who have already answered green) or a green house (a building made of glass that is
to continue to participate, you can allow students used for growing plants).
to mime clues to others who are having trouble
remembering. At the end of the activity, try to amaze 2 ^ 01 Play the track for students to listen and point to
your students by naming everyone and their hobbies! the object in their classroom.

++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
0 The classroom
Students think of other classroom objects to add to
l a In pairs, students match the words with the objects in
the vocabulary in this lesson and look up the English
the pictures. Check the answers. words in the Macmillan Online Dictionary, e.g. marker
Answers pen, pencil sharpener, notebook, etc. If you are using
1 window 2 door 3 board 4 board rubber the presentation kit, elicit interactive whiteboard or
5 poster 6 com puter 7 desk 8 pencil 9 rubber IWB and ask students to add it to their vocabulary
list.
10 book 11 pen 12 chair 13 ruler 14 bag
15 dictionary
HOMEWORK
1b Ask students how they say the words in their own
language. Assign students page 4 in their W orkbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
1С LISTENING Q 01 Now play the track for students to listen
and repeat. Point out the silent V in board /bo:(r)d/ and
the stress on the first word in board rubber. S ee p163 for
Speaking P6 Ф p
the audioscript for this exercise.
Learning to spell words with the correct pronunciation
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: PRONUNCIATION
The /э/ sound The alphabet
Drill the pronunciation of the schwa sound /э/ and 1 PRONUNCIATION © 02 Play the track for students to listen and
remind students that this is the most common sound repeat the alphabet. See p163 for the audioscript for
in the English language. If students find it difficult to this exercise.
pronounce /э/, ask them to let their shoulders drop and
say ugh as if they were tired. 2 a LISTENING Q 03 Play the track for students to listen
and choose the correct alternative. See p163 for the
audioscript for this exercise.
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
Play the track again and ask students to underline
the stressed syllables in the words in exercise 1a and
I Answers
IQ 2 E 3V 4 A 5 I 6U 7G 8R
circle the schwa /э/ sound. The /э/ sounds are in bold
2 b In pairs, students practise saying all the letters in
in the answers for exercise 1a.
exercise 2a.

3 SPEAKING In pairs, students take turns to spell a classroom


object for their partner to guess. Draw students'
attention to the model dialogue.

Starter unit 29
2 О 04 Play the track for students to listen and check ~ e r
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY answers. See p163 for the audioscript for this exercise
Instead of saying some of the letters in exercise 2a,
Answers
mouth them silently and ask students to write them
: 1 What's this in English? 2 Can you repeat
down. Explain that paying attention to where sounds
that? 3 How do you spell that?
are produced in the mouth will help them improve
their pronunciation. Key differences between sounds
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
are because we make them in a different place in the
mouth, e.g. V is produced when the lower lip touches Write these two sentences on the board: Let me
the upper teeth and В is produced with both lips repeat that. / It's a table you sit at to work or write.
together. With the long /u -J sound in U, the tongue is Ask students to match them to the correct classroom
close to the back of the roof of the mouth. expressions in exercise 1 (answers 2 and 4, respective!.
Elicit any other classroom expressions students know.

TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: PRONUNCIATION


3a SPEAKING In pairs, students practise the dialogue in
T he alphabet - difficult pairs exercise 1.
Being able to pronounce and understand the English
3b Ask students to change the word in red and make ne.’.
alphabet is an important life skill. If students' L1 has the
dialogues. In a less confident class, encourage a more
Roman alphabet they can have problems understanding
confident pair of students to model this activity first.
or producing the English alphabet because the name
of a letter in their language is similar to the name of a HOMEWORK
different letter in English. This leads many students to
Assign students page 5 in their Workbook or the
mix up pairs of letters such as A/E, A/R, K/Q, E/I, G/J
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
and l/Y.
W hen students' L1 has a completely different script
they tend to have problems with sound distinctions that
don't exist in their own language. Nationalities that use Vocabulary P7
the Roman script can also have som e of these kinds of
problems, e.g. Spanish speakers having problem s with
Talking about classroom objects and colours
В and V. Identifying the letters and sounds that your
students are having trouble with and drilling/highlighting 0 Colours
them regularly in class can help them to becom e more l a In pairs, students match the objects with words for
aware of these issues and focus on correcting them. colours in the box. Draw students' attention to the
exam ple. Check their answers.
HOMEWORK
I Answers
I Assign students page 4 in their Workbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
1 blue 2 red
7 brown
3 black 4 orange 5 purple 6 pink
8 white 9 yellow 10 grey 11 green

1b Q 05 Play the track for students to listen and repeat.


See p16,3 for the audioscript for this exercise.
Speaking P7
1 с Students write sentences describing the objects in the
Understanding and using classroom expressions pictures.

1 Ask students to put the classroom expressions in the Answers


2 The dictionary is red.

1
correct place in the dialogue and decide which two
expressions are not in the dialogue. 3 The pen is black.

TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: CLASSROOM TIPS 4 The bag is orange.


5 The rubber is purple.
Classroom language
6 The poster is pink.
Using English and avoiding L1 for instruction language 7 The board rubber is brown.
and common questions in the classroom is essential if
8 The ruler is white.
you want students to use English in your class. Teach
9 The book is yellow.
your students useful classroom language they can use in
1 0 The chair is grey.
English to ask for translations, spelling, pronunciation,
etc., e.g. How d o you say ... in English ? How do you 11 The desk is green.
sp e ll? You could make a poster with expressions in 2 In pairs, students find objects in their classroom that
English, and put it up where all students can see it. have the sam e colour as the ones in this exercise. Elicit
Later, if a student uses an L1 equivalent for an English answers from students around the class.
expression you have already taught, remind her or him
- in English - what they should be saying. The more the HOMEWORK
students comm unicate with you and with each other in Assign students page 5 in their Workbook or the
English the more comfortable they will becom e with it. relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
Vocabulary Ps HOMEWORK
Assign students page 6 in their Workbook or the
Talking about cardinal and ordinal numbers and dates, relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
days and months

Days and months


Numbers - cardinal and ordinal
3a Ask students to put the words in the box in order in
1a Divide the class into pairs and set a time limit of three
the correct column. Draw students' attention to the
minutes for the activity. Ask students to put the words
exam ples. To make this more fun, ask students to work in
in the box in order in the correct column and write the
pairs and race against the rest of the class to com plete
numbers next to them. Draw students' attention to the
the columns first.
exam ples.
зь Q 08 Play the track for students to listen, check and
1 b © 06 Play the track for students to listen, check and
repeat. See p163 for the audioscript for this exercise.
repeat. See p163 for the audioscript for this exercise.
Answers
Answers
Days Months
Cardinal numbers Ordinal numbers
Tuesday February
two - 2 second - 2nd
W ednesday March
three - 3 third - 3rd
Thursday April
four - 4 fourth - 4th
Friday May
five - 5 fifth - 5th
Saturday June
six - 6 sixth - 6th
Sunday July
seven - 7 seventh - 7th
August
eight - 8 eighth - 8th
Septem ber
nine - 9 ninth - 9th
O ctober
ten - 10 tenth - 10th
Novem ber
Decem ber
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: PRONUNCIATION
The /9/ sound A SPEAKING In pairs, students look at the calendar and ask
and answer questions. Draw students' attention to the
Some students may have difficulty pronouncing the /0/
model dialogue.
sound, e.g. fifth. Encourage them to put their finger on
their lips and say the sound. Their tongue should lightly 5 Individually, students answer the questions. Check their
touch their finger. answers and encourage students to ask and answer the
questions in pairs.
2a Ask students to match the ordinal numbers with the
words in the box. HOMEWORK

2 b ^ 07 Play the track for students to listen, check and Assign students page 6 in their W orkbook or the
repeat. See p163 for the audioscript for this exercise. relevant sections of the Online Workbook.

Answers
a 11th eleventh b 12th twelfth с 13th thirteenth
d 20th twentieth e 21st twenty-first
f 25th twenty-fifth g 30th thirtieth h 31st thirty-first

++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
Give each letter of the alphabet a different number,
e.g. A = 10, В = 22, С = 12. You can write this on
the board or dictate the letters and values for extra
practice. Say a word, and ask the students to race to
write the word, add the value of the letters and shout
out the total (e.g. desk = 3 + 17 + 21 + 4, so the
students race to shout out 45).

Starter unit___________ 31
Speaking Ps Language checkpoint
Talking about time
» > FAST TRACK
Telling the time The extra support provided on the Vocabulary section
1 Ask students to match the times with the pictures. makes the Vocabulary revision section ideal for setting
as homework. You could get students to complete
( Answers
lb 2d 3 e 4 a 5 f 6 c
the whole revision section or just certain exercises for
homework.

2 SPEAKING In pairs, students take turns to ask and say the


tim es. Walk around and check they are saying the times Vocabulary revision p 9 _____________________
correctly. In a less confident class, you could elicit the
times and write them on the board in a jum bled order. THE CLASSROOM
Then erase the tim es and ask students to repeat the
activity. 1 Ask students to com plete the words with vowels (a, e, i,
o, u).
I Answers
five past six
a b seven o'clock С quarter past three
Answers
d half past eleven e quarter to seven I twenty past ten 1 board 2 desk 3 bag 4 poster 5 window
g twenty to six h twenty-five past three 6 com puter 7 dictionary 8 rubber 9 pencil
10 chair
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: CLASSROOM TIPS
COLOURS
M onitoring
Circulating around the classroom while students are 2 Ask students to write the colours.
engaged in activities can provide information on Answers
students' levels of understanding and help you become
1 grey 2 black 3 blue 4 purple 5 orange
more aware of how well students are getting on with
6 pink 7 brown 8 yellow 9 white 10 green
the task. Move around the classroom during pair and
groupwork activities, working with students on a
NUMBERS - CARDINAL AND ORDINAL
one-to-one basis as needed. Monitoring helps keep
students on track and provides you with more detailed
3 Ask students to write the numbers.
feedback on their progress.

3 Ask students to say what time it is now. If students are


I Answers
a thirteen b thirty С second d twenty-first
from other countries, ask them to say what time it is in e eight f eleven g twenty h twelfth i thirtieth
their country. j third

HOMEWORK
DAYS AND MONTHS
Assign students page 6 in their W orkbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook. 4 Ask students to com plete the prompts 1-10 if Monday is
the first day of the week and January is the first month of
the year.

I Answers
1 W ednesday 2 February 3 Decem ber 4 Sunday
5 Saturday 6 June 7 Tuesday 8 O ctober
9 Thursday 10 May

HOMEWORK
Assign students page 7 in their Workbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES Ш CEF A
I Students will be able to: X
/
■ talk about different countries and nationalities ■ understand simple texts giving basic personal /
■ ask for and give basic personal information using information /
/
to be and have g o t ■ write a short personal profile /
■ talk about their family

UNIT OVERVIEW DIGITAL OVERVIEW


Countries
Presentation Kit
Nationalities /\
Vocabulary ► Flipped classroom video Unit 1 : to be -
PRONUNCIATION Word stress
affirmative and negative
21stcentury kids Life skills video Unit 1: Understanding statistics
CRITICAL THINKING Com paring young
|~v| Vocabulary tool: Countries; The family
Reading people's interests and hobbies
around the world ■ Interactive versions of Student's Book activities
to be - affirmative and negative Integrated audio and answer key for all activities
to b e - questions and Workbook pages with answer key
Grammar in short answers
context
Teacher's Resource Centre TRC
The family ► Flipped classroom video Unit 1: to be -
affirmative and negative
Vocabulary ► Life skills video Unit 1: Understanding statistics
o '' Numeracy: Understanding statistics ► Grammar communication activity Unit 1: Is she
И from Russia?
Life skills ► W orksheets for this unit, including:
Identifying the picture - Grammar Practice worksheet Unit 1
- Flipped classroom video worksheet Unit 1:
Listening to be - affirmative and negative
have g o t - Literature worksheet Units 1 and 2
Possessive adjectives - Culture worksheet Unit 1
Gram m ar in
- Life skills video worksheet Unit 1
context
- Everyday English worksheet Unit 1
Personal questions - 1

Developing
speaking
Student's App
Gateway 2nd Edition wordlist for the award-winning
Q
A personal profile Sounds A pp (available for download)

Developing
writing
Listening: Identifying the correct
picture
Exam su ccess Speaking: Spelling

✓ TESTING AND ASSESSMENT


Resources for exam preparation and measuring student progress

► Test Generator Unit 1 ► Printable test Unit 1 ► G atew ay to exams Units 1 and 2
(end of Unit 2)

Unit 1 33
2 © 09 Play the track for students to listen, check and
Vocabulary Рю repeat. See p163 for the audioscript for this exercise.

Answers
Talking about countries and nationalities
1 Russia (yellow) 2 Brazil (green) 3 the US (the
United States of A m erica) (red) 4 M exico (grey)
» > FAST TRACK 5 A ustralia (blue) 6 China (white) 7 Spain (orange)
You could ask students to do exercise 1b at home so that 8 the UK (brown) 9 Egypt (purple) 10 Turkey (pink)
less confident students are prepared for this activity. You
could ask them to make sure they know all the colours in ++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
the map in preparation for exercise 3. They can also look Ask students to underline the main stress in each
up the pronunciation of each country in their dictionaries word. Provide dictionaries to help them (see answer
or the Macmillan Online Dictionary and practise saying key for exercise 2 above).
the names of the countries in preparation for exercise 2.
3 SPEAKING In pairs, students look at the map and say a
WARMER colour for their partner to say what country it is. Direct
students' attention to the model dialogue.
30
Nationalities
4 Students match the countries in exercise 1b with the
nationalities, as in the exam ple. Elicit answers from
students around the class.

I Answers
Brazil - Brazilian, China - Chinese, Egypt - Egyptian,
British
Mexico - M exican, Russia - Russian, Spain - Spanish, the
US - Am erican, the UK - British, Turkey - Turkish
Write the unit title in a circle in the centre of the
board M y ID. Elicit what ID stands for (personal
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE
identity, identification card) then write four or five
words about yourself around the circle. Write some N a tio n a litie s
easy ones like: Tom, 30, swimming, Spain, British. Ask Highlight the following rules and conventions:
the students to guess how these words relate to your
■ Many nationalities end in -(i)an, e.g. Egyptian,
identity (son, age, hobby, place o f birth, languages
Australian, Russian, Brazilian, Am erican, M exican. The
you speak, pets, nationality, favourite country, etc.).
stress com es before the -(i)an sound.
Give them the answers and ask them to look at
■ Some nationalities end in -ish, e .g . British, Turkish,
the photo strip and the unit title, and predict what
Spanish. These are generally two-syllable words and
they think the unit is going to be about - countries,
the stress is on the first syllable.
nationalities, family, hobbies, etc.
■ A few nationalities end in -ese, e.g . Chinese. The stress
is always on the -ese sound. Point out to students that
0 Countries the word for the language is often the same as for the
1a Ask students to look at the map and say what is different nationality, e.g . I speak Spanish, Russian and Turkish.
about it.
» > FAST FINISHERS
I Answer
It is upside down. Write these countries Canada, Ireland, Italy, Portugal,
Japan, Germany on the board and ask students to
E BACKGROUND INFORMATION think of the nationality. Then, in open class, ask the
students to share their ideas and check their answers.
In upside down, or reversed, maps, south is up, north is
down, east is left and west is right so that the Southern
Hemisphere appears at the top of the map instead of
I Answers
Canadian, Irish, Italian, Portuguese, Jap anese, German
the bottom. This type of map is as correct as a north-
up map, but conventional maps through history have 5 a PRONUNCIATION ^ 10 Play the track for students to listen
usually shown the north to the top and east to the right. to the words and choose the correct alternative. Elicit
Many see this as an exam ple of Europe historically answers from students around the class. See p163 for
claiming their domination over the Southern Hemisphere the audioscript for this exercise.
and upside-down maps are now seen as important in
changing people's views and ideas about the world. I Answers
la 2b 3b 4a 5b 6a 7a 8a 9a
l b l n pairs, students match the country names to the map. 10 a

5 b Q 10 Play the track for students to listen again and


repeat with the correct word stress.
TEAC H ER D EV ELO P M E N T: P R O N U N C IA T IO N

W ord stress
Reading Pn
Word stress m eans that one syllable in each word Understanding short texts which give personal
is stressed, i.e. it is pronounced longer, louder and information
stronger than the other w eaker syllable(s). This happens
in all words of two or more syllables. Students who pay » > FAST TRACK
attention to word stress will improve their pronunciation
You could ask less confident students to answer the
and comprehension.
questions in exercise 5 at home in preparation for the
6a Individually, students write down the name of one speaking activity.
famous person for the nationalities in exercise 4.
WARMER
6b SPEAKING Divide the class into small groups. Ask students
Play the game First to five. Divide the class into
to take it in turns to say the nam es from exercise 6a
groups of three or four. Explain that you are going
for other students to say the correct nationality. Draw
to give them a category. The first group to write
students' attention to the m odel dialogue.
down five words from that category and shout STOP!
» > FAST FINISHERS gets a point for their team if they are all correct.
Repeat with five or six categories: Classroom objects,
Students say something famous for each country for
Colours, Nationalities, Countries, Hobbies.
others to say the correct country, e.g. hot dogs - the
US, kangaroos - Australia, etc.
l a In pairs, students look at the photos and say who the
people are. Elicit any personal information students
7 LISTENING © 11 In pairs, students listen to people saying
know about these famous people.
hello in their language and decide what nationality
they are from exercise 4. C heck their answers and
ask students if they know how to say hello in another
I Answers
a Bruno Mars b O scar с Chris Hemsworth
language. Draw students' attention to the model
dialogue. See p163 for the audioscript for this exercise. l b READING Draw students' attention to the w eb article and
ask them to read the first section. Elicit who the text
Answers
I 1 C hinese 2 Brazilian 3 Spanish 4 Russian
is written for (teenagers) and what it is going to be
about. Ask students to read the text quickly and choose
5 Turkish 6 Egyptian the correct answer. Set a time limit of three minutes
to encourage students not to get stuck on difficult
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY vocabulary at this stage. Elicit which photo in 1 a each
In pairs, students race against each other to make a text mentions. Let students com pare their answers in
list of the capital cities for the countries in exercise pairs before checking in open class.
1 b. The first pair to get to ten wins the game. Ask I Answers
them to come up and write them on the board and
elicit the correct word stress. Name Photo Nationality Hobby
Answers
I C an berra. Brasilia, Beijing. Cairo. Mexico City, 1 Tom b British football

M oscow. Mad rid . London. W ashington D .C ., Ankara


2 Elena a Russian choir /pop music

3 Murat с Turkish making films/film


HOMEWORK club

Assign students page 8 in their W orkbook or the


2 Ask students to read the text again and choose the best
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
answers.

I Answers
lb 2 a 3 b 4 c

3 Individually, students read the


questions and make notes before comparing their
ideas with the rest of the class.

Unit 1 35
4 Encourage students to use their dictionaries to find the
TEAC H ER D EV ELO P M E N T: S TU D E N T T R A IN IN G meaning of the underlined words in the text. If students
Critical thinking have access to computers, they can look up the words in
the Macmillan Online Dictionary.
Critical thinking skills are essential skills for life and work.
Students should be encouraged to be inquisitive, ask I Answers
questions, and not believe and accept everything they

I
fan: som eone who likes watching or listening to
are told. Key critical thinking skills are: something such as sport, films or music very much
■ analysing similarities and differences player: som eone who plays a gam e or sport
■ explaining how they solve a problem best: the person or thing that is the most satisfactory, of
■ creating categories and ranking items appropriately the highest quality
■ identifying relevant information choir: a group of singers who perform together, for
■ constructing and recognising arguments example in a school
■ testing your ideas singer: som eone who sings, especially som eone who
■ knowing fact from opinion sings well or as a job
The most effective way to foster critical thinking skills interested in: wanting to know about
is to actively teach those skills. W e should ask as many
5 SPEAKING What about you? In pairs or small groups,
questions as we can that encourage evaluation and
students take it in turns to ask and answer the questions.
synthesis of facts and concepts. Higher-level thinking
Draw attention to the model dialogue. Elicit som e
questions should start or end with words or phrases
answers from different pairs/groups.
such as, 'Explain ...' ‘Com pare 'W hy . ..' 'W hich is a
solution to the problem ...,' 'W hat is the b e st and why HOMEWORK
and 'D o you agree or disagree with this statem ent? .
Assign students page 9 in their Workbook or the
Example answers
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
1 In my country, young people are interested in
the things in the text. They are also interested in
basketball.
Grammar in context РР12-тз
2 In my opinion, today's young people all around the
world are interested in similar things. Young people Using to b e (affirmative, negative, questions and short
are very interested in social media.
answers)

E CULTURAL INFORMATION » > FAST TRACK


Having interests allows teenagers to express them selves You could ask students to do exercises 3 and 4 at home.
and builds their confidence. Society is becom ing more Then they could do exercise 5 at the beginning of the
and more globalised, with young people's interests lesson.
around the world becom ing increasingly similar; music,
films and TV shows, social networking, or playing
Test before you teach: Flipped classroom
com puter gam es are all common hobbies for teens.
Set the Flipped classroom video and worksheet
Interests may differ depending on whether they are from
for homework before the lesson. You can check
a city or a rural area and the opportunities available
the students' Flipped classroom video answers in the
to them or the access to technology that they have.
Online Workbook. This will allow you to assess the needs
In an outdoor culture, where the weather is constantly
of the students before the class. Students can then move
good, interests may include cycling, roller skating and
on to the relevant grammar practice activities.
skateboarding. Artistic young people may be interested
Talk to students about this change in the classroom
in film-making, photography, painting and drawing.
m odel. G o over the guidelines for watching the videos
Universally, sports are an important hobby with many
and discuss the procedure in class. After the students
young people being part of a team or a specific club or
have com pleted their first Flipped classroom lesson,
simply using it as a m eans to spend time with friends.
encourage students to evaluate if they think the learning
video has been effective and helpful.
TEACHER D EV ELO P M E N T: C L A S S R O O M TIP S
Answers
2 W e're Brazilian.
Flipped classroom vid eos
3 She's American.
-lipped classroom videos 'flip' (quickly change) the 4 They're Australian.
traditional teaching methods for presenting grammar
5 You're Russian.
cy moving parts of a lesson outside the classroom. The
6 He's Chinese.
teacher has more class time to help students develop
their communication skills and give feedback and 2b Students now make the sentences in exercise 2a
assistance. In this way, students have more talk time in negative, as in the exam ple. Check their answers.
English during class using the target language.
Answers
~he Flipped classroom videos enable students to take an
active role in their learning and give them confidence in 2 W e aren't Brazilian.
tneir capacity for autonomous study. Flipped classroom 3 She isn't American.
. d e o s cater for different learning styles as students have 4 They aren't Australian.
-ю ге control over the pace of their learning. Students 5 You aren't Russian.
can com e to class prepared with any questions and they 6 He isn't Chinese.
can identify which areas they are confident in or the areas
they might need to practise more. 3 Ask students to choose the correct alternative. Let
students compare their answers in pairs before checking
Remind students that they can refer to the videos at any
in open class.
time for homework help or revision.

to be - affirmative and negative


I Answers
1 isn't 2 are 3 are 4 is 5 aren't 6 are

4 Ask students to look at the photo below the text and say
1a Ask students to look at the sentences and com plete the
the name of the city (Los A n g e le s ). Ask what they know
verb table. Check their answers. Remind students that
about Los A ngeles. Individually, students com plete the
we do not contract I am in affirmative short answers.
sentences with the correct form of the verb to be in the

I Answers
a 'm b 're с 're d isn't e aren't f aren't
affirmative or negative. Students can compare in pairs
before you check the answers.

1b Ask students to match the long forms to their Answers


contractions. Elicit when we use long forms and when a 's b 'm not с 'm d are e are f aren't g 're
we use contractions. Draw students' attention to the h is i 'm
exam ple. Check their answers.
5 In pairs, students write six grammatically correct
Answers sentences using the words in the box. Draw students'
2 e 3 c 4a 5 d 6 f attention to the exam ple sentence. Walk around,
monitoring students and helping them if necessary. Ask
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE som e students to read out their sentences.

G ram m ar - contracted form s


to be - questions and short answers
A contraction is two words joined together to make the
short form. The verb to be is often shortened. We use 6 Ask students to look at the sentences and com plete the
an apostrophe (') in place of the missing letters. W e can verb table. Check their answers.
only make contractions with certain words. There are
three common types: I aAnswers
Are b Is с Are d is e aren't
■ Subject + auxiliary verb
■ Negative sentences with not. (Note that it is not 7 A sk students to com plete the sentences with the correct
possible to contract the present simple of the first form of the verb to be. Check their answers.
person singular form of be - am and the negative
Answers
adverb not)
a Are b 'm not с Are d am e Is f isn't
■ Question words with is
g Are h are
Contractions are common in spoken English and informal
writing. W e don't usually use contractions in formal
writing.

2a Students write sentences using the words and


nationalities in the box, as in the exam ple. Remind them
to use contractions. Check their answers.

Unit 1 37
TEAC H ER D EV ELO P M E N T: P R O N U N C IA T IO N » > FAST FINISHERS
Rising intonation Students find five adjectives to describe people in the
A question mark is placed at the end of a sentence that text (little, the best, special, great, only).
asks a question. Questions end in both rising and falling
intonation. If the sentence ends in falling intonation, the l b O 13 Play the track for students to listen and check
voice tone goes down at the end of the sentence. If a their answers. Check students understand the expression
sentence ends in rising intonation, the voice tone goes to be g o o d to so m e b o d y (to show kindness to other
up at the end of the sentence. people). See p163 for the audioscript for this exercise.
Questions that can be answered with a yes or no answer Answers
(often referred to as Yes/No questions) usually end in
a brother b mother с father d grandparents
rising intonation. The voice tone goes up at the end of
e grandfather f uncle g aunt h nephew i cousins
the sentence.
Exam ples^ r ++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
Is he Brazilian?
In pairs, students write down other words for family
Is it five o'clock?
members (dad, daughter, son, grandchild, great-
grandparents, half brother, half sister, husband, wife,
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY mum, stepbrother/stepdaughter, etc.).They can look
In pairs, students read out the dialogue. Remind them up in their dictionaries. Ask students to share
them to use rising intonation in Yes/No questions. their words in open class.

8 LISTENING ^ 12 Ask students to look at the table. Ask 2a Students write down the names of six people in their
students what type of information is in each column family.
(country; city, type o f sch ool, stu dents' surnames). Draw
2b SPEAKING In pairs, students look at the names and guess
their attention to the dialogue below. Play the track for
who the people are. Draw students' attention to the
students to listen and read the dialogue. Elicit who the
model dialogue.
person is. See p163 for the audioscript for this exercise.
Answer ++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
Lee Draw your family tree with all the relationships you
want to practise. Do not show this to students at this
9 SPEAKING Divide the class into pairs. O ne student chooses
point. Prepare a number of statements about the
a person from the table in exercise 8 and their partner
relationships to help your students construct your family
asks questions to guess who they are. You could model
tree, e.g. Richard is John's father, Joel is John's nephew,
this activity with a more confident pair of students first.
etc. Divide the class into small groups. Write the clues
Refer students to the Gram m ar reference on page 20 if up on the board one at a time for students to start
necessary. drawing the family tree. Move round the class to see
how they are getting on. The winner is the first team to
HOMEWORK
put together a family tree identical to the original.
Assign students page 10 in their Workbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
HOMEWORK
Assign students page 11 in their Workbook or the
Vocabulary Ртз relevant sections of the Online Workbook.

Talking about your family


Gatew ay to life skills ppi4-i5
» > FAST TRACK
U nderstanding statistics
If students are familiar with the target vocabulary, you
could do exercise 1a as a class activity by inviting To match diagrams and statistics, to read and understand
individual students to read out a sentence and the rest of statistics and to find and present different statistics
the class to call out an answer. Confirm their answer each
time by playing the corresponding section of the audio. » > FAST TRACK
You could set exercise 1a for homework in preparation
Q The family for the class pairwork activity in exercise 1b.
l a A sk students to look at the family tree and com plete the
text with the words. Check that they understand all the
words in red.
* BACKGROUND INFORMATION 2 Ask students to look again at the information and decide
if the sentences are true or false. Students compare in
..•п егасу is a life skill and affects all aspects of our lives
pairs before you check in open class. Ask students to
5 . ery day. A firm foundation in understanding numbers explain what calculations they made or what information
s essential to numeracy confidence and com petence,
they used to decide on their answers. In a less confident
: students need to also be able to apply mathematical
class, write these prompts on the board: I a d d e d /
_- derstanding and skills to solve problems and m eet the su b tra cted /ca lcu la te d /d ivid e d ...
rem ands of day-to-day living in com plex social settings.
_ -ey need to be able to interpret information, solve
; 'oblems and make informed choices in all the varied
I Answers
IF 2 T 3 T 4 F 5 T 6 T 7T 8F
: : "texts of their daily lives.
3 In pairs, students discuss which statistics in exercise 1 are
s lesson challenges students to make sense of real-life
interesting or surprising. In a less confident class, write
zi-.a and present statistics. Developing good numeracy
these prompts on the board to help students: I think it's
s< Is helps students understand financial, political and
interesting t h a t ...// found it surprising that .../A n o th e r
social information.
surprising/interesting statistic is ... . Elicit opinions from
students around the class.
FARMER
4 LISTENING ф 14 Tell students they are going to
Introduce the idea of big numbers. Ask students
watch or listen to some statistics about the

S
to guess how much a celebrity or a football player
Australian population. See p163 for the
earns, how much the lottery prize is, how many
videoscript/audioscript for this exercise. Play the video
people live in Monaco, etc. Ask students to open
their books and look at the words we use to say or track and ask students to say which statistic is the
numbers and statistics in Key concepts. Drill the same as in the UK.
pronunciation of average /'аеу(э)гк1з/. Then draw a
bank on the board. Tell the class that there is a lot I Answer
1 in 6 people is over 65.
of money inside and whoever is able to guess the
amount, wins the money! Think of a large sum of 5 © U Play the video or track again for students to
money, write it on a piece of paper and hide it from match the numbers to the information. G ive students
the students, e.g. €156,325,999. Elicit guesses from a minute to compare in pairs before you check their
around the class, responding with 'over' or 'under' answers in open class.
each time until somebody guesses correctly. Students
could continue playing the game in small groups. I Answers
IE 2 I 3C 4 G 5 D 6 F 7A 8H 9B
One student writes a large number (up to 1,000,000)
and hides it for the others to guess.
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
Books closed. Play a few sentences of the track or
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE video and do this Dictogloss activity:
Big num bers Ask students to listen intensively and write down as
.',9 do not make hundreds, thousands and millions many words as they can. Then, in pairs, students try
с jra l when the number in front is more than 1, e.g. to combine their versions to get the version as close
’ 00 - one hundred, 200 - two hundred, 4,000 - four to the original as possible. Play the section one more
: -ousand, 1,000,000 - one million. However, when time. Then give students two minutes to write their
-.-ere is no num ber in front, we do add -s, e.g. millions final version. Ask pairs to combine to make groups
: f people. The word and is used between the hundreds of four to work together on the final version. Groups
=-d the tens in a number, e.g . 3,765 - three thousand swap texts to peer correct any mistakes they see
seven hundred and sixty-five. W e describe big numbers (misspelled words, bad punctuation, etc.) and count
r. th a series of different figures, grouping numbers them. The team with the few est mistakes is the
h hundreds/tens of millions, then thousands, then winner.
"^ndreds, e.g. 153,200 = one hundred and fifty three
: -ousand, two hundred. W hen pronouncing decim als we TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: CLASSROOM TIPS
^se the word po in t to represent the dot. The numbers
■ollowing the dot are pronounced separately, D ictogloss
e.g. 1.36 = one po in t three six. Dictogloss is a dictation activity where learners listen to
a short text and then reconstruct it. It is a multiple skills
1a READING Individually, students look at the information activity where students practise listening, writing and
about the UK and match it to the pictures. speaking (when they are comparing in groups). In this
activity, students get a chance to work intensively on
1 b In pairs, students com pare and explain their answers.
the key features of spoken discourse, e.g . contractions,
Elicit answers from different students around the class.
intonation, fillers such as you know, the thing is ..., as
Answers well as words such as this, that, here, there, which refer
1 g 2 f 3 c 4 e 5h 6 d 7b 8a backwards or forwards and are very much a context-
dependent feature of talk.
г 6 SPEAKING In pairs, students discuss if the statistics for
Australia are similar or different to the statistics in
their own country and say why or why not. Encourage
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: STUDENT TRAINING
Using pictures to m ake inferences
students to share their ideas in open class. Making inferences means using what you know to make
a guess about what you don't know. It requires abstract
LIFE TASK thinking and it is therefore a higher-level skill. Students
who make inferences use clues such as pictures and
Tell students they are going to prepare a other types of visual information along with their own
presentation about the population o f a country of experiences to help them predict what will be in a
their choice. listening activity.
■ Step 1 Use pictures to help students infer the setting for an
In pairs, students choose a country. Walk round, activity and generate a list of things they already know
making sure students have all chosen a different about a topic or a situation. Ask about what is happening
country. Ask them to look at the list of statistics that in the picture, what they think the listening is going to
they will need to find out about their country and be about. Encourage students to use phrases such as,
plan and organise how they are going to divide up It looks like ..., I know t h a t I think t h a t ..., and give
the task equally. reasons for their inferences based on reason that comes
■ Step 2 from their prior knowledge and facts. Remind students
Ask students to make or find illustrations to that they can change or modify their inferences as they
present the statistics. Remind them that they must read.
not say or show the name of the country in the
presentation. 2a LISTENING 0 15 Tell the students they are going to listen to
■ Step 3 three dialogues. Ask students to tick the correct picture.
Tell students you will play the track twice. See p163 for
Set a time limit for students to prepare their
the audioscript for this exercise.
presentation. Students then present their country in
class for others to identify. 2 b © 15 Play the track again for students to listen and
check their answers. Elicit answers from students around
rv л the classroom.
Listening Pi6 « II n
Answers
Using pictures to infer meaning 1 A 2 В 3 В

WARMER ++ EXTRA ACTIVITY

Play Snowman with words to revise vocabulary from Write some comprehension questions on the board
the previous lessons. Divide the class into two teams: for students to answer:
1 Who is Sarah? Why is the dog in the picture?
I A and B. Team A chooses a word or phrase from
the previous lesson and one student draws a circle What's the dog's nam e? (Sarah is Mark's cousin.
(the body of a snowman), and a short line on the She is often at Mark's house with her dog. Max.)
board for each letter. Team В says a letter and the 2 What's Helen's favourite band? Why is a CD not a
student either writes the letter on the correct line or g o o d idea? (The Arctic Monkeys, She's got a lot of
draws another part of the snowman. If the drawing their CDs.)
is completed before the word is guessed, Team A 3 Why is Joe's bag heavy? Where is his mobile
are the winners. Repeat the process with Team A p ho n e? (There is a heavy dictionary in the bag. His
guessing the word. mobile phone is in his pocket. In a less confident
class, you could give students the audioscript to
1 In pairs, students discuss what is in the pictures. Elicit as practise saying the dialogues in pairs.
much information about each picture before students do
the listening activity.
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: CLASSROOM PLANNING
✓ EXAM SUCCESS | Students read the instructions in
Listening activities
exercise 2a and say why it's a good idea to look at the
pictures before they listen. Tell them to turn to page 151 For the C E F R dossier, students could assess the listening
(Listening: Identifying the correct picture) to compare activities they have done in class on a self-evaluation
their ideas. sheet, including the subject, date and an evaluation of
their progress:
I understood the first time I listened. 1 2 3 4 5
I understood when we had finished listening. 1 2 3 4 5
I understood after listening with the audioscript. 1 2 3 4 5

шбйШш S ill! iяшя ПНЮ


2 Students look at the table and write com plete sentences
HOMEWORK with the correct affirmative or negative form of have got.
Assign students page 11 in their W orkbook or the Draw attention to the exam ple sentence.
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
Answers
2 Lucy hasn't got a bike.
3 A lex and Lucy have got mobile phones.
Gram mar in context PPi6-m 4 Alex and Lucy haven't got cats.

Using have g o t and possessive adjectives to talk 5 Alex has got a bike.
about possessions 6 Zoe hasn't got a mobile phone.

3a SPEAKING Draw students' attention to the model dialogue.


» > FAST TRACK Tell them they are going to do a memory test. Divide the
You could do exercises 6 and 7 as a class activity by class into A and В pairs. In a less confident class, model
inviting different students to read out the sentences and this activity with a more confident student. Then ask Bs
nominate another student to say the answer. to close their books and As to ask questions about the
table. At the end of the activity, ask students if they think
Test before you teach their partner has a good memory.
Take an object from your bag - a mobile phone, a pen -
3b In pairs, students take turns to ask each other about
and gesture to show it is yours. W rite on the board
the things in the table. Draw students' attention to the
...........................a .................................. and elicit the sentence m odel dialogue.
l have g o t a m obile phone. Write ...............................
4a Individually, students put the words in order to make
....................... a .................................. and make a gesture questions.
.vith two fingers together to signal a contracted form.
Elicit I've g o t a m obile phone. Write on the board Answers
1 Have you got a sister or brother/brother or sister?
........................................................................................a m obile
ohone? Ask students to make a question with have got. 2 Has your family got a car?
Ask students to write a question about another object 3 Have you got a pet?
n your bag. Elicit questions from students and give 4 Have you got a favourite singer?
snort answers. Ask students to work in pairs and ask and 5 Has your grandfather got a mobile phone?
answer questions with have g o t about objects in their 6 Have you got an English dictionary?
с artner's bags or rucksacks. If students seem familiar with
■mis structure, do the Gram m ar guide exercises quickly in 4b SPEAKING In pairs, students take turns to ask and answer
;o e n class. the questions. You could ask a more confident pair to
m odel this activity first.

iave got 5 Ask students to com plete the text with the correct forms
of to be and have got. Students com pare their answers
' a Ask students to look at the sentences and com plete the in pairs before you check in open class.
verb table.
I Answers
Answers
I a 's got b hasn't got с Have, got d haven't
a is b has got с is d have got e are
f hasn't got g has got h have got
' о Students match the contractions and the long forms, as
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
n the exam ple.
Students take turns to ask each other five Have you
Answers
g o t ...? questions and get one point each time the
b 4 c 1 d 3 answer is Yes, I have. They then ask five Have you
g o t ...? questions where they get one point for each
i ACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE time their partner says No, I haven't to questions like
- sv e g o t Have you g ot a million p o un d s? The student with the
most points wins the game.
*’ a can use have and have g o t to talk about our
: rssessions. In Am erican English have is more frequent
г ■; :he negative and question form is form ed with
г т auxiliary do, e.g. Do you have a m obile p h o n e ? In
s : : -,en British English have g o t is much more common,
z Have you g o t a m obile p h o n e ? We use have in
* - : ng as it is a little more formal. Have g o t is also used
■л ■: metabled events or illness, e.g. I've g o t an exam
arс з у ./l've g o t a cold, and to say we understand I've g o t
T "O W .
Personal questions - 1
Possessive adjectives 1 LISTENING Q 16 Tell students they are going to listen to
Carlos answering his new English tutor's questions. Play
6 Students look at the sentences and write the possessive
the track for students to listen and com plete his answers.
adjectives next to the correct subject pronouns. Elicit
Ask students to compare in pairs before you check
answers from different students.
answers. Elicit where Carlos lives now (London). See

I Answers
a my b your с its d her e our f their
p164 for the audioscript for this exercise.

Answers
7 Students read the sentences and choose the correct 1 Torres 2 double 3 M exico City
alternative. 4 14/fourteen 5 sport 6 football

I Answers
1 My 2 His 3 O ur 4 Their 5 Her
2a LISTENING О 17 Play the track for students to listen to
three people spelling their names and write them down.
Check their answers. See p159 for the audioscript for
8 Ask students to com plete the text with the words in the this exercise.
box.
Answers
Ia I Answers
1 Adam ir 2 Garrett 3 Beeston
My b my с His d O ur e Her f Its g Their
2 b SPEAKING In pairs, students practise spelling the words.
Refer students to the Gram m ar reference on page 20 if
Remind them to use 'double' when necessary.
necessary.
HOMEWORK У EXAM SUCCESS Students discuss why it is important to
know the alphabet in English. Tell them to turn to page
Assign students page 12 in their Workbook or the 151 (Speaking: Spelling) to compare their ideas.
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE
S p e llin g
Developing speaking pis Ф p
Students need a lot of regular practice to know the
Responding to questions asking for personal alphabet and make spelling out words in English
information become an automatic skill, so integrate practice so that
it becom es a regular feature of your lessons. Knowing
how to spell out words used regularly in daily life,
» > FAST TRACK
such as your name or address, is an essential life skill.
You could ask students to com plete the questions in The spelling of our name is part of our identity and a
the Speaking bank in exercise 3 at home. They can then misspelled word may mean you don't get an important
compare their answers in pairs and take turns to ask and email/letter, etc. Being confident in using the alphabet
answer the questions. is also important as it is often present in the first part of
many official exam s where students are asked to give
WARMER personal information.
Play Vocabulary tennis. You will need a soft ball for
3 Q 16 Play the dialogue in exercise 1 again for students
this (or a screwed up piece of paper works just as
to com plete the questions in the Speaking bank. Check
well).
answers in open class.
■ Divide the class into two teams.
■ Say a category from the unit, e.g. countries, Answers
nationalities, the family, hobbies. The first person in a name b Can с from d old e hobbies
Team A says a word belonging to that category and I address
then throws the ball to someone in the other team.
4a Individually, students invent personal information.
■ The person with the ball now says a word and
throws back to someone in the other team. This 4b SPEAKING In pairs, students prepare new dialogues using
continues until a word is incorrect, repeated or the questions in the Speaking bank and their information
someone takes longer than five seconds to say a from exercise 4a. Remind students to ask their partner
word. In these cases, the other team wins points to spell their name or surnam e. W alk round, checking
like in a game of tennis, e.g. 15. The teacher then students are on task and making sure students are
gives another category. The first team to get more speaking English to each other.
than 40 wins the game.
I Suggested questions
What's your name? What's your surnam e? Can you spell
that? W here are you from? How old are you? W hat are
your hobbies? Have you got an email address?
5 Ask students to write down other personal questions, as
in the exam ple. In a less confident class, write ideas on Developing writing Pi9
the board to help students: nicknam e/birthday/address/
ph one num ber/food/colour/pets/sports, etc. Set a time Presenting simple written information about yourself
limit of three minutes. Elicit questions from students and with correct punctuation
write them on the board.

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT » > FAST TRACK


6 SPEAKING In pairs, students take it in turns to ask and You could ask students to do exercise 1 at home and
answer questions in the Speaking bank and their check their answers at the start of the lesson. Alternatively,
questions in exercise 5. Remind students to give true you could set the writing task in exercise 5 as homework.
answers. Walk round, noting down errors and good use
of language, which you can talk about when you give WARMER
feedback on this activity. Write these questions from this lesson on the board
.ЛГ............................................................................................................ . in a jumbled order, e.g.
Model dialogue interested are What you in?
A: Hello. What's your name? p ets g ot have you What?
B: My first name is Sophie and my surname's Arnaud. you r birthday is W hen?
A: Arnaud? Can you spell that? singers Who favourite are yo u r?
B: Yes. It's A-R-N-A-U-D. are from you W here?
A: W here are you from? hobbies What are yo u r?
B: I'm French. I live in Paris. Ask students to reorder the questions. In pairs, they
A: How old are you? take turns to ask and answer the questions.
B: I'm 15 years old in October. Answers
A: W hat are your hobbies? What are you interested in? What p e ts have you g o t?
3: I'm really interested in films. When is yo u r birthday? W ho are y o u r favourite sin gers?
A: Have you got an email address? W here are you from ? What are y o u r h o b b ie s?
B: Yes. It's sophie.arnaud@ mixm ail.com
A: O K. Thank you! A personal profile
1 READING Students com plete the Fact File with information
from the profile. Check their answers in open class.
+ EXTRA ACTIVITY
Answers
Ask pairs to make groups of four students. Each pair a Becky b Davidson С Liverpool d 12/twelve
takes it in turn to introduce his/her partner to the e Thom as and Gemma f one brother - Jam ie
other pair, remembering the personal information in g no pets h music
exercise 6.
2a Ask students to look at the rules for using capital letters
in English in the Writing bank. Ask students to find
HOMEWORK
an exam ple of each rule in Becky's profile. Elicit some
Assign students page 13 in their Workbook or the exam ple sentences for each rule from different students
relevant sections of the Online Workbook. around the class.

I Suggested answers
I'm, At the m o m e n t. . . , Liverpool, Spain, British, January

2b Ask students if the rules for using capital letters are


different in their language. Ask them to give exam ples.

3 Students read the personal profile and rewrite the text


correctly using capital letters. You could ask students to
com e up and write correct sentences on the board to
check the answers.
Answers
Hi. My name's Raul Vega. I'm thirteen years old. My
birthday is in October. I'm from Cholula. Cholula is a
small city near Puebla in M exico.
My mother's name is Susana and my father is called Jo se .
I've got a brother called Francisco and a sister called
Adriana. And I have a dog called Rocky.
My hobby is going to the cinema. My favourite film is The
Hobbit. I think Martin Freeman is a very good actor. What
about you? Are you interested in American or British films?

“nis page is taken from G a tew a y 2nd Edition AT + Teacher's Book. It Is photocopiable and may be used within class.
Macmillan Publishers Limited 2016_______________________________________________________________________________________________ Unit 1 43
4 Students com plete the Fact File with information about
them selves.

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT


5 Students write their own personal profile using the
information in their Fact File in exercise 4. When they
finish, they should use the information in the Writing
bank to check their use of capital letters. Tell them to
plan what they are going to write and to follow the
advice in the Writing bank on page 156.
---------------------------
Model text
Hello. My name's Adriana Montalvo. I'm Venezuelan.
I'm from Caracas, the capital city of Venezuela. A t the
moment I'm 14, but my birthday is in November.
My mother's name is Alejandra and my father is called
Luis. He's from Spain. I've got two brothers called Jose
Manuel and W illiam and a sister called Carla. She's at
university at the moment. I love animals. I've got two
dogs called Pinky and Perky.
I'm really into films. My favourite film is The Hunger
Gam es. I think Jennifer Lawrence is a very good actress.
My other hobby is sport. I like football but my favourite
sport is basketball.
W hat about you? Are you interested in films and sport?

++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
Students give themselves a mark for their personal
profile, according to the self-assessment criteria
below. Their written work and assessments could
form part of the CEFR dossier. Students could also use
these assessment guidelines to grade their partner's
descriptions.
■ Correct use of subject pronouns?
■ Correct use of possessive adjectives?
■ Correct use of punctuation?
■ Correct use of paragraphs?
■ Correct use of to be?
■ Correct use of have g ot?
я Correct use of contracted and long forms?
■ Good spelling?
■ Good use of basic vocabulary from Unit 1?
■ Good use of expressions from Unit 1 (to be
interested in/to be into something, etc.)?

HOMEWORK
Assign students page 14 in their Workbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
My ID

Vocabulary revision p21


Language checkpoint: Unit 1
COUNTRIES

» > FAST TRACK 1 Students write the names of the countries next to the
The extra support provided in the Grammar and cities.
Vocabulary reference sections makes the Grammar
and Vocabulary revision sections ideal for setting for I Answers
1 Brazil 2 the UK 3 Egypt 4 Turkey
homework. You could get students to complete the whole
5 the US 6 Russia
revision page or just certain exercises for homework.

NATIONALITIES
Grammar revision p21
2 Students com plete the nationalities with the correct
vowels.

1 Students com plete the dialogue with the correct form of I Answers
1 Chinese 2 Australian 3 Egyptian 4 Turkish
the verb to be.
5 Mexican 6 Brazilian
I Answers
a Are b 'm not с Are d are e 're f Is THE FAMILY
g isn't h is
3 Students put the letters in the correct order to make
have got a m em ber of the family. They then say if the person is
male (M), fem ale (F), or if there is no difference (ND).
2 Students choose the correct alternative. Answers
Answers
I 1 have 2 have 3 haven't 4 Has Daniel got
1 cousin ND 2 niece F 3 sister F 4 wife F
5 grandparent ND 6 aunt F 7 nephew M
5 has 6 Have 7 have 8 uncle M

HOMEWORK
Possessive adjectives
Assign students page 15 in their W orkbook or the
3 Students write the correct possessive adjective in each relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
space.
Answers
1 My 2 His 3 Her 4 O ur 5 Its

Unit 1 45
KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES ^ C E F
Students will be able to:
■ talk about a basic school day give basic physical descriptions
■ use question words to ask basic questions write a short informal email
■ understand simple texts about school life

UNIT OVERVIEW Г DIGITAL OVERVIEW


School subjects
Presentation Kit В
Everyday objects /\
Vocabulary ► Flipped classroom video 2: Possessive's
► Life skills video Unit 2: Organising your studies
Bring your own technology (BYOT)
to school ► 0 Vocabulary tool: School subjects; Everyday
Reading
CRITICALTHINKING Comparing ideas objects; Describing faces
about technology in the classroom ► Interactive versions of Student's Book activities
Po sssessive's ► Integrated audio and answer key for all activities
Possessive pronouns ► Workbook pages with answer key
Grammar in Regular and irregular plural nouns
context "•
Describing faces Teacher's Resource Centre TRC
► Flipped classroom video Unit 2: P o ssessive's
Vocabulary ► Life skills video Unit 2: Organising your studies
Autonomy: Organising your ► Grammar communication activity Unit 2: In the
studies library
f S
Life skills ► Worksheets for this unit, including:

Studio schools - Grammar Practice worksheet Unit 2


- Flipped classroom video worksheet Unit 2: Possessive's

Listening - Literature worksheet Units 1 and 2

Question words - Culture worksheet Unit 2


this, that, these, those - Life skills video worksheet Unit 2
Grammar in Articles - Everyday English worksheet Unit 2
context
Describing people
Student's App |Z j
Developing G ateway 2nd Edition wordlist for the award-winning
speaking Sounds App (available for download)

An informal email

Developing
writing
Reading: True/False/
Not Mentioned
Exam su ccess Use of English: Conversation

Resources for exam preparation and measuring student progress

► Test G enerator Units 1-2 ► Printable test Unit 2 ► Gateway to exams Units 1 and 2
(end of Unit 2)
Vocabulary P 22
0
iv i Everyday objects
3a Students look at the picture and say which of the words
are not in the photo. Ask them to check they understand
Talking about school subjects and everyday objects
all the words. Encourage them to use a dictionary if
necessary.
» > FAST TRACK
You could ask students to do exercises 1a and 3a at I Answers
laptop, MP3 player, pencil case, trainers
home so that less confident students are prepared for
these activities. Students could also note down the зь Q 19 Play the track for students to listen and repeat the
subjects they have got today and the times they do each words. See p 164 for the audioscript for this exercise.
activity in preparation for doing exercise 2 in class.
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
WARMER Ask students to underline the main stress in each
Tell students to look at the unit title School days word. Provide dictionaries to help them or they can
and the image, and predict what they think the unit look up the words in the Macmillan Online Dictionary.
is going to be about - school life, different schools
around the world, technology in schools, etc.
I Answers
calculator, folder, laptop, marker pens, mobile phone,
Draw a picture of a school in a circle in the centre of MP3 player, p encil case, snack, tablet, trainers
the board and brainstorm names for different rooms
in a school, e.g. gym, science lab, music room, art LISTENING d 20 Tell students they are going to listen to
room, classrooms, library, office, staffroom, cafeteria, four students. Play the track for students to listen and
etc. In a less confident class, you could give the first say what they have got in their bags and decide what
letter(s) of some words. lesson the object is for. Elicit answers from students
around the class. See p164 for the audioscript for this
0 School subjects exercise.

1a In pairs, students match the school rooms (a-e) with Answers


some of the words. Check their answers.
Object Lesson
Answers 1 snack PE
a PE (Physical Education) b art С science 2 tablet ICT
d music e IC T (Information and Comm unication
3 marker pens history
Technology)
4 mobile phone maths
1b © 18 Play the track for students to listen and repeat
the words. Ask students which subjects we write with
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
capital letters (language subjects). See p164 for the
audioscript for this exercise. Ask some comprehension questions: 1 What is Jane's
snack? Why has she g o t a snack? Has the boy g o t a
f + EXTRA ACTIVITY snack? (an apple and some chocolate/She is always
Ask students to underline the main stress in each hungry after PE./No, he hasn't.) 2 Has the boy's
word. Provide dictionaries to help them or they can school g o t laptops? (No, they've got tablets.) 3 Why
look up the words in the Macmillan Online Dictionary. is a marker pen useful in lessons? (You can underline
Answers important information.) 4 Has she g o t a calculator?
Can she use a mobile p h o n e? (No, she hasn't./The
art, E n g lish. French, geography, history. ICT
boy isn't sure.).
(Inform ation and Comm unication Technology), maths,
music. PE (Physical Education), science
5 SPEAKING In pairs, students take it in turns to say which of
the objects in exercise 3 they have got in their bag now
2 SPEAKING In pairs, students take turns to say what subjects
and say why. Draw students' attention to the model
they have got today. They could also say the times of each
dialogue.
subject. Direct students' attention to the model dialogue.
Answers
Reading Р2з 1 Bring your own technology to school
2 a Mia Jo n es: No
U n d ersta n d in g an a rticle a b o u t sch o o l life and b Brad Simmons: Yes
te ch n o lo g y с Angela Hughes: No

» > FAST TRACK 3 Ask the students to say if the statements are true or
false. In pairs, students compare their answers before
You could ask less confident students to answer the
you check in open class.
questions in exercise 6 at home in preparation for the
speaking activity.
I Answers
1 F 2 F 3 T 4 F 5 T 6 F
WARMER У EXAM SUCCESS Students say if it's a good idea to read
Play Hot seat. Prepare a list of words from previous the text quickly or slowly in order to do exercise 3 and
lessons. say why. Tell them to turn to page 151 (Reading: True/
■ Divide the class into two teams or more if you have False/Not Mentioned) to compare their ideas.
a large class.
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: STUDENT TRAINING
■ Put a chair at the front of the class, with the back
to the board. Reading quickly for gist
■ Students from each team rotate turns sitting in the Before students do a reading comprehension task, they
chair. should think about the type of questions they are being
■ Write a word on the board. Each team has 20 asked. Encourage students to read the text once quickly
seconds to elicit the word written on the board and then read the questions. Next, they read the text
from their teammate sitting in the hot seat. They more thoroughly. Remind them that it is not necessary to
cannot say, spell or draw the word. understand everything in a reading text; they just need
■ A volunteer from the other team then comes and to answer the questions.
sits in the 'hot seat'.
4 Individually, students note down
■ The team with the most points at the end of the
situations when it is important to have a mobile
game wins.
phone or smartphone and when it is important
to switch it off and give reasons. Ask students to
1 In pairs, students say if they have got a phone, tablet or
compare their ideas with the rest of the class.
laptop and whether they take them to school and to say
why or why not. Elicit answers from students around the Example answers
class. In my opinion, a mobile is very useful when you need
to have access to the Internet, for exam ple to find
E CULTURAL INFORMATION important information or an address if you are lost, using
BYOT the G PS tracking system. It's also useful to be able to
make calls in em ergencies or access important phone
B YO T (Bring your own technology) is not a new concept
numbers.
in the US and it is now starting to be seen in schools in
the UK and the rest of Europe. However, it is likely to I think a good time to turn a mobile off is when you are
quickly becom e more widespread. Encouraging students doing something in class and you need to pay attention
to bring in their own technology, rather than having the to the teacher, or when you are at the cinema and you
schools supply it, means that students are more likely shouldn't disturb people.
to take care of their devices and schools do not have to 5 Encourage students to use their dictionaries to find the
foot the heavy costs involved in supplying up-to-date meaning of the underlined words in the text. If students
technology to all their students. have access to com puters, they can look up the words
Currently in the US 44% of schools encourage students on the Macmillan Online Dictionary.
to bring their own devices and 57% of children own a
mobile device by age five. Educators are now beginning
Answers
to accept that rather than forbid personal technology send texts: send a short written message by mobile
usage in the cla’ssroom, they need to embrace and phone
exploit it to its fullest and adapt the way they teach and expensive: costing a lot of money
students learn. fair: treating all people equally

2 READING Refer students to the text. Elicit what an Internet 6 SPEAKING What about y o u ? In pairs or small groups,
forum is and ask what the discussion subject is and who students take it in turns to say when they use their
is participating. Ask students to read the text and answer m obile phones, sm artphones, laptops or tablets and
the questions. what for. In a less confident class, give students time to
prepare their answers in written form before doing this
as a speaking activity. Elicit some answers from different
pairs/groups and try to create a discussion in open class.
HOMEWORK I Answers
I They've got tablets at W illiam and Dana's school.
Assign students page 17 in their W orkbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
I2
3
4
Is Jack's pencil case blue?
My friends' names are O scar and Ellie.
correct
Gram m ar in context PP24-25 5 Our school's head teacher is in favour of mobile
phones.
Using p o ssessiv e's and possessive pronouns to talk 6 correct
about who things belong to and using som e regular 7 correct
and irregular plural nouns
i SPEAKING Divide the class into small groups. Ask students
to point to an object in the classroom and say whose it
» > FAST TRACK is. Drill the pronunciation of w hose /hu:z/ and point out
You could ask students to do exercises 2 and 3 at home. to students that this is a question pronoun to ask about
Then they could do exercise 4 at the beginning of the possession. In a less confident class, model this activity
lesson. first with a pair of more confident students.

Test before you teach: Flipped classroom Possessive pronouns


Set the Flipped classroom video and tasks for
Щ 2 9 Р homework before the lesson. This will allow vou 5a Ask students to look at sentences a- с and com plete 1-3
to assess the needs of the students before the class. with the correct possessive pronouns.
Students can then move on to the relevant grammar Answers
practice activities.
i: mine 2 hers 3 theirs

5b Elicit from students what type of words are the words in


Possessive's blue.
Answer
1 Ask students to look at the sentences (a- с ) and then
match 1 -4 with A - D .
I They are possessive adjectives.
Answers 6 Ask students to choose the correct alternative.
IB 2 С ЗА 4 D
I Answers
1 my 2 your 3 mine 4 our, yours 5 theirs
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE
6 hers 7 his
P o s s e s s iv e 's
We use the p o ssessive's when we want to show that TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE
something belongs to som ebody or something. The
Possessive pronouns
number of objects is not important. The important thing
Students often confuse possessive pronouns and
for this structure is the possessor and not the possessed,
possessive adjectives. Possessive adjectives come before
e.g. It's Jane's bag. They're Jane's bags. With two names,
the noun they modify to show possession, e.g. M y bag
we only a d d 's to the second name, e.g. J o e and Jane's
is heavy. Possessive pronouns clarify who an item or an
bag.
idea belongs to and are always placed at the end of a
2 Students write sentences about the people and their sentence. Point out that none of the possessive pronouns
possessions. Draw students' attention to the exam ple. are spelled with an apostrophe.
Check their answers.
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
Answers
2 It's my dad's bag. Divide the class into groups of three or four students.
Ask them to place a few personal items on the desk
3 It's the teachers' computer.
and take turns identifying to whom everything
4 They're my sisters' marker pens.
belongs. When they put things on the desk, students
5 It's Emma's MP3 player. use possessive adjectives, These are my keys., etc.
6 They're the students' books. When students pick up objects from the desk, they
7 They're A lex and Amy's tablets. use possessive pronouns, These are not mine. These
are yours., etc.
Ask students to decide if the sentences are correct
and rewrite the incorrect sentences. In pairs, students
7 Students answer the questions using possessive
com pare their answers before you check in open class.
pronouns.
Elicit the meaning of to b e in favour o f som ething
(supporting a person or an idea that you believe is right)
and ask students to think of another exam ple sentence
I Answers
2 it's mine 3 it's his 4 it's theirs 5 they're ours
for this expression. 6 it's mine

Unit 2 49
Regular and irregular plural nouns TEACHER D EV ELO P M E N T: P R O N U N C IA T IO N

The /аи/ sound


8 Ask students to look at the two lists and say which are
Some students have trouble pronouncing the sound
regular plural nouns and which are irregular.
/аи/ correctly. In the first sound, the jaw is dropped more,
Answers the tongue is raised and pulls back, slightly higher in
List 1: Irregular the back. In the second sound the tongue stretches up
List 2: Regular towards the soft palate. The tip of the tongue is touching
the bottom front teeth in the first sound, but is not
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE quite touching in the second sound. Practise saying the
diphthong /аи/ in words they are familiar with, e.g . cow,
Regular and irregular plurals
now, sound, how, mouth.
With regular plurals, we usually add -s, e.g. bags, days.
You could point out to students that nouns that end 2 SPEAKING In pairs, students look at the adjectives in the box
in -ch, -x, -s, -z or s-like sounds require an -es for the and say what part(s) of the face we can describe with
plural, e.g. b o xe s, fishes, sandw iches, buses. Nouns that each adjective. Elicit which word cannot describe a part
end in a consonant + у drop the у and take -/'es: cities, of the face. Remind students to use their dictionaries if
countries, nationalities. Note that a lot of nouns that end necessary.
in о take -es in the plural: tom atoes, potatoes. There are
Suggested answers
many irregular plurals that you can point out to students
as they come up: feet, m ice, teeth, etc. ears: big, small, red
eyes: big, blue, dark, brown, green, grey, small
9 Elicit from students what they can see in the pictures. hair: brown, dark, curly, fair, grey, long, red, short,
Ask them to write sentences using numbers and the
singular or plural form of the word. Check their answers.
i straight

mouth: big, small


Answers nose: big, small, long, red
2 two families 3 one boy 4 two women teeth: big, small, long, straight
5 two men 6 seven people 7 three children 1 tall isn't used to describe the face
Refer students to the Gram m ar reference on page 32 if
3 Students read the description of the boy in the photo
necessary.
and find three mistakes.
HOMEWORK
Answers
Assign students page 18 in their W orkbook or the
1 He hasn't got long, fair hair. He's got short, fair hair.
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
2 His hair isn't curly. It's straight.
3 He hasn't got brown eyes. He's got blue eyes.

Vocabulary P25 4a Students write a description of them selves.

Giving basic physical descriptions 4b Collect in students' descriptions and read them out to
the class for students to decide who they are.

» > FAST TRACK ++ EXTRA ACTIVITY

If students are familiar with the target vocabulary, you In pairs, students test each other on describing the
could play the track in exercise 1b for students to touch faces of other people in class. One student asks
the different parts of their faces. questions, e.g. Has Rachel g ot curly hair? Has Joan
got blue ey es? while the student answering the
0 Describing faces questions has their eyes closed.

l a In pairs, students say the words in the box and touch the
different parts of their faces. Point out the irregular plural HOMEWORK
teeth.
Assign students page 19 in their Workbook or the
i b Q 21 Play the track for students to listen and repeat. relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
Practise saying the word mouth. A sk them to say m and
then make a long au and finish with the th /0/ like the
initial consonant of this. See p164 for the audioscript for
this exercise.
School days

» > FAST FINISHERS


Gateway to life skills pp26-27
Ask students to write or find definitions for the
O rganising your studies following words: comfortable, concentrate, folder,
turn off, lamp.
To think about where and when to study, to see how
other students organise their time and space and to
Suggested answers
create a weekly study plan comfortable: /'клтйэЬ(э)1/ - physically relaxed
concentrate: /'kDns(3)n,treit/ - to give all your
» > FAST TRACK attention to the thing you are doing
folder: /'£эиЫэ(г)/ - a thin flat container for sheets of
you could set the reading in exercise 2 for homework
and ask students to evaluate their study space at home in £ paper
preparation for the discussion. turn off: Лз:(г)п of/ - to stop a piece of equipment
working temporarily by pressing a button or by moving

KDBACKGROUND INFORMATION
As students becom e more independent they need to
develop their organisational skills. Planning, organising
■ a switch

lamp: /laemp/ - an electric light

and being able to prioritise different tasks are important ++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
fe skills which apply to all areas of our daily lives. Students rank the study space tips in order of
Managing your studies effectively and becoming an importance. Students can explain what they think the
ndependent learner is essential to academ ic life. In most/least important tip is to the class and say why.
the world of work, em ployers look for candidates who Encourage others to agree or disagree.
can demonstrate the ability to m eet deadlines and
demonstrate good organisational skills. In pairs, students look at the picture and decide what is
Studying is often really hard work; it can sometimes good or bad about the study space. Tell them to make
*eel overwhelming for students. In this lesson, students two lists: Good/Bad and remind them to refer to the
explore organisation and time m anagem ent and consider information in the text in exercise 2. You could set a time
suggestions which will help students think about ways in limit of two minutes. Then elicit answers in open class.
.vhich they can improve the organisation of their studies.
Answers
Good:
WARMER
There is a desk.
Write a simple riddle on the board and see if the
There is a desk lamp.
students can guess the answer.
There is a window not far from the desk.
You can't save it,
There are shelves with textbooks organised on them.
You can't borrow it,
Bad:
You can't lend it,
There isn't a comfortable chair.
You can't leave it,
There are disorganised papers on the floor.
You can't take it,
The curtains are drawn so there isn't enough light.
You can only do tw o things with it - use it or lose it.
Answers 4 LISTENING ^ 22 Tell students they are going to
I TIM watch or listen to students giving advice about

S
E!
time m anagement. Play the video or track
Ask students to open their books and look at the words ents to watch or listen and put the advice in the
in Key concepts. Elicit from students what they think the order they mention it. See p164 for the videoscript/
esson is going to be about. audioscript for this exercise.

1 In pairs, students look at the questionnaire and take it in


turns to ask and answer all the questions.
I Answers
IB 2 С ЗА

2 READING Students read about study spaces and then 5 О 22 Play the video or track again for students to
evaluate their own study space. Ask students to compare match the sentence halves. G ive students a minute to
in pairs and say whether their study space is good or com pare in pairs before you check their answers in open
bad and explain why. class.

I Answers
lc 2 e 3a 4 d 5b 6 f

Unit 2 51
» > FAST FINISHERS LIFE TASK
Write these questions on the board for students to
Tell students they are going to create their own
answer. Ask students to explain their answers to the
study planner in English.
rest of the class once everyone has finished.
■ Step 1
What is a vlog? When is it m ost important to know
your school tim etable? Where is it g o od to have a Individually, students copy the table in exercise 7.
copy of you r school tim etable? What are Dylan's ■ Step 2
hobbies? Why is Charlotte careful to follow the plan? Students then put in their school tim etable.
Answers ■ Step 3
a videoblog; at the start of the year; at school and at Students now add other activities after school and
home; football and playing the guitar; her parents have at the weekend.
a copy of her study planner ■ Step 4
Students now add times when it's easy or
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY convenient to study and do homework.
■ Step 5
Ask students to re-tell the actions and recycle
In small groups, students compare and com ment on
the language from the lesson and practise simple
their study planner with other students. Encourage
connectors of sequence. Elicit the characters' names,
students to ask each other if they have got ideas to
where they are and ask students to list objects in the
make their study planners better. Elicit useful advice
order they observe them.
and comments from students. You could display the
Characters: Charlotte, Dylan
study planners for students to study and comment
Location: kitchen on.
O bjects: tim etable/fridge, laptop/study planner
Put students into pairs to retell the action in the
video. One student starts and others continue Listening P 28
by adding a sentence. Write these connectors of
sequence on the board to help students reconstruct Understanding simple texts about school life
the action: first, next, then, finally.
WARMER
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: CLASSROOM TIPS Play Tic-tac-toe to recycle vocabulary from the unit so
far.
Using video in the classroom
■ Split the class into two teams: X and O.
On-topic videos can help students engage with the
■ Draw two tic-tac-toe grids on the board, side by
material on a deeper level. Many teachers who use
side. One grid for reference and one for actually
video say that their students retain more information,
drawing the noughts and crosses.
understand concepts more rapidly and are more
enthusiastic about what they are learning. Using video
is a good way to reach students with different learning 14 years old the UK green
styles, especially visual learners, and those with a variety
of information acquisition styles. No, I've got
skateboarding maths
Videos can provide real-world context and cultural a laptop.

relevance for lessons. With video as one com ponent


in a thoughtful lesson plan, students often make new From 8 am
Yes, he has. It depends.
to 3 pm
connections between curriculum topics. By exploiting the
power of video to deliver lasting im ages, teachers can Write these responses to questions in each square
engage students and help them practise media literacy
(14 years old/the UK/green/skateboarding/maths/
and critical viewing skills as well as provide a common
No, I've g o t a laptop./Yes, he has./From 8 am to
experience for students to discuss in the classroom.
3 pm/lt depends.).
Each team must think of a grammatically correct
6 In pairs or small groups, students discuss their opinions
question for the response to win a square, e.g.
of the advice in exercise 5 and say if it is / / very good,
How old are y o u ? Where are you from ? What's
/ good o r * not very good. Encourage students to share
your favourite colour? Have you g o t any hobbies?
their ideas in open class.
What's you r favourite sub ject? Have you g ot a
7 Direct students' attention to the study planner. In pairs, com puter? Has he g o t a brother? What time are
students discuss if it is sim ilar to theirs and say what is your classes? Have you g ot hom ework every day?
similar or different. Elicit opinions from students around To keep the entire class focused, pick students at
the class. random.
School days

1 In pairs, students look at the photo of a 'Studio School'


and discuss if it is similar to their school. Elicit why or Gramm ar in context P P 28 29
why not?
Using question words, this, that, these, those and
Suggested answer
I It looks more like a com pany than a school. articles

2a Ask students to read the questions and make sure they » > FAST TRACK
understand all the vocabulary. You could do exercises 4 and 5 as a class activity by
inviting different students to read out the sentences and
2b LISTENING @ 23 Play the track for students to listen and
nominate another student to say the answer.
answer the questions. Tell students you will play the
track twice. Ask students to compare in pairs before you
Test before you teach
elicit answers from students around the classroom. See
Draw a ? on the board and ask students to think of as
pp164-165 for the audioscript for this exercise.
many Wh- question words as they can (question words
Answers are also called Wh- questions because they include the
i: b 2 4 b 5 letters W and H). Students can look in their Student's
Book for ideas. Ask students to turn to exercise 1a on
CULTURAL INFORMATION page 28 to see if they have thought of all the same
question words.
Studio Schools are a new type of pioneering state school
for 14-19 year olds in the UK combining academ ic
studies and work-based training. The schools have TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: CLASSROOM TIPS
been set up to try and deal with the problem of youth
Testing before you teach
unemployment, and address concerns that school-leavers
don't have the skills to succeed in the world of work. The It is a good idea to start a lesson with a diagnostic
curriculum involves enterprise projects and access to real activity to establish how much of the target vocabulary
work experience. Students spend a significant portion of or grammar students already know. Monitor closely to
their w eekly time in real workplaces. From 16-19 this is establish which areas you will need to focus on most in
paid work. However, opinion is divided. Supporters say the subsequent 'teach' stage of the lesson.
the schools will improve em ployability and offer good
qualifications alongside the kind of skills em ployers want. Question words
Critics say that they could push students into making
career choices too young. 1a Ask students to look at the questions and check that
they understand the question words. In a less confident
I SPEAKING What about you? Ask students what they think class, write what each question word asks on the board
about Studio Schools. In a less confident class, you in a jum bled order for students to match.
could put some prompts on the board: I think it sounds
interesting becau se .../In m y opinion, I think the idea is
Answers
.../It's a bad idea because ... 1 How old: asks your age
2 W here: asks about the place
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
3 How many: asks the num ber of something
In pairs, students rank these things about Studio 4 W ho: asks the person
Schools in order of importance for them: 5 W hich: asks about a specific thing
They haven't got a lot of homework. 6 How much: asks about the amount
They study from nine to five. 7 W hat: asks what someone is
The classrooms are comfortable. 8 W hen/W hat tim e: asks about the time
They've got a personal coach. 9 W hy: asks the reason
They've got one day a w eek in a real company. 10 How: asks the manner in which something is done
The schools are small.
l b Students match each question in exercise 1a with
They work in teams.
the correct answer below. You could do the first one
They've all got laptops.
together, as an exam ple.
The lessons are practical.
They decide how they want to work. I Answers
Ic 2d 3 f 4 i 5 g 6b 7e 8a 9h
Ask students to compare in small groups and what
students think is the best thing about Studio Schools. 10 j
2a Ask students to com plete the sentences with the correct
HOMEWORK question words. Give students time to com pare in pairs
before you elicit answers from students round the class.
Assign students page 19 in their W orkbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook. Answers
1 How 2 Which 3 How 4 How 5 Where
6 W ho 7 When 8 W hat

Unit 2 53
2b SPEAKING In pairs, students ask and answer the questions. V EXAM SUCCESS Students look at the incorrect answers
in exercise 7 and say if the grammar is wrong or they
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
are answers to different questions? Tell them to turn to
Model and drill the question to show how Wh- page 151 (Use of English: Conversation activities) and
questions usually end in falling intonation. compare their answers.
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: PRONUNCIATION Ask students to think of questions for the other
Falling intonation answers in the four dialogues.
The musical pattern of ups and downs in our speech
Refer students to the Gram m ar reference on page 32 if
- in both the middle and end of sentences - is called
necessary.
intonation. These different musical patterns communicate
different m essages to your listener. HOMEWORK
Questions that begin with who, what, when, where, why, Assign students page 20 in their Workbook or the
which, and how (often referred to as Wh- questions) relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
usually end in falling intonation. This is because Wh-
questions ask for more information from the listener. This
is most often heard in the very common question: Developing speaking Рзо Q Q
How are you ?
Describing people to identify them in a photo by
this, that, these, those giving basic physical descriptions

3a Students match each sentence with the correct picture. » > FAST TRACK

I Answers
Id 2a 3b 4c
You could ask students to com plete exercise 3 at home.
They can then compare their answers in pairs before you
check their answers in open class.
3b Students decide which of the words in blue are singular,
plural, for things that are distant from the speaker and WARMER
for things that are close to the speaker.
Draw a stick person on the board and elicit
Answers vocabulary for describing people
1 singular: this, that; plural: these, those 2 that, (Parts of the face: ear, eye, hair, mouth, nose, teeth;
those 3 this, these A djectives: big, blue, brown, curly, dark, fair, green,
grey, long, red, short, small, straight, tall). Draw what
4 Students look at the pictures and com plete the
they say. In pairs, ask students to take it in turns to
sentences with this, that, these, those.
describe a person for their partner to draw.
Answers
1 These 2 That 3 Those 4 This Describing people
5 Ask students to choose the correct alternative. 1 LISTENING0 24 Tell students they are going to listen to two
teenagers/friends talking about a class photo. Ask students
Answers
to look at the photo. Play the track for students to listen and
1 This 2 This 3 those 4 Those 5 These 6 that decide which person is Karen and which is Tom. Check their
answers. See p165 for the audioscript for this exercise.
Articles
Answers
6a Students match each rule (a-e) with one of the sentences Karen: 5
(1-5). Elicit answers from different students. Tom: 1

I Answers
lb 2a 3d 4 e 5c
2 a О Zh Ask students to com plete the sentences from the
dialogue. Play the track again if necessary. Elicit answers
from students around the class.
6b Students read the sentences and choose the correct
alternatives.
I Answers
1 Is 2 tall 3 tall 4 's got 5 curly 6 eyes
I Answers
1 an, The 2 - 3 a, The 4 - 5 The

7 Ask students to choose the correct responses to


com plete the four dialogues. Elicit answers from
students around the class.

I Answers
1 с 2 b 3 b 4 b
2b Students look at the information in the Speaking bank
and choose the correct alternative. Ask students to Developing writing P3i
com pare in pairs before you check their answers.
Highlight that the word hair is usually used without Writing an informal email about your life
article in singular num ber when it refers to all the hairs
on one's head in general.
» > FAST TRACK
Answers
I be, have got, very/really, not very/a bit/quite, -/hair You could ask students to do exercises 1 and 2 at home
and check their answers at the start of the lesson.
Alternatively, you could set the writing task in exercise 5
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE as homework.

G rad ab le ad jectives
WARMER
Adjectives are words that describe the qualities of
something. Some adjectives in English are gradable - Play Pictionary to introduce key vocabulary from the
that means you can have different degrees or levels of lesson.
that quality. The adverbs a bit, very, really and quite can ■ Divide the class into two team s (or three or four in a
all be used with gradable adjectives, e.g. a bit hot, very large class).
frightened, really tall, quite cold. ■ In turn, a m em ber from each team com es to the
board.
3 Students com plete the sentences with the correct form ■ G ive the student a vocabulary word from the list
of be or have got. (sch o o l, m aths, guitar, hobby, tim etable, com puter,

I Answers
1 has got 2 is 3 are 4 's got 5 've got 6 Is
email, brother).
■ The student has one minute to draw the word while
that person's team shouts out guesses.
PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT
■ If after one minute the team can't guess the word, the
4 SPEAKING Divide the class into pairs, A and B. Tell Student other team can try to guess the word.
As to turn to page 154 and Student Bs to turn to page
155. They then take it in turns to describe and identify
the people in the photo. Remind students to use the
An informal email
information in the Speaking bank. Walk round, checking 1 READING Ask students to read the email from Jam es and
students are on task and making sure students are find him and a boy called Connor in the photo. Elicit
speaking English to each other. 'w hat the word e-pal m eans (the electronic equivalent
of a pen pal - a person that you make friends with by
-----------------------------------------------------------
sending em ails, often som ebody you have never met).
Model dialogue
A: Person e has got long, straight hair. It's really fair. Answers
I think she's got blue eyes and she's quite tall. Her Jam es: 1
mouth is very small. Connor: 3
B: Person b isn't very tall. His hair is a bit curly and dark
2 Ask students to read the email again and write Jam es's
and it's quite long. His eyes are blue and he's got a
answers to the questions. Elicit answers from different
really big mouth and quite a big nose.
students around the class.

Answers
+ EXTRA ACTIVITY 1 Manor Park 2 It's sm all. 3 400 students
Play 20 questions. In pairs, students take it in turns 4 maths and science 5 on Monday and
to answer Yes/No questions about the people in the W ednesday 6 yes 7 yes 8 yes - drama club and
photos on page 30. Each student chooses a person guitar lessons
for the others to ask questions, e.g. Is it a girl? Has 3 Ask students to look at Jam es's email again and
she g ot dark hair? Is he quite short? until the other com plete the expressions in the Writing bank.
student guesses who they are thinking of.
I Answers
Hi, 've, back, All
HOMEWORK
Assign students page 21 in their W orkbook or the 4 Individually, students answer the questions in exercise 2
relevant sections of the Online Workbook. about them selves. Tell them to make notes.
,
2b Students look at the information in the Speaking bank
and choose the correct alternative. Ask students to Developing writing P3i
com pare in pairs before you check their answers.
Highlight that the word hair is usually used without Writing an informal email about your life
article in singular num ber when it refers to all the hairs
on one's head in general.
» > FAST TRACK
Answers
I be, have got, very/really, not very/a bit/quite, -/hair You could ask students to do exercises 1 and 2 at home
and check their answers at the start of the lesson.
Alternatively, you could set the writing task in exercise 5
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE as homework.

G rad ab le ad jectives
WARMER
Adjectives are words that describe the qualities of
something. Some adjectives in English are gradable - Play Pictionary to introduce key vocabulary from the
that means you can have different degrees or levels of lesson.
that quality. The adverbs a bit, very, really and quite can ■ Divide the class into two teams (or three or four in a
a I be used with gradable adjectives, e.g. a bit hot, very large class).
gh te n e d , really tall, quite cold. ■ In turn, a m em ber from each team com es to the
board.
3 Students com plete the sentences with the correct form ■ G ive the student a vocabulary word from the list
of b e or have got. (sch o o l, m aths, guitar, hobby, tim etable, com puter,
Answers email, brother),
1 has got 2 is 3 are 4 's got 5 've got 6 Is m The student has one minute to draw the word while
that person's team shouts out guesses.
PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT
■ If after one minute the team can't guess the word, the
4 SPEAKING Divide the class into pairs, A and B. Tell Student other team can try to guess the word.
As to turn to page 154 and Student Bs to turn to page
155. They then take it in turns to describe and identify
the people in the photo. Remind students to use the
An informal email
information in the Speaking bank. W alk round, checking 1 READING Ask students to read the email from Jam es and
students are on task and making sure students are find him and a boy called Connor in the photo. Elicit
speaking English to each other. 'what the word e-pal m eans (the electronic equivalent
of a pen pal - a person that you make friends with by
...........................................................................................................
sending emails, often som ebody you have never met).
Model dialogue
A: Person e has got long, straight hair. It's really fair. Answers
I think she's got blue eyes and she's quite tall. Her Jam es: 1
mouth is very small. Connor: 3
B: Person b isn't very tall. His hair is a bit curly and dark
2 Ask students to read the email again and write Jam es's
and it's quite long. His eyes are blue and he's got a
answers to the questions. Elicit answers from different
really big mouth and quite a big nose.
students around the class.
Answers
'+ EXTRA ACTIVITY 1 Manor Park 2 It's sm all. 3 400 students
Play 20 questions. In pairs, students take it in turns 4 maths and science 5 on Monday and
to answer Yes/No questions about the people in the W ednesday 6 yes 7 yes 8 yes - drama club and
photos on page 30. Each student chooses a person guitar lessons
for the others to ask questions, e.g. Is it a girl? Has 3 Ask students to look at Jam es's email again and
she g o t dark hair? Is he quite short? until the other com plete the expressions in the Writing bank.
student guesses who they are thinking of.
I Answers
Hi, 've, back, All
-OMEWORK
Assign students page 21 in their W orkbook or the 4 Individually, students answer the questions in exercise 2
relevant sections of the Online Workbook. about them selves. Tell them to make notes.
PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT
5 Ask students to imagine they are Jam es's new e-pal.
Students write back to Jam es with information about
them selves. Ask them to follow the paragraph plan and
remind them to use expressions from the Writing bank
to start and end their email. Tell them to plan what
they are going to write and to follow the advice in the
Writing bank on page 156. For less confident students,
photocopy the model below for extra support during the
writing task.
1
Model text
Hi Jam es,
My name's Juan Tello. I'm from Murcia in Spain. Here's
a photo of me with my parents. I'm the one with brown
eyes and black hair. My hair's curly. I'm quite tall, but my
father is really tall!
My school is called Antonio de Nebrija School. It's very
modern and it's quite big. It's got over 800 students.
My favourite subjects are art, PE and ICT. I've got art on
Monday and W ednesday and PE and IC T on Tuesday
and Thursday. I also like science. A t school, w e've got a
really modern laboratory.
After school, w e've got a lot of homework. But I've
also got time for other activities. For exam ple, I'm in a
football club. A t the weekend I've got piano lessons.
Write back soon.
Juan

++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
Students give them selves a mark for their email,
according to the self-assessment criteria below.
Students could also use these assessment guidelines
to grade their partner's descriptions.
■ Correct use of subject pronouns and possessive
adjectives?
■ Good physical description?
■ Interesting information about school, timetable,
favourite subjects?
■ Talks about homework and other activities?
■ Correct use of punctuation?
■ Correct use of paragraphs?
■ Correct use of to be and have g ot?
■ Correct use of contracted forms?
■ Good spelling?
■ Good use of expressions from the Writing bank?

HOMEWORK
Assign students page 22 in their Workbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
Vocabulary revision p33 -.....—.....................
Language checkpoint: Unit 2
SCHOOL SUBJECTS

FAST TRACK \ Students write the names of the school subjects.


extra support provided on the Gram m ar and
. : zsbulary reference sections makes the Gram m ar I Answers
1 maths 2 history 3 IC T 4 PE 5 science
r c Vocabulary revision sections ideal for setting
6 geography
t - -omework. You could get students to com plete
те .vhole revision page or just certain exercises for
EVERYDAY OBJECTS
- :~ e w o rk.
2 Students find six everyday objects and write them below.
Зч зттаг revision p33
I Answers
1 marker pens 2 trainers 3 pencil case 4 mobile
ossessive's and possessive pronouns
phone 5 MP3 player 6 laptop
1 Students com plete the sentences with the words in the
oox. Point out to students that they will not need all of DESCRIBING FACES
n e eight words because there are only six spaces.
3 Students com plete the description with parts of the face
Answers
I а my b mine с sister's d hers e sisters' f theirs
and adjectives.

I Answers
a short b curly с grey d ears e nose f teeth
Pegular and irregular plural nouns
HOMEWORK
2 Students write the plural form of the words.
Assign students page 23 in their W orkbook or the
Answers
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
1 parents, people 2 children, families
3 nephews, boys 4 wom en, girls

Question words

3 Students choose the correct alternative.

I Answers
1 Which 2 old 3 When 4 W hy 5 Who 6 How

•his, that, these, those and articles

4 Students com plete the text with this, those, a, an, the or
- (no article). Remind students they can use each word
once only.

I Answers
a an b The C a d This e - f -

Unit 2 57
6b Q 25 Play the track again for students to listen and
/
/ Reading Рз4 check their answers.
/ Answers
/
/
/ > TIP FOR READING EXAMS
i: a 2 b 3 b

/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
л
У
1
/
/
У
Я ! Students read the text again and decide if the 7a Divide the class into A and В pairs. Tell Student A to turn
у to page 154 and spell the names to their partners. Tell
у information in the sentences is True (T) or False (F).
У Students В to write down the names. When they have
У Answers
finished, tell them to check the spelling.
/ IF 2 F 3 T 4 F 5 T 6 F
/ Answers
/
I SPEAKING What about you? In pairs, students discuss 1 S - T - U - double R - l - D - G - E
/
/ which of the schools in the text is their favourite and say
2 G - E - double R - A - R - D
/ why. Ask different students to share their ideas with the
S 3 A - double L - E - N
class.
/ 4 J-O -H -N -S-T-O -N -E
/
У 5 R - A - D - C - L - l - double F - E
У Use of English Рзд
/ 7b Students now change roles. Tell Student В to turn to
S- page 155 and spell the names to their partners. Students
/
> then check their answers.
У TIP FOR USE OF ENGLISH
/ | Answers
/ Students read the tip for choosing the correct
/ responses in dialogues. Remind them that it is very 1 R -O -D -G -E -R -S
/ important that the response is grammatically correct 2 D -A -V -l-E -S
У
/ and logical. Ask them to turn to Exam Success on 3 D - R - l - S - C - O -d o u b le L
/ page 151 for more ideas. 4 R - О - double S - l - T - E - R
I /
/
У 4 Ask students to choose the correct responses to
5 В - R - A - double N - A - G - A - N

/ com plete the five dialogues. 8 Divide the class into small groups. Individually, students
У choose a new word from Units 1 and 2. Students take it
У
/ I Answers
lb 2a 3b 4a 5b
in turns to spell their words for other students to race to
/ be the first to guess them.
/
/ HOMEWORK
/
У
Listening P35 Assign students pages 24-25 in their W orkbook or
/
the relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
/
/
/ > TIP FOR LISTENING EXAMS
/ Students read the tip to remind them to look at the
У 1 Ask students to read the 'can do' statements and
/ pictures before they listen to give them an idea of
У what comes in the dialogues. Ask them to turn to reflect on their own ability. Students mark from
/ Exam Success on page 151 for more tips. 1-4 how well they can do each thing in English.
/
/ 2 Ask students to look at their marks and decide
/ 5 In pairs, students discuss what is in the pictures.
/ what they need to do to improve. Elicit ideas from
У 6a LISTENING ^ 25 Ask students to read the questions. Play
students around the class.
/
У the track for students to listen to three dialogues and
/ tick the correct picture. See p165 for the audioscript for
У this exercise.
/
/
/
/
У
У
У
/
I

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES CEF


Students will be able to:
■ talk about basic routine actions using the present ■ talk about what they do and where they go in their
simple free time

■ say how often they do things using adverbs of ■ ask for and give directions
frequency ■ write short notes

UNIT OVERVIEW DIGITAL OVERVIEW


Everyday activities
Presentation Kit
Free-time activities
Vocabulary ► Flipped classroom video Unit 3: Adverbs of
frequency
Hobbies that give you something
else! Life skills video Unit 3: Attitudes to TV
Reading
CRITICAL THINKING Com paring ideas [у*| Vocabulary tool: Everyday activities; Free-time
about com puters games activities; Places in a town
Present simple - affirmative and Interactive versions of Student's Book activities
negative Integrated audio and answer key for all activities
Grammar in PRONUNCIATION Third person singular
Workbook pages with answer key
context /iz/
Places in a town
Teacher's Resource Centre TRC
► Flipped classroom video Unit 3: A dverbs of
Vocabulary
frequency
Personal well-being: Attitudes to
Ш I ► Life skills video Unit 3: Attitudes to TV
wm TV
► Grammar communication activity Unit 3: Let's
Life skills
race!
A young musician
► W orksheets for this unit, including:
- Grammar Practice worksheet Unit 3
Listening
- Flipped classroom video worksheet Unit 3: Adverbs of
Present simple - Yes/No questions
frequency
and short answers
- Literature worksheet Units 3 and 4
Grammar in wh- questions
context - Culture worksheet Unit 3
Adverbs of frequency
- Life skills video worksheet Unit 3
Giving directions
- Everyday English worksheet Unit 3

Developing
speaking
Student's App j~ j
A short note - 1
Gateway 2nd Edition wordlist for the award-winning
Sounds A pp (available for download)
Developing
writing
Listening: True/False/N ot
Mentioned
Exam su ccess W riting: Style and content

•У TESTING AND ASSESSMENT


Resources for exam preparation and measuring student progress

► Test G enerator Units 1-3 ► Printable tests ► Gatew ay to exam s Units 3 and 4
Unit 3 and Review (Units 1-3) (end of Unit 4)

Unit 3 59
2 SPEAKING Divide the class into small groups. Ask students
Vocabulary Рзб to take it in turns to talk about a typical day. Draw
students' attention to the model dialogue. With less
Talking about everyday and free-time activities confident students, do this in open class first and write
simple connectors of sequence on the board: first, then,
next, after that.
» > FAST TRACK
You could ask students to do exercises 1a and 3a at » > FAST FINISHERS
home so that less confident students are prepared for Students think of more everyday activities, e.g. get
these activities. Students could also note down typical dressed, have a break, walk the dog, etc. They can
everyday activities and the times they do each activity in look up the English words in the Macmillan Online
preparation fo rd o in g exercise 2 in class. Dictionary and tell the rest of the class their new
words when everyone has finished.
WARMER
Tell students to look at the unit title 24/7 and the 0 Free-time activities
images, and predict what they think the unit is going
3 a In pairs, students match the pictures with some of the
to be about: things people do every day as a routine
free-time activities in the box. Draw students' attention
and in their free time. Ask students what the unit
to the exam ple. Ask students to compare their answers
title means (24 hours a day, seven days a week) and
before you check in open class.
point out that we usually say 'twenty-four seven'.
Ask students to say what they think this means and Answers
where they expect to see a 24/7 sign (a non-stop 2 play the guitar 3 watch films/TV 4 listen to music
service available any time; a 24/7 service might be 5 do sport 6 read 7 paint
offered by a supermarket, convenience store, ATM,
3 b О 27 Play the track for students to listen and repeat the
petrol station, restaurant, taxis, security services.
words. See p165 for the audioscript for this exercise.
Public 24/7 services often include those provided by
airports, airlines, hospitals, police and em ergency 4 a Individually, students put the free-time activities in order
telephone numbers). for them (1 = great, 10 = boring) as in the exam ple.

Q Everyday activities 4 b SPEAKING In pairs, students compare their lists and say
if they are similar. In open class, elicit activities that
l a In pairs, students match the pictures with some of the
students think are great (1) and boring (10) and ask why.
phrases. Point out to students that dinner is the main
meal of the day, served either in the evening or at 5 LISTENING © 28 Tell students they are going to listen
midday. Some people call an evening meal supper. to people talking about their everyday and free-time
Answers activities. Play the track for students to listen and match
the speakers (1-5) with the activities (a-e). Elicit answers
1 get up 2 have a shower 3 have breakfast
from students around the class. See p165 for the
4 go to school 5 do homework 6 go to bed
audioscript for this exercise.
l b Tell students that pictures 1-6 are in a logical order.
Ask them to continue the everyday activities. Remind I Answers
lc 2b 3d 4a 5e
them to use all the phrases and use their dictionaries if
necessary.
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
1 C © 26 Play the track for students to listen and check Play the track again and pause at the end of each
their answers. See p165 for the audioscript for this section. In pairs, students note down the words they
exercise. remember. Play the track again as a whole class and
Answers try to reconstruct the text on the board.

start school, have lunch, finish school, go home,


do homework, have dinner, go to bed HOMEWORK

Id 26 Play the track for students to listen and repeat. Assign students page 26 in their Workbook or the
Highlight th e io n g vowel sound /u:/ in school. relevant sections of the Online Workbook.

TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: PRONUNCIATION


The /u:/ sound
With the long /u:/ sound, the tongue is close to the back
of the roof of the mouth. Ask students to make and hold
the sound, as if they have just heard some interesting
gossip, e.g. oooo. Elicit words students know that have
this sound, e.g . shoe, rule, tooth, room.
М И М !®
v-jw u ’I
4 Encourage students to match the underlined words in
Reading Рз7 the text with the definitions.

Understanding a simple text about hobbies I Answers


1 review 2 send 3 tester 4 im mediately
5 website
> » FAST TRACK
You could ask less confident students to answer question 2 » > FAST FINISHERS
In exercise 5 at home in preparation for the speaking activity. Students think of ways to start a new hobby (join
a club, look for information on the Internet, do a
WARMER workshop or a short course, read about it, etc.).
Write these words on the board: pencil, brush, MP3
player, computer, book, ball, websites, series, cinema, 5 SPEAKING What about you? Divide the class into pairs or
guitar, Internet. In pairs, students race to write the small groups and ask them to discuss the questions.
free-time activity or activities associated with the 1 Students decide which hobby they prefer and say why.
words. The first pair to finish shouts Finished!
2 Students say which of their hobbies they recommend
Suggested answers to other people and say why.
draw, paint, listen to music, play com puter gam es, In a less confident class, give students time to prepare
read, do sport, surf the Internet, watch TV, watch their answers in written form before doing this as a
films, play the guitar, chat online speaking activity. Elicit some answers from different
pairs/groups and try to create a discussion in open class.
1 READING Ask students to read the article from a school
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
magazine about two teenagers and their hobbies. Set
a two-minute time limit to encourage students to read In small groups, students think how they can make
quickly and not get stuck on difficult vocabulary at this money from doing their hobby. Students present
stage. Check their answers. their ideas to the rest of the class.

I Answers
Charlotte: books from authors
HOMEWORK
Assign students page 27 in their W orkbook or the
Nick: some money and free com puter games relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
© CULTURAL INFORMATION
As well as the obvious benefits of having a hobby such
as making new friends, hobbies can provide teenagers Gram m ar in context РРз8-з9
ith life-long skills such as independence, confidence
and responsibility, or a passion that they could turn into Talking about basic routine actions using the present
a career in the future. Hobbies they enjoy, from mending simple affirmative and negative
=Cs or other electronic equipm ent to making anything
;rom cakes to jewellery, could also earn them cash as well » > FAST TRACK
as helping them to develop a skill. The more specialised
You could ask students to do exercises 3 and 4 at home.
a skill is, the more they are likely to be able to charge.
Then they could do exercise 5 at the beginning of the
lesson.
2 Ask students to read the text again and note down if
the information is about Charlotte (C), Nick (N) or both
Test before you teach
(B). In pairs, students com pare their answers before you
Elicit a few activities that students, their friends and
check in open class.
family do regularly, e.g. g o to sch ool, d o hom ew ork, chat

I Answers
IN 2 С 3B 4 N 5 N 6B
online, g o ou t with friends, play the piano, paint, etc.
Ask students to write sentences about them selves, their
best friend and their mother, father, brother or sister, e.g.
3 Individually, students note down I g o to school. M y b e st friend plays the piano. M y sister
if they think computer games are good or bad for paints. Monitor to see how comfortable students are with
them and give reasons. Ask students to compare their using the present simple.
ideas with the rest of the class.
Example answers
Present simple - affirmative
Some people think violent com puter games are bad
♦or you and can make young people violent. But some l a Ask students to look at the sentences and say when
computer games can help you think quickly, plan and verbs in the present simple finish in -s/-es.
solve problems.
Com puter games are good for you. Some games are I Answer
Verbs in the present simple finish in -s/-es when the
active and can help your coordination. Some games are
subject is he, sh e or it.
.vith other players and can help you to be part of a team .

Unit 3 61
1 b Students say if the sentences are true or false. Check TEACHER D EV ELO P M E N T: LANGUAGE
their answers.
Present sim ple - negative
Answers
I1T 2 T
With the exception of the verbs be and for some
speakers have, we use the auxiliary d o n 't or d o e sn 't
2a PRONUNCIATION ^ 29 Play the track for students to listen to form negative sentences in the present simple.
and say which words have the /iz/ sound at the end. Auxiliaries are verbs which com bine with other verbs to
In pairs, students compare their answers before you form various tenses. W hen the auxiliary is combined with
check in open class. See p165 for the audioscript for this another verb, the auxiliary agrees with the subject and
exercise. the other verb is always in the infinitive form, e.g . He
d o e sn 't work.
I Answers
1 finishes 5 w atches 8 teaches 10 w ashes
Remind students that an apostrophe can be used to
replace a letter, e.g. d o n 't (do not) or d o e sn 't (d o es not).
W hen this happens, a new word (called a contraction) is
2b Q 29 Play the track again for students to listen and
formed. The contracted forms are usual in speaking and
practise saying the words in exercise 2a.
writing, but are not often used in formal writing. Drill the
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: PRONUNCIATION pronunciation of do not /du:not/, d o n 't /daunt/, d o e s not
/dsz:not/and d o e sn 't /'dAz(3)nt/.
T h e /iz/ so u n d
The endings -s, -es and -ies in third person singular verbs 6 Students com plete the sentences with do n 't or doesn't.
and plural nouns are pronounced either /s/, Ы or /iz/. Elicit answers from different students around the class.
The pronunciation depends on the final sound of the
Answers
simple form of the word.
1 don't 2 don't 3 doesn't 4 doesn't 5 don't
W e say /iz/ after /s/, Ы , /sh/, /zh/, /ch/, 1)1, /ks/, /z/.
6 don't 7 doesn't
When a word ends in these sibilant (hissing) sounds, the
-es ending is pronounced as a separate syllable. This is 7 Students make the sentences negative. Draw students'
because these sounds are so similar to the sound of the attention to the exam ple. Ask students to com pare in
-es ending, that the ending must be pronounced as a pairs before you check their answers.
separate syllable in order to be heard clearly. Similarly,
Answers
when -s is added to words ending in -ce, -ge, -se or -ze,
the final -es is usually pronounced as a separate syllable. 2 I don't go to school in a sports car.
3 My cousin doesn't read ten books a day.
2c Ask students to choose the correct alternative in the 4 Her parents don't watch TV at 7 am.
spelling rules. 5 I don't speak Chinese.
6 Sam and Leo don't go to bed at ten o'clock.
I Answers
1 -es 2 irregular 3 -es 4 -ies 7 His brother doesn't make the dinner.
8 She doesn't watch TV in the afternoon.
3 Ask students to choose the correct alternative.
8a Ask students to look at the words in the table and make
I Answers
1 play 2 read 3 study 4 has 5 go 6 w atches
as many correct sentences as possible with the words.
Point out that they must use each word at least once.
4 Ask students to com plete the sentences with the present Set a five-minute time limit and give regular updates,
simple form of the correct verb in the box. You could e.g . 'Two m inutes to g o ... . Thirty se co n d s l e f t . . . .
do the first one together as an exam ple. Check their S to p writing!'. Students could com pete against each
answers. other to see who can write the m ost correct sentences.
Ask students to come up to the board and write their
I Answers
1 plays 2 write 3 does 4 love 5 hates
sentences to check they are correct.
Suggested answers
6 finishes, go 7 asks
Stephanie and I go to school.
Present simple - negative I don't go to school.
Stephanie doesn't go to school.
5 Ask students to look at the sentences and com plete the Stephanie and you don't go to school.
rules with d on 't or doesn 't. C heck their answers. I play com puter gam es.

I Answers
1 doesn't 2 don't 3 -s
You and I don't play com puter gam es.
W e play/don't play com puter games.
Stephanie doesn't play com puter games.
Stephanie watches TV.
I don't watch TV.
W e don't watch TV.
8 b Ask students to write one long sentence with the
words. Ask them to count the num ber o f words in Vocabulary P39
their sentences to see who has the longest sentence
(contractions count as one word). Talking about places in a town
Suggested answer
The sentences in exercise 8a can be joined using and to » > FAST TRACK
make one long sentence, e.g. I don't go to school and If students are familiar with the target vocabulary, you
play com puter games (nine words). could play the track in exercise 1b for students to say the
correct letter for each picture in exercise 1a.
9 a Individually, students decide if the sentences are true for
them and if not, add don't.
0 Places in a town
9 b SPEAKING In pairs, students take turns to say the sentences l a In pairs, students match the pictures with the words in
to their partner to see how many are the same. the box.

3 SPEAKING In pairs, students take it in turns to say which of


the places in exercise 1 they have got in their town or
city. Draw students' attention to the model dialogue.

TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE


R e cyc lin g v o c a b u la ry
You could use a 'word bag' to recycle vocabulary.
Regularly note down new words from lessons on 'word
bag cards'. Students can write definitions and exam ple
sentences for these word bag cards. O nce the word bag
is full, students can choose eight to ten words and make
up a story, or they can make questions out of the words
to ask each other. You can also use the words to play
board games such as H ot seat, Snowm an, etc.

HOMEWORK
Assign students page 29 in their W orkbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.

Unit 3 63
..........................................................................................A.—
Then ask students to open their books and look
Gateway to life skills pp4o-4i at the words in Key concepts and the photos and
diagrams for more ideas to include in their mind
A ttitu des to TV map. Elicit from students what they think the lesson
To think about how much TV you watch, to consider how is going to be about.
TV influences us and to consider other things to do apart
Suggested answers
from watching TV
Verbs: see, look at, change channel, turn on/off,
| switch on/off
» > FAST TRACK
People: presenter, producer, viewers, audience,
You could ask students to do exercise 3a for homework technicians
in preparation for the discussion. What you can see on TV: series, documentary,
drama, reality show, talk show, sports programme,
E BACKGROUND INFORMATION quiz show, talent show, news, advert/advertisement
Television plays an important part in the lives of Things: screen, remote control
teenagers. According to recent statistics, teenagers
spend up to four hours a day in front of a TV screen and
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: CLASSROOM TIPS
almost two additional hours on the com puter (outside
of schoolwork) playing games or watching self-made Brainstorm ing
celebrities on YouTube. Teenage boys prefer science Brainstorming is a fun activity used to generate ideas
fiction and sport. Teenage girls watch more drama in small groups and can be used as a warm er to get
series, docum entaries and news programmes. Both students thinking about the topic. The key thing is to
watch soap operas, music programmes and quiz shows. encourage free association. You need lots of ideas to
Unlike American teen shows, British teen shows usually generate more good ideas; accept everyone's ideas as
involve actual teens as actors and show more of the valid and evaluate them at the end of the activity. There
real-life problems that can be associated with being a are no 'right' or 'wrong' answers in brainstorming and no
teen. Recent popular shows in the UK include Skins, The danger of teacher correction.
Inbetw eeners, M y M ad Fat Diary. A brainstorming tool is a mind map where the topic is
In this lesson the students will look at teenage TV written in the centre of the page or on the board and
viewing habits in the US and compare them to their students link other related words in a logical manner. To
own habits. They are encouraged to reflect on the save time and help students visualise the task, prepare a
positive aspects of TV as a source of entertainment partially com pleted mind map with exam ples. Students
and education, but also on how TV could affect them can brainstorm in small groups and com pete with each
psychologically and physically. other to get the highest num ber of words or you can
brainstorm in open class. G ive students a time limit of
WARMER five minutes. Brainstorming can help learners to take
charge; you could give students turns to be 'the teacher'
Ask the students to think of all the words they know
and ask them to write their peers' suggestions on the
connected with the topic of TV and create a mind
map. Ask the class to give you words to write on the board.
board (or give board pens to one or more students Encourage students to copy the mind map into their
and get them to do the writing). To save time, draw notebooks using different coloured pens and illustrations.
this partially completed mind map on the board. Most students are visual learners and this can help them
recall words better. Students can record new words on
the mind map and it can be a very effective revision tool
when students come to exam time.

l a READING Individually, students com plete the TV survey with


their answers.

1b Students then compare their answers with the rest of the


class to see if their answers are similar. W here students
answered Yes, remind them to give further details. Hold
a class vote to see what the top answers are. Ask a
student to read out the sentences and another student
to count the number of raised hands.
TEACHER D E V ELO P M E N T: C L A S S R O O M T IP S I LISTENINGф 31 Tell students they are going to
■ Й Ё watch or listen to a teenager called Megan
Onion ring talking about TV in her video diary. Play the
f you have space, divide the class in two and ask half video or track for students to watch or listen and say if
:ne class to form a ring in the middle of the classroom the sentences are true or false. See p p165-166 for the
■vith their backs to the centre. The other half stand in videoscript/audioscript for this exercise.
: 'ont of a partner in this ring so the outside ring people Answers
зге facing the centre of the same circle. The inside circle
IF 2 F 3T 4 T 5 F 6T
asks a question from the survey to their first partner and
~otes down their answer. They then change partners by
» > FAST FINISHERS
:ne outside circle moving one person to the right and the
nside circle staying in the same place. The inside and Write a couple of extra comprehension questions on
outside circle then swap roles. A t the end of the activity, the board for students: What activities does Megan
students with the sam e question total up their answers. do in her 'No TV W eek'? (She draws or paints, makes
jewellery, writes songs, sings and plays the guitar.)
What is a TV zom bie? (someone who doesn't feel good
or bad when they watch TV, they don't do anything).
(D ® CD Ask students to share their answers with the rest of
the class when they have all finished exercise 4.
CD ® CD
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
® ® ( ' ® ® Ask students to dub the video. Prepare copies of a
section or all of the audioscript and divide the class
® 'X * ® into pairs. Students take it in turns to read sections of
the video and try to synchronise their speaking with
® X
®
® the video. Encourage them to focus on the rhythm
and pace of Megan's voice. Play the video with the
sound down. Students can then record themselves
2a Students look at the results of the survey when high school using an audio-recording editor, such as Audacity.
students in the US were asked the questions in 1. Ask them
to compare the results to their class results to see if they 5a Individually, students look at the ideas for things to do
are similar. Elicit students' comments in open class. instead of watching TV. A sk them to give a mark from 1
(you don't like it) to 5 (you love it).
2b SPEAKING In pairs, students discuss their opinion of
these results and decide if each statistic is good, bad, 5b In pairs, students compare their answers. Encourage
interesting, surprising or normal. Focus students' students to share their opinions in open class.
attention on the model dialogue. A t the end of the
activity, elicit com ments from students around the class. LIFE TASK

3a READINGStudents look at the com ments about the Tell students they are going to imagine that next
influence of TV and decide if each one talks about a w eek is 'No TV Week'. Divide the class into small
positive influence (✓) or a negative influence (X). groups. They are going to make a poster, so decide
what resources you are going to need in advance.
Answers

I
* Step 1
Positive: Rory, Rose, Jared Students make a list of ideas for things to do
Negative: Tania, Hugo, Helen instead of watching TV. Ask them to use ideas from
exercise 5a and add their own ideas.
3b In pairs, students discuss which comments are true for
them with their partner. Ask students to summarise the ■ Step 2
main idea in each com ment. (1 TV is entertainm ent and Students choose their favourite five activities and
relaxing. 2 TV is a fantasy world and it doesn't show how add important details to help someone who wants
things really are. 3 TV can be negative for your body to do the activities (what, where, how, etc.).
and mind. 4 TV is educational. 5 TV is a good topic of ■ Step 3
conversation. 6 TV stops families from talking.) Students make a poster with their five activities.
■ Step 4
3c Encourage students to contribute other comments
Students display their posters. Pin them up around
about the positive or negative influence of TV.
the classroom and encourage students to walk
Example answers
I TV program mes can be violent. TV characters often
around and find good ideas from other posters.
■ Step 5
depict risky behaviours, such as smoking, and also Encourage students to spend a week without TV.
reinforce gender-role and racial stereotypes. Ask them to write down what they do instead of
We see more than 40,000 adverts a year and they make watching TV and share their experiences with the
I us want things that we don't necessarily need. rest of the class at the end of the week.

Unit 3 65
2 b © 32 Play the track again for students to listen and
Listening P42 check their answers. Ask students to com pare in pairs
before you elicit answers from students around the
Understanding a simple text about a young musician classroom.

WARMER I Answers
IF 2 NM 3 F 4 T 5 T 6 T 7 NM
Write the names of musical instruments on the board
in a jumbled order for students to unscramble. Elicit 3 SPEAKING W hat about yo u ? Ask students to discuss the
the names of any other musical instruments students questions in pairs or small groups. Elicit answers and try
know. to develop a class discussion.
tacelrni, rciceeltturgia, tufel, aopin, psohxaeno, sabs,
HOMEWORK
mrud
Answers Assign students page 29 in their Workbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
clarinet, electric guitar, flute, piano, saxophone, bass,
drum

1 SPEAKING In pairs, students take it in turns to ask and


Gramm ar in context PP42-43
answer the questions.
Asking and answering questions about basic routine
✓ EXAM SUCCESS Students read Exam Success and say actions using the present simple and saying how often
what they think. (The correct answer is Not Mentioned.) you do things using adverbs o f frequency
Elicit answers from students around the class and tell
them to turn to page 151 (Listening: True/False/Not Test before you teach
Mentioned) to compare their answers. Write these three sentence prompts on the board. In
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: STUDENT TRAINING pairs, students write the full questions. Walk round
monitoring to see if students already know how to make
Inference in listening: True/False/N ot M entioned correct present simple questions. Elicit the answers and
One of the most difficult exam question types is the write them on the board. In pairs, students take turns to
True/False/Not Mentioned. Students need to decide if the ask and answer the questions.
information in the written or audio text agrees with the 1 W hat tim e/get up/on Saturday?
information in the question. There are usually two question 2 Who/go out with/at the w eekend?
types in this activity: True/False/Not Mentioned based on
3 How many hours of TV/watch?
fact and True/False/Not Mentioned based on opinion. If
the question begins with The writer says ... students need
to think about the writer's opinions and not about facts. Present simple - Yes/No questions and short
Students need to read or listen to parts of the text and answers I .
the whole question closely and decide what the writer or
speaker means. To choose the true option, there must 1a Ask students to look at the questions and short answers
be information in the text that agrees exactly with the and match the questions (1 and 2) with the answers (a
statement in the question. To choose the false option, and b).
there must be information in the text that is directly
opposite to or contradicts the statement in the question. I Answers
1 b 2 a
To choose the not mentioned option, students must be
sure that there is no information about it in the text. 1b Students decide if the sentences are True (T) or False (F).
Check their answers.
2a LISTENING О 32 Tell students they are going to listen to a
radio programme about a young musician called Kiran
Leonard. Encourage students to read the questions
I Answers
IT 2 T 3 F
before listening, then play the track for students to listen
and say if the sentences are True (T), False (F), or if the
information is Not Mentioned (NM). See p166 for the
audioscript for this exercise.
24/7

TEACHER D E V ELO P M E N T: LANGUAGE TE AC H ER D E V ELO P M E N T: C L A S S R O O M T IP S

3resent sim ple questions and short answ ers Find som eone w ho ...

~nere are two types of questions: Yes/No questions and Fin d so m eo n e who ... is a com municative and student-
>Vh- questions. centered activity that involves a lot of talking and moving
around. It helps students get to know each other a little
.7e use short answers for Yes/No questions. In short
better, and it gives them valuable practice forming
answers, we repeat the auxiliary, e.g. D oes she work at
questions. You could put some quiet music on in the
: i e sh o p ? Yes, she d o e s./N o , she doesn 't.
background and have students mingle around the room
.Vh- questions are different from Yes/No questions
asking Yes/No questions to different classm ates. If a
cecause they ask for information.
student answers Yes to the question, the other student
.Ve make questions in the present simple by adding the
writes down the classmate's name. Explain students
a jxiliary d o before the subject (exceptions are the verb
cannot use the same person for more than one question.
:o be and modal verbs such as can).
The first student to write a name for all the questions
(Questions word +) D o/D oes + subject + infinitive (+ wins.
complement)?

2a Ask students to com plete the questions and answers Present simple - wh- questions
with d o , d o e s, d o n 't or d oesn 't. G ive students time to
compare in pairs before you elicit answers from students » > FAST TRACK
around the class.
You could do exercises 5a and 5b as a class activity by
Answers inviting different students to read out the questions and
I 1 Do, do 2 Does, doesn't 3 Do, don't 4 Do, do nominate another student to say the answer.
5 Do, do
4 Students look at a- с and answer the questions below.
2b SPEAKING In pairs, students ask and answer the questions in Check their answers.
exercise 2a. Remind them to give true answers. Answers
3a SPEAKING Students look at the activities and prepare 1 at the start of the question
questions to ask people in the class. Draw students' 2 with a long answer
attention to the exam ple sentence. Walk round, helping
students if necessary.
5a A sk students to put the words in the correct order to
make questions. Remind students of Q A SV for making
Answers questions (question word, auxiliary, subject, main verb).
2 Do you watch TV before school?
Answers
3 Do you play tennis at the w eekend?
1 W here do you and your family live?
4 Do you sing songs in English?
2 How many instruments does he play?
5 Do you go to school by car?
3 How do you com e to school?
6 Do you study on Sunday?
4 W hat time does your family have dinner?
7 Do you listen to hip-hop?
5 W hy does Susanna go home for lunch?
8 Do you go out with friends on Friday?
6 W hat does your brother do on Saturday?
9 Do you do sport on Monday?
5b Students now match the answers to the questions in
3b Ask students to write the numbers 1-9 on a piece of exercise 5a.
paper. Students move around the class and ask different
people in the class the questions. Encourage them to Answers
find a different person in the class for each activity and i: b 2 d 3 e 4 f 5 c 6 a
write their name next to the correct number.
6a Students com plete the questions.

I Answers
1 do, have 2 does, have 3 do, do
4 do, study 5 do, watch 6 do, like

6b SPEAKING In pairs, students take turns to ask and answer


the com pleted questions in exercise 6a.

Unit 3 67
Test before you teach: Flipped classroom
Set the Flipped classroom video and tasks for
Developing speaking P44 Ф p
homework before the lesson. This will allow you
Asking for and giving directions
to assess the needs of the students before the class.
Students can then move on to the relevant grammar
practice activities. » > FAST TRACK
You could ask students to com plete exercise 1 at home.
Ш Ш In pairs, students compare their answers before you
Adverbs of frequency
check their answers in open class.
7 a As< students to look at the sentences and focus on the
words in blue that say how often we do something. WARMER
Ask students if the sentences 1-6 are in order from Draw a simple map of the area around the school.
'Very frequent to Not frequent' or 'Not frequent to Very Ask students to come to the board and label where
frequent'. Check their answers. the school and other familiar buildings are. Mark a
Answer location on the map and ask students to give you
I Very frequent to not frequent
directions to get to the school. Introduce and drill
turn left/right and other ways of giving directions.
7b Ask students to look at the sentences below and decide Then mark a beginning position on the map and
if the rules are true or false. give a set of directions. Ask students Where am I? to
see if they were able to follow along with you and
I Answers
1 T 2 F
repeat.

8 SPEAKING In pairs, students take turns to ask and answer Giving directions
the questions. Remind them to answer with Yes or No 1 SPEAKING In pairs, students match the pictures with the
and an adverb of frequency. Draw students' attention to phrases.
the exam ple.
Answer
9 Ask students to look at the key and write sentences a Turn right, b Turn left, с Go straight on.
using the correct form of the verbs given. Draw students' d Go past (the cinema), e It's on the corner (of
attention to the exam ple sentence. X and Y). f It's on your left, g It's opposite (the
Answers cinema), h It's on your right, i It's between (X and Y).
2 My friends and I sometimes go out on Sunday.
j W alk along (X).
3 You are never late. 2 LISTENING © 33 Play the track for students to look at the
4 W e usually speak English in class. map. Tell them Jam es is inside the bus station. Ask them
5 I am always happy. to listen and say where he wants to go. See p166 for the
6 W e never go to school at the weekend. audioscript for this exercise.
7 She often studies in the evening. Answer
I The sports centre
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
3a In pairs, students com plete the dialogue.
Students write questions about everyday activities
using adverbs of frequency. Then they interview each 3 b © 33 Play the track again for students to listen and
other and answer with Yes or No and an adverb of check their answers.
frequency.

Refer students to the Gram m ar reference on page 46 if


I Answers
left
a b right С straight on d past
necessary. e left f park g school
HOMEWORK 4a Students use the map in exercise 2 to prepare directions
Assign students page 30 in their Workbook or the from the bus station to a different place in town.
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
4b SPEAKING In pairs, students give their directions, without
saying the name of the place, for their partner to guess.
Draw students' attention to the model dialogue.

5 Ask students to look at the useful expressions in the


Speaking bank and say which expressions are 'Giving
directions' and which are 'Asking for directions'. Check
that they understand all the expressions.

Answers
I Asking for directions, Giving directions
PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT
6a SPEAKING Tell students they are going to do a role-play Developing writing P45
using expressions from the Speaking bank to help them.
Writing a short note
Divide the class into pairs, A and B. Tell Student A to
turn to page 154 and Student В to turn to page 155
and take turns to ask and give directions. Walk around, » > FAST TRACK
checking students are on task and making sure students You could ask students to do exercises 1 and 2 at home
are speaking English to each other. and check their answers at the start of the lesson.
Alternatively, you could set the writing task in exercise 5
6b Students act out their dialogues for the class.
as homework.
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: CLASSROOM TIPS
WARMER
Inform ation-gap activities
Ask students to think about what's going on in their
An information-gap activity is an activity where the
local area. Ask them to imagine a notice board in a
information students need to com plete the task is
local shop or library and elicit what type of notes
hissing and they must talk to each other to find the
they can usually see there (extra tuition, lost animals,
soecific details they need. The participants each have
jo b s, local festival and concerts, clubs, competitions).
some knowledge or information not shared by the
Elicit where the school notice board is and what they
other(s) and can only solve the problem if they share their
can find there (school menus, timetable changes,
nformation. Check that students know some key phrases
sports clubs, school events, etc.). Ask students to
for clarifying meaning and rephrasing, e.g. Can you
look at the notices on the school notice board on
■epeat that, p le a se ? I'm sorry, I d o n 't understand. Can
page 45 and elicit the three activities that are posted
you speak m ore slow ly?, etc.
there (a music festival, art club and competition).
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Model dialogues A short note - 1
A: Excuse me. Can you tell me how to get to the 1 READING Ask students to read the notices from a school
shopping centre please? notice board and answer the questions about each one.
B: When you go out of the bus station, turn left. Walk Check their answers.
along Smith Road, go past the museum and then
Answers
turn right at Greenhill Road. Then turn right at Brown
Street. Go straight on and the shopping centre is on В
your left. 1 Cindy in class 6B
A: Thanks! 2 three
I 3 She needs information about the school Art Club.
B: Excuse me. Can you tell me how to get to the school, С
please? 1 Chris in class 4D
A: When you go out of the bus station, turn left. Walk 2 three
along Smith Road and then turn right at Greenhill 3 He wants to enter the 'Com puter G am es Designers of
Road. G o straight on. Walk past the swimming pool. the Future' com petition.
Turn left at Brown Street. Go past the park and the
school is on your left, opposite the sports centre. 2 Ask students to look at the note replying to Cindy's
B: Thanks! notice. Ask them to find Laurence's answers to Cindy's
questions and underline them . Ask students if he gives
all the necessary information and elicit what's missing.

+ EXTRA ACTIVITY Answers


Students write directions from your classroom to the Hi Cindy,
library, computer room, cafeteria or another location My name's Laurence. I'm in class 5C and I'm a mem ber
in the school. Tell them to write their name at the top of the Art Club. W e m eet on Mondays and W ednesdays
of the paper but not to write the final destination. after school, at 4 o'clock. We don't m eet in the Arts and
Collect and redistribute the papers around your class Crafts Room because they have special lessons there
for each student to follow the directions on the paper on those days. But Room 12 has all the things we need.
and write down the location and return it to the It's free then, so we meet there. Mrs Stewart is in charge
writer of the directions to check their answer. of the Club. She gives us ideas fo r things to d o but
you're free to d o what you want. Generally, one w eek is
painting and the next is drawing. Com e to the club next
-3MEW0RK
Monday and see what we do!
Assign students page 31 in their W orkbook or the See you,
relevant sections of the Online Workbook. Laurence
No. Laurence doesn't say exactly what the club does
when it meets.

эаде is taken from G a te w a y 2nd Edition AT + Teacher's Book. It is photocopiable and may be used within class.
Unit 3___________ 69
» > FAST FINISHERS TEACHER D EV ELO P M E N T: S TU D E N T TR A IN IN G

Write these definitions on the board and ask students W riting for an audience
to find words in the note in exercise 2 to match to
The most basic question for any writer is: W ho am I
them: to be responsible for, someone who belongs to
writing to ? Before students begin the process of writing,
a club, different from usual, available for som eone to
they should identify their audience and take some time
use/decide for yourself.
to consider what is important to them and what kind of
I Answers
in charge of, member, special, free
text organisation would help the audience understand
their m essage. An email to the company director or their
best friend would look quite different in term s of content,
3 Ask students to look at the note again and find an structure, and even tone. Keeping your audience in mind
exam ple of becau se, and, but and so. Ask them to write while you write can help you make good decisions about
the words in the correct place in the Writing bank. what material to include, how to organise your ideas, and
how best to support your argument.
I Answers
a and b but с because d so
HOMEWORK
4 Students com plete the sentences with and, but, because Assign students page 32 in their Workbook or the
and so. Check their answers. relevant sections of the Online Workbook.

I Answers
1 and 2 but 3 because 4 so 5 but 6 so
7 because
PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT
5a Ask students to choose to reply to either Jan or Chris's
notice. Tell them to plan what they are going to write and
to follow the advice in the Writing bank on page 156.

5b Students write their note and give all the necessary


information. Remind them to use the words from the
Writing bank. For less confident students, photocopy the
models below for extra support during the writing task.
-
I! Model text
j Hi Jan,
! I am interested in the school music festival next month.
; I like all types of music, but I really like rock and pop
! music. I sing and I play the guitar. I want to hear songs by
!I One Direction at the music festival.
! See you,
! Paul
I
I
! Hi Chris,
; Here are my ideas for the 'Com puter G am es Designers
! of the Future' com petition. I like sports games and action
I games. I like Faith in the game Mirror's E d g e . It's a world
J in the future. I've got some great ideas and tim e to help
! you make a new game for the com petition.
! See you,
I
! Jane

✓ EXAM SUCCESS Students discuss how important it is to


know who you are writing to and what information to
include. Elicit reasons and tell them to turn to page 151
(Writing: Style and content) to compare their answers.
- he extra support provided on the Gram m ar and Answers
•'ocabulary reference sections makes the Gram m ar
1 have a shower 2 go to bed 3 have breakfast
and Vocabulary revision sections ideal for setting
4 do homework 5 get up 6 finish school
*or homework. You could get students to com plete
7 go home
n e whole revision page or just certain exercises for
-omework.
FREE-TIME ACTIVITIES

Grammar revision p47 2 Students match words to make free-time activities.


Answers
Present simple - affirmative and negative
1 chat online 2 play the piano 3 surf the Internet
1 Students write sentences using the affirmative and
4 go out with friends 5 listen to music
negative form of the present simple. 6 do sport 7 watch films

Answers PLACES IN A TOWN


1 Usain Bolt doesn't play tennis.
2 My grandfather watches TV all day. 3 Students com plete the sentences with the correct place
3 I don't get up at 5 am. in a town.

4 My sister finishes school at 3.30 pm.


5 My parents don't do homework.
I Answers
1 cinema 2 park 3 restaurant 4 sports centre
6 My friends and I go to school on Friday. 5 swimming pool 6 shopping centre 7 library
7 My teacher has lunch at school.
HOMEWORK

Present simple - questions and short answers Assign students page 33 in their Workbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
2 Students choose the correct alternative.

Answers
] a Do you go b do с do you go d I walk,
e Do you do f I don't, g do you

Adverbs of frequency

3 Students put the adverbs of frequency in the correct


place in the sentence. They then order the adverbs from
1 (very frequent) to 5 (not frequent).

Answers
1 I som etim es read comics.
2 My sister always listens to hip-hop.
3 I'm n ever late for school.
4 She usually has music lessons at the weekend.
5 ! often go out with my friends.

1 always, 2 usually, 3 often, 4 som etim es, 5 never

Unit 3 71
KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES L cef
Students will be able to:
■ talk about houses and rooms using There is/There name different food and drink
are make and reply to offers
■ talk about quantities with som e, any, a/an write a short description of a place

UNIT OVERVIEW DIGITAL OVERVIEW

Vocabulary
Rooms
Furniture
Presentation Kit
► Flipped classroom video Unit 4: Prepositions of
e/\
PRONUNCIATION Word stress
place
Studying abroad Life skills video Unit 4: Following a recipe
Reading CRITICAL THINKING Evaluating a good
place to study and live R Vocabulary tool: Rooms; Furniture;
Food and drink
There is/There are
Interactive versions of Student's Book activities
Prepositions of place
Grammar in Integrated audio and answer key for all activities
context Workbook pages with answer key
Food and drink
Teacher's Resource Centre trc
Vocabulary ► Flipped classroom video Unit 4: Prepositions
Physical well-being: Choosing of place
«9 healthy food ► Life skills video Unit 4 : Following a recipe
Life skills ► Grammar communication activity Unit 4 : There's
Following a recipe a (n )... / There are som e ...
► W orksheets for this unit, including:
Listening - Grammar Practice worksheet Unit 4
Countable and uncountable nouns - Flipped classroom video worksheet Unit 4: Prepositions of
som e, any, a/an place
Grammar in - Literature worksheet Units 3 and 4
context
- Culture worksheet Unit 4
Making and replying to offers
- Life skills video worksheet Unit 4

- Everyday English worksheet Unit 4


Developing
speaking
A description of a place Student's App
G ateway 2nd Edition wordlist for the award-winning
Developing Sounds App (available for download)
writing
Reading: Matching titles and
paragraphs
Exam su ccess Use of English: Com pleting the
dialogue

V TESTING AND ASSESSMENT


Resources for exam preparation and measuring student progress

► Test G enerator Units 1-4 ► Printable test Unit 4 ► G ateway to exams Units 3 and 4
(end of Unit 4)
w щ шom
щ e тti ш

TE AC H ER D E V ELO P M E N T: P R O N U N C IA T IO N
Vocabulary P48 (д а )
h i and /ai/
Talking about your home, your room and your Since the spelling of the short Л/ and the long /ai/
furniture is often the sam e, students often confuse these two
sounds. Point out that although the i is the second letter
» ) FAST TRACK of both living room and dining room , the pronunciation
• : j could ask students to do exercises 1 and 3a at home of i in these words is different: I I I living /ai/ dining. Say
so that less confident students are prepared for these both words for the students emphasising that the stress is
activities. Students could also draw a simple plan of their on the first syllable in both words, but the pronunciation
- ; js e or flat in preparation for doing exercise 5 in class. of the i is different. In pairs, students practise saying both
words. Ask students to practise saying kitchen, too.
«ARMER
Ask students to look at the unit title Home time and
0 Furniture
•ле images and predict what they think the unit is 3a In pairs, students match the objects (a-m) in the picture
going to be about: rooms and houses. Draw a room with the words. Ask students to com pare their answers
on the board with a window and door. Then write with the pair of students working next to them before
these words on the board - ceiling, window, door, you check in open class.
//all, floor. In pairs, ask students to label the room. Answers
Brainstorm words related to homes: room, house,
a sofa b radiator с shelf d table e chair
apartment, neighbour and elicit rooms in a house.
f cupboard g toilet h sink i wardrobe j bath
Tell them to turn to page 48 exercise 1 to see if they
к fridge I bed m shower
nave thought of the same rooms.
» > FAST FINISHERS
Students make a list of other objects they can find
inside a house, e.g. clock, desk, lamp, TV, etc. Ask
them to share the words on their list with the student
next to them when everyone has finished exercise 3a.

3b Q 35 Play the track for students to listen and repeat.


Highlight the silent letter p in cu pboard
/'L\b3(r)d/ and elicit the plural form of sh e lf (shelves).
W rite this on the board for students to record in their
notebooks. See p166 for the audioscript for this
exercise.

4 LISTENING О 36 Tell students they are going to listen to


som ebody describing a sim ilar flat to the one in exercise
1. Play the track for students to listen and circle six
_ Rooms
differences in the picture. Elicit full sentences to describe
1 n pairs, students match the rooms (1-6) with the words.
the six differences from students around the class. See
| Answers p166 for the audioscript for this exercise.
j 1 bedroom 2 bathroom 3 living room Answers
1 4 hall 5 kitchen 6 dining room I In the picture, the living room has two sofas and one
2 з PRONUNCIATION О 34 Play the track for students to listen and
~ave students mark the word stress in each word with
a circle. Draw students' attention to the exam ple, and
demonstrate bathroom with the correct word stress. See
I chair. In the Listening, the living room has one sofa
and two chairs.
2 In the picture, the cupboard in the dining room has
only got two doors. In the Listening, the cupboard has
o166 for the audioscript for this exercise. three doors.
Answers 3 In the picture, the bathroom has got a bath. In the
c o 0 0
cedroom , dining room, hall, kitchen, living room description in the Listening, the bathroom hasn't got a
bath.
20 Q 34 Play the track for students to listen again. In 4 In the picture, the bedroom hasn't got shelves. In the
oairs, students practise saying the words with the correct Listening, the bedroom has got two shelves.
stress. 5 In the picture, the kitchen has got a small fridge. In the
Listening, the kitchen has got a big white fridge.

I 6 In the picture, there is a table and four chairs in the


kitchen. In the Listening, there is no table or chairs.

5a Students draw a simple plan of their house or flat and


mark where the furniture in exercise 3a is. Emphasise
to students that it shouldn't take them more than five British boarding schools have three terms a year,
minutes to draw the sketch. Each piece of furniture does approxim ately 12 w eeks each, with a week's half-terr-
not need to be drawn in detail. break each term . Students are expected to go home
during the holidays as the schools usually close. B e ir ;
5b SPEAKING in pairs, students show each other their plan and
away from home and learning to cope can give chilc-^'
explain it to their partner. Draw students' attention to
confidence and independence, but they are e xp ensi. e
the exam ple, and encourage them to use have g o t to
and being separated from family and friends can be
describe what furniture each room has.
difficult for some boarders.
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: STUDENT TRAINING
In pairs, students write questions using the present
simple about rooms in a house, e.g. Where do you M atching titles and paragraphs
sleep ? Where do you do your hom ew ork? Where do
Asking students to match the titles to paragraphs in a
you eat breakfast? Where do you watch TV?, etc. text is a common type of reading question in official
Students swap partners with another pair and take
exam inations. Often the main idea and answer are in
turns to ask and answer the questions.
the title or topic sentence and there are similar words
(synonyms) in the paragraphs and paragraph headings
HOMEWORK to help students match titles to paragraphs. However,
they still need to read the text carefully to check. R e m ir;
Assign students page 34 in their Workbook or the
students that if a match is not im mediately obvious,
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
they should move on to the next one. If they are unsure
between two answers at first, tell them to note both of
them down. They can eliminate one answer later if it fits
Reading P49 another paragraph better.

Understanding a text about studying abroad 2 READING Ask students to match the questions with the
correct parts of the text.
» > FAST TRACK
You could ask less confident students to answer the I Answers
le 2c 3d 4a 5b
question in exercise 6 at home in preparation for the
speaking activity. j Students discuss why it is useful to reaa
the whole text before matching titles to the text sections
in reading exercises. Tell them to turn to page 151
WARMER
(Reading: Matching titles and paragraphs) to compare
In pairs, students say two true sentences and one false their ideas.
sentence to describe their home using have got, be
Ask students to read the text again and say if it
and the present simple. Their partner guesses which is
describes the same place as in the photos. Ask students
the false sentence. Model this activity first, e.g.
to give reasons for their answers. In pairs, students
I've g ot a wardrobe in my bedroom . /
compare their answers before you check in open class.
M y kitchen is very big. / I work in the living room. /
Example answers
1 In pairs, students describe the photos. Elicit descriptions Yes, because it describes a room with a desk, a window
from students around the class. Write boarding school and a notice board.
on the board. Ask students if they know what a boarding Yes, because there are three girls choosing their food in
school is and elicit ideas about boarding school life. a school canteen.

Suggested answers щ д Individually, students think


Photo 1: A girl is in her room. She's got a laptop and a about whether this is a good place to study and live,
desk. She's got a notice board on her wall. She is happy. from the photos and description and give reasons
Photo 2: I can see three girls with their food. They are why or why not. In a less confident class, write these
smiling. They are at school. sentences prompts on the board:
I think it looks like a good/bad place to live because

EDCULTURAL INFORMATION . . . . In the photos, I can see . . . . I really like the idea ...
. I would like to study there because . .. .
British boarding schools Ask students to compare their ideas with the rest of
A boarding school is a private residential school. the class.
Students live in dormitories or resident halls on the Example answers
school's campus. Many boarding schools around the I think it looks like a good place to live because you are
world are m odelled on British boarding schools. Students always with your friends and you have everything you
learn, live, do sport, exercise and play together in a need for studying.
communal setting under adult supervision. Boarding
I wouldn't like to study there because I like my house,
school students follow a structured day in which classes,
family and friends. I think the rooms are small and you
m eals, sport, study times, extracurricular activities and
are always with other people.
free time are timetabled for them.
'E A C H E R D E V E LO P M E N T : S TU D E N T T R A IN IN G Ц1ММШ1
C 'itica l thinking Students find more vocabulary items to add to their
list about rooms and furniture: desk, window, lamp,
C ' tical thinking is required to navigate the ever-complex
shower, notice board, bookshelves.
r " . :ronment in which students live. Students who are
: : -ripetent in not only the basics of content areas but
; so the basics of productive and creative thinking will HOMEWORK
belong learners, knowledge creators and problem
Assign students page 35 in their W orkbook or the
=: .ers who can live and work effectively in a world of
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
::n s ta n t change.
I - :ical thinking com prises a num ber of different skills
t~at help us learn to make decisions. To think critically
;c o u t an issue or a problem means to be open-minded
Gram mar in context PP5o-5i
; - з consider alternative ways of looking at solutions,
Talking about houses and rooms using There is/There
'aenagers know how to access and locate, interpret
are and prepositions o f place
: ~a apply information, but if they don't invest time in
e.aiuating the information they use, their efforts often
-esult in a low-quality product. Key critical thinking » > FAST TRACK
;< fls are reasoning; teenagers are able to explore the You could ask students to do exercises 1 and 2a at home.
-p licatio n s of information, explain what they think and You could play the track in exercise 2b for students
= ve reasons for their opinions, and flexibility; teenagers to check their answers and repeat the words at the
ran take what they learn in one situation and transfer it to beginning of the lesson.
5-other situation.
Test before you teach
5 Encourage students to match the underlined words in Write a list of classroom objects on the board, some
the text with the definitions. of which are in your classroom and some of which are
Answers not. Try to include both singular and plural nouns, e.g.
pencils, poster, d esks, door, window, board rubber,
1 enormous 2 stuff 3 inconvenient 4 in the corner
com puters, DVD player. Ask the students if there are the
5 together 6 boarding school 7 accommodation
objects in the classroom: A re there p en cils? Is there a
8 en suite 9 dishes 10 cooker
p o ste r? Students answer: Yes, there are. No, there isn't.
i SPEAKING W hat about you? Divide the class into pairs or Then write gapped sentences on the board e.g . There
small groups and ask them to discuss if they would like pencils. There _ _ a poster. Elicit what words are
to study abroad one day and say why or why not. In a needed to com plete the gaps. If students already have a
less confident class, give students time to prepare their good knowledge of the structure, move quickly through
answers in written form before doing this as a speaking the first exercises in class.
activity. Elicit some answers from different pairs/groups
and try to create a discussion in open class.
There is/There are
Example answers
'd like to study abroad because you can learn a new 1 A sk students to look at the sentences and answer the
anguage and experience new customs, food, art, music questions.
and politics.
wouldn't like to study abroad because I would miss my I Answers
a 1 ,2 , 6 b 3, 4, 7 с 1 ,3 d 2, 4, 5, 6, 7
•amily and friends. e 5 f 6, 7

TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE 2a Ask students to look at the picture and com plete
the sentences with is, isn't, are or aren't. Check their
.would like to
answers.
~-e term lexis is a common word these days and
epresents a w ider concept than vocabulary - typically I Answers
1 is 2 aren't 3 are 4 isn't 5 aren't 6 are
s:s of individual words - and consists of collocations,
:~unks and formulaic expressions. Recognising certain 7 is 8 isn't 9 are 10 isn't
ra m m a r structures as lexical items means that they can
2b Q 37 Play the track for students to listen, check and
ce introduced much earlier, without structural analysis.
repeat. See p166 for the audioscript for this exercise.
d like to isn't taught as the conditional but as a chunk
expressing desire and can be introduced lexically
datively early on.

Unit 4 75
TEACHER D E V ELO P M E N T: LANGUAGE TEAC H ER D EV ELO P M E N T: LANGUAGE
There is/There are Prepositions of place
W e use There is/There are to say things or people exist, Prepositions of place are used to show the position or
often in a certain place. W e don't usually stress there, location of one thing with another, usually to answer the
is or are. W e do stress isn't and aren't in negatives and question W here?
short answers.
behind/in front of
Contracted forms make words easy to say. We write
Behind is the opposite of in front of. It means at the back
and say the contracted forms there's/there isn't/there
(part) of something,
aren't in informal speech and writing. However, adding
next to
another -re to there to create ‘there're1 produces a word
N ext to usually refers to a thing (or person) that is at the
that is difficult to pronounce. As well as being difficult
side of another thing. Another way of saying next to is
to pronounce (native speakers say 'ther-ur' and 'therr')
b esid e.
'there're' is not often seen in written English.
near
3 Ask students to com plete the questions and short N ear is similar to next to/beside, but there is more of a
answers about the picture, using there is, there are. distance between the two things. Another way of saying
near is close.
Answers
on
1 Are there three pizzas? No, there aren't.
On means that something is in a position that is
2 Are there three chairs? Yes, there are.
physically touching, covering or attached to something,
3 Is there a burger? No, there isn't.
in
4 Is there a radiator? Yes, there is.
W e use in to show that something is enclosed or
5 Are there shelves? Yes, there are.

1
surrounded.
6 Is there a cupboard? Yes, there is. above
4 SPEAKING Memory test! Divide the class into A and В A b o ve refers to something being directly (vertically)
pairs. Ask Student A to close their books. Student В ask above you. O ver has a similar m eaning.
questions about the picture to see if their partner can under
remember. A fter four questions, students swap roles. U nder means at a lower level - something is above it.
Draw students' attention to the model dialogue. Walk Below has a similar meaning.
round, making sure students are on task and helping Sometimes we use the word underneath instead of under
with any language difficulties. and beneath instead of below . There is no difference in
meaning, but they are less frequently used.
Тев! before you teach: Flipped classroom
Й Set the Flipped classroom video and tasks for 6 Ask students to look at the pictures and choose the
homework before the lesson. This will allow you correct alternative. Elicit answers from different students
to assess the needs of the students before the class. around the class.
Students can then move on to the relevant grammar
practice activities. I Answers
1 in 2 in front of 3 under 4 on 5 behind 6 near
7 on 8 above
Prepositions of place
7a Students use the prepositions to write five sentences
5 Ask students to look at the sentences and match them about the position of objects in the pictures in exercise
with diagrams a-h to show they understand the meaning 6. Remind students to make two sentences false. Draw
of the prepositions. students' attention to the exam ples. Ask students to
compare in pairs before you check their answers.
I Answers
2 e 3a 4 g 5b 6d 7h 8 f 7b SPEAKING In small groups, students take it in turns to read
out their sentences for others to identify the false ones.

++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
In small groups, students write at least three true/
false questions about their Gateway Student's Books
using There is/There are and prepositions of place.
Write a couple of examples on the board:
There is a glass o f orange juice next to a burger on
page 52. (true)
There are photos o f four famous people on page 85.
(false)
Students swap their quizzes for other groups to do.
Refer students to the Gram m ar reference on page 58 if TEAC H ER D E V E LO P M E N T : P R O N U N C IA T IO N
necessary.
The /сУ sound
HOMEWORK
Some nationalities have trouble saying the soft /g/ and /j/
Assign students page 36 in their Workbook or the sounds and find saying words like orange ju ice difficult
relevant sections of the Online Workbook. Soft /д/ and /j/ sounds are pronounced the same in
English, e.g . /ф /. Soft /g/ is in words like giant, giraffe,
age and large and /j/ (pronounced the same way) is
Vocabulary P5i found in words like ju ice and reject. The j so u n d /&,/ and
ch so u n d /$/ are the only affricate sounds in English.
Naming different food and drink In a sequence of identical affricates, no special linking
occurs and the sounds are pronounced twice in a row.
» > FAST TRACK Therefore, in the phrase orange ju ice, the j sou n d should
be pronounced twice.
If students are familiar with the target vocabulary, ask
students to write the categories in exercise 2 as headings A good way to help students is to tell them to add the
for four columns. Play the track in exercise 1с for students /d/ sound right before /]/ and /g/ because it helps shape
to repeat and write the words in the correct columns. You the mouth to make pronunciation easier.
could then go directly to exercise 3.
2 Ask students to say which words in exercise 1 are types
of fruit, drinks, sw eet or dairy products.
3 Food and drink
1a In pairs, students find types of food and drink in the box Answers
in the pictures. Tell them to use the words in the box to a types of fruit: apple, banana, strawberry, orange
help them. b drinks: coffee, lem onade, milk, orange juice, tea,
water
Answers
С sweet: biscuit, cake, honey, ice cream, jam , sugar
1 chicken 2 pizza 3 biscuit 4 orange juice
d dairy products (made from milk): butter, cheese, ice
5 tomato 6 strawberry 7 chips 8 yoghurt
cream , milk, yoghurt
9 banana 10 cake 11 honey 12 tea 13 milk
14 burger 15 sugar 16 egg 17 bread 18 butter 3 SPEAKING In pairs, students take it in turns to find out which
19 salad 20 meat food and drink their partner likes and dislikes. Draw
students' attention to the model dialogue.
1bStudents use their dictionaries to check that they
understand all the words in the box. ++ EXTRA ACTIVITY

» > FAST FINISHERS Students think of at least one more item for each
category in exercise 2.
Ask students to mark the word stress on the words in
exercise 1a.
Answers HOMEWORK
apple, banana, biscuit, bread, burger, butter, cake, Assign students page 37 in their W orkbook or the
cheese, chicken, chips, coffee, egg, fish, honey. relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
ice cream , jam , lem onade, m eat, milk, orange juice,
pizza, salad, salt, strawberry, sugar, tea, tom ato, water,
vo ahurt Gatew ay to life skills P P 52-5 3

1с © 38 Play the track for students to listen and repeat. C hoosing healthy food
Highlight the silent letter и in biscuit /'biskit/ and the
To learn how to read food labels, to think about our food
long /i:/ sound in ch eese. See p166 for the audioscript
choices and to analyse what we eat and decide if it is
for this exercise.
healthy or not

» > FAST TRACK


You could ask students to do exercises 1 and 2 for
homework in preparation for the lesson.

Unit 4 77
в BACKGROUND INFORMATION
Research shows that the intake of saturated fat, salt and
3b READING Individually, students read and match A -D with
1-4. Check their answers.

sugars in teenagers' diets is above recommended levels


and that they have low intakes of some key vitamins
I АAnswers
З В 1 С 2 D 4
and minerals. Research has linked poor diet to poor
4 Ask students to read texts A -D again and mark the
performance in schools. One statistic shows maths
statements True (T) or False (F). Elicit answers from
performance overall in the US to be behind that of many
students around the class.
other nations and the typical fast food diet or pizza,
burgers, chips and fizzy drinks could be one cause.
In the UK like in the US, the recommended average of
I Answers
IT 2 T 3 F 4 T 5 F 6 T
five fruits and vegetables per day is not being met by
most teens. In the 11-18 age group, only 1 in 13 girls 5a In pairs, students look at the food label and say if they
are getting their five-a-day. They eat on average 2.7 think it is healthy or unhealthy and give reasons for their
portions a day, while boys fare a little better consuming answer.
3.1 portions a day. Answers
It is unhealthy. There are three red labels which means
WARMER stop and only one green label. It is high in fats and
Play O d d one out. Write these groups on the board. sugars.
In pairs, students decide which one is different from
5b In open class, students say if they think the food label
the rest of the group and say why.
comes from a pizza packet or a chocolate bar and say
apple, banana, orange, jam why.
chicken, burger, meat, fish
chips, biscuit, bread, cake I Answers
It is from a chocolate bar. It contains a lot of sugar.
ice cream, butter, cheese, egg
orange juice, lemonade, strawberry, salad 6 LISTENING О 39 Tell students they are going to
Suggested answers Ш Ё watch or listen to an interview with a teenager
jam - all the others are unprocessed fruits about what he eats. Play the video or track
for students to watch or listen and say what they think
fish - all the others are types of meat
of his diet. Elicit students' opinions from different
chips - it's the only one that comes from a potato
students around the class. See p166 for the videoscript/
egg - all the others are dairy products
audioscript for this exercise.
salad - all the others have fruit in them

Then ask students to open their books and look at 1Answer


He has an unhealthy diet.
the words in Key concepts and make some sentences
using these new words and the food items from the 7 Q 39 Play the video or track again for students to watch
Warmer, e.g. elicit from students what they think the or listen and answer the questions. Elicit answers from
lesson is going to be about. students around the class.

1 In pairs, students look at the different types of food and I Answers


1 sometimes cereal or two chocolate bars and lemonade
drink and decide if they are healthy (H) or unhealthy (U)
options or it depends (D). Elicit answers from different 2 burger and chips or pizza and chips
pairs around the class and ask students to explain the 3 It's fast - his parents don't have time to make him a
reasons for their choices. sandwich.

Suggested answers
1 apples H 2 breakfast cereals D 3 eggs D
4 chips U 5 orange juice D 6 burger D
4 No, he knows it's unhealthy.
2 Tell students to read about Reference Intake and then 5 No, it doesn't. He will eat healthy food when he is
look at the table and say what the total num ber of older.
calories for them is. Elicit what (g) stands for - grams.
8 SPEAKING Discuss in open class if the boy's diet is typical
3a Ask students to read the food label on a breakfast cereal of teenagers in their country. Ask them to give reasons
packet and say if they think it is healthy, unhealthy or in for their opinions and point out the similarities and
the m iddle. Elicit students' comments in open class and differences.
encourage them to give reasons for their answers.

Answers
In the middle because the cereal is low in fats but high in
sugar and has quite a lot of salt.

78 Unit 4
♦ EXTRA ACTIVITY
Listening P54
Л - te these questions on the board.
Л "at do you usually eat for breakfast? Following instructions for a simple recipe
A/id for lunch?
2 о you realise that you r diet is really healthy? The WARMER
■?od you eat has lots o f ... Write these present simple questions on the board in
- pairs, students re-enact the interview with a a jumbled order. In pairs, students unscramble them
: -eren ce. This time the boy/girl chooses healthy and take it in turns to ask each other the questions.
-tod options. Ask students to plan his/her answers Explain the word recipe if necessary (instructions
i- d practise their interview. Students could act out for cooking or preparing food). Elicit answers from
~ eir interviews in front of the class. You could record different pairs in open class.
ro dents and play the interviews back for discussion. favourite What's recipe your ?
cook you Can ?
TACHER DEVELOPMENT: CLASSROOM TIPS Where recipes find you do ?
like you Do program m es food ?
. 3 ng a video cam era
Answers
: •. oents learn a lot by watching them selves on video,
v :s t cameras can be connected directly to a television What's your favourite recipe?
-: ■instant playback, analysis and discussion. You can Can you cook?
^:ord the students, give the camera to your students or W here do you find recipes?
e: them produce a video with their own devices. Do you like food program mes?
: a/back is a time for positive critical analysis and
: : sitive encouragem ent. Suggest or elicit alternative 1 Students match the photos with the words.
ways to say something and helpful tips on body
;~guage, but don't correct them on every preposition! I aAnswers
spoon b bowl с саке tin d food processor
■: j could consider making copies for students to take

; .vay with them. 2 Tell students they are going to listen to a food
program me. Ask them to look at the ingredients
necessary for today's recipe and check they know what
all the ingredients are. Encourage students to guess
~ell students they are going to find out if they have what they think the recipe is for.
i healthy diet or not.
• Step 1
3 LISTENING© 40 Play the track for students to listen to the
programme and decide what the recipe is for and note
Individually, students write an eating diary for
down the ingredients in the order they hear them . Ask
the last three days. Tell them to make a list of the
students to com pare in pairs before you elicit answers
contents of their breakfast, lunch and dinner, plus
from students around the classroom. See pp166-167 for
any other snacks.
the audioscript for this exercise.
■ Step 2
Next, students circle each type of food or drink Answers
on their list in different colours. Green means it The recipe is for strawberry cheesecake.
hasn't got much sugar, fat or salt. A m ber means it's 1 a (low-fat cream cheese) 2 d (honey) 3 с
medium and Red means it's got a lot. (sugar) 4 e (biscuits) 5 b (butter) 6 f (strawberries)
■ Step 3
4a О 40 A sk students to read the description of the
In pairs, students look at the colours in their eating
recipe and find seven mistakes. Play the track again if
diary and say what the good and bad things are
necessary.
about their diets. Encourage students to focus on
the green and red marks in their eating diaries and 4b Students correct the mistakes. A sk different students
see how they could swap some of the red marks for around the class to read out the correct sentences.
healthy alternatives.
Answers
1 500 grams (not 300) of low-fat cream cheese.
2 You also need one spoonfuls (not two) of honey
3 and two (not one) of sugar.
4 You mix them together in a bowl, (not a cake tin)
5 You need 100 grams (not 50) of butter.
6 A t the end you put strawberries (not strawberry jam)

I on top.

7 In about 60 minutes (not 30) it's ready to eat.


» > FAST FINISHERS TEAC H ER D EV ELO P M E N T: LANGUAGE

Ask students to find words in the text in exercise C o untable and uncountable nouns
4a to match these definitions: the amount on one Countable and uncountable nouns are often taught with
spoon is a ... (spoonful); mix two things together and
the topic of food. However, point out to your students
you get a ... (mixture); the bottom of a cheesecake
that they already know other uncountable nouns, e.g.
is called the ... (base). Ask students to share their weather, hom ew ork, information, history, transport,
answers with the rest of the class for them to add to
money, hair, furniture, advice.
their vocabulary list.
Countable nouns are people or things (both abstract
and concrete), which can be counted and can be used in
SPEAKING What about you? Ask students to discuss the
both the singular and plural form, e.g. one banana, four
questions in pairs or small groups. In a less confident
bananas.
class, ask students to write down their answers before
Uncountable nouns generally refer to things that do not
doing this as a speaking activity. Elicit answers and try to
naturally divide into separate units (i.e. can't be easily
develop a class discussion.
counted), have no plural form and are never used
f+ EXTRA ACTIVITY with numbers. Many nouns can be countable or
uncountable, depending on whether we see them as
Tell students they are going to have a dinner party.
units or as a mass, e.g. glass (the material) is uncountable
Write the words starter, main course, dessert on the
and a glass (a container for drinks) is countable.
board. In pairs, students think about what they are
going to cook and prepare a menu. Students can
2 Students put the food and drink in the correct place.
swap their menus and vote on the best food ideas for
Check their answers.
a dinner party.
Answers
Countable: banana, biscuit, burger, chip, egg,
HOMEWORK
strawberry, tomato
Assign students page 37 in their W orkbook or the Uncountable: bread, butter, honey, jam , lemonade,
relevant sections of the Online Workbook. meat, milk, orange juice, salt, sugar, water

3 SPEAKING In pairs, students look around the classroom and


Grammar in context p p 5 4 -5 5
try to find three countable and three uncountable nouns
Elicit answers from students around the class.
Talking about food and drink using countable and Suggested answers
uncountable nouns and some, any, a/an Countable: pencil, rubber, book
Uncountable: paper, rubbish, homework
Test before you teach
Tell students you are having a special picnic and they can
I only bring foods that are uncountable. Say I'm going on
some, any, a/an
a picn ic and I'm bringing som e rice. Then ask a student
to repeat the sentence and add another food item, e.g. » > FAST TRACK
I'm goin g on a picnic and I'm bringing som e rice and You could do exercises 4 and 5 as a class activity by
som e chocolate. If they say an uncountable noun, say: inviting different students to read out the sentences and
Well done! You can com e to my picnic. If they say a nominate another student to say the answer.
countable noun, say: Sorry. You can't com e to m y picnic.
If they seem familiar with countable and uncountable 4 Ask students to look at the sentences and com plete the
nouns, go through the Gram m ar guide exercises quickly rules with som e, any or a/an.
with the class.
I Answers
1 a/an 2 some 3 any
Countable and uncountable nouns
5 Students choose the correct alternative. Walk around,
Ask students to look at the sentences and the word helping students if necessary. Check their answers.
in blue in each sentence. Ask them to decide if it
is possible to count the word or not and write С I Answers
1 any 2 any 3 some 4 any 5 some 6 a
(Countable) or U (Uncountable) next to the word. Check
7 some
their answers.

Answers 6 Ask students to look at the photo and decide if the


statements are True (T) or False (F). Elicit answers from
С 2 С 3 U, U 4 U 5 С
students around the class.

I Answers
IF 2 T 3 F 4 T 5 F 6 T
w t i r a r a
т
f S c e n t s com plete the sentences about the picture in
e«=rcise 6 with is, are, isn't or aren't and som e, any, a or Developing speaking P56 Ф ф
M aking an d re p lyin g to o ffe rs
4,-s.vers
I : any 2 is some 3 are some 4 are some
» > FAST TRACK
5 : r- 6 isn't any 7 is some 8 aren't any
You could ask students to com plete exercise 1b at home
I- .r e n t s com plete the dialogue with the correct form in preparation for the speaking activity.
:— e-e is or there are and a, an or any. Ask students to
-- - заге their answers in pairs. WARMER
*.*s-«vers Play Tic-tac-toe to recycle vocabulary from the unit so
I s =~ ere a b there is с Is there any far.
I % T-e-e is e Are there any f there aren't ■ Split the class into two teams: X and O.
I | s —ere a h there is i Are there any J there are ■ Draw two tic-tac-toe grids on the board, side by
side. One grid for reference and one for actually
я * 0 ~ Play the track for students to listen and check. See
drawing noughts and crosses.
: :7 for the audioscript for this exercise.

ACTIVITY
watch visit offer
я 5*irs, students practise saying the dialogue. Tell
m to pay attention to the rising intonation in
. 4o questions. take turn on invite

n pairs, students ask and answer the questions put play drink
г f s e 8a. Remind them to give true answers about
e school. Then, in open class, elicit answers from Write the verbs from today's lesson in each square
* t f : students around the class. (watch, visit, offer, take, turn on, invite, put, play,
drink).
DEVELOPMENT: CLASSROOM TIPS
Each team must make a grammatically correct
M r -: ' correction question with the verb to win a square, e.g. Do
* •. -^iportant skill for language teachers is error yo u w atch T V a fte r s c h o o l? D o y o u visit y o u r
■ ■ к - r on. It is important not to over-correct as this will g ra n d m o th e r? Can I o ffe r yo u a d rin k?, etc.
ю - _ c : fluency-based activities and can make students To keep the entire class focused, pick students at
:c-fid e n ce . Not correcting, however, leads to random.
developing bad habits and can negatively affect
I f l t e i ::~ m u n ic a tive abilities.
Making and replying to offers
II» «б>. skill is to develop the ability to distinguish between
l a SPEAKING In pairs, students say what they can see in the
and 'm istakes'. A mistake is a slip; you know the
photo. Elicit answers in open class.
• r —ing to say, but you said the wrong thing by
Suggested answer
:-r-: Mistakes are not critical to correct unless they
rc-eated too often. Errors are when the student does
I There are two boys. They are sitting on the sofa in a
- : .*« the correct form, term or usage. living room looking at a tablet.
- e - mportant to decide whether it is better to
1 b ln pairs, students take it in turns to ask and answer the
e-rors on the spot, at the end of the activity or
questions. Elicit answers in open class.
d jr z r n the lesson and then decide on an appropriate
ш е е : :n technique. 2 LISTENING ^ 42 Play the track for students to listen to the
K c l : : ~ect on the spot it must be quick: you can ask people in the photo and say if the statements are True
- р т - :o repeat the sentence again, echo the sentence (T) or False (F). A sk students to compare in pairs before
£ЖЫ -re етог for students to finish, write the word on you check their answers. See p167 for the audioscript for
*r - a ;;a r d and underline it, etc. As much as possible, this exercise.
«т - г z i self-correction. Alternatively, you can do
: ::T e ctio n later (error correction makes a nice
: - cetween parts of the lesson). Write the errors on
I Answers
IT 2 F 3 F 4 T 5 F
- m z c i- z n an anonymous way (change some of the words
За О 42 Play the track again for students to listen and
p w s ssa~y) and elicit correct answers from the class.
com plete the Useful expressions in the M aking offers
Штег srjd en ts to the Gram m ar reference on page 58 if section of the Speaking bank.
*У-
I Answers
a put your coat in the cupboard/turn the com puter
i gr students page 38 in their W orkbook or the on b seat с a snack d some orange juice e help
sections of the Online Workbook.
-----------------------
3 b © 63 Play the track for students to listen, check and
j Model dialogue
repeat. See p167 for the audioscript for this exercise.
! A: Hello, Com e in! .
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: STUDENT TRAINING ! B: Hi! Thanks. W hat a cool T-shirt.

M aking and replying to offers J A: Thanks. Shall I take your jacket and bag?
• A: Yeah, sure. Thanks.
W e often make offers in conversations in order to be
polite and helpful. A ccepting offers is just as important, ! B: Can I put it here on the sofa?
or even more important than offering things. Students ! A: Yes, thanks. But be careful because I've got my
should make sure they thank the person and, if they mobile phone in there.
don't want to accept an offer, be sure to politely refuse. ! B: Let's go to the living room and play video games,
Offering an excuse is also a good idea. j A: Great. W e can watch TV later.
W e use these expressions for making offers: ! B: Have a seat.
Can I ... ? ! A: Cheers.
Shall I . . . ? j B: Are you hungry? W ould you like a snack?
W ould you like ... ? ! A: No thanks, I'm fine.
How a b o u t... ? ! B: Would you like anything to drink?
Remind students that Shall I . . . ? and Can / ...? a r e [ A: Yes, please. Have you got any lemonade?
followed by the verb without to.
| B: No, sorry. I don't think I have. How about some
Can I put it on the table?
orange juice?
Shall I take you r coat?
; A: Yes, that'd be great. I'm really thirsty. Shall I turn the
Shall is more formal than can.
! com puter on while you go and get it?
W ould you like ... ? is followed either by a noun, or by the
j B: O K . Thanks.
verb with to.
W ould you like a biscuit/to drink som e lem onade?
Point out to students that we always use some words HOMEWORK
when offering someone something. Assign students page 39 in their Workbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
4 Students com plete the dialogue with what Holly says
to Olivia. Ask students to compare in pairs before you
check their answers.
Developing writing P57 Ф ф
Answers
Iа 2 b 5 с 4 d 3 e1 Writing a description o f a place

» > FAST FINISHERS » > FAST TRACK


Students practise saying the dialogue in pairs. You could ask students to do exercise 2 at home and
check their answer at the start of the lesson. Alternatively,
✓ EXAM SUCCESS Students say if it is important, in this you could set the writing task in exercise 7 as homework.
kind of exercise, to read the whole, complete dialogue
when they finish. Tell them to turn to page 151 (Use of WARMER
English: Completing the dialogue) and compare their
Play Snowman with words to revise vocabulary from
ideas.
the previous lessons. Divide the class into two teams,
PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT A and B. Team A chooses a word or phrase from a
previous lesson and one student draws a part of the
5a SPEAKING Divide the class into pairs, A and B. Ask students
snowman's form on the board for each letter. Team
to read the situation: Student A is at home and a
В says a letter and the student either writes the
friend com es to visit him/her. Student В visits his/her
letter on the correct line or draws one part of the
partner's house to play com puter gam es. Tell students to
snowman. If the drawing is completed in ten steps
prepare a dialogue including two offers. Remind them
before the word is guessed, Team A are the winners.
to use expressions to make and reply to offers from the
Repeat the process with Team В guessing the word.
Speaking bank.

5b Ask students to practise the dialogue. W alk round, A description of a p lace


checking students are on task and making sure students
l a SPEAKING In pairs, students imagine their dream bedroom
are speaking English to each other.
and the objects they would like to have in it. Ask
5 c Students act out their dialogues for the class. students to look at the objects and give each one a mark
from 0 to 5 (0 = I don't want it, 5 = I really want it). Elicit
marks from different students around the class.

This page is taken from G a tew a y 2P° Edition A1 +Teacher's Book. It is photocopiable and may be used within class
-----------
I S - - rrjd e n ts if there any other objects they would like
| Model text
г * : e cit which ones.
j My ideal bedroom is very big and has got blue walls. On
H С Ж Ask students to read the three teenagers' ] the walls, I've got some big and colourful paintings and
zbsct otions of their dream bedroom s and decide who ! lots of shelves for my books. There's always music in my
• £-zs the bedroom in the picture. Set a time limit of two ; room and I've got a huge piano. W hen my friends come
- -_*.es to encourage students to read quickly. Elicit the ! and visit me we play music for hours. I've got a really
t ans*er. ; comfortable sofa and bed. Next to my bed, there's a
л гт н в r i big desk where I do my homework. In front of the desk,
I - ■there's a big TV and a games console. W hen my friends
■ _*a ' e
! come, we play video games there. There's also a cold
3 PiMJG In pairs, students take turns to tell each other ! drinks m achine. My bedroom has got enormous windows
mr сл bedroom they like and which one they don't like ; and a great view of a big park.
i - ; explain their decisions. Draw students' attention to
* » model dialogue.
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
■ I -=< students to look at the texts again and write a Students could swap texts and use your marking
r. of adjectives that appear in the descriptions, as in guide to correct each other's texts. Students then
—e exam ple. Remind students that adjectives help write a clean version for homework.
to write interesting descriptions and point out that
^: ectives don't have a singular and plural form, e.g. we
HOMEWORK
: : n't add a final -s to an adjective. Check their answers.
Assign students page 40 in their W orkbook or the
JL-sw ers
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
I : -< dream, old, big, happy, relaxed, favourite, cool,
I : : — ortable, enormous, cold, hot, great

5 - =ч students to look at the Writing bank and the texts


- exercise 2 and choose the correct alternatives in the
-- es for word order. Check their answers.
A n sw e rs
1 re*'ore, after, before, after

i Students say if the word order is correct in the


sentences. Ask them to correct any mistakes.
A n sw e rs
I 1 The walls are red and there are big and colourful
paintings.
I 2 sometimes write stories and songs in my bedroom.
3 correct
4 correct
5 My friends are often at my house.
6 've got a beautiful desk next to the window.

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT


' a Ask students to read the task and make a plan with ideas
for an article about their ideal bedroom . Remind them
to include information about furniture and other objects.
Tell them to plan what they are going to write and to
follow the advice in the Writing bank on page 156.

7b Students write their article. Remind them to check the


word order in their description. Less confident students
can model their texts on one of the descriptions in
exercise 2.

i page is taken from G a te w a y 2 ** Edition AI + Teacher's Book. It is photocopiable and may be used within class.
Macmillan Publishers Limited 2016
Unit 4 83
Vocabulary revision p59
ROOMS

1 Students put the letters in the correct order to make


The extra support provided on the Gram m ar and rooms.
Vocabulary reference sections makes the Gram mar
and Vocabulary revision sections ideal for setting I Answers
1 kitchen 2 bedroom 3 dining room 4 hall
for homework. You could get students to complete
5 bathroom
the whole revision page or just certain exercises for
homework.
FURNITURE

Grammar revision p59 2 Students write the names of the objects.

There is/There are I Answers


1 radiator 2 sink 3 cupboard 4 wardrobe
1 Students choose the correct alternative. 5 fridge 6 bath 7 shelf
Answers
i; are 2 aren't 3 aren't 4 is 5 isn't 6 Are
FOOD AND DRINK

3 Students com plete the words.


ШШШ
Prepositions of place

2 Students com plete the sentences with a preposition.


I Answers
1 tea 2 jam 3 butter 4 salad 5 salt 6 sugar
7 ice cream
Answers
i: next to 2 in front of 3 under 4 on 5 above HOMEWORK
Assign students page 41 in their W orkbook or the
Countable and uncountable nouns relevant sections of the Online Workbook.

3 Students write С (countable) or U (uncountable) after


each word.

I Answers
1 U 2 U 3C 4 U 5 С 6U 7 С 8C

some, any, a/an

4 Students com plete the sentences with som e, any, a or


an.
Answers
i: any 2 any 3 an 4 some 5 any 6 a
/ Gateway to exam s: Units 3-4 ssss
j heading Рбо Щ Use of English P6i /
/
/
/
1FOR READING EXAMS > TIP FOR USE OF ENGLISH /
/
£ii<it why it is important to read the whole text first Students read the tip for choosing the correct /
:-e*ore answering specific questions. Ask students to responses in dialogues. Remind them that it's very /
/
-rsd the tip and look at Exam Success on page 151 important that the response is grammatically correct
/
—• more ideas. and logical. Ask them to turn to Exam Success on /
page 151 for more ideas. /
CADM6 Students read the interview with a teenage girl /
/
ard say what her favourite free-time activity is and why i Ask students to choose the correct responses to /
—e book The H unger Gam es is special for her. com plete the dialogue. /
/
Answers Answers /
/
-■=' ’ree-tim e activity is collecting books. 1 A 2 F 3 В 4 E /
~~e oook is special because it's a first edition, it's got the /
/
anchor's signature and she loves the story. /
Listening P6i
Й «1 II /
I frjd e n ts read the text again and match the questions /
ith the correct part of the text. r /
/
j Answers > TIP FOR LISTENING EXAMS | /
Elicit from students what they should remember /
l i d 2b 3 e 4a 5 f 6 c /
to do in True/False/Not Mentioned activities. Ask /
I ?tAKING W hat about you? In pairs, students spend a students to read the tip to compare their ideas and /
•"ew minutes discussing the questions, then ask different /
then look at Exam Success on page 151 for more /
soidents to share their answers with the class. ideas. ■
/
/
Writing p60 LISTENING ф UU Tell students they are going to listen to a X
man called Mike answering questions about where he /
/
lives. A sk students to read the questions. Play the track /
>■ TIP FOR WRITING EXAMS for students to listen and say if the sentences are True /
(T), False (F) or the information is Not M entioned (NM). /
Ask students to read the tip about writing a short /
See p167 for the audioscript for this exercise. /
-ote and look at Exam Success on page 151 for more
/
tips. Answers
/
\ : F 2 NM 3 T 4 T 5 NM 6 T 7 F 8T /
4 Ask students to look at the notice from a school notice /
ooard and elicit who the notice is from and what three 8 SPEAKING What about you? In pairs, students discuss if /
/
oieces of information they want. they would like to live in this place and say why or why /
not. Elicit opinions from different students around the /
Answers /
class.
: s from Stephanie in class 2B. /
/
Sne wants to know: 1 Which day or days does the school HOMEWORK /
Book Club m eet? 2 W here are the m eetings? 3 W hat Assign students pages 42-43 in their Workbook or B
/
exactly does the club do when it m eets? the relevant sections of the Online Workbook. /
/
5 Students write a reply to Stephanie's note. Remind them /
to give all the necessary information and invent details. /
/
For less confident classes, photocopy the model text X
below and let students read it before they start. Г - — — — — — — — I /
1 Ask students to read the 'can do' statements and /
....................................................................................
reflect on their own ability. Students mark from /
Model text /
1-4 how well they can do each thing in English. " /
Hi Stephanie,
/
My name's Jo . I'm in class 2C and I'm a member of the 2 Ask students to look at their marks and decide x
school Book Club. W e meet on the first Tuesday of every what they need to do to improve. Elicit ideas from Й /
/
I month at five o'clock. We don't meet in the school library students around the class. /
Decause students study there. But Room 14 is quiet and it's /
~ee then, so we meet there. Mr Jackson is in charge of the /
/
Club. He gives us a book to read, but we can choose and /
/ote for a different book if we want. W e read sci-fi, fantasy /
/
and contemporary books for teenagers. They are really /
good! Come to the club next Tuesday and see what we do! /
See you, /
/
Jo /
s taken from G a tew a y 2 'd Edition AI + Teacher's Book. It is photocopiable and may be used within class.
Units 3-4
KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES
I Students will be able to:
■ talk about abilities using can!can't and adverbs of ■ understand spoken and written texts about
manner com puters and the Internet

| ■ talk about likes and dislikes ■ ask for and give information about places, films, etc.

■ give basic instructions using the imperative ■ write a sim ple questionnaire
В ______ __

UNIT OVERVIEW DIGITAL OVERVIEW


Computers
Presentation Kit s
Using computers /\
Vocabulary Flipped classroom video Unit 5: The imperative
Life skills video Unit 5: Preparing presentations
Teen tech world: Brilliant tech
ideas! 0 Vocabulary tool: Computers; Using computers
Reading
CRITICAL THINKING Discussing the Interactive versions of Student's Book activities
usefulness of inventions
Integrated audio and answer key for all activities
can! can't
Workbook pages with answer key
Adverbs of manner
Grammar in PRONUNCIATION /ге/ and /a:/
context Teacher's Resource Centre TRC
► Flipped classroom video Unit 5: The imperative
The Internet
► Life skills video Unit 5: Preparing presentations
Vocabulary ► Grammar communication activity Unit 5:
о»' ICT: Preparing presentations O ne picture = 1,000 sentences
| Я ► W orksheets for this unit, including:

Life skills - Grammar Practice worksheet Unit 5

Online passwords - Flipped classroom video worksheet Unit 5: The imperative


- Literature worksheet Units 5 and 6
Listening - Culture worksheet Unit 5
The imperative - Life skills video worksheet Unit 5
like, love, hate + gerund - Everyday English video Unit 5
Grammar in
context
Student's App jZ j
Asking for and giving information
G ateway 2nd Edition wordlist for the award-winning
S ounds A p p (available for download)
Developing
speaking
A questionnaire

Developing
writing
Use of English:
Multiple-choice cloze activities
Exam su ccess Speaking: Information exchange

V TESTING AND ASSESSMENT


Resources for exam preparation and measuring student progress

► Test G enerator Units 1-5 ► Printable test Unit 5 ► G ateway to exams Units 5 and 6
(end of Unit 6)
Connected

++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
Vocabulary P62
Ask students what the objects in exercise 1 are used
Talking about electronic gadgets related to com puters for. Elicit answers from students around the class.
and the Internet and using the com puter Suggested answers
keyboard: We use it to put information into the
» > FAST TRACK computer.
foil could ask students to do exercises 1 and 4 at home monitor/screen: W e can see words and pictures on it.
so that less confident students are prepared for these mouse: You move it to do things on the com puter
activities. screen.
printer: You use it to print out docum ents,
WARMER scanner: You copy or print a document into a computer,

In pairs, ask students to brainstorm electronic screensaver: A com puter programme that makes the
screen black or shows a picture when the com puter is

i
gadgets teenagers use for studying and for
entertainment. Set a three-minute time limit and on but not in use.
give them regular updates, e.g. Two minutes to go speaker: You use it to listen to music.
... . Ask students to add up how many devices they

I
touchpad: You touch it with your finger to move the
thought of. Ask the pair with the longest list to come cursor on the screen.
up and write them on the board to check spelling.

I
touch screen: A screen you touch to choose what you
Ask students to look at the unit title C onn ected and want to see next.
the image, and ask them what they think the unit
is going to be about (technology; inventions and USB port: A place where you can attach a cable and
inventors, using the Internet). ■
>connect a printer, keyboard, etc.
USB cable: A thick wire that carries electronic signals,
webcam : A camera connected to a com puter that
3 Computers
I produces images that can be seen on a website.
1 In pairs, students look at the photos and name as many
of the objects as they can. 3 Students play a gam e. Ask a student to draw one of the
objects in exercise 1 on the board for others to identify.
2a Ask students to look at the words in the box and make Alternatively, students can play this gam e in pairs.
sure they can name all the objects in exercise 1. Check Student A draws one of the objects in their notebook
their answers. and Student В identifies the object. They take it in turns
Answers to draw the objects.

a mouse b printer С monitor/screen d screensaver


e scanner f keyboard g USB cable and port 0
ivi Using computers
h touchpad i touch screen j w ebcam к speaker 4 Ask students to match the words and icons. Ask students
to compare their answers before you check in open
2 b © 45 Play the track for students to listen and repeat class.
the words. Elicit where the stress falls on each word (the
Answers
stress patterns are underlined in the answers above.
Practise the 'uh' /л/ vowel sound in touchpad 1 cut and paste 2 print 3 copy 4 download
/'utf.paed/ and touch screen /'tAtf skri:n/. See p167 for 5 save 6 send an email 7 click on 8 log on/off
the audioscript for this exercise. 5 @ 46 Play the track for students to listen and repeat the
words. See p167 for the audioscript for this exercise.

6 Ask students to com plete the sentences with words from


exercise 4. Elicit answers from different students around
the class.

I Answers
1 copy 2 download 3 click on 4 save 5 print
6 send an email 7 cut and paste 8 log on/off

7a LISTENING © 47 Play the track for students to listen to a


student answering the questions and note down what
she says. Ask students to com pare in pairs before you
elicit answers from students around the class. See
p p 167-168 for the audioscript for this exercise.

Unit 5___________ 87
Answers 1 READING Individually, students read the two articles, and
1 every day, seven days a week then decide on a good title for each article. In pairs,
2 for homework and mainly school work; for watching students compare their titles before you check in open
videos and listening to music class. Elicit from students what each article is about.

3 not often, one or two songs Suggested answers


4 not often, sometimes school work to teachers A Quick news
5 I sometimes print out homework, or print a lot for В A banana keyboard?
subjects like history or geography. I use a scanner
when a friend forgets her textbook. С CULTURAL INFORMATION
6 I use a webcam to speak to my sister.
Teenage inventors and apps
7 Yes, a great photo of me with my best friend.
Teens are starting to appear in the news more and more
because of their exciting invention ideas. Many new
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
inventions are for the mobile phone app market. App
Ask some comprehension questions about the is short for application - com puter programs usually
listening. used on mobile phones or tablets that are designed to
Why does she use a webcam with her sister? (Her be practical or entertaining. Young people who are still
older sister isn't at home, she's away at university and at school have designed some very successful apps.
she uses a webcam to speak to her.) Your students may find it motivating to learn about such
Why does she print a lot o f docum ents for geography cases. For exam ple:
and history? (They haven't g o t a textbook.) Arjun Kumar from India created the Ez School Bus
How often does she change her screensaver? (She Locator at just 14, an app which lets parents know if their
changes her screensaver all the time.) child is on the bus and where the bus is and when it will
reach home.
7b SPEAKING In pairs, students take turns to ask and answer Maximillian Polhill aged 15 developed a physics-inspired
the questions in exercise 7a. Remind them to give true game app called Stellar Alien.
answers. Elicit answers from students around the class to By age 16 Julian Wyzykowski had created eight
close the activity. mobile apps and games and started his own company
Com bustible Gam es.
HOMEWORK
Brittany W enger aged 19 developed an app named
Assign students page 44 in their Workbook or the the Global Neural Network Cloud Service for Breast
relevant sections of the Online Workbook. Cancer. The program is able to detect 99 per cent of
life-threatening tumours. Her work won her the Google
Science Fair in 2012.
Reading Рбз Some of the most popular apps and websites for teens

I Understanding a text from a science magazine


are ones where they can text, microblog, send photos,
videos and messages with a lifespan of only 1 to 10
seconds.
» > FAST TRACK
2 A sk students to read the text again and com plete the
You could ask students to do exercises 1 and 2 for table. Check their answers.
homework and check their answers.
I Answers
WARMER Text A Text В
In pairs, students think of the three greatest
1 Name of the Nick D'Aloisio Eric Rosenbaum
inventions of all time. Set a time limit of three
inventor(s) and Ja y Silver
minutes and elicit answers from students around the
class. Ask students to rank the inventions in order of 2 Nationality of British American
importance and give a reason why they are important the inventor(s)
to society.
3 Name of the Summly Makey Makey
invention
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: CLASSROOM TIPS
4 Main aim of It changes long You can make
Pyram id discussions the invention news stories any object
A pyramid discussion is a way to organise this type of into three that conducts
exercise to encourage full participation. Students start off paragraphs. electricity into
discussing in pairs, then join with another pair after a set a touchpad,
amount of tim e, until finally the whole group is involved keyboard or
in one discussion. mouse.

88 Unit 5
Connected

3 Students answer the questions. Check their answers. give reasons for their answers. In a less confident class,
Answers give students time to prepare their answers in written
form before doing this as a speaking activity. Elicit some
1 Today, people need to get information quickly and
answers from different pairs/groups and try to create a
easily.
discussion in open class.
2 He's a millionaire.
3 You connect the object to the Makey Makey board. ++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
4 O bjects that don't conduct electricity don't work with Ask students to research an app for learning English
the Makey Makey gadget. and present it to the class. Set a word limit for their
presentation of 50-100 words.
Individually, students think about
how useful the inventions are and give reasons why.
Then ask students to compare their ideas with the HOMEWORK
rest of the class. Assign students page 45 in their W orkbook or the
Example answers relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
I think Summly is useful for reading news articles quickly
on smartphones.
I think Makey Makey is a really useful invention. You can Gram m ar in context p p 6 4 -6 5
learn a lot about com puting, science and robotics. It's a
new type of toy that is a game but teaches children to Talking a b o u t a b ilitie s using can /can 't a n d a d v e rb s o f
code. m anner

TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: STUDENT TRAINING » > FAST TRACK


Critical thinking You could ask students to do exercises 1, 4, 5 and 6 at
home. You could then check their answers and do the
Bloom's Taxonomy offers teachers a wide variety of
pronunciation and com municative activities in class.
questions in the classroom, not just W hat? W here? and
W hen? but also W hy? H ow ? How d o you know ? and
Test before you teach
What i f . . . ? This extra range of questions helps teachers
Write the headings a baby and superm an on the board.
develop and strengthen their critical thinking skills.
Under each, draw two columns with a tick and a cross
Bloom's Taxonomy is named after Benjamin Bloom
at the top. Write these exam ple sentences on the board
who in 1956 developed the classification of questions
under the correct column. Elicit more affirmative and
according to six levels of higher order thinking. An
negative sentences using can and can't to see how
important teaching skill is being able to ask questions
familiar students are with the form.
that generate more questions. Below are some exam ples
Л A baby can't walk.
of questions that will generate more questions:
/ Superm an can fly.
■ Questions that focus attention: Do you n o tice? or Have
you se e n ?, etc.
■ Questions that invite assessm ent: How many?, How can/can't
often?, etc.
■ Questions that ask for clarification: Can you give me an 1 Ask students to look at the sentences and choose the
exam ple?, What d o you mean by?, etc. correct alternative. Check their answers.
■ Questions that invite inquiry: What do we n ee d to
know?, How can we find out?, W hat w ould happen if? I Answers
1 can 2 can't 3 don't use 4 don't repeat 5 use
я Questions that ask for reasons: How d id you know?,
Why d o you say that? TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE

5 Encourage students to guess the underlined words in са п /c a n 't


the text and then check them in their dictionary. Can is a modal verb. Modal verbs are different from
Answers normal verbs:

fits: is the right size to fill a space 1 They don't use an -s for the third person singular.

concisely: expressed only using a few words but is easy 2 They make questions by inversion (She can go.
to understand becom es Can she go?).

gadget: a small tool that does something useful or 3 They are followed directly by the infinitive of another
impressive verb (without to), e.g . She can to go.

via: going through one place on the way to another


2a PRONUNCIATION ^
48 Play the track for students to listen to
conduct: to allow electricity to pass through an object the sentences and notice that can is short, but can't is
6 SPEAKING What about you? Divide the class into pairs or long. See p168 for the audioscript for this exercise.
small groups and ask them to discuss if they would like
to have a Makey Makey board and what their favourite
gadget or app is and why they like it. Ask students to

Unit 5 89
TEACHER D EV ELO P M E N T: P R O N U N C IA T IO N 5 Ask students to com plete the table. Check their answers.
I Answers
The /ае/ and /a :/ sound
Practise saying the long vowel sound /a-J in can't with Adjective Adverb
students (tell them that it's the sound that you make bad 1 badly
when a doctor looks at your throat: aaaahhh). Elicit other calm 2 calmly
words with this vowel sound, e.g. plant, aunt, afternoon.
3 careful carefully
Sometimes, it is difficult to distinguish between can and
can't because native speakers don't pronounce the final t clear 4 clearly
at the end of can't. So, if students don't hear the different 5 easy easily
consonant sounds in can and can't clearly, they should
fast 6 fast
listen for the length o f the vo w el sound to distinguish
the two words. 7 good well
hard 8 hard
2 b © 49 Play the track for students to listen and underline quick 9 quickly
the alternative they hear. Check their answers. See p168
10 slow slowly
for the audioscript for this exercise.
Answers 6 Ask students to read the text and find and correct seven
1 She can sing. mistakes with adjectives and adverbs. Let students
2 He can't play the guitar. compare their answers in pairs before checking in open
3 They can't swim. class.
4 W e can speak Spanish. I Answers
5 She can understand French. I study ICT at school. My IC T teacher speaks very fastly
6 I can't ride a bike. fast, but he explains things good well. I don't think ICT
is very difficult. I understand everything quite easy easily,
2 c © 49 Play the track again for students to listen and
even when the teacher talks quickly. The only problem is
repeat the correct sentence in exercise 2b.
that I often do bad badly in my exam s. I don't know why,
3a SPEAKING In pairs, students use the pictures to ask and because I always study hardly hard. I read the questions
answer questions with can or can't. Draw students' carefu ly carefully, too. Maybe the problem is that I don't
attention to the exam ple dialogue for question 1. Check write very clear clearly. I think I need to be calm and
their answers in open class. write slowly next time.

Answers » > FAST FINISHERS


2 Can you dance? Yes, I can./N o, I can't.
Look at students' work and if they got any incorrect
3 Can you play the piano? Yes, I can./No,Ican't. answers, tell them how many, but not which ones.
4 Can you ski? Yes, I can./N o, I can't. This will keep them busy while the others catch up. It
5 Can you speak Chinese? Yes, I can./N o,Ican't. will also train students to look at their answers again,
6 Can you paint? Yes, I can./No, I can't. which is a good exam strategy.

3b Ask different pairs to tell the class about their partner.


SPEAKING In small groups, ask students to find someone
Direct students' attention to the model to ensure that
who can do the different activities in the list. Draw
students use but when they talk about their partner
students' attention to the model dialogue. Alternatively,
you could organise a Find som eone who ... activity (See
Adverbs of manner
Teacher developm ent: Classroom tips Unit 3 page 67).
4 Ask students to look at the sentences and choose the Refer students to the Gram m ar reference on page 72 if
correct alternative. Check their answers. necessary.
Answers HOMEWORK
i: how 2 don't usually 3 normally 4 irregular Assign students page 46 in their Workbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE
A d verb s of m anner
Adverbs of manner tell us how something happens.
They form the largest group of adverbs. They are usually
placed either after the main verb or after the object, e.g.
Plan well./P eople n eed to g e t information quickly and
easily.
W e form most of them simply by adding Ay to their
corresponding adjective, but there are sometimes
changes in spelling: easy > easily; careful > carefully;
gentle > gently.
HOMEWORK
Vocabulary P65 (да)€Г
Assign students page 47 in their W orkbook or the
Talking about the Internet relevant sections of the Online Workbook.

» > FAST TRACK


Ask students to do exercise 1 at home. In class, play the
Gateway to life skills p p 6 6-6 7

:-эск in exercise 2 for students to listen and check their


Preparing presentations
answers.
To learn about a style of presentation called Pecha
Kucha, to look at common mistakes when preparing and
The Internet
giving presentations and to prepare and give a mini­
1 Ask students if they are an Internet expert and
presentation about Pecha Kucha
encourage them to predict how many definitions they
are going to get right in this exercise. Ask students to
» > FAST TRACK
read the definitions (1-6) and choose the correct word
from the box. You could ask students to do exercise 2 for homework
in preparation for the lesson. Students could look up
Answers
exam ples of Pecha Kucha presentations on the Internet
1 password 2 w ebsite 3 search engine 4 virus to see this type of presentation in practice.
5 blog 6 social network

2 0 S O Play the track for students to listen, check and


repeat the words in the box in exercise 1. Highlight the
EDBACKGROUND INFORMATION
Being able to give a presentation is a marketable skill
long /a:/ sound in passw ord /'pa:s,w3:(r)d/. See p168 for that is much needed in various jobs around the world.
the audioscript for this exercise. In many vocational and professional courses, students
have to learn the skills to use a range of equipm ent or
» > FAST FINISHERS
demonstrate their communication skills. Research has
Ask students to underline the word stress on the shown that oral presentations that use visuals are more
words in exercise 1 the stress is underlined in the persuasive, more interesting and more professional. Oral
answers above. presentations help integrate ICT and language skills,
which are both essential skills in today's world of work.
3 SPEAKING In pairs, students take it in turns to say their Presentations also work on the four skills: while the
answers to the questions. After the activity, elicit answers presenter is presenting his or her work, everybody else is
from different students around the class. reading the slides, listening to the talk and taking notes
to later ask the presenter questions about the topic.
+ EXTRA ACTIVITY
Presentations also promote and encourage learning through
Develop a class discussion on students' opinions of discovery and research. Collating the information needed
social networks on the Internet. for a presentation requires research and organisation - both
Write these prompts on the board and ask students important skills for working life. Students are placed at the
to discuss in pairs before you ask their opinions in heart of the learning process by taking responsibility for
open class: their own learning. In an oral presentation class, teachers
Do you contact p eop le you see a lot or friends you delegate autonomy and leadership to students and
don't see in p erso n? facilitate, support, organise and guide students' learning.
What information do you share online?
Are there rules in your house about social networking?
How long do you spend online?

Ф CULTURAL INFORMATION
-n area of concern regarding teenagers and online
social networking is the type of personal information
:eens make available on these networks. They could be
over-sharing', i.e. sharing information that can harm their
•jture education or job prospects or sharing information
:nat puts them at risk.
Research by the FO SI (Family Online Safety Institute)
-ound that social media were the only online activity
technology for which parents believed the risks
: jtw eig hed the benefits. Am ong the 53% of parents
«vhose children had a social networking account, more
:nan three-quarters of parents had’logged onto their
rnildrens' accounts to monitor or check their posts.
WARMER E C ULTURAL IN FO R M A TIO N
Pecha Kucha is a presentation style in which 20 slides are
/ Format shown for 20 seconds each (6 minutes and 40 seconds in
Structure \ [
total). The format keeps presentations concise and fast-
paced. Multiple-speaker events called Pecha Kucha Nights
(PKNs) are held around the world. According to John
Medina's best-selling book Brain Rules, eight to 12 minutes
is the ideal amount of time for human attention. In a longer
Audience '^'(PRESENTATIONS) ^ presentation you risk losing the audience's attention. Pecha
\ / Equipment
Kucha presentations are even shorter than this.

3 Ask students to look at the four slides and say if they


— ^ / How to 'ч
are good slides to use in a presentation. Elicit students'
I present \
comments in open class and encourage them to give
reasons for their answers.
Answers
Draw a mind map. Write the word PRESENTATIONS No, they are not good slides to use in a presentation.
in a circle on the board and words that are connected
A It is hard to read because of the colours and there are
directly to the central concept branch out from this
no bullet points. There is no visual.
as in the mind map above. Ask the following prompt
В The graphics are confusing.
questions to get students to contribute more ideas
? С The text is too small and the font is difficult to read.
to add to the diagram: What presentations have you
seen ? How do they look? Who's listening? What can D There are too many bullet points and there are
you use? In small groups, ask students to brainstorm spelling and grammar mistakes.
as many ideas as they can to answer these questions. 4 Individually, students read the text from a website giving
Set a time limit of five minutes and encourage help with presentations. Ask students to match each
students to look up words in their Macmillan Online
slide in exercise 3 with the mistakes. Elicit answers from
Dictionaries. Say STOP! and encourage students
students around the class.
to write the answers on the board to check their
spelling. Ask students to look at Key concepts on Answers
page 66 to see if they have thought of these ideas. Mistakes 1, 2, 3, 8: Slide A
Mistake 6: Slide В
1 SPEAKING In pairs, students take it in turns to ask and Mistakes 3, 4, 5: Slide С
answer the questions. Elicit answers from different pairs Mistakes 3, 7, 8: Slide D
around the class.
Ask students if they can identify any of the other mistakes.
Example answer
5 LISTENING 51 Tell students they are going
3 Presentations may be given for the purposes of:
to watch or listen to som ebody giving a
■ Persuasion ■ Training ■ Teaching and learning
presentation. In order to com plete the visual
■ Informing ■ Assessm ent aspects of exercise 5, students will need to watch the
People give (computer-based) presentations at job video rather than listen to the audio track. Play the
interviews, when they are demonstrating a product or video for students to watch and say if the statements
an idea, to give an overview of research as part of their are True (T) or False (F). Elicit answers from different
academ ic programme at university, at meetings, etc. students around the class. See p168 for the videoscript/
2 READING Ask students to read about a type of presentation audioscript for this exercise.
called Pecha Kucha and say if they think it's a good
idea and give reasons why or why not. Ask students to
I Answers
IF 2 F 3 F 4 T 5 F 6 F 7T
feedback their ideas in open class.
6 In pairs, students use the sentences in exercise 5 to write
Suggested answers a list of positive ideas about how to give a presentation.
It's short so it's easy to practise and rehearse. Draw students' attention to the exam ple sentence and
It's short enough to keep everyone interested. (Long prompts. Elicit ideas from different students around the
presentations are boring.) class.
You say only the key points and really use each slide. Suggested answers
It helps you improve your communication skills. It's a good idea to speak slowly and clearly.
It's too difficult to say everything in six minutes. It's a good idea not to read all the words on the slide.
It's useful to look at the audience.
It's a good idea not to stand in front of the screen.
It's a good idea to practise any difficult words in the
presentation.
J £E TASK f t Listening P68 tf \
~s students they are going to prepare a mini-
Understanding a listening text about com puters and
: esentation about Pecha Kucha to give to the class.
the Internet
• Step 1
^dividually, students decide what they are going to
WARMER
talk about. Encourage them to think of something
:hey really like, or are interested in, or know about. Play Hot seat. Prepare a list of words from previous
lessons and introduce some key vocabulary for this
• Step 2
lesson (keyboard, mouse, password, social network,
Ask students to prepare ten slides. Remind them
virus, website, blog, etc.).
not to make the mistakes in the text in exercises 3
■ Divide the class into two teams or more if you have
and 4.
a large class.
■ Step 3
■ Put a chair at the front of the class, with the back
Tell students to prepare some notes for each slide.
to the board.
Remind them that they've only got 20 seconds for
■ Students from each team rotate turns sitting in the
each slide.
chair.
• Step 4
■ Write a word on the board. Each team has 20
In pairs, students take it in turns to practise their
seconds to elicit the word written on the board
presentations. Remind them to time each other.
from their teammate sitting in the hot seat. They
• Step 5
cannot say, spell or draw the word.
Students give their presentations to the class.
■ A volunteer from the other team then comes and
sits in the 'hot seat'.
EACHER DEVELOPMENT: STUDENT TRAINING The team with the most points at the end of the
Assessing oral presentations game wins.

T'al presentations can be assessed by the teacher, the


l a In pairs, students discuss the questions. Elicit answers
: 'esenting student or other students. Peer evaluation is
from different students around the class.
3 good way to develop students' reflective and critical
;ense, but students should be directed, guided and l b l n pairs, students create an imaginary good password
--ained to learn from their peers and from their own and a bad password. Elicit what it is important to do or
-ista k e s. The teacher, the presenter and his or her peers not to do to create a password.
:an all use the same checklist, and the results can be
riscussed after the presentation. Suggested answers
Don't include your own name, date of birth or where you
/ // / / / / / / /
live. Use a mixture of numbers and letters. Use a mixture
Use of audiovisual of upper and lower case letters.
aids
2 LISTENING © 52 Play the track for students to listen to an
Body language expert talking about online passwords. Ask students
to note down which of their ideas in exercise 1b she
Eye contact with the
mentions. Ask students to com pare in pairs before you
audience
elicit answers from students around the classroom. See
Rate of speech (too p168 for the audioscript for this exercise.
; fast/too slow) Example answers
Not reading the text i Make it long.
on the slide

Structure of the
presentation
I ■ Make it com plicated. Use some capital letters, some
small letters, numbers, punctuation.

Choice of topic

Gram m ar
■ If possible, don't use real words, in English or in any
Vocabulary
language.
Pronunciation i Never use personal information - your name, your
birthday, your favourite band.
I ■ Alw ays keep your passwords secret!
1 ■ N ever send your password in an email.
I3 Answers

T 52
2 Play
T 3the
T track
4 F again
5 F for6 students
F 7 F to listen and
decide if the sentences are True (T) or False (F). Check
their answers.
4 SPEAKING What about you? Ask students to evaluate, with
TEACHER D EV ELO P M E N T: LANGUAGE
the information from the listening text, the passwords
they created in exercise 1b and create a really good The im perative
password together. Ask students to com e up to the
There is only one imperative form for both 'you' singular
board and write their really good passwords and vote on
and plural. The form of the imperative is the same as the
the best one.
infinitive.
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY W e use the imperative form when giving instructions
(Stand up./Take a left and then a right.), orders (O pen
Ask students to play Just a minute relay. In small
yo u r books.) and to make offers (Have a seat.). The
groups, students talk for a minute about one of
imperative is also very common in written instructions.
these topics: passwords, social networking, giving
W e can see the imperative on signs and notices (Do not
a presentation, how I use the Internet or a topic
use./lnsert a coin.). To be polite, we add please to the
of their choice connected with the unit's theme. A
sentence: Please stop talking!
speaker is 'buzzed out' for hesitation, repetition
or deviation by the students in their group. Points 2 Ask students to look at the ideas for security on the
are awarded to the listening students for a correct Internet and choose the alternative that gives good
challenge and to the student who is talking, if they advice. Give students time to compare and discuss their
are still talking at the end of the minute. The student answers in pairs before you check answers as an open
with the most points wins the game. class.
Answers
HOMEWORK
1 Don't give 2 Change 3 Don't use
Assign students page 47 in their Workbook or the 4 Don't make 5 Don't use 6 Log off 7 Have
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
3 Ask students to match the verbs with the ends of the
sentences (a—f) to make classroom instructions. Give
students time to compare in pairs before you check their
Grammar in context PP68 69 answers.

Giving basic instructions using the imperative and


talking about likes and dislikes using like, love, hate +
I Answers
I f 2 e 3c 4 d 5b 6a
gerund
4 Ask students to use the imperatives and the words given
to write typical school rules. Focus students' attention
» > FAST TRACK
on the exam ple sentence. Elicit answers from students
You could do exercises 1 and 2 as a class activity by round the class.
inviting different students to read out the sentences and
nominate another student to say the answer. Answers
2 Bring your books.
Test before you teach: Flipped classroom 3 Do your homework.
Set the Flipped classroom video and tasks for 4 Don't shout.
homework before the lesson. This will allow you 5 Listen to ,the teacher.
to assess the needs of the students before the class. 6 Don't write on the desk.
Students can then move on to the relevant grammar 7 Don't use your mobile phone without permission.
practice activities.
5 SPEAKING In pairs, ask students to make a list of good ideas
to learn English fast. Draw students' attention to the
The imperative exam ple sentences. Elicit ideas from students around
the class.
1 Ask students to look at the sentences and choose the
correct alternative. Check their answers. Suggested answers
Listen to English songs.
I Answers
1 use 2 negative 3 make 4 Don't 5 can
Go on holiday to the UK or the US.
Read books in English.
Look up new words in the dictionary and try to write your
own sentence with the new word.

like, love, hate + gerund

6 Students look at the sentences and answer the


questions. Check their answers.

I Answers
1 -ing 2 с
7 Ask students to write sentences with love, like, don 't
like, hate/can't stand and the gerund. Draw students' Developing speaking P7o Q ф
attention to the exam ple sentence. W alk round, helping
students if necessary. Elicit answers from students Asking for and giving information about places, films,
around the class. etc.
Answers
2 Je ss and Holly hate/can't stand watching TV. » > FAST TRACK
3 You don't like chatting online. You could ask students to com plete exercise 1 at home
4 We like playing com puter gam es. in preparation for the listening activity.
5 She loves doing sport.
6 They don't like reading. WARMER
7 O ur friends hate/can't stand listening to hip-hop. Play Tic-tac-toe to recycle vocabulary from the unit so
far.
8 SPEAKING In pairs, students take turns to ask and answer
■ Divide the class into two teams: X and O.
questions about the activities in exercise 7. Draw
■ Draw two tic-tac-toe grids on the board, side by
students' attention to the possible replies in the model
side. One grid for reference and one for actually
dialogue.
drawing the noughts and crosses.
9 Ask students to read the text and choose the best word ■ Write a prompt in each square: wh- question,
(A, В or C) for each gap. Go over the answers, asking Yes/No question, question with do, question
students why they chose each option. with does, question with be, question with have,
question with can, question with like, question with
I Answers
IB 2 В 3B 4 В 5 A 6 A 7 С 8B
H ow much.
a Each team must make a grammatically-correct
✓ EXAM SUCCESS Students read about multiple-choice question with the verb to win a square, e.g. What
doze activities. Elicit why it is important for students to is you r p assw ord? A re you an Internet ex p e rt? Do
ook at the words before and after the gap. Tell them to you go online every day?, etc.
turn to page 152 (Use of English: Multiple-choice cloze * To keep the entire class focused, pick students at
activities) to check their answers and read more about random.
this type of activity.
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: STUDENT TRAINING Asking for and giving information
M ultiple-choice cloze activities 1 Students look at the advertisem ent and say what
The multiple-choice cloze test is used in official information is missing. Draw students' attention to the
examinations. It is often a section of text with certain exam ple. Elicit answers in open class.
.vords removed, where the student is asked to com plete
the missing words in sentences. Cloze tests require the I Answers
b subject С place d tim e e price
ability to understand context and vocabulary in order to
f phone num ber
identify the correct words or type of words that belong
in the deleted passages of a text. Com pleting these 2 LISTENING О 53 Tell students they are going to listen to
sentences requires critical thinking skills and allows a boy called W illiam asking his friend Kay about the
teachers to measure how well students are able to use tutor in the advertisem ent. Play the track for students
semantic and syntactic cues to construct meaning from to com plete the missing information in exercise 1. Ask
the text as well as their knowledge of vocabulary and students to com pare in pairs before you check their
grammar. answers. See p168 for the audioscript for this exercise.
The most important step is feedback after students have
com pleted the activity. Discuss with the students their I Answers
a Sullivan b IC T С (your) home
:-,oices, review any other acceptable answers, where
d 5.30/half past five e 25 f 635212
possible, and ask the students to explain why they chose
a particular response. Discuss specific context clues that 3 Ask students to put the words in order to make
are found around the gap that help in word selection. questions from the dialogue. Then ask them to match
each one with the missing information (a-f) in exercise
Refer students to the Gram m ar reference on page 72 if
1. Remind students that for one of the pieces of
necessary.
information there are two answers. Ask students to
HOMEWORK com pare in pairs before you check their answers.
Assign students page 48 in their W orkbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.

Unit 5 95
Answers 6b Ask Student В to ask their partner their questions
1 W hat does she teach? (b) from exercise 5. Tell Student A to turn to page 155 to
find information about a new science-fiction film and
2 How do you spell Sullivan? (a)
answer their partner's questions. Walk around, checking
3 When can she give lessons? (d)
students are on task and making sure students are
4 Can she give lessons at your home? (c)
speaking English to each other.
5 How much do the lessons cost? (e)
Answers
6 What's the teacher's name? (a)
7 Have you got her telephone number? (f) Skylab. Apollo Cinema in Smith Street. 7.20 pm or
9.15 pm. It's an hour and forty-five minutes. Tickets cost
» > FAST FINISHERS £13 for adults and £10.50 for children under 12.

Students reconstruct the dialogue with the i Я Students read the question and say if
information from exercises 1 and 3 and practise it is important to listen to what their partner says and
saying it in pairs. say why or why not. Tell them to turn to Exam Success
on page 152 (Speaking: Information exchange) to check
their answers.
4 Ask students to look at the information in the Speaking
r^C---------------- ------- ----------------------------------------------
bank and find an exam ple of each type of question in
Model dialogues
exercise 3.
A: Have you got any information about the science
Answers museum?
1 W hat does she teach? When can she give lessons? B: Yes, I have.
How do you spell Sullivan? How much do the lessons A: W here is it?
cost? What's the teacher's name?
B: It's at 43 Lyall Street.
2 Can she give lessons at your home? Have you got her
A: How do you spell that?
telephone number?
B: L-Y-A-double L
3 W hat does she teach? How do you spell Sullivan? How
A: When is it open?
much do the lessons cost?
B: It's open from Monday to Saturday, from 10 am to 7 pm.
4 What's the teacher's name?
A: W hat can you see and do there?
5 Have you got her telephone number?
B: You can see 3D films and do different experiments.
6 When can she give lessons? Can she give lessons at
A: How much do the tickets cost?
your home?
B: It costs £6 for adults and £3 for children under 14.
5 Divide the class into A and В pairs. Ask Student A to A: Can you buy something to eat there?
use the words to help them prepare questions to ask
B: Yes, you can. There's a restaurant and a snack bar.
Student В about a science museum. Ask Student В to
A: That's great. Thanks!
use the words to help them prepare questions to ask
B: Have you got any information about the new science-
Student A about a new science-fiction film. Walk round,
fiction film?
helping students if necessary.
A: Yes, I have.
Answers B: What's it called?
Science museum (Student A): W here is it? How do you A: Skylab
spell that? When does it open? W hat can you see and do B: How do you spell that?
there? How much does it cost? Can you eat there?
A: S-K-Y-L-A-B.
Sci-fi film (Student B): What's the title? How do you spell
B: W here can I see it?
that? W here can you see it? When can you see it? How
A: It's on at the Apollo Cinema in Smith Street.
long does it last? How much does it cost?
B: When can I see it?
PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT A: You can go at 7.20 pm or 9.15 pm.
6a SPEAKING Ask Student A to ask their partner their questions B: How long does it last?
from exercise 5. Tell Student В to turn to page 154 to A: It's one hour and forty-five minutes long.
find information about the science museum and answer
B: How much do the tickets cost?
their partner's questions. Walk round, checking students
A: £13 for adults and £10.50 for children under 12.
are on task and making sure students are speaking
B: That's great. Thanks!
English to each other.

Answers
43 Lyall Street. Monday to Saturday 10 am to 7 pm. You
can see 3D films and do different experim ents. It costs
I £6 for adults and £3 for children under 14. There is a
restaurant and snack bar.

This page is taken from G a te w a y 2ndEdition AT + Teacher's Book. It is photocopiable and may be used within class.
I "EACHER DEVELOPMENT: STUDENT TRAINING
A questionnaire
Conversation skills 1 SPEAKING In pairs, students discuss the questions. Elicit
answers from different students around the class.
Vany oral examinations have a collaborative speaking task
.•■-ere it is important to listen carefully and 'actively' when 2 READING Refer students to the questionnaire. Ask what
: j r partner is speaking. Elicit from students how to keep the title of the questionnaire is and elicit what they
r conversation going. Remind them of some key points think it means. Ask who they think it's for and what the
.- "ich help the speaker know you are really listening: main aim of the questionnaire is. Ask students to match
' Face the speaker. the questions and the answers. G ive students time to
2 Maintain eye contact. compare in pairs before you check their answers.
3 Show you understand. Say uh-huh, really, interesting
and ask follow-up questions. I Answers
1 g 2 h 3b 4a 5 f 6 c 7e 8d
- Focus on what the speaker is saying. Don't just think
about what you are going to say next. 3 a Ask students to look at the instructions in the Writing
bank about how to write a good questionnaire.
-3MEW0RK
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: STUDENT TRAINING
Assign students page 49 in their W orkbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook. W riting a questionnaire
A questionnaire is a set of questions on a given topic that
can be filled in by an interviewer or by the person being
Developing writing P7i asked the questions. A questionnaire is usually used
Щ Щ to collect information that is not available elsewhere.
* Writing a simple questionnaire Questionnaires usually ask for people's opinions and
views that give you statistics about a subject you're
researching. You need to know how the survey results
» > FAST TRACK
will help you. There's no point in asking for information
■'ou could ask students to do exercise 2 at home and that isn't relevant to your aim. Before writing your
:neck their answers at the start of the lesson. Alternatively, questionnaire, make sure you know what you want to
.ou could set the writing task in exercise 5 as homework. find out. Predict what you think the results will show;
it will help you write the questions. After completing
WARMER the survey, look at the results to see if they match your
Write the names of the ten most famous museums on prediction.
the board in one column, and the cities where they
3 b Ask students to read the questionnaire written by a
are situated, out of order, in another. Be sure to mix
student and decide if the student followed the advice in
up the order of the cities so they appear differently to
the Writing bank. Elicit answers from different students
the key. Ask students to match the museums with the
around the class.
cities and the name of the country in pairs. The first
pair to finish shouts Finished! Check their answers. Answers
1 The title could be more interesting.
Smithsonian Institution New York City
2 Not all the questions are relevant to the topic, e.g .
Le Louvre Amsterdam
Can you read? isn't a good question.
Acropolis Museum Florence
3 The questions could be in a more logical order.
State Hermitage London
4 The writer has made several grammatical mistakes.
British Museum Paris
The Prado Vatican City
Metropolitan Museum of Art Washington D.C.
Vatican Museums Athens
The Uffizi Gallery St Petersburg
Rijksmuseum Madrid

Answers
Smithsonian Institution, Washington D .C ., the US
Le Louvre, Paris, France
Acropolis Museum, Athens, G reece
State Herm itage, St. Petersburg, Russia
British Museum, London, England
The Prado, Madrid, Spain
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, the US
Vatican Museums, Vatican City, Italy
The Uffizi Gallery, Florence, Italy
Rijksmuseum, Am sterdam , the Netherlands
4 In pairs, students do the tasks. Ask them to correct any 5c Ask students to report back to the class and tell them
mistakes, take out any questions that are not relevant, some interesting answers to the questions in their
add one or two relevant questions and think of an questionnaires. .
interesting title. Check answers in open class. - -------------------------

Answers | Model text


1 j The Internet - good or bad?
; Ebooks - do you like them or not? ! 1 How often do you use computers?
1 Do you like reading ebooks? ] 2 W hat is your main reason for using the Internet?
2 Have you got an ebook? i 3 Have you got a com puter at home?
3 W hat do you think about reading in general? ! 4 W hat other devices do you use to go online?
4 Can you read? ] 7 Do you prefer surfing the Internet on your phone or
! your computer?
5 Which do you prefer - ebooks or traditional books?

I
! 5 W hat do you like doing online?
6 W hat do you like about traditional books?
] 6 W hat do you dislike about the Internet?
2
! 8 W hat is your general opinion of the Internet and the
Can you read? is not a relevant question.
! information it offers?

3
W here do you buy your ebooks? W hat type of books do ++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
you read? W hat are the advantages of ebooks?
Students could analyse their results and write a short
4
report on their survey.
Are traditional books a thing of the past?

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT HOMEWORK


5a Ask students to read the task and write a questionnaire Assign students page 50 in their Workbook or the
to find out what people in their class think about
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
computers and/or the Internet. Remind them to ask
questions like: What do they like doing with com puters
or online? What do n 't they like? and use the information
in the Writing bank to help them. Tell them to plan what
they are going to write and to follow the advice in the
Writing bank on page 156.

5b Ask students to give their questionnaire to other


students to com plete. Remind everyone to write their
answers on a separate sheet of paper.

This page is taken from G a te w a y 2nd Edition A1 + Teacher's Book, It is photocopiable and may be used within class.
98 U n its
» > FAST TRACK
- he extra support provided on the Grammar and
Vocabulary reference sections makes the Grammar
and Vocabulary revision sections ideal for setting for 2 monitor
nomework. You could get students to complete the whole 3 touchpad
'evision page or just certain exercises for homework. 4 USB cable

5
Grammar revision p73
16 touch sc reen
speaker

■ 7 screensaver
can/can't
USING COMPUTERS
1 Students use the prompts to write sentences with can
and can't. 2 Students choose the correct alternative.
Answers
1 Can Ann ski?
I Answers
1 send 2 on 3 download 4 on 5 save
2 Nathan can't dance. 6 cut and paste
3 I can speak English.
4 Liz and Kate can't understand Germ an. THE INTERNET
5a Q : Can Mike play the guitar? 5b A : Yes, he can.
3 Students put the letters in the correct order to make
words connected with the Internet.
Adverbs of manner

2 Students choose the correct alternative. I Answers


1 blog 2 virus 3 website 4 password
Answers 5 search engine 6 social network
1 quickly 2 hard 3 fast 4 clear 5 carefully
HOMEWORK

The imperative Assign students page 51 in their Workbook or the


relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
3 Students write imperatives using the prompt sentences.
Answers
1 Do your homework!
2 Don't walk in the road!
3 Don't copy in exams!
4 Do your homework tonight!

like, love, hate + gerund

4 Students find and correct six mistakes in the dialogue.


Answers
Chloe: Do you like tree using your tablet?
Andy: Yes, I +tke do. And I love feed reading my ebook.
W hat about you?
Chloe: I prefer traditional books. I like t© going to
bookshops. My dad is the sam e. He doesn't can't stand
reading digital books. He really loves hates reading
them.

Unit 5 99
KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES L cef
Students will be able to:
* talk about what is happening now using the present name different clothes and say what people are
continuous wearing
understand simple written and spoken texts describe pictures
connected with shops and shopping write a note and check their work

ВНВНННИООНЯВВВВВЯНЯН^^
UNIT OVERVIEW DIGITAL OVERVIEW
Shops
Shopping
Presentation Kit e/ \
Vocabulary Flipped classroom video Unit 6: Present
continuous - affirmative and negative
Text m essage conversation
Life skills video Unit 6: Identifying selling techniques
Reading Special offers
CRITICAL THINKING Discussing statistics [v*] Vocabulary tool: Shops; Shopping; Clothes
about text messaging Interactive versions of Student's Book activities
Present continuous - affirmative Integrated audio and answer key for all activities
and negative Workbook pages with answer key
Grammar in PRONUNCIATION Correct stress in -ing
context words
Teacher's Resource Centre TRC
Clothes ► Flipped classroom video Unit 6: Present
continuous - affirmative and negative
Vocabulary ► Life skills video Unit 6: Identifying selling
Money and finance: Identifying techniques
'ШМ
selling techniques ► Grammar communication activity Unit 6: Ten
Life skills seconds
A phone conversation ► Worksheets for this unit, including:
- Grammar Practice worksheet Unit 6
I Listening - Flipped classroom video worksheet Unit 6: Present
Present continuous - questions continuous - affirmative and negative
and short answers - Literature worksheet Units 5 and 6
Grammar in Present simple and present - Culture worksheet Unit 6
context continuous
- Life skills video worksheet Unit 6
Describing pictures
- Everyday English video Unit 6'

Developing
speaking Student's App P
A short note - 2 G ateway 2nd Edition wordlist for the award-winning
Sounds App (available for download)
Developing
writing
Reading: Matching notices and
prompt sentences
Exam su ccess Listening: Multiple-choice

■J TESTING AND ASSESSMENT


Resources for exam preparation and measuring student progress

► Test G enerator Units 1-6 ► Printable tests ► G ateway to exam s Units 5 and 6
Unit 6 and Review (Units 4-6) (end of Unit 6)
Good buys

++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
Vocabulary P74
Play the track again for students to answer these
Talking about shops and shopping comprehension questions.
1
» > FAST TRACK What d oes he w ant? (an England football shirt)
You could ask students to do exercises 1 and 5 at home D oes he buy it? (No, they haven't g o t any.)
so that less confident students are prepared for these 2
activities. What do they b uy? (chicken, strawberries, butter,
jam)
WARMER 3
How much m oney d oes she put in her account? (£50)
Write these items on the board:
4
cakes, money, medicine, a T-shirt, a watch, a
newspaper, a stamp, boots, tennis racket, som e milk What does he p o st? (three letters and a postcard)
In pairs, students race to think of the names of shops How d oes he p ost them ? (first class)
where they can obtain these things. Set a two-minute 5
time limit and give them regular updates, e.g. One Why don't they go to the superm arket? (There are a
minute to go . . . . When a pair has all the names they lot o f p eo p le in there.)
shout Finished! Ask students to open their books on What do they buy at the baker's? (bread and possibly
page 74 and look at the words in the box in exercise cakes)
1 to check their answers. Refer students to the unit 6
title G o o d buys and the image and ask them what What d oes she want? (to repair her watch)
they think the unit is going to be about (shops, Can they fix it? (If it's som ething easy.)
shopping, money). Ask students what the unit title
means - something you can buy at a cheap price,
4 SPEAKING In pairs, students take turns to ask their partner
a bargain - and why it is a play on words in English
how often they go to the places in exercise 1 .
(G ood buy sounds the same as Goodbye!).
0 Shopping
2 Shops 5 In pairs, students match the photos with the words.
1 Ask students to look at the plan of the shopping centre
and match the shops with the words in the box. Check I Answers
1 credit card 2 cash 3 cheque 4 change
their answers.
5 purse/wallet 6 price 7 sale 8 size
Answers
a chemist's b shoe shop с sports shop 6a Students com plete the dialogue with words in exercise
d post office e bank f newsagent's 5. Ask students to say which person is the shop assistant
g clothes shop h bakery i jeweller's j superm arket and which is the customer. Students com pare their
answers in pairs.
2 @ 54 Play the track for students to listen and repeat.
Highlight the /к/ sound in chem ist's and the /d3/ sound 6 b © 56 Play the track for students to listen and check
in jew eller's /'d3u;3l 9(r)z/. Students practise saying the their answers. See p169 for the audioscript for this
words. See p168 for the audioscript for this exercise. exercise.
Answers
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: PRONUNCIATION
1 size 2 price 3 credit 4 cash 5 purse
T h e / к / sound 6 change
Remind students that the letters ch in chemist's are A is the custom er
pronounced like the к in kick and not like the ch in В is the shop assistant
church. W rite the phonetic spelling on the board:
/:kemists/ and drill the pronunciation. 6c SPEAKING In pairs, students practise the dialogue and
invent a similar dialogue. Ask students to substitute the
3 LISTENING © 55 Play the track for students to listen and items they are buying, prices and methods of paying to
say where the people are in the shopping centre. Check invent similar dialogues.
their answers and elicit the key words that helped them
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
decide. See pp168—169 for the audioscript for this
exercise. Ask students to perform their dialogues for other
students to guess the names of the shops.
Answers
1 sports shop 2 superm arket 3 bank 4 post office
5 bakery 6 jeweller's HOMEWORK

Assign students page 52 in their Workbook or the


relevant sections of the Online Workbook.

Unit 6___________ 101


4 Ask students to match the notices (A-G ) to the prompt
Reading P75 sentences (1-5). Remind them there are seven notices
but only five prompt sentences. Give students time to
Understanding a text message conversation and compare in pairs before you check their answers in open
notices class.

» > FAST TRACK I Answers


IF 2D 3 E 4 A 5 В
You could ask students to do exercises 1 and 2 for
homework and check their answers. » > FAST FINISHERS

Write some extra questions on the board for students


WARMER
to ask and answer in pairs, e.g. When do you shop?
Ask students to race to match the abbreviated text How much do you usually sp e n d ? What's your
terms to the full English version. Write them on the favourite sho p ? Do you shop online?
board and set a time limit of three minutes and check Elicit answers to the questions when the whole class
their answers. has finished.
Text message Full English
✓ EXAM SUCCESS Students say if it is important to read
1 L8R a see you all the notices before they make their decision. Elicit
2 CU b before reasons why or why not and tell them to turn to page
3 UR с mate 152 (Reading: Matching notices and prompt sentences)
to check their answers.
4 M8 d later
5 B4 e at the moment TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: STUDENT TRAINING
6 RU f great M atching notices and prom pt sen ten ces
7 2 DAY g for your information
A part of the reading paper in many official examinations
8 FYI h you are asks students to look at very short texts, such as signs
9 GR8 i are you and m essages, postcards, notes, emails, labels and
10 ATM j today match them to prompt sentences. Students should read
all the notices first and look for key words to help them
Answers
choose the correct answer. When they have finished the
Id 2 a 3 h 4 c 5b 6 i 7 j 8 g reading activity, encourage them to keep a record of any
9 f 10 e new key words they find.

1 READING Refer students to the text m essage conversation 5 Individually, students read
between Mason and Evan. Ask them to read it and say the statistic about American teenagers and text
where Mason and Evan are exactly in the Greenwood messaging and decide what they think. Then, ask
Shopping Centre. Check their answers and elicit the students to compare their ideas with the rest of the
names of the shops (Win and Heels). class.
Answer Example answer
Mason is outside the sports shop (Win). I think it is a lot. I don't think people receive and send as
Evan is in the shoe shop (Heels). many m essages in this country.
W e usually don't make phone calls and most of the text
2 Ask students to read the texts again and answer the
m essages are very short, just to say 'H ello'.
question.

Answers
1 Becky is in the shoe shop; she needs new shoes for the
E CULTURAL INFORMATION
Most teenagers in America are inseparable from their
party tonight. mobile phones (US cell phones). Text messaging has
2 Mason sends Evan a photo of a special offer at the become the preferred channel of basic communication
sports shop because he needs a new sports bag. between teens and their friends. Some 75% of 12-17
3 Becky's sister, wearing a blue T-shirt. year olds now own mobile phones, up from 45% in 2004.
4 In the shoe shop. Those phones have become indispensable tools in teen
communication patterns. Teens use their phones to
3 Ask students to look at the notices from the Greenwood record and share their daily experiences. Text messaging
Shopping Centre and say which notice Mason sends to is functional and efficient. Teenagers are not talking
Evan. Check their answers. about much, but they're telling people they're connected
to them. Q W ER TY smartphone keyboards, predictive
I Answer
D
text, autocorrect, and the removal of m essage character
limits means teenagers are typing full, real words.
However, abbreviated slang appears to be here to stay.
SPEAKING What about y o u ? Divide the class into pair? or 2a Ask students to look at the exam ples and com plete the
small groups and ask them to discuss how many texts table with the correct -ing forms.
they send a day, to whom they send them and if they
Answers
send many picture m essages. In a less confident class,
give students time to prepare their answers in written List A List В List С
form before doing this as a speaking activity. Elicit some w ear -> wearing dance -» dancing chat -> chatting
answers from different pairs/groups and try to create a
cook - * cooking take - * taking sit - * sitting
discussion in open class.
study -» studying have -» having shop -> shopping
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY read -» reading save -» saving stop -» stopping
Ask students to write text m essages to each other
using the abbreviated text term s from the Warmer. 2b Ask students to match the spelling rules (1-3) with the
correct list (A -C).

HOMEWORK Answers

Assign students page 53 in their W orkbook or the


1 В 2 A 3 С
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
Say some more verbs and elicit from students which
group they go in:

A Add -ing sen d - sending,


sing - singing
В Verbs ending in drive - driving,
» > FAST TRACK consonant + e, take away ride - riding
You could ask students to do exercises 1, 2a and 2b. -e and add -ing
You could then check their answers and do the other С Verbs ending in one win - winning,
activities in classroom. vowel + one consonant, clap - clapping
we double the last letter
Test before you teach: Flipped classroom and add -ing.
Set the Flipped classroom video and tasks for
homework before the lesson. This will allow you
3a PRONUNCIATION^ 57 Play the track for students to listen to
to assess the needs of the students before the class.
the exam ple -ing words in the table in exercise 2a. Ask
Students can then move on to the relevant grammar
them to mark the stress in each word. Draw students'
practice activities.
attention to the exam ples. See p169 for the audioscript
for this exercise.
Present continuous - affirmative and negative
I Answer
The stress is always on the first syllable.
1 Ask students to look at the sentences and answer the
questions. зь Q 57 Play the track again for students to listen and
Answers repeat the words with the correct stress.

1 the auxiliary of to be 4 A sk students to write the correct form of the verb to be


2 we add not to the auxiliary to com plete the text m essages. Check their answers in
3 W e use the present continuous to talk about things open class.
happening now.
I Answers
1 'm/am 2 're/are 3 's/is 4 isn't/is not 5 's/is
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE
6 'm not/am not 7 're/are 8 're/are 9 're/are
Present continuous 10 are
We form the present continuous with to be + verb -ing.
5 Ask students to put the verbs in the correct form of the
Write I am, he is, we are, they are on the board and elicit
present continuous. Check their answers in open class.
from students what the shortened forms are (I'm, he's,
we're, they're). Remind them that we use the short form Answers
when we are speaking and check and drill pronunciation. 1 is watching 2 aren't talking 3 is making
It may help students to know that words/phrases such as 4 'm/am doing 5 're/are writing 6 'm/am not sitting
now, at the m om ent, at this time and right now are often 7 are shopping
used with the present continuous.
We double a consonant before adding -ed and -ing to
a verb ending in one vowel + one consonant. However,
if the final syllable is not stressed, we do not double the
final letter, e.g. listen, happen , visit.

Unit 6 103
6 Students look at the people in the photos and com plete
0 Clothes
sentences to describe what they are doing using the
1 Ask students to find someone in the picture on the page
verbs in the present continuous. Check their answers in
who is wearing the items in the box. Draw students'
open class.
attention to the exam ple. Elicit answers in open class.
Answers
Answers
1 Isabella is running.
coat - Anna
2 Gavin and Lucas are talking.
dress - Anna
3 Matt and O liver are playing com puter games.
jacket - Jo e
4 Leo is reading a book.
jeans - Jo e
5 Stella is listening to music.
jum per - Katie
6 Alyssa is writing.
shirt - David
7a Ask students to write four sentences about the people skirt - Katie
in the photo. Ask them to make two sentences true and sweatshirt - Simon
two sentences false. W alk around and monitor students,
T-shirt - Magda
helping them if necessary.
top - Katie, Magda
Example answers trainers - Simon
A girl is sitting on the grass. trousers - David, Jo e
She is listening to music.
2 О 58 Play the track for students to listen and repeat
A man and a woman are running in the middle of the
the words in the box in exercise 1. See p169 for the
photo.
audioscript for this exercise.
The man is wearing shorts.
3 SPEAKING Draw students' attention to the model dialogue.
7b SPEAKING Divide the class into small groups and ask
In pairs, students close their books and try and
students to close their books. Tell them to take it in turns
remem ber what the people are wearing.
to read out their sentences for others to guess which
sentences are true and which are false. Draw students' 4 SPEAKING In pairs, students take it in turns to ask and
attention to the model dialogue. Elicit some sentences answer the questions. In a less confident class, students
in open class at the end of the activity. could note down their answers before doing this as a
speaking activity. Elicit answers from students around the
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
class.
In small groups, students mime one of the verbs in
exercise 2a for others to guess what they are doing. ++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
■ Ask everyone to get a pen/pencil and a piece of
Refer students to the Gram m ar reference on page 84 if paper.
necessary.
■ Divide the class into two teams and ask the teams
HOMEWORK to stand in two lines so that each member of Team
Assign students page 54 in their Workbook or the A is facing a member from Team B.
relevant sections of the Online Workbook. ■ Explain that the person opposite them is their
partner. Ask the students to turn around so that
they are back-to-back with their partner.
Vocabulary P77 ■ Ask them to remember and write down what their
partner is wearing that day without looking. They
Talking about what you wear must include colours. Model with what you are
wearing, e.g. a blue shirt, red b oots and blue jeans.
» > FAST TRACK ш Explain that each correct item of clothing they
write down is a point for their team, but if you
Ask students to do exercise 1 at home. In class, play the
catch them looking you will remove points from the
track in exercise 2 for students to listen and repeat the
team.
words.
■ Set a time limit of two minutes for this before
allowing students to turn round. Count each team's
points.

HOMEWORK

Assign students page 55 in their W orkbook or the


relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
Good buys

WARMER
Gatew ay to life skills pp78-79 Write this short text on the board. In pairs, ask
students to work out the total cost of each flight and
Identifying selling techniques
say which flight they would choose and why.
To think about how special offers influence us, to look at
Two flights from London to Munich
different techniques used in adverts and to identify the
Flight 1: Flight ticket $400, including meals, drinks
ways adverts make us want to buy things
and luggage. Passengers pay $40 on travel to
airports. The flight takes three hours and 11 minutes.
» > FAST TRACK
Flight 2: Flight ticket $221 for the ticket, $58.46 for
You could ask students to do exercise 2 for homework in the meals, drinks and luggage. Transit costs $71.41 as
preparation for the lesson. the airports are further from the city. The flight takes
four hours 16 minutes.
E BACKGROUND INFORMATION Answers
The buying power of children and adolescents has Flight 1: $440 in total
increased exponentially o vertim e and has made Flight 2: $350.87 in total
targeting youth a lucrative business. A recent study by
Elicit answers in open class and ask students to look
Nickelodeon (the children's TV channel) revealed that
at Key concepts on page 78 to see if they used any
teenagers also shape the buying patterns of their whole
of the words in their discussion. Elicit from students
families; from holiday destinations, to buying a car, to
what they think the lesson is going to be about.
what the family will eat for breakfast. Seventy-one per
cent of US parents ask for their children's opinion when
1 In pairs, students take it in turns to ask and answer the
making purchases. More than two-thirds of these parents
questions. If they answer Yes, ask them to give more
take their children's opinion into consideration when the
details. Elicit answers from different pairs around the class.
purchase is for the family as a whole, and three out of
five parents would ask their children which luxury car they 2 READING Ask students to quickly read the texts about how
liked. The phenomenon is not only Am erican, the same shops and businesses use special offers to make us buy
trend is developing in Israel, India and the Philippines. things and match each one to the correct photo.
Marketers use a variety of traditional techniques to
attract audiences to increase product purchases: 'Buy I Answers
lb 2 a 3 c
one get one free' and freebies (free merchandise that
accom panies a product). However, a range of new 3 A sk students to read the text again and choose the
pricing practices has com e into use to attract consumers. correct alternative. Check their answers in open class.
Drip pricing has becom e popular online. Consum ers
only see an elem ent of the price upfront, and price
increments are revealed as they 'drip' through the buying
I Answers
lb 2 a 3 a
process (e.g. airline taxes or charges to pay using credit
4 In pairs, students look at the offers and discuss what
cards). That is, the total price is only revealed (or can only
they need to think about before they take them . Elicit
be calculated) later on in the purchasing process. Others
students' comments in open class.
include 'baiting' (with a few discounted products) and
com plex 'three-for-two' offers. Suggested answers
In this lesson, students evaluate a variety of selling a W hat extra costs are there, e.g . is there a booking fee,
techniques and how they can affect consumer behaviour or a credit card fee?
and value perceptions. b W ill you use all of the extra product or will you throw
some away?
С How many items have a 50% discount? Will lots of
items have a small discount or no discount at all?

i In pairs, students think of an advert or type of advert


that uses the selling techniques a-d . Elicit answers from
students around the class.

» LISTENING О 59 Tell students they are going to


ш ЯШ Ж watch or listen to two students talking about the
advertising techniques (a-d) in exercise 5.
A sk them to put the techniques in the order they are
m entioned. Elicit answers from different students around
the class. See p169 for the videoscript/audioscript for
this exercise.
Answers
1 с 2d За 4 b

Unit 6 105
7 Q 59 Play the video or track again for students to
match the advertising techniques (a-d) from exercise Listening Pso
5 to the sentences (1-6). Elicit answers from different
students around the class. Understanding a phone conversation connected with
shops and shopping
I Answers
la 2 c 3b 4 d 5 c 6b WARMER

++ EXTRA ACTIVITY Write the word A D V ER TISEM EN T on the board. Set


a time limit of three minutes for students, in pairs, to
Freeze frame: pause the video in different places
make as many words as they can from this word. Give
with the freeze frame button of your video or DVD
regular time updates, Two minutes to go . . . !, then
player. Press freeze frame when a character has
ask them to stop. The pair with the most words wins
an interesting expression on his/her face, is about
the game.
to react to something or answer a question. Have
students anticipate what the character will say or do ■J EXAM SUCCESS Students read the technique for doing
next. Release freeze frame to compare with what multiple-choice listening activities. Ask students to read
actually happens. 1-6 in exercise 1 and decide which words are important.
Encourage them to underline the important words. Ask
8 SPEAKING In pairs, students discuss the questions. In a less students how this can help them. Elicit answers and tell
confident class, students could prepare their answers them to turn to page 152 (Listening: Multiple choice) to
in written form before they do this as a speaking check their answers.
activity. W alk around the class, noting down good use
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: STUDENT TRAINING
of language and any errors to go over in a feedback
session at the end of the activity. Before you listen
Example answers Students can predict what the listening is about and
1 I don't like adverts on TV. They are boring and they identify important words if they look at questions and
interrupt interesting programmes. pictures before they listen. Key vocabulary may be
illustrated in the pictures/photos and give clues to the
2 I'm sure advertising is a good thing. It allows us
content of a listening. If students read the questions,
to get the latest information about new products,
they can predict the answer and be clear about exactly
technologies and services. It encourages com panies to
what information they are listening for. This helps reduce
produce cheaper and better products.
anxiety and improves students' performance.
3 Advertising influences everyone, even if you think
it doesn't. I sometimes buy a product and then I 1 LISTENING Q 60 Play the track for students to listen to a
remem ber the advert on TV. phone conversation between a boy called Luke and his
4 Adverts with young, famous people are effective mum. Ask students to choose the correct answer. See
because teenagers want to be like them. pp169-170 for the audioscript for this exercise.

2 О 60 Play the track again for students to com plete and


LIFE TASK
check their answers. Ask students to compare in pairs
Divide the class into small groups. Tell students they before you elicit answers from students around the class.
are going to make an advert and ask them to follow Elicit w hether underlining the key words helped students
the plan. decide on their answers. Check their answers.
■ Step 1
In their groups, students think of a product that is I Answers
1C 2 С ЗА 4 С 5 С 6В
popular with them and their friends.
■ Step 2 3 SPEAKING What about you? In pairs, students discuss who
Ask students to think of advertising techniques and buys the items 1-3 in their family.
ideas that are popular with teenagers.
» > FAST FINISHERS
■ Step 3
Students answer more detailed questions about
Ask students to create an advert. Walk around,
things they buy:
helping them to decide if their advert is for TV,
radio, a newspaper, online, etc. Ask them to Where do you go shopping for food/your clothes/
prepare some of the following for their advert: a things you need for school or sp o rt?
video, music, photos or pictures, a dialogue, etc. What are typical things that your family buys for food
■ Step 4 each w eek?

Students show their adverts to the class. Ask


students to vote on the best advert. HOMEWORK
Assign students page 55 in their Workbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
3a Ask students to put the words in order to make
Gram mar in context PP8o-8i questions.
Answers
Asking questions and giving short answers using
the present continuous, and the present simple and Й 1 Are you doing an English exercise?
present continuous м2 W hat is your mum doing now?
3 W hat is your teacher doing at the moment?
» > FAST TRACK 4 W here are you sitting?
You could do exercises 1 and 2a as a class activity by 5 W hat are your friends doing?
inviting different students to read out the sentences and 6 W ho are you talking to right now?
nominate another student to say the answer.

Test before you teach


Think of an action and mime it for your students, e.g.
1 7 A re people writing at the moment? *

3b SPEAKING In pairs, students take turns to ask and answer


the questions. Remind them to give true answers. Elicit
some answers from students around the class.
making a cake, eating a bow l o f sou p, driving to school,
etc. Ask students to guess what you are doing and elicit a 4 Ask students to look at the pictures and make questions
sentence in the present continuous, e.g. You're making a and answers using the words given. Check their answers.
cake. Ask other students to mime actions for the class to
guess and check how comfortable they are with forming
Answers
sentences in the present continuous. If they already have 1 Q: Are Adam and Ben wearing jeans?
a good knowledge of the structure and use of this tense, A: Yes, they are.
move quickly through the first exercises in class. 2 Q: Is Becky playing the guitar?
A: No, she isn't. She's singing.
Present continuous - questions and short answe 3 Q: W hat is Nancy eating?
A: She's eating a burger.
1 Ask students to look at the questions (a-d) and choose 4 Q: Is Dylan buying bread?
the correct alternative (1-3). Check their answers. A: No, he isn't. He's buying a cake.

I* Answers
1 before 2 is 3 only use the verb to be Present simple and present continuous

5 Ask students to look at the sentences (a-d) and then


TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE
match them to the statements (1-4). Check their
Present continuous questions and short answ ers answers.
Yes/No questions are created by moving the verb be to
the beginning of the sentence. Wh-questions are formed I Answers
1 a, с 2 b, d 3 a, с 4 b ,d
by moving the verb be, and then adding the Wh-word.
Sometimes Wh-questions start with a contraction, e.g.
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE
What's he d o in g ? Short answers contain the subject and
be. A negative short answer often has a contraction, e.g. The present sim ple and present continuous
No, he isn't. We use the present simple tense when we want to talk
about fixed habits or routines - things that don't change.
2a Ask students to com plete the questions with the present We use the present continuous to talk about actions
continuous form of the verbs given. Check their answers. which are happening at the present moment, but will
Answers soon finish.
1 is, wearing 2 A re, playing 3 are, doing He always buys pizza, tells us that buying pizza is
4 Are, wearing 5 Is, reading 6 is, listening something the speaker always does. It is part of a routine
7 is, writing or habit. W e can call this a perm anent situation.
I am buying a pizza, tells us that the speaker is buying a
2b Ask students to look at the photos on page 76 and pizza right now. W e call this a tem porary situation. We
answer the questions in 2a. Elicit answers from students use frequency adverbs with the present sim ple. We often
round the class. use these time expressions with the present continuous -
Answers at the m om ent, now, nowadays - either at the start or at
the end of the sentence.
1 Isabella/She is wearing a blue sweatshirt.
2 No, they aren't.
3 They/M att and O liver are playing com puter games.
4 Yes, they are.
5 No, he isn't.
6 Stella/She is listening to music in the park.
7 Alyssa/She is writing in the classroom on the
blackboard.

Unit 6 107
6 A sk students to read the text and choose the correct 1 SPEAKING In pairs, students look at picture a and answer the
alternative. W alk round, helping students if necessary. questions. Elicit answers in open class.
Elicit answers from students around the class.
Answers
Answers : 1 5/five
1 are they doing 2 Do you watch 3 are watching 2 They're in a bookshop.
4 brush 5 are brushing 6 are one million 3 O ne man is talking on his mobile phone. Another
people sending 7 surf 8 are surfing 9 are young man is standing and reading a book. One older
playing 10 sleep 11 are two billion people doing man is sitting in an armchair and reading a book. A
12 're sleeping girl is sitting in an armchair reading a book. A child is
standing and looking.
7 SPEAKING In pairs, students talk about the questions. Elicit
4 The girl and the child are wearing T-shirts and jeans.

1
possible answers from students around the class.
The young man is wearing jeans and a sweatshirt. The
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY other men are wearing shirts and trousers. The old
man is wearing a tie.
In pairs, students discuss what they think people in
their family are doing at the moment, e.g. I think my 2 Ask students to look at picture b and find ten differences
mum's working. I think my brother's playing basketball. between this picture and picture a. Encourage students
to use the questions in exercise 1 to help them.
Refer students to the Gram m ar reference on page 84 if
necessary. 3 LISTENING Q 61 Play the track for students to listen to two
HOMEWORK students doing exercise 2 and check their answers. Ask
students to compare in pairs before you check their
Assign students page 56 in their Workbook or the
answers in open class. See p170 for the audioscript for
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
this exercise.
| Answers
Developing speaking Ф p I In a the old man's wearing brown boots. In b they're

I
P82
black.
Describing pictures

» > FAST TRACK 2 In a he's reading a book. In b he's looking at a clock.


3 In a the time on the clock is half past two, in b it's half
You could set exercise 1 for students to prepare at home
past three.
and come to class to talk about.
4 There's a teenage boy looking at a book. In b he's
listening to an MP3 player as w ell, but in a he isn't.
WARMER
5 In a he's wearing trainers, in b normal black shoes.
Write these time zones around the world on the
6 In a there's a C C T V camera behind the girl in the
board. Make sure students understand what am and
armchair. In b, there isn't a camera.
pm mean (in the morning, in the afternoon/evening).
7 There's a girl in the armchair. In a she's got brown hair.
Find out if any of the students know what time it is in
In b it's black.
another city around the world.
8 In a she's reading a book. In b she's reading a comic.
Paris 1 pm
9 There's a small girl with a T-shirt. In a her T-shirt has
M oscow 4 pm
Beijing 9 pm
New York 8 am
Madrid 2 pm
I got stars, in b there aren't stars.

10 There's a man. In a he's talking on his mobile phone.


Rio de Janeiro 10 am In b he's texting someone.
Tokyo 10 pm
4 Q 61 Play the track again for them to listen to the
Sydney 11 pm students again and tick the words and expressions from
Los A ngeles 5 am the Speaking bank they use.
Model the activity first yourself. Choose a city, e.g. Paris
Answers
(but don't say which city you have chosen), and describe
what some people in that city are probably doing at I can see
that time, e.g. Som e people are eating bread with There is/There are ...
cheese., etc. Say more present continuous sentences In picture a there's a ... but in picture b there's a ...
until students guess where it is. In pairs, students then on
take it in turns to guess each other's secret city. behind
He's listening to music
I think

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT


5 In pairs, students talk about the two pictures. Ask them
to find ten differences between them . Remind them to
use the expressions in the Speaking bank to help them.
Suggested answers ++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
1 In a the bakery is called Brown's, in b White's.
Present continuous pictionary. Divide the class into
2 In a the man outside the bakery is sitting and reading, two teams. Ask a volunteer from Team A to come
in b he's standing. up to the board and draw a present continuous
3 In a this man is wearing grey shoes, in b he's wearing sentence on the board for their team to guess. Give
black shoes. them 20 seconds to encourage students to draw an
4 In a the boy on the left is eating, in b he's drinking. identifiable picture as quickly as possible for their
5 In a the girl in the middle is texting, in b she's looking team to guess to win a point. Repeat the activity with
at a tablet. Team B. If teams don't guess in the time given, the
6 In a a small boy outside the bakery is running, in b other team can guess for a point. The team with the
he's walking. most points wins the game.
7 In a there isn't a dog, in b there is.
8 In a an old lady in the foreground is wearing acoat, in HOMEWORK
b she's wearing a jacket.
Assign students page 57 in their Workbook or the
9 In a this lady has got black hair, in b she's got grey hair. relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
10 There's a man playing the guitar. In a his sweatshirt
says STAR, in b it says START.

Developing writing Рзз


Model dialogue
A: There's a high street with five shops. In picture a, Writing a short note - 2
there's a bakery called Brown's Bakery, but in picture
b it says White's Bakery. » > FAST TRACK
B: Yes, and in a and b there's a woman walking down the You could set the writing task in exercise 4 as homework.
street but in a she's wearing a long blue coat and in b
she's wearing a short blue jacket. WARMER
A: O h, yes. And look, in a she's got black hair and in b
In pairs, students take turns to make questions using
she's got grey hair.
the present simple and present continuous. Ask
B: O h, and the boy here is eating an apple but in picture
them to flip a coin to either answer the question
b he's drinking something. I think it's a coffee.
them selves (tails) or for their partner to answer
A: And in a there's a man sitting on a bench reading
(heads).
a newspaper, but in b he's standing reading a
newspaper. And in a he's wearing grey shoes and in b
he's wearing black shoes. A short note - 2
B: You're right. And I can see a man who is wearing a 1 In pairs, students look at the instructions for a writing
sweatshirt and playing the guitar. In a the sweatshirt's task. Draw their attention to the exam ple and ask them
got the word STAR but in picture b it says START. to write some ideas for what to include in the note to
A: And then there's a dog next to him in picture b but in their friend. Elicit ideas from different students around
picture a there is nothing. the class.
B: Yes, and a teenage girl is looking at her mobile phone Suggested answers
in a and in b she is looking at a tablet. W e can m eet at 3 pm outside the bookshop.
A: That's all, I th in k ... No, wait. The small b o y ... In a he's W e can have a pizza in the food court.
running but he's only walking in b.
A fter lunch, we can go to the cinema.

READING Ask students to look at two students' notes in


TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: STUDENT TRAINING response to the task in exercise 1. Ask them to read
them and answer the questions. Ask different students
D escribing pictures around the class if they have sim ilar ideas and what they
Many oral exam inations have a collaborative speaking think of each note.
task where students are often asked to describe a photo
or a picture for a minute. Students often need to use the
present continuous tense to describe what is happening.
Students can need a lot of practice to help them do this
well. Remind them to move from the general to the more
specific, e.g. start off with a general description of the
picture or photo before going into more detail. Students
also need to know the vocabulary for describing different
parts of a photo or a picture, e.g. at the top, at the
bottom , in the left-hand com er, jn the background, in
the front, behind, next to, on the right, on the left, in the
m iddle.

This page is taken from G a te w a y 2nd Edition A H Teacher's Book. It is photocopiable and may be used within class.
Macmillan Publishers Limited 2016
3 Refer to the correction checklist in the Writing bank.
A sk students to find an exam ple of each mistake in one
of the notes and correct it. Draw their attention to the
exam ple. Check their answers.
Answers
В
capital letters: ite+terr Italian pizza place
spelling: Shoping Shopping Centre
word order: an offe r spec ia l a special offer
agreement between the subject and verb: my mum
sey says
correct style (informal or formal): Hi Annette,
tenses: I g© am going to Greenwood ...

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT


4a Ask students to look at the instructions and write some
ideas to include in their note. Tell them to plan what
they are going to write and to follow the advice in the
Writing bank on page 156.

4b Ask them to use their ideas in exercise 4a to write their


note. When they have finished, ask them to check their
work using the correction checklist in the Writing bank.
Alternatively, ask students to work in pairs and swap
texts with their partner for them to check. Photocopy
the model text below for less confident students to give
them ideas.
rS“C-_______________________________________________
| Model text
! Good morning Sam!
! W e're going to the bakery now. Jad e wants to buy
! some typical English cakes. You're still sleeping. Meet
; us for lunch. W e can m eet up at Heels, the shoe shop at
! 1.00, for exam ple. I need some new shoes for the party
! tonight. Then we can go to the new American restaurant
J - Jad e wants to eat a hamburger and chips. After lunch,
! we can maybe go to Browntree Shopping Centre. W e
| can look at the clothes and things in the shops.
! See you!
! Jackie

HOMEWORK
Assign students page 58 in their Workbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
Vocabulary revision p85 ....... .........................
Language checkpoint: Unit 6
SHOPS

1 Students name the shops where they can buy the things
The extra support provided on the Gram m ar and (1-7).
Vocabulary reference sections makes the Gram m ar
and Vocabulary revision sections ideal for setting I Answers
1 bakery 2 newsagent's 3 chemist's 4 post office
for homework. You could get students to com plete
5 sports shop 6 jeweller's 7 superm arket
the whole revision page or just certain exercises for
homework.
SHOPPING

Grammar revision p85 2 Students read the definitions and write the words.

Present continuous - affirm ative and negative I Answers


1 custom er 2 wallet 3 price 4 size 5 credit card
1 Students use the prompts to write sentences in the
6 cash 7 change
present continuous.
CLOTHES
Answers
1 I'm writing the answers. 3 Students put the letters in the correct order to make
2 She isn't shopping. words for clothes.
3 We aren't chatting online.
4 Helen is waiting for you.
I Answers
1 coat 2 shirt 3 skirt 4 jum per 5 jeans 6 jacket
5 Kay and Tim are sitting on the sofa. 7 trousers
6 You aren't listening to me.
HOMEWORK
Present continuous - questions and short answers Assign students page 59 in their Workbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
2 Students choose the correct alternative.

I Answers
1 Are 2 not 3 doing 4 sitting 5 is 6 Are they
7 aren't

Present simple and present continuous

3 Students decide if the sentences are correct, and if they


are not they write them correctly.

Answers
1 Listen! Sarah is playing the piano.
2 I always do my homework in my bedroom.
3 Quickly! The teacher is waiting for us.
4 correct
5 She usually goes to bed at 10 pm.
6 correct
I
У Gatew ay to exams: Units 5-6

/ Reading P86 Speaking P87 Ф


/
/
/ > TIP FOR SPEAKING EXAMS
/ > TIP FOR READING EXAMS
Щ Ask students to read the tip to compare their ideas
у Students read the tip for matching notices to prompt
and then turn to Exam Success on page 152.
/ sentences and turn to Exam Success on page 152 for
/
more ideas. Divide the class into A and В pairs. Ask Student A to
/
/ prepare questions to ask Student В about an interesting
y. 1 READING Students read the notices (A-G ) and match them new shop. Ask Student В to prepare questions to ask
у
У to the prompt sentences (1-5). Point out that there are Student A about a new restaurant. Check their questions
У seven notices and five prompt sentences. Check their to make sure they are correct.
У answers.
У Answers
У Answers
У
У
I 1G 2 В 3C 4 A 5 D
New shop
■ What's the name of the shop?
У
У 2 In pairs, students say what the main message in the ■ W hat does it sell?
У other notices is. ■ W here is it? How do you spell that?
У
У ■ When is it open?
Answers
У ■ Has it got any special offers?
У E All the food we serve is vegetarian.
У New restaurant
F W e wash and repair your clothes.
У ■ What's the name of the restaurant?
У
У ■ W hat type of food does it serve?
У ■ W here is it? How do you spell that?
У
У ■ W hen is it open?
У ■ Has it got any special offers?
У
У 6a Student A asks their partner their questions from
У exercise 5. Student В turns to page 154 to find
У information in order to answer their partner's questions.
У
У Answers
У
У 3 Ask students to read the text and choose the best word Technoworld
У It sells com puters, laptops, tablets and webcam s.
У (A, В or C) for each space.
У It is in the Kirkby Shopping Centre
Answers
У
У
У
i; A 2 A 3B 4 A 5 В 6C 7C 8C
It's open from Monday to Saturday from 9.30 am to 8 pm.
There is a special offer: 50% off all printers and scanners.
У
У 6b Student В asks their partner their questions from
У Listening P87 exercise 5. Student A turns to page 155 to find
У
У r information to answer their partner's questions.
У Answers
У > TIP FOR LISTENING EXAMS
У Blue Star Grill
У Students read the tip about what to do in
They serve burgers, hot dogs and American-style food.
У multiple-choice listening activities. Ask them to turn
У They are in Clarke Street.
to Exam Success on page 152 for more ideas.
У They're open seven days a w eek from 11 am to 11 pm.
У
У 4 a Tell students to look at 1 to 5 and underline the Their special offer is free lemonade between 3 pm and 5 pm.
У
important words. Draw their attention to the exam ple.
У HOMEWORK
У Answers
У Assign students pages 60-61 in their Workbook or
У 2 Eve a can't see, screen b can't write, keyboard the relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
У
С hasn't got', letters, keyboard
У
У 3 Joe a can't, help Eve b helps Eve, write, laptop
У с brother, help Eve
У 1 Ask students to read the 'can do' statements and
У 4 Tom 5 Tom
У reflect on their own ability. Students mark from
У 4 b LISTENING Q 62 Play the track for students to listen to two 1-4 how well they can do each thing in English.
У teenagers talking about a problem. Ask them to choose
У 2 Ask students to look at their marks and decide
У the correct answers in exercise 4a. See p170 for the
У audioscript for this exercise. what they need to do to improve. Elicit ideas from
У students around the class.
У
У I Answers
lb 2b 3b 4a 5a
У

Units 5-6
KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES l cef
Students will be able to:
■ talk about the past using to be and the past simple understand basic written and spoken texts about
affirmative sports
■ name different sports and sports people and talk ask for and give an opinion on basic topics
about taking part in sports com petitions write a simple story

UNIT OVERVIEW DIGITAL OVERVIEW


Sports
Sports competitions
Presentation Kit Ш
/\
Vocabulary ► Flipped classroom video Unit 7: Past simple
PRONUNCIATION Word stress
affirmative - irregular verbs
The museum of football
Life skills video Unit 7: Working in a team
Reading CRITICAL THINKING Good and bad effects
of football today |~у"| Vocabulary tool: Sports; Sports people

Past simple of to be Interactive versions of Student's Book activities

There was/There were Integrated audio and answer key for all activities
Grammar in Workbook pages with answer key
context
Sports people Teacher's Resource Centre TRC
► Flipped classroom video Unit 7 : Past simple
Vocabulary affirmative - irregular verbs
Social skills and citizenship: ► Life skills video Unit 7: W orking in a team
Working in a team
► Grammar communication activity Unit 7 : Past
Life skills charades
Sports ► W orksheets for this unit, including:
- Grammar Practice worksheet Unit 7
Listening - Flipped classroom video worksheet Unit 7: Past simple
Past simple affirmative - regular affirmative - irregular verbs
verbs - Literature worksheet Units 7 and 8
Grammar in PRONUNCIATION -ed endings
- Culture worksheet Unit 7
context Past simple affirmative - irregular
- Life skills video worksheet Unit 7
verbs
- Everyday English worksheet Unit 7
Asking for and giving opinions

Developing
speaking
Student's App
Gateway 2nd Edition wordlist for the award-winning
Q
A story Sounds A pp (available for download)

Developing
writing
Listening: Matching
W riting: Checking your work
Exam su ccess

У TESTING AND ASSESSMENT v::'


Resources for exam preparation and measuring student progress

► Test G enerator Units 1-7 ► Printable test Unit 7 ► G ateway to exams Units 7 and 8
(end of Unit 8)
3a Ask students to look at the guide for how we use play,
d o and g o with sports.

3b Ask students to look at the sports in exercise 1 and


Talking about different sports and sports competitions
decide if they go with play, g o or do. Check their
answers.
» > FAST TRACK
Answers
You could ask students to do exercises 1 and 5 at home
so that less confident students are prepared for these 1 play: baseball, basketball, football, golf, ice hockey,
activities. rugby, tennis, volleyball
2 go: cycling, ice-skating, horse-riding, skiing, swimming
WARMER 3 do: gym nastics, judo

Write There's no '/' in team, on the board. Explain 4 SPEAKING In pairs, students take turns to ask and answer
that this is a very common expression in English. Put the questions. Elicit answers from students in open class.
your students into pairs and ask them to discuss what
» > FAST F IN IS H E R S
the expression means before you elicit their ideas in
open class. (Teamwork takes priority over individual In pairs, students tell each other more information
achievement.) Ask students to open their books at about the questions in exercise 4. Write the question
page 88. Refer students to the unit title Teamwork words on the board to help prompt students to ask
and the image and ask them what they think the unit questions: W hy? W here? H ow ?
is going to be about (sports, working in teams). Elicit
where the stress falls in teamwork.
0 Sports competitions
5 In pairs, students read the sentences and find the words
0 Sports in the box in the sentences. Ask them to check they
1 In pairs, students match the photos with some of the understand the meaning. Encourage them to use their
words. Check that they know the other sports. Ask dictionaries if necessary.
them to use their dictionaries if necessary. Check their
Answers
answers.
1 team , players 2 champion, medal 3 final, match,
Answers competition 4 race 5 wjnner(s), final, race, cup,
1 ice hockey 2 volleyball 3 gymnastics 4 baseball medal 6 com petition, team s, prize, cup, medal
5 cycling 6 rugby 7 horse-riding 8 judo 7 referee, match(es)
champion: someone who has won an important
2a PRONUNCIATION@ ^3 Ask students to look at A and B. Play
com petition, especially in a sport
the track for students to listen to the pronunciation and

I
say how many syllables each word has and where the competition: an organised event in which people try to
stress falls. See p170 for the audioscript for this exercise. win prizes by being better than other people
cup: a large round metal container with two handles
Answers
given as a prize to the winner of a competition
A two syllables, the stress is on the first syllable final: the last or deciding game in a competition
В three syllables, the stress is on the first syllable match: a game in which players or teams com pete
against each other, especially in a sport. The usual

I
2 b Q 6It Play the track for students to listen to all the
words in the box and decide which words are A (Oo) and ,, American word is game.
medal: a small flat piece of (often gold silver or bronze)

(
which words are В (Ooo). Elicit which two words are not
A or B. See p170 for the audioscript for this exercise. metal that you are given for winning a competition
player: someone who plays a particular game or sport
Answers

I
prize: a reward that you get for being successful in a
1 A baseball, cycling, football, judo, rugby, skiing,
sport, competition or gam e, or for being better than
swimming, tennis
others at something. Som eone who has won a prize is
В basketball, horse-riding, ice hockey, ice-skating, called a prize winner.
volleyball
2 golf, gym nastics (oOo).

2c О 64 Play the track again for students to listen and race: competition that decides who is the fastest at
repeat with the correct stress. doing something, especially running
referee: someone whose job is to make sure that players
in a game obey the rules

! team: a group of people who play a sport or a game


against another group: can be followed by a singular or

I plural verb

1 winner: someone who wins a race, competition or prize

6 Q 65 Play the track for students to listen and repeat the


words. See p170 for the audioscript for this exercise.
1 Refer students to the photos. In pairs, students say
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
what they can see in the photos and what they think the
Students could underline the word stress in the words connection is between each photo and football. Elicit
in the box in exercise 5 (see underlined syllables in ideas from around the class.
the answers above).
2 READING Ask students to read the texts and say exactly
7a SPEAKING In pairs, students talk about the photo of what each of the photos shows. Check their answers and
Rafael Nadal and the Spanish Davis Cup tennis team. ask them if their ideas in exercise 1 were co rre ct
Encourage them to use as many words as they can from Answers
exercise 5.
1 a portrait of King Henry VIII
7b LISTENING @ 66 Play the track for students to listen to two 2 a photo of the Field Gam e at Eton
people talking about the same photo. Ask them to tick 3 a picture of a World W ar I trench
the words in exercise 5 that they use. See p170 for the The connection between the photos is: Henry VIII played
audioscript for this exercise. football, Eton school wrote the first football rules, the
Answers British and Germ an soldiers played football together
I winner, com petition, player, cham pion, final, m edal, cup,
during the First World W ar at Christmas.

prize, team
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: STUDENT TRAINING
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY Inference in reading
In pairs, students mime the sports on page 88 for Drawing inference is a key strategy for reading. Good
their partner to guess. Encourage students to say readers use their prior knowledge about a topic and
full sentences in the present continuous, e.g; You're the information from the text they have read so far to
riding a horse, etc. make predictions about what might happen next. One
of the most important strategies in reading strategy is
drawing inference - really understanding the meaning
HOMEWORK
of things; what is important, why it is important, how
Assign students page 62 in their W orkbook or the one event influences another. Simply getting the facts
relevant sections of the Online Workbook. in reading is not enough - we must encourage students
to use clues to gain a deeper understanding of their
reading. Students should make sure that their inferences
Reading P89 are based on the text rather than their own feelings or
experience. Always ask students to check to see if they
Understand a text about sport can actually identify the parts of the text that led them to
their conclusion to check their com prehension.
» > FAST TRACK
3 Ask students to read the text again and say if the
You could ask students to find out the history of their sentences are True (T), False (F) or Not M entioned (NM).
favourite sport in preparation for exercise 6. G ive students time to com pare in pairs before you check
their answers in open class. Elicit how they decided on
WARMER their answers.
In pairs, students race to build a Syllable pyramid
with sports vocabulary from exercise 5 in the I Answers
IF 2 NM 3 F 4 F 5 T 6 T 7 NM 8F
previous lesson. Draw this syllable pyramid on the
board and ask them to write one-syllable words in 4 Individually, students think about
the one-piece blocks, two-syllable words in the two- football today and the good and bad effects it can
piece blocks, three-syllable words in the three-piece have on people. In a less confident class, ask students
blocks and one word in a four-piece syllable block. to make notes before they compare their ideas with
Check their answers. the rest of the class.
Example answers
I think football has a bad effect on people. Football
players are paid too much money and are not good
role models for young people. Som etim es there is a
lot of bad behaviour and violence at football matches.

Suggested answers

race
I There aren't any hooligans in other sports like rugby or
basketball.
I think football has a good effect on people. It is very
popular and lots of people want to play so it's good for
match prize cup them and their health. You also learn how to win or lose
win ner re 'fer ее and play as a team . People also really like to watch it and
they can enjoy going to matches with their friends and
com pe tion play er team

I family so it's good for relationships.

Unit 7 115
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
You could divide the class into two teams and hold a
Grammar in context PP9o-91
debate about the good and bad effects of football.
Talking about the past using the past simple o f the
verb to b e and there was/there were
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: CLASSROOM TIPS
D ebating in class » > FAST TRACK
Debate improves critical thinking. It makes us consider You could ask students to do exercises 1 and 2a at home.
two perspectives, not just our own and it encourages You could then check their answers and do the other
us to anticipate objections to our arguments, answer activities in class.
counter-arguments and to weigh the evidence on both
sides. Test before you teach
Divide the class into two teams according to how much Write these sentence prompts on the board:
they agree or disagree with a statement, e.g. Football 1 I/at hom e/last night
has a bad e ffect on p e o p le . Ask students to debate and 2 We/at school/yesterday
say their points of view. Remind students of the rules of 3 My last English test/easy
conduct: Elicit what time the sentences are about, present or
1 Everybody is free to speak, even if I disagree. past (past) and what verb they need to com plete the
2 I will respect my teamm ates. sentences (to be). Ask students to use the prompts to
3 I will be a generous winner and a gracious loser. write sentences in the past, using the positive or negative
O ne m em ber of the affirmative team speaks first, form, and then write three similar sentences in their
then one from the negative team . This continues until notebooks. Monitor to see if they have consolidated
everyone has spoken. At the end of the activity, ask your knowledge of the past simple of to be.
students to rate how much they agree with it;
0 = com pletely disagree and 10 = totally agree. Past simple of to be
5 Ask students to look at the underlined words in the text 1 Ask students to look at the sentences and choose the
and guess their meaning. Encourage students to then correct alternatives in 1-4.
check in their dictionaries.
Answers
I Answers
1 he, she, it
gentlemen: an old-fashioned word for a man from a
2 they
: family in a high social class
3 wasn't, weren't
invention: a machine, tool or system that someone has
4 before
m ade, designed or thought of for the first time
armies: large organisations of soldiers who are trained to
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: PRONUNCIATION
.1 fight wars on land
soldiers: people who are members of an army w as/wasn't - W eak and strong form s
generals: the head soldiers who are responsible for The same word can have very different pronunciations
1 organising the soldiers depending on what it does in the sentence. Generally,
content words such as nouns and principal verbs are
6 SPEAKING What about you? Divide the class into pairs or
stressed, while structure words such as articles, auxiliary
small groups and ask them to discuss their favourite verbs, etc. are not.
sport, say why they like it and if they know about their
Understanding weak and strong forms in English will
sport in history. In a less confident class, give students
really help students' English speaking and listening.
time to prepare their answers in written form before
Put the two ways of pronouncing was and were on the
doing this as a speaking activity. Elicit some answers
board and drill them with the class (the strong form of
from different pairs or groups and discuss in open class.
were has the same sound in it as bird and learn),
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY was - weak /wsz/, /waznt/, strong /w d z/, /woznt/
Ask students to investigate the history of their were - weak Ava(r)/, /wa(r)nt/, strong /w3:(r)/, /w3:nt/
favourite sport. Explain to students that we normally use the weak
form, but if the word is stressed because it is especially
important, or because we want to show a contrast, we
HOMEWORK
use the strong form. Elicit exam ples of weak and strong
Assign students page 63 in their W orkbook or the forms from the exam ples in exercise 1, e.g.
relevant sections of the Online Workbook. weak /wsz/: Henry VIII was the king with six wives. Was
Henry VIII a football p layer?
strong / w d z / : Yes, he was. Football wasn't a sp o rt for
gentlem en.
we a k / ws(r)/: They were very strong. The generals
w eren't happy.
2a Ask students to look at the ticks and crosses and write ++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
com plete sentences with was, were, wasn't or w e re n 't
Check their answers. Speaking marathon. In pairs, students speak in
English with their partner for as long as possible. Ask
Answers them to stand up. Tell them they can start from How
1 I wasn't interested in dinosaurs at primary school. are y o u ? and continue from there. Encourage them
2 Yesterday I was at school. to try to have a normal English conversation and that
3 My friend wasn't with me yesterday afternoon. it doesn't matter if they make mistakes. Tell them
4 Last weekend I was really happy. that if their conversation stops for too long (e.g.
five seconds) or they start speaking in a language
5 My last English exam was difficult.
other than English they must sit down. The last pair
6 My parents weren't at home yesterday evening.
standing wins the classroom speaking marathon.
7 My friends and I were late for school this morning.
Refer students to the Gram m ar reference on page 98 if
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY necessary.
Drill the weak pronunciation /wsz/ and /wa(r)/ in the HOMEWORK
answers for exercise 2a. Assign students page 64 in their W orkbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
2b SPEAKING In pairs, ask students to use the prompts to talk
about them selves. Tell them to give true answers. Draw
students' attention to the exam ple dialogue.
Vocabulary P<?i
З а Students com plete the sentences with was or were.
Talking about people who do sports
Answers
I was 2 were 3 were 4 was 5 was 6 was

I
» > FAST TRACK
7 were
Ask students to do exercises 1 and 2 at home.
3b In pairs, students decide which sentence in exercise 3a is
false. 0 Sports people
1 In pairs, students match the photos with some of the
3c Q 67 Play the track for students to listen for the false
words in the box. Elicit answers in open class.
sentence and check their answer. See p170 for the
audioscript for this exercise. Answers
Answers 1 clim ber 2 skater 3 horse rider
Sentence 3 is false. They w eren't in London. They were in
4 ice hockey player
Athens, G reece. 2 Tell students that all except one of the words in exercise
1 come from verbs. Ask students to write the verbs
4 a Ask students to com plete the questions with was or
and say which word does not come from a verb. Draw
were. Check their answers in open class.
students' attention to the exam ples.
- Answers
I 1 W ere, were 2 was 3 were 4 were 5 Was
Answers
drive, play, ride, run, skate, ski, swim
6 was 7 was
gym nast does not com e from a verb
4b SPEAKING In pairs, students take it in turns to ask and
answer the questions in exercise 4a. Remind them to 3 Play a game. A sk a student to draw one of the words in
give true answers. Walk round and monitor students, exercise 1 on the board for the rest of the class to guess.
helping them if necessary. Elicit some of their answers in
4a SPEAKING In pairs, students look at the people in the
open class.
photos and say what type of sports person they are or
w ere. Elicit answers from students around the class.
There was/There were
Answers
5 Ask students to look at the sentences and answer the 1 Lewis Hamilton is a racing car driver.
questions.
2 Serena W illiam s is a tennis player.
Answers 3 Valentino Rossi is a motorbike rider.
1 a, с 2 b, d 3 a, b 4 c, d 4 Michael Phelps is a swimmer.

6 Ask students to read the notes and com plete the 4b Ask students to name other famous sports people. Draw
sentences with there was, there wasn't, there were or students' attention to the exam ple dialogue.
there w eren't. Check their answers.
Answers
1 There was 2 there weren't 3 There were
4 There wasn't 5 There was 6 There were
7 there were 8 There wasn't
+ + EXTRA ACTIVITY WARMER

Play Twenty questions. Students have to guess the Draw a Venn diagra,m on the board. Ask students to
name of a famous sports person by asking a student work in groups of three. Ask them to write the name
with a secret identity 20 Yes/No type questions. of each group member in each circle of the Venn
Ask a volunteer student to think of a famous sports diagram and find hobbies that they have either as
person and sit at the front of the class. The other individuals or in common. If two of the group have
students take it in turns to ask Yes/No questions in the hobby in common write it between those two
order to guess the secret identity of the student. names, if three, in the centre of the diagram. Set a
When a student correctly guesses the student's secret time limit of five minutes.
identity, he or she comes to sit at the front of the
class. A yes response earns the questioner another
chance to ask another question.

HOMEWORK
Assign students page 65 in their W orkbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.

Gatew ay to life skills pp92-93 f t


W orking in a team
To think about when and why we work in team s, to learn
how to work well in a team and to work together on a Elicit answers in open class and ask students to look
team task and think about the experience at Key concepts on page 92 and ask these questions:
Were you a good team ? Who was in the leader
role? Did you all pay attention? Did everyone make
» > FAST TRACK
a contribution? Did anyone interrupt the activity?
You could ask students to do exercise 1 for homework in Elicit from students what they think the lesson is
preparation for the lesson. going to be about.

E BACKGROUND INFORMATION 1 Individually, students think about their answers to the


questions and make notes if necessary.
Team work
Teamwork involves working confidently within a 2 Divide the class into groups of three and assign A , В and
group, contributing your own ideas, taking a share С roles to each student. Ask Student A to tell Student
of responsibility, being assertive rather than passive, В their answers to the questions in exercise 1. Remind
accepting criticism and giving constructive feedback them to talk for as long as they can. Ask Student В to
to others. Many students may have been a part of a listen to their partner and ask Student С to turn to page
team when they've played sports, but many jobs in 154 and follow the instructions for Unit 7.
today's workplace now demand a proven ability to work After they have finished the exercise, ask Student С
effectively in a team to achieve goals. Though some to com ment on whether Student В listened carefully,
students may well prefer working individually, and indeed interrupted or looked interested. Student С ask Student
work better that way, it is important that they recognise В to repeat the main things Student A said to check
the benefits and necessity of working as part of a team if they were listening carefully and they ask Student A
and that to work effectively within a team is a skill that if they can repeat the main things they said. Ask for
needs to be learnt like any other. Decision-making, feedback on this activity in open class. Ask С whether В
problem-solving, accountability, dealing with conflict was a good listener.
and finding ways to work with people from different
backgrounds are all life skills that form an important part 3 READING Ask students to read Mike's advice about working
of teamwork. in a team and answer the questions. Check their answers
in open class.
Answers
I A good team player listens carefully to what other

I team mem bers say.

2 We are not good team players when we don't pay


attention, we interrupt or we only hear what we want
to hear.
3 and 4 Students' own answers
4 Ask students to read Mike, Katie and Shona's advice
LIFE TASK
about working in a team and com plete the sentences
with one to three words in each space. Tell students they are going to take part in a team
Answers
I 1 do the work 2 on time 3 negative 4 ideas
task and then mark their perform ance.
■ Step 1
5 waste 6 respect, solutions Divide the class into small teams (four or five
students). Tell students that their task is to think
5 In pairs, students discuss if they think the advice in
of a vocabulary game or activity (a mime game,
exercise 4 is good and say why or why not. Elicit answers
a crossword, a word search, etc.) to practise the
from students around the class.
vocabulary in the unit. Inform them that they need
6 LISTENING О 68 Tell students they are going to to present the activity to the class and ask them to
М И Ё watch or listen to five speakers and decide what do it.
they bring (a-e) to a team . Ask students Set a time limit of ten minutes for students to
to com pare their answers in pairs before you elicit prepare the activity. Ask teams to swap their activity
answers from different students around the class. See with another group and do the activity they have
p170 for the videoscript/audioscript for this exercise. received.
Answers ■ Step 2
When students have finished, ask them to work
Id 2b 3 e 4 c 5a
individually and follow Step 2 and give themselves
7 SPEAKING In pairs, students discuss what they think they a mark from 5 (yes, definitely) to 0 (not at all).
bring to a team . Elicit students' ideas in open class. * Step 3
Ask students to work in their team and discuss their
'+ EXTRA ACTIVITY
answers from Step 2 to see if they agree with each
Who said what? Ask students to relate these key other. Encourage them to give them selves a mark
sentences to speakers 1-5 (Adam, Charlotte, Dylan, from 5 (we worked really well together) to 0 (we
Megan and Reece) from 6. Play the video or audio worked really badly together). Elicit the marks from
track again for students to check their answers, the different teams.
explain things very clearly
speaking in front of others
preparing slides Listening P94 sf \ *
II
r \
II
make animations
Understanding a spoken text about sport
take the final decision
make people happy
WARMER
organise the group
make projects look good In pairs, students race to complete the word stems.
Write the stem of different sports words on the
something positive to say
board and ask students to complete them. Ask them
art and crafts and making things
to write the sport and the person that plays the
Answers
sport, e.g.
Adam: preparing slides, make animations gym, ski, ten, ice-s, eye, ath
Charlotte: organise the group, take the final decision
Add the stem ath to pre-teach athlete, athletics. Set
Dyla n: explain things very clearly, speaking in front of a time limit of two minutes and ask students to shout
I others Finished! as soon as their list is complete. Go through
Megan: art and crafts and making things, make answers in open class.
i projects look good Suggested answers
Reece: something positive to say, make people happy gym nastics, gymnast
skiing, skier
tennis, tennis player
ice-skating, ice skater
cycling, cyclist
athletics, athlete
1 LISTENING ^ 69 Play the track for students to listen to
Poppy talking about what sports and sports activities she
Gram mar in context PP94-95
did last w eek. Ask students to listen for when she did the
Talking about the past using the past simple
different sports and write a letter (a-g) next to each sport
affirmative
or activity (1-5). Remind them that they will hear the
conversation twice. Play the track twice and then check
their answers. See pp170—171 for the audioscript for this » > FAST TRACK
exercise. Students could do exercises 1 and 3 at home for you to
do exercise 2 as a class activity.
Answers
1 g 2a 3 e 4 c 5 b
Test before you teach
W rite these sentence prompts on the board:
V EXAM SUCCESS Students say why it is important not
to panic if they don't hear an answer the first time 1 l/play basketball at school/last week.
they listen. Tell them to turn to page 152 (Listening: 2 Last weekend/l/train for football.
Matching) to check their answers. 3 They/watch the m atch/on Sunday.
Ask students to use the prompts to write sentences in
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: STUDENT TRAINING the past simple and then write three similar sentences in
Listening for gist the past simple in their notebooks. Monitor to see if they
have consolidated knowledge of the past simple tense.
'Listening for gist' means listening for the central
meaning of a text. The first time students listen, they
Answers
should concentrate on the general idea of the text, not 1 I played basketball at school last week.
the little details - the gist of the text. When people listen 2 Last weekend I trained for football.
in their first language, they use a variety of strategies to 3 They watched the match on Sunday.
get both the main idea and the detail of what they listen
to. However, students tend to panic when they first listen
to a text in L2, forgetting their L1 listening skills and Past simple affirmative - regular verbs
adopting a one-word-at-a-time strategy. Setting a first
task where students listen for gist is a good way to train 1 Ask students to look at the sentences and answer the
students to concentrate on identifying what the text is questions. Check their answers.
about, who is speaking, to whom, and why, before they Answers
follow this up in a more detailed way.
1 a change b play с rest d start e love
2 © 69 Ask students if they can remem ber the 2 Add -(e)d to the end of the verb.
information about Poppy's sports and sports activities. 2a PRONUNCIATIONО Play the track for students to listen to
Ask them to read the sentences and decide if they are the words in the three lists. Ask them to match each of
True (T) or False (F). Play the track again if necessary. the sounds to the correct list. Check their answers. See
Answers p171 for the audioscript for this exercise.
IT 2 F 3 F 4 T 5 F 6 F Answers
1 Ь /d/ changed, played, loved, stayed, listened
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
2 с /t/ liked, worked, watched, w ashed, stopped
Ask students to correct sentences 2, 3, 5 and 6 3 a /id/ rested, started, wanted, decided, needed
(Her basketball training is always three hours. /
Poppy's volleyball team won 3-0. / Poppy watched 2 b @ 70 Play the track again for students to listen and
a basketball match on TV on Saturday. / Poppy's repeat the words.
basketball team lost 56-70.).
2c Ask students to look at the correct list and say which two
letters come before -ed in the words finishing with the
3 SPEAKING What about you? In pairs, students discuss what
/id/ sound. Check their answer.
sports they do in a typical school w eek and what new
sport they would like to do.
I Answers
ta n d d
HOMEWORK
Assign students page 65 in their W orkbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.

120___________Unit 7
TEAC H ER D EV ELO P M E N T: P R O N U N C IA T IO N

The -ed ending


Teaching the regular past simple verb forms offers an 4 Ask students to look at the sentences (a-j) and match
opportunity for students to learn the difference between the irregular past forms with the verbs (1-10).
voiced and voiceless sounds. Voiced consonants use Answers
the voice. Ask students to test this by putting their a 6 b 10 с 5 d 2 e l f3 g 7 h8 14
finger on their throat as they say the letters b, g , I, m,
j 9
etc. If they feel a vibration, the consonant is voiced.
Voiceless consonants, such as f, p , k, s and so on, do TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE
not use the voice. They are hard sounds and there is
no vibration in your throat, just a short explosion of air Past sim ple affirm ative - irregular past form s
as you pronounce. Knowing the difference between Some verbs are irregular; their past forms do not end in
these sounds helps us to know how the -ed ending is -ed. It's important for students to learn them from a list
pronounced on each verb. like vocabulary. Refer them to the irregular verb list on
We say /d/ if the verb ends with a voiced vowel sound or page 158 and point out that they will find a similar list to
a consonant: this one for reference in most grammar textbooks and
-b, -g, -I, -m, -n, -th, -v or -z. student's books they com e across.
We say /X/ if the verb ends with a voiceless sound: -f, -p,
-k, -s, -sh, -ch, -x or -h. ++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
However, tell students the important thing is to Use a soft ball, say an infinitive and then throw
rem em ber when to pronounce /id/ (after verbs that end the ball to a student. The student then has to say
in -d or -t), since this is the sound that matters the most the past simple form of the verb before saying the
in oral speech. infinitive of another verb and throwing the ball to a
different student.
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
Write the past tense forms below on the board in a 5 Refer students to the pictures showing what O liver did
jumbled order and ask students to write them in the last w eekend. Ask them to write one sentence for each
correct column in exercise 2a. Drill the pronunciation picture using some of the verbs in exercise 4. Draw
of each past tense form. students' attention to the exam ple sentence. Walk
round, helping students if necessary. Elicit answers from
arrived, hated, talked, walked, planted, turned,
students around the class.
cooked, dem anded, missed, stopped,
rained, celebrated, lived, relaxed, used Answers
Answers 2 He bought a red football shirt.
/1/: talked, walked, cooked, m issed, stopped, relaxed 3 He ate pizza.
/d/: arrived, turned, rained, lived, used 4 He did his homework.
/ id /: hated, planted, dem anded, celebrated 5 He got up at eight o'clock.
6 His team won 5-0.
3 Ask students to com plete the sentences with the past 7 He w ent home.
form of the verbs in the box. Remind them that they are 8 He saw a football match on TV.
all regular verbs. Elicit answers from students round the
class. 6 Students com plete the text with the past form of the
verbs in the box. Remind students to use each verb
Answers once and that some are regular and some are irregular.
1 walked 2 watched 3 loved 4 played 5 stayed Elicit answers from students around the class.
6 wanted
Answers
Test before you teach: Flipped classroom 1 was 2 w ent 3 started 4 saw 5 trained
Set the Flipped classroom video and tasks for 6 played 7 lost 8 won
homework before the lesson. This will allow you
7a Individually, students write down two things they did
to assess the needs of the students before the class.
yesterday/last week/last year/when they were small.
Students can then move on to the relevant grammar
Draw students' attention to the exam ple sentences.
practice activities.
W alk around the class, helping students if necessary.

7b SPEAKING In pairs, students com pare their answers. Draw


students' attention to the model dialogue. Students are
probably familiar with the phrase M e too! or That's the
sam e as m e. If students don't have things in common,
they could say Really? I didn't, or D id y o u ? I didn't.
7 c Encourage students to tell the class something 3 LISTENING О 71 Play the track for students to listen to the
interesting about their partner. dialogue and check their answers. Ask students to put
the conversation in.order. See p171 for the audioscript
Refer students to the Gram m ar reference page 98 if
for this exercise.
necessary.
HOMEWORK I Answers
с 3, b 2, d 1, a 4
Assign students page 66 in their Workbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook. 4 Ask students to look at the Speaking bank and com plete
the expressions. Remind them to look at the dialogue
again if necessary. Ask students to compare in pairs
Developing speaking P96 Q ф before you check their answers.

Asking for and giving opinions I Answers


like, think, feel, opinion, depends, mad

» > FAST TRACK 5 SPEAKING Divide the class into A and В pairs. Student A ask
the questions in exercise 2 in order and Student В give
You could set exercise 1 for students to prepare at home
their opinion. Students then change roles.
and come to class to talk about.
PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT
6a Individually, students think of three questions to find out
Play Past tense bingo with the regular and irregular people's opinions of something they are interested in
verb forms students have seen so far. First, write - a sport or another free-time activity (music, com puter
the infinitives on the board and elicit the past tense gam es, films, etc.). They should begin their questions as
forms. shown.
change, play, love, stay, listen, like, work, watch,
6b SPEAKING Students take it in turns to interview each other
wash, stop, rest, start, want, decide, need, buy, do,
with their questions and answer the questions. Remind
eat, get, go, have, lose, see, take, win
them to use the expressions in the Speaking bank to
Ask students to draw a 3 x 3 grid in their notebooks. help them give their opinions. If you have space, you
They then choose nine past tense forms to write in could organise an Onion ring activity (See Teacher
the spaces. Call out infinitives for students to cross developm ent: Classroom tips Unit 3 page 65 Life skills).
out the corresponding past tense forms on their -----------------------------------------------------------------------
grid. The first student to cross out all nine past tense ! Model dialogue
forms shouts Bingo! ■A: Excuse me. Сап I ask you some questions?
! B: Yes, O K.
I
j A: Do you like music?
; B: Yes, I do. I listen to music all the time and I love going
! to concerts.
; A: W hat do you think about buying music? Do you think
it is cheap or expensive?
j B: W ell, I think it's quite expensive. It doesn't cost much
money to record an album nowadays. And usually if I
buy an album, there are only one or two good songs
! on it. So I prefer to buy individual songs.
J A: How do you feel about downloading music from the
Internet?
I
Asking for and giving opinions [ В: I like downloading music from the internet but I only
1 SPEAKING In pairs, students look at the photo and discuss use legal websites. Downloading music illegally is like
what they can see. Elicit ideas in open class. stealing money and the quality is often very bad.

Answers
The footballer David Beckham playing football with a
HOMEWORK
teenage boy.
Assign students page 67 in their Workbook or the
2 Ask students to match the questions and answers. relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
Encourage students to compare in pairs.

I Answers
a 4 b 2 с 3 d 1
PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT
Developing writing P97 н а 5a In pairs, students think of ideas for a story where
som ebody buys a second-hand object. Ask them
^ Writing a simple story
to make notes for each part of the story: the start/
introduction of the characters; middle/main events; end.
» > FAST TRACK Tell them to plan what they are going to write and to
You could set the writing task in exercise 5 as homework. follow the advice in the Writing bank on page 157.

5b Ask students to work individually and use their notes to


WARMER
write the story. Remind students to include words from
Play Grammar auction. Divide the class into small the Writing bank and to consider the information in the
teams. Write some correct and incorrect past simple Exam success box.
sentences on the board, e.g. Yesterday I visit Paris.
V EXAM SUCCESS Students read the information and
He w ere at the bank this morning. I were born in
discuss what tense the verbs are in and if the verbs
1987., etc. Explain that the sentences are for sale
change suddenly from present to past. Tell them to turn
and each team has a total of £1,000. Read out a
to page 152 (Writing: Checking your work) to check their
sentence and ask each team to decide if it is correct.
ideas.
If they think it's correct, they can bid against the
Answers
other teams to buy the sentence. Keep track of how
much each team spends on the board. At the end of No, the story is in the past simple and continues in the
the auction, tell the students which sentences were past simple.
correct. Tell them if they bought a correct sentence, .....................................................................................
they win back the money they paid for it. If they | Model text
bought an incorrect sentence, they lose the money
! A very special pair of trainers
they paid for it. Ask the teams to add up their final
! Katie loved running but she wasn't very good at it. She
totals. The team with the most money wins.
i was often in athletics com petitions, but she always came
! last. O ne Saturday, she had a big competition
A story i and she was feeling nervous. The day before, she
1 In pairs, students look at the title of the story and the | decided to buy a new pair of trainers. She w ent to the
pictures. Encourage them to put the pictures in order ! sports shop but all the trainers were very expensive. She
and say what they think happens in the story. Elicit the ] w ent to a second-hand shop and there was an old pair of
order of the pictures, suggestions and ideas about the ! trainers in her size. She put them on and suddenly had a
story from different students around the class. ! good feeling.
! The next afternoon, she was fast and strong. She won
2 READING Ask students to read the story and check their
! the race easily. Then she won the next four competitions!
ideas in exercise 1. Ask different students around the
j In the end, she becam e the Under-15 cham pion. After
class if they had sim ilar ideas and what they think of the
! the final race, an old woman cam e and spoke to her. 'I
story.
i know those trainers,' he said. 'They were mine. I was the
Answers ! 100 metre world champion 50 years ago!'
I 2, 4, 5, 1 ,3

3 Ask students to put the events in the story in order. Tell


++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
them to read the story again if necessary. Check their
answers. In pairs, students swap texts and check each other's
work using the criteria in Exam success on page 152.
( Answers
le 2 f 3b 4a 5 c 6d
Students could then write a final text together using
sentences from both of their texts.

4 Ask students to look at the words and expressions in the


Writing bank and say which appear in the story. Check HOMEWORK
they understand all the words. Assign students page 68 in their W orkbook or the
Answers relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
Words and expressions of time: One Sunday, Then,
suddenly, In the end, After the match
Basic linkers: and, but, and so

This page is taken from G atew ay 2 * Edition A1 + Teacher's Book. It is photocopiable and may be used within class.
Macmillan Publishers Limited 2016
Vocabulary revision p99
Language checkpoint: Unit 7
SPORTS

» > FAST TRACK 1 Students look at the objects and name the sports.
The extra support provided on the Gram m ar and
Vocabulary reference sections makes the Gram m ar I Answers
1 tennis 2 rugby 3 ice-skating 4 cycling
and Vocabulary revision sections ideal for setting
5 swimming 6 gymnastics 7 skiing
for homework. You could get students to complete
the whole revision page or just certain exercises for
SPORTS COMPETITIONS
homework.

2 Students com plete the sentences with the correct word:


Grammar revision p99
I Answers
1 referee 2 race 3 teams 4 final 5 champion
Past of to be
6 prize
1 Students com plete the dialogue with was, were, wasn't
or w eren 't SPORTS PEOPLE

I Answers
1 W ere 2 weren't 3 were 4 was 5 was
3 Students write the correct word for the person who doe;
each sport in exercise 1.
6 wasn't 7 was
I Answers
2 rugby player 3 ice-skater 4 cyclist 5 swimmer
There was/There were
6 gymnast 7 skier
2 Students look at the answers to the exercise and decide
HOMEWORK
if they are correct. If they are not correct, ask students to
write them correctly. Assign students page 69 in their W orkbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
Answers
1 There was a good film on TV last night.
2 There weren't ten people in the team last year.
3 correct
4 There was a problem at school last week.

3 Students change the sentences from present simple to


past simple.
Answers
1 I got up at 7.30 am.
2 She did sport every day.
3 They went to our school.
4 W e ran in the morning.
5 He walked to school.
6 They had training on Friday.
7 You bought magazines.
8 W e aw her at the weekend.
9 I wanted orange juice.
KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES CEF
Students will be able to:
■ ask questions and make negative sentences about understand simple written and spoken texts about jobs
the past give longer, extended responses to personal
■ talk about different jobs and the personal qualities questions
needed for them write an informal email giving news

UNIT OVERVIEW DIGITAL OVERVIEW


Jobs
Presentation Kit
Personal qualities /\
Vocabulary Flipped classroom video Unit 8: Past sim ple -
questions and short answers
Valley High goes job shadowing!
Life skills video Unit 8: Getting work experience
Reading CRITICAL THINKING Giving your opinion
on job shadowing [у*| Vocabulary tool: Jobs
Past simple - negative Interactive versions of Student's Book activities
Integrated audio and answer key for all activities
Grammar in Workbook pages with answer key
context
A djectives to describe jobs
Teacher's Resource Centre trc
► Flipped classroom video Unit 8: Past sim ple -
Vocabulary
questions and short answers
The world of work: Getting work
► Life skills video Unit 8: G etting work experience
experience
► Grammar communication activity Unit 8: Create
Life skills your story
A billionaire businessman ► W orksheets for this unit, including:
- Grammar Practice worksheet Unit 8
Listening
- Flipped classroom video worksheet Unit 8: Past simple -
Past simple - questions and short questions and short answers
answers
- Literature worksheet Units 7 and 8
Grammar in
- Culture worksheet Unit 8
context
- Life skills video worksheet Unit 8
Personal questions - 2
- Everyday English Unit 8
Developing
speaking Student's App
An informal email: giving news Gateway 2nd Edition wordlist for the award-winning
Sounds A pp (available for download)
Developing
writing
Reading: Matching people and
information
Exam su cce ss Speaking: Knowing about
evaluation

•J TESTING AND ASSESSMENT


Resources for exam preparation and measuring student progress

► Test G enerator Units 1-8 ► Printable test Unit 8 ► G ateway to exam s Units 7 and 8
(end of Unit 8)

Unite 125
Personal qualities
Vocabulary Pioo 4 A sk students ta match the words in the box with the
exam ples. Check their answers.
Talking about different jo b s and the personal qualities
n eed ed for them I Answers
1 hard-working 2 clever 3 friendly 4 kind
5 cheerful 6 creative 7 responsible 8 calm
» > FAST TRACK
You could ask students to do exercises 1 and 4 at home 5 LISTENING 73 Play the track for students to listen to
so that less confident students are prepared for these som ebody asking about a job and decide what job it i<
activities. A sk them to note down which three personal qualities
in exercise 4 are necessary for the job. See p171 for th
WARMER audioscript for this exercise.

Ask students to look at the unit title Great job ! and Answers
the image. Elicit what they think the unit is going to Job: shop assistant
be about. Write these questions on the board for Personal qualities: 1 friendly 2 calm 3 hard-workin
students to discuss in pairs: When do p eo p le usually
start work in your country? When do people usually 6 SPEAKING In small groups, students talk about the differei
retire (stop work) in your country? What are som e jobs in exercise 1 and what personal qualities they thir
common jo b s in your country? What do people in are necessary for them. Draw students' attention to th'
your family d o ? What is your dream jo b ? model dialogue.

++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
Q Jobs In pairs, students rank the jobs in exercise 1 from
1 In pairs, students match the photos with the words. least stressful to most stressful and from worst paid
Check that they understand all the jobs. Ask them to use to best paid. Elicit answers from different pairs
their dictionaries if necessary. around the class.
Answers
1 waiter/waitress 2 hairdresser 3 bus driver 4 chef HOMEWORK
5 engineer 6 businessman/woman Assign students page 70 in their Workbook or the
7 shop assistant 8 m echanic 9 nurse 10 builder relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
! О 72 Play the track for students to listen, check and
repeat the words. Some nationalities need extra practice
in saying the consonant b. Tell them to press both lips Reading pioi
together and with your vocal cords vibrating, open your
lips suddenly. Highlight the difference between the short Understanding a simple text about jo b s
vowel sound N in businessm an/wom an /'biznssmsen/
/'biznas.wumsn/and bu ilder /'bilcMr)/and the short vowel » > FAST TRACK
sound /л/ in bus d riv e r/bAS 'draivsCr)/. See p171 for the
You could ask students to prepare answers for exercise
audioscript for this exercise.

++ EXTRA ACTIVITY WARMER

Ask students to decide on the stress pattern in Play Hot seat to start the class. Divide the class intc
the words businessman, mechanic, hairdresser and two teams: A and B. A volunteer from Team A sits
assistant. Write the two stress patterns in these with their back to the board. Select a job from the
three-syllable words on the board and ask students to previous lesson and write the word on the board.
match the words to the correct pronunciation. Team A defines the job in 30 seconds for their tearr
Ooo - businessman, hairdresser member to guess. Play then passes to Team B. Eacf
oOo - mechanic, assistant time a team member guesses a job correctly within
one minute, their team wins a point. The team with
the most points at the end of the game wins.
3 SPEAKING In pairs, students take it in turns to ask and
answer the questions. Draw students' attention to the
exam ple. Elicit answers from different students around 1 In pairs, students look back at exercise 6 on page 10
the class. and say, in their opinion, what the important persons
qualities of a chef or a nurse are. Elicit ideas from arc
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE the class.

A rticles 2 READING Ask students to read the text and say what
Remind students that the indefinite article a/an is used personal qualities they mention for a chef and a nur:
before jobs, e.g. I'm a doctor. I'm an engineer. Check their answers and ask them if their ideas in
exercise 1 were similar.
Answers SPEAKING What about you? Divide the class into pairs or
chef: hard-working, creative, calm small groups and ask them to discuss if they would like
nurse: hard-working, kind and cheerful, calm , physically to be a chef, doctor or nurse and say why or why not.
and emotionally strong. Ask them to discuss who they would like to work with for
a day if they could job shadow. In a less confident class,
3 Ask students to read the text again and say if the give students time to prepare their answers in written
information is about Jad e (J), Mandy (M) or both (B). form before doing this as a speaking activity. Elicit some
G ive students time to com pare in pairs before you check answers from different pairs/groups and discuss in open
their answers in open class. Elicit how they decided on class.
their answers.
HOMEWORK
Answers
I IM 2 J 3 J 4 В 5 J 6M 7 J
Assign students page 71 in their W orkbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
■J EXAM SUCCESS | Students discuss if it is important to
check for the answer in both texts and say why or why
not. Tell them to turn to page 153 (Reading: Matching
people and information) to check their ideas.
Gram m ar in context PPi 02-юз { § !
IH CULTURAL INFORMATION Making negative sentences about the past
Job shadowing is becoming increasingly popular among
secondary school students in the UK, US and Canada. » > FAST TRACK
Students can enter a workplace and work with an You could ask students to do exercises 1 and 2 at home.
em ployee in a particular industry, such as engineering You could then check their answers and do the other
or nursing, to learn more about various aspects of the activities in class.
industry, organisation and the skills required to do the
job. The experience can last for up to a week or more Test before you teach
and can help the individual get a better sense of what Divide the class into groups of three. W rite the words
the job consists of and a chance to 'test out' possible below on the board. Set a three-minute time limit for
career options before making a decision about what to students to individually write two true and one false
study at university. Jo b shadowing is increasingly useful sentence about them selves. G ive an exam ple: I didn 't
because students are expected to make choices about play football yesterday. I didn 't g o to the cinem a last
what they want to study from very young and it is very w eekend. I didn 't se e m y grandm a last m onth.
difficult for them to choose when they have no idea what I didn't shop yesterday
they want to do. A lso, job shadowing is a way to get
work last weekend
a foot in the door in a workplace and potentially make
play last month
early contacts with professionals.
see last year
CRITICAL THINKING Individually, students think about go two years ago
if it is a good idea to job shadow and think of reasons A sk students to take it in turns to read their sentences to
why or why not. In a less confident class, ask students their group. The other students try to guess which is the
to make notes before they compare their ideas with false sentence. Monitor to see if they are fam iliar with
the rest of the class. past simple negative.
Example answers
I think it's a good idea to do a job shadow because you Past simple - negative Ш .--
can try a job for a day to see if you're really interested.
I think it's a bad idea to do a job shadow because it 1 Ask students to look at the sentences and decide if the
depends on who you are shadowing. If they don't like statements are True (T) or False (F). Check their answers.
their job or they don't explain it well, you can get the
wrong idea about a job. I Answers
IF 2 T 3 T
5 Ask students to look at the underlined words in the text
and guess their meaning. Encourage students to then TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE
check in their dictionaries. Past sim ple - negative
Answers Negatives in the past simple are form ed by adding didn 't
opportunity: a chance to do something, or a situation in (informal) or d id not before the simple form of the verb
which it is easy for you to do something (d idn 't is more common in spoken English). The verb be
professional: relating to work that needs special skills is an exception to this; in the case of be, we just add n't
and qualifications (informal) or not (formal) after was or were. Point out that
we use didn 't for all subjects.
busy: having a lot of customers
emotionally: in term s of your feelings
2 Ask students to make the sentences negative. Draw
physically: to do with how you use your body students' attention to the exam ple sentence. Check their
answers.
Answers 5 Ask students to com plete the text with the past simple
of the verbs given. Check their answers.
2 Beethoven didn't play the electric guitar.
3 Queen Elizabeth I didn't eat burgers. Answers
4 Cleopatra didn't w ear jeans. 1 didn't come 2 studied 3 didn't finish 4 went
5 The Ancient Romans didn't have cars. 5 didn't have 6 didn't give 7 worked 8 didn't stoc
6 Leonardo Da Vinci didn't use a computer.
» > FAST FINISHERS
3a Ask students to look at the picture of a factory in 1900.
Write some more information about Brad Pitt on
Ask them to find eight mistakes in the picture. You could
the board. Ask students to write true and false past
elicit a mistake in open class as an exam ple for this
simple sentences. At the end of the activity, students
exercise. Check their answers.
read out their sentences for the class to say if they
Answers are true or false.
A girl has a tablet. Academ y Award nomination 1995 / no O scar /
The boy is wearing headphones. married to Jennifer Aniston for five years / born 1963
A boy is listening to an MP3 player. Oklahoma, the US / 'Troy'. 'Mr & Mrs Smith'. 'Fury',
A boy is talking on a mobile phone. 'The Curious Case of Benjamin Button' and 'Ocean's
Eleven'
There's a picture of a plane on the wall.
On a wall there's a flat screen TV.
6a Ask students to write five true affirmative sentences
One of the bosses has a can of soft drink on the desk.
about things they did yesterday. Draw students'
A boy is wearing a Messi football shirt. attention to the exam ple sentences.
3b Ask students to write eight sentences about each
6b Now ask students to write five true negative sentences
mistake using the past simple negative. Remind them
for each sentence in exercise 6a. Draw students'
to use each of the verbs in the box. Draw students'
attention to the exam ple sentences. Walk around and
attention to the exam ple and ask them to start each
monitor students, helping them if necessary.
sentence with In 1900. Encourage students to compare
in pairs before you check answers in open class. 6c SPEAKING In pairs, students take it in turns to read the
I Answers negative sentences for their partner to try and guess
the original sentences. Draw students' attention to the
In 1900 they didn't drink soft drinks.
model dialogue. In a less confident class, ask a stronger
In 1900 they didn't have tablets.
pair to model this exercise first before students continue
In 1900 they didn't listen to music onMP3 players. in pairs.
In 1900 they didn't use/have mobile phones.
In 1900 they didn't use/have/wear headphones. ++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
In 1900 they didn't watch/have TV. Play Twenty questions. Students have to guess the
In 1900 they didn't w ear football shirts. name of a famous film star by asking the player 20
Tell students who identified the jeans that jeans were Yes/No type questions. Ask a volunteer student to
invented in the 1800s. think of a famous sports person and sit at the front
of the class. The other students take it in turns to ask
4a Ask students to write true sentences using the past Yes/No questions in order to guess the secret identity
affirmative or negative form of the verbs given. of the student. When a student correctly guesses the
student's identity, he or she comes to sit at the front
I Answers
1 won/didn't win
of the class. A yes response earns the questioner
another chance to ask another question.
2 had/didn't have
3 ate/didn't eat Refer students to the Gram m ar reference on page 110 if
4 bought/didn't buy necessary.
5 wore/didn't w ear HOMEWORK
: 6 got up/didn't get up
Assign students page 72 in their W orkbook or the
i; 7 cam e/didn't come
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
8 saw/didn't see

4b SPEAKING In pairs, students take turns to read out their true


sentences from exercise 4a to find out how many are the
same. Walk round and monitor students, helping them
if necessary. Elicit similarities from different pairs around
the class.
Gateway to life skills P P i 0 4 -1 0 5 ^

Using adjectives to describe job s G ettin g w ork exp erien ce


To learn about work experience, to read advice about
» > FAST TRACK applying for work experience and to consider your own
interests and personal qualities for a job
Ask students to do exercise 1 at home.

» > FAST TRACK


A djectives to describe jobs
You could ask students to do exercise 1a for homework
1 In pairs, students look at the words in the box and match
in preparation for the lesson.
each word with its opposite. Encourage them to use
their dictionaries if necessary. Elicit answers in open
class. E BACKGROUND INFORMATION
Answers G ettin g w ork exp erien ce
badly-paid - well-paid, full-time - part-time, Around 95% of teenagers in the UK between the ages of
indoor - outdoor, skilled - unskilled 14-16 do work experience, where they take up two-week
placem ents in an industry or at a com pany that interests
2 © 74 Play the track for students to listen and repeat. them. The UK Departm ent for Education's definition of
Drill the /и/ sound in full /ful/. See p171 for the work experience is: 'A placem ent on employer's premises
audioscript for this exercise. in which a student carries out a particular task or duty,
or range of tasks or duties, more or less as would an
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: PRONUNCIATION
em ployee, but with an emphasis on the learning aspects
The /и /sound of the experience.' Though placem ents are usually
Some nationalities have difficulty distinguishing between organised through schools, students often have to apply
the long vowel sound /u:/ and /и/. The /и/ sound in full is and interview for work experience in the same way that
much shorter and of a different quality. It corresponds to they would have to do for a job. Work experience gives
the vowel sound in words like foot, put, pull, woman and young people the opportunity to understand more about
would. the work environment, and how it differs from school,
You could put these words on the board and drill the two choose future careers or prepare for employm ent. In
sounds /и/ and /u:/ today's com petitive, globalised workplace environment,
full /ful/ - fool /fu:l/ work experience can also develop students'
look /luk/ - Luke /lu:k/ com munication, tim e-m anagem ent and decision-making
pull /pul/ - pool /pu:l/ skills, greatly improving their future employability.

3 Ask students to use the words in exercise 1 to com plete


the sentences. Elicit answers from students around the
Write the question on the board:
class.
I'm a teen looking for my first jo b . What can I d o ?
Answers Ask students to brainstorm advice in pairs. Elicit
1 part-time 2 badly-paid 3 full-time ideas in open class and discuss. Ask students to turn
4 outdoor 5 skilled 6 outdoor to Key concepts on page 104 to see if they used any
of the vocabulary in the discussion.
4 SPEAKING In pairs, ask students to look at the photos and
describe each of the jobs using words from exercise 1.
l a READING Individually, students read the text Work
Draw students' attention to the exam ple. Elicit ideas in
exp erien ce in the U K and answer the questions. Elicit
open class.
answers in open class.
Suggested answers
Answers
A badly-paid, unskilled, indoor, part-time or full-time
1 14
В skilled, indoor and outdoor, well-paid, full-time
2 to discover the real world of work
С skilled, indoor and outdoor, well-paid, full-time
3 anywhere
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY 4 It can help you to see if you like a job, and if you are
good at it.
In pairs, students take it in turns to describe a job
from the unit for their partner to guess. 1 b ln pairs, students discuss what their opinion is of work
experience and if they would like to do it. Encourage
them to give reasons why or why not. Elicit opinions in
HOMEWORK
open class.
Assign students page 73 in their Workbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Wprkbook.
2 Ask students to look at the advice from a work
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
experience w ebsite. Ask them to read the introductory
paragraph and then match the titles to the sections. Write this text on,the board or photocopy it for
students. Students watch or listen to the track again
I Answers
IB 2 A 3D 4 E 5 С
and correct the mistakes. In pairs, students compare
their answers before you elicit answers in open class.
3 Ask students toread the text again and say which Speaker 1:
section of each text (1-5) gives the advice in the I'm applying to a big company that makes planes.
exercise. Point out that one piece of advice does not I spend my w eekends working on cars, helping to
appear in any section and elicit which one. Check their build them.
answers in open class. Speaker 1:
Answers I'm applying for work in a restaurant. I want to see if
1 2 2 5 3 3 4 doesn't appear inthe text I like it.
5 1 6 4 I want to go to France and study French when I leave
school.
4 Ask students to read the task and give each type of Speaker 2:
work a mark out of 5 (0 = not interested, 5 = extremely
I think it can help me learn more about MP3 players.
interested). Students can compare their answers before
I enjoy watching films. I also like reading books.
you elicit which type of work is most interesting for
different students around the class. Speaker 2:
I want to do work experience in a supermarket.
5 LISTENING ^ 75 Tell students they are going to I play the piano and I write books.
■ М Я В watch or listen to four British teenagers talking | Answers
about the work experience they are applying

I
Boy 1:
for. Ask students to match each speaker with one of the
I'm applying to a big company that makes cars.
jobs. A sk students to compare in pairs before you elicit
answers from different students around the class. See
p171 for the videoscript/audioscript for this exercise.

I Answers
la 2d 3 c 4b
I spend my weekends working on cars, helping to fix
them.
Girl 1:
6 Q 75 Ask students to look at the interests and personal I'm applying for work in a hospital. I want to see if I
qualities and match each one to a speaker. Play the
like it.
video or track again if necessary. Elicit students' ideas in
open class. I want to go to university and study medicine when
I leave school.
Answers
Boy 2:
Speaker 1 (Liam): 6, 7

I
I think it can help me learn more about computers.
Speaker 2 (Amber): 2, 3, 8
I enjoy playing computer games. I also like
Speaker 3 (Max): 1, 5 I knowing how computers work.
Speaker 4 (Phoebe): 2, 4

I
Girl 2:
I want to do work experience in a primary school.

I play the guitar and I write music.


Great job!

7 SPEAKING In pairs, students talk about which of the 3 LISTENINGQ 76 Play the track for students to listen and put
sentences in exercise 6 are true for them. the events in exercise 2 in the correct order. Check their
answers. See p171 —172 for the audioscript for this activity.
LIFE TASK

Ask students to follow the plan and work


I Answers
IF 2 В 3D 4 E 5 G 6A 7 С
individually:
4 © 76 Ask students to choose the correct alternative.
■ Step 1
Play the track again if necessary. Have students compare
Students make a list of their personal qualities. in pairs before you check their answers in open class.
Remind them to look at the words on page 100 for
ideas. Answers
■ Step 2 1 wasn't 2 Students 3 record com pany 4 thirty
Students make a list of their interests. They can be 5 1999 6 like 7 normal people 8 $250,000
hobbies or things that they like at school. 5 SPEAKING What about you? In pairs, students discuss
■ Step 3 these questions. Elicit if they know any other famous
Ask students to imagine that they can do two businessmen or businesswomen and how they became
weeks of work experience. Ask them to choose a fam ous; if they would like to start their own business and
job from the list. Remind them to use the lists from say what type of business; if they would like to fly into
Step 1 and 2 to help them decide. space and say why or why not.
■ Step 4
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
Ask them to write a personal statem ent saying
why they are applying for this job. Remind them Hold a brainstorming session on What m otivates us
to include the personal qualities and interests in to work? (See Teacher development: Classroom tips
their list that they think are relevant. Follow the Unit 3 page 64 Brainstorming). Elicit key concepts
other advice in the text on page 104. Set a time and write them on the board, e.g. conditions, friends,
limit o fte n minutes for students to prepare their experience, opportunity. Encourage students to
statements. explore each concept and think of related vocabulary
for each concept, e.g. salary, wages, contract, trial
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY period, working hours, holidays, bonus. Ask students
to write a letter of application for a summer job at
Ask students to swap their personal statements and Startup enterprise a new company that flies famous
say if they would give them the job and give reasons
people into space. Encourage them to refer to the
why or why not.
language on the board. The language that em erges
can be left up on the board as the students prepare
for the task, in this case a meeting.
Listening Рюб
HOMEWORK
Understanding a spoken text about a businessman
and different jo b s Assign students page 73 in their W orkbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
WARMER

Write the word billion on the board and drill the


pronunciation /'biljsn/. Ask students how may 0's there Gram m ar in context РРюб-ш
are in a billion (1,000,000,000). Ask students to spend
one minute writing down all of the different words they Asking and answering questions about the past
associate with the word 'billionaire'. In pairs, students
share their words and write down five questions they » > FAST TRACK
would ask a real billionaire. Elicit questions in open Students could do exercises 1 and 2a at home. Start the
class. Ask students if they have heard of Sir Richard class on exercise 2b.
Branson. Elicit what they know about him and ask them
to open their books at page 106. Test before you teach: Flipped classroom
Set the Flipped classroom video and tasks for
1 In pairs, students look at the things and try to work out homework before the lesson. This will allow you
the connection with the billionaire Sir Richard Branson. to assess the needs of the students before the class.
Students can then move on to the relevant grammar
2 Refer students to the sentences about Sir Richard
practice activities.
Branson and check their ideas in exercise 1. Ask them
to put the events in the order they happened. Tell them
they can guess if they don't know.

Unite 131
4 Ask students to write questions for the underlined part
Past simple - questions and short answers
в of the answer. Elicit answers from students around the
class.
1 Ask students to look at the sentences and answer the
questions (1-3). Check their answers. 1Answers
2 W hat did Claude Monet paint?
Answers
1 b
2 W e change do or does to did.
3 no

TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE


3 W hat did Jennifer Lawrence win in 2013?
Past sim ple questions 4 W hat did Apple make in 2015?
Question formation can cause problems for a lot of 5 W hat did Gustave Eiffel design?
students. An easy way for them to rem em ber is to learn 6 W hat did Mark Zuckerberg create?
the mnemonic Q ASi (pronounced like the English word 7 W hat did Jim i Hendrix play?
quasi - meaning almost) Q - Question word,
A - Auxiliary, S - Subject, I - Infinitive. 5a Ask students to put the words in order to make questions.
Remind students that if the question starts with Answers
Did ..., they can give a short answer, e.g. Yes, he did./ s 1 W hat did you watch on TV last night?
No, he didn't. It is not necessary to use the main verb
-2 W hy did you study last night?
in the answer. If the question begins with a И/h-word, it
w3 W hat did you do last w eekend?
requires a more detailed answer.
4 When did you finish primary school?
2 a Students com plete the questions with the correct form 5 W hat did you eat last night?
of the verbs given. 6 How did you m eet your best friend?
Answers I 7 W hat time did you go to bed last night?

1 did, create 2 did, do 3 did, become 5b Ask students to match the answers to the questions in
4 did, invent 5 did, play 6 did, make exercise 5a.

2b In pairs, students write down their answers to the


questions.
I Answers
a3 b 7 с 5 d 2 e4 f 6 g1
2 c LISTENING ^ 77 Play the track for students to listen and 5c SPEAKING In pairs, students take it in turns to ask and
find out how many correct answers they have got. Elicit answer the questions in exercise 5a. Remind them to
the num ber of correct answers from different pairs give true answers. Draw students' attention to the model
around the class. See p172 for the audioscript for this dialogue. Walk round, monitoring students and helping
exercise. them if necessary. Note down good use of language and
Answers any errors to go over at the end of the activity.

1 Microsoft 2 an actor 3 by creating The 6a Ask students to write com plete questions. Draw
Simpsons 4 Nike trainers 5 basketball 6 jeans students' attention to the exam ple.

3 Draw students' attention to the photo. Elicit what they Answers


think the text is going to be about and ask students 2 Did you pass your last English exam ?
to read the text to check their answer. Students then 3 Did your parents go shopping last weekend?
choose the correct alternative in the dialogue. Check
4 Did you have a pet when you were seven?
their answers.
5 Did you have a big breakfast this morning?
Answers 6 Did
++ your
EXTRA teachers give you a lot of homework
ACTIVITY
1 did 2 W hy 3 happen 4 Did 5 did 6 Did yesterday?
In pairs, students take it in turns to ask and answer
7 didn't 7 Did
the your class
questions in go on an excursion
exercise lastpronunciation
6a. Drill the year?

++ EXTRA ACTIVITY 6bDid


Nowyouask...students
? /didju/.to write true short answers.

Brainstorm informal and formal clothes people


TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: PRONUNCIATION
wear to work, e.g. informal clothes: jeans, T-shirts,
sweatshirts, short sleeves, running shoes, sandals; Saying did y o u . . . ? /didju/
formal clothes: button-up/collared long-sleeved Highlight the pronunciation of did you. Show how the
shirts, ties, formal black or brown shoes. two words run together /didju/ and how the stress falls on
the main verb, e.g. Did you go.

Refer students to the Gram m ar reference on page 110 if


necessary.
HOMEWORK 2 LISTENING Q 78 Play the track for students to listen to a
boy answering the questions in exercise 1. Ask them if
Assign students page 74 in their Workbook or the
they think that he answers them well and to say why or
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
why not. See p172 for the audioscript for this exercise.

I Answers
Developing speaking рюзФ ф No. He doesn't expand on his answers.

3 LISTENING Q 79 Play the track for students to listen to a


Responding to personal questions with more detailed
girl answering the same questions. Ask them if they
information
think that she answers them well and to say why or why
not. Elicit what they notice about her answer to the last
» > FAST TRACK question. See p172 for the audioscript for this exercise.
Students could do exercise 1 at home. Answers
I Yes, she gives full answers. She is honest that she isn't
WARMER
certain about her answer to the last question.
Play a memory game to recycle vocabulary from the ✓ EXAM SUCCESS Students answer the questions in Exam
unit. Divide the class into teams of three or four. Success. Elicit their answers and what they think is an
Draw a grid with words in on the board: important thing to remember in a speaking exam. Tell
them to turn to page 153 (Speaking: Knowing about
A В С D E
1 evaluation) to compare their ideas.
shop time badly- hard- driver
2 professional paid work job shadow TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: STUDENT TRAINING
3 assistant business organisation record ■construction
Self-assessm ent
4 working bus experience full- company
After speaking activities, you can ask students to
Explain to the class that each team chooses two
evaluate their own performance or other students using
squares in turn. In each square there's half of a two-
a checklist. If students know marks are distributed and
word phrase, e.g. badly-paid, bus driver, jo b shadow,
which skills are necessary, they can assess their weak
etc. (see below). Write the words on the board when
points and work to improve on them. Students are often
they choose them. If the two words make a phrase,
not aware of the importance of communicating with their
they get a point and take another turn. If the two
partner in many oral exams.
squares don't match, rub them off the board and it's
the next team's turn. The team with the most full 4 © 79 Ask students to read about ways we give
words at the end is the winner. ourselves thinking time in a conversation. These linkers
Suggested answers keep the conversation going. Play the track for students
shop assistant, bus driver, hard-working, badly- to listen to the second student again and tick the words
paid, full-time, job shadow, work experience, record or expressions in the Speaking bank she uses. Ask
company, professional organisation, construction students to com pare in pairs before you check their
business answers.

Personal questions - 2 I Answers


E r r ... /
1 Refer students to the questions and point out that they
are typical questions in an oral exam . Ask students to
think about their answers. W ell ... /
That's a good question. /
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: STUDENT TRAINING
The thing is ... /
A sking and answ ering personal questions I'm not (really/totally/completely) sure. /
Asking and answering personal questions is a typical Let me see ... /
first section of many oral exam interviews. The first few You know ...
minutes of an oral exam can be very nerve-wracking. I t h in k ... /
Students who prepare and rehearse this part of the exam
I imagine ...
tend to perform well. When students get off to a good
start, it boosts their confidence and helps them relax. 5 SPEAKING In pairs, take it in turns to ask and answer the
Recycle personal information activities in different ways questions in exercise 1. Remind them to answer the 'Tell
to give students lots of practice in this area and help me a b o u t...' question with an extended response. In a
them internalise their answers. less confident class, students could prepare their answers
in note form before they do the speaking activity.

Unite 133
PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT
6a Individually, students write down three personal questions
Developing writing Рю9
/ 1
and one 'Tell me a b o u t q u e s t io n to ask their partner.
^ Writing an informal email to give news
Refer students to the prompts to give them ideas.

6b SPEAKING Students take


it in turns to ask and answer the » > FAST TRACK
questions. Remind them to use the expressions in the You could set exercises 1 and 2, or alternatively, the
Speaking bank to give them time to think. writing task in exercise 5 as homework.
- л - - ---------------------------------------------- ------- --------------
Model dialogue WARMER
A: W hat are your favourite hobbies?
Write the word TIME on the board and ask students to
B: That's a good question. I do different things. I do
think of related verbs, prepositions, adjectives/nouns
yoga three times a w eek, but I also love cycling.
and expressions. Introduce the noun time off and elicit
A: W hat did you do on your last holiday? Did you go what it means (when you are not at work or at school).
anywhere special? Students can work in pairs and race to think of as many
B: Let me s e e ... I went to Canada to see my words as they can in a time limit of three minutes. The
grandparents. They live in Q uebec and I practised pair with the most correct words wins the game.
speaking French and English. We travelled and saw a
TIM E Vs. Related verbs waste time
lot of different places in Canada.
spend time
A: Tell me about your plans for the future.
\ Nouns/Adjectives time off
B: I'm not really sure. I want to help people and become
\ timetable
a nurse. I want to go to university and study medicine
\ free-time
but I think it's quite difficult. It depends on my marks
at school. But I definitely want to study before I get a \ part-time
full-time job. \ full-time
Expressions to be on time
have a good time/
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY hard time
time flies
Just a minute is a good game to get students used to
speaking under pressure like they will have to in the time is money
exam, but in a relaxed game atmosphere. Ask students time after time
to talk for a minute, giving answers to the questions
in exercise 1. They are allowed to hesitate and use
An informal email: giving news
the fillers in the Speaking bank, but pauses can't be
longer than a second. Use a countdown timer and ask 1 READING Ask students to read the two emails and look at
students to do this activity in pairs or small groups. the photo. They decide which of the two girls, Natalie or
G race, is in the picture.

HOMEWORK I Answer
Natalie '
Assign students page 75 in their Workbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook. 2 Ask students to read the emails again and match
the people mentioned in the emails to the sentence
prompts 1-7. Elicit answers from different students
around the class.

Answers
1 Grace's dad 2 Natalie's brother 3 Natalie 4 Grace
5 Chloe 6 Natalie 7 Natalie's brother

3 A sk students to look at the expressions in the Writing


bank and decide who uses each one - G race (G) or
Natalie (N). Make sure students understand what each
expression means. Check their answers.
Answers + EXTRA ACTIVITY
■ How are you? N Elicit what students do when they take time off
| I hope you're w ell. N (travel, work experience, study, volunteering locally

;! G ood/G reat to hear from you. G or abroad, explore a personal interest, etc.). Divide
V I've got some great news! N the board up and ask students to think of advantages
That's great news a b o u t... G and disadvantages of having time off before going
to university. In pairs, students take one side of the
^ Did I tell you th at/a b o u t...? G
debate and talk about what is good or bad about
j How/W hat about you/your (week/weekend)? N
taking time off.
: How was your (week/weekend)? N
Example answers
1 Say hi to ... from me. G
Good things: See the world; get work experience and
; G ive (him/her) my (love/congratulations). G
j key skills; earn some money; develop useful contacts;
1 That's all for now. G make international friends; improve employability;
challenge yourself; do something good for other
4 Ask students to make notes with good news and good
people.
things that have happened to them, their family or friend(s)
last week. Encourage students to invent information if Bad things: You are a year behind everyone if they
necessary. Direct students' attention to the list of ideas. didn't take a year off them selves; it can cost a lot of
money to organise and do; you may get injured or sick
PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT during your travels; the break is too interesting and
5a Students use their notes in exercise 4 to write an email you don't want to go back into formal education; you
to a friend giving their news. Remind them to use lose your study skills; universities don't like it if you
Natalie's email (A) as a model and include expressions don't use your time constructively; it can be difficult
from the Writing bank. Tell them to follow the advice in and uncomfortable.
the Writing bank on page 156.
HOMEWORK
5b In pairs, students exchange emails and write a reply to
their partner. Remind them to use Grace's email (B) as a Assign students page 76 in their Workbook or the
model and include expressions from the Writing bank. relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
Sc-_______________________________________________
Model text

Hi Harry,
How are you? I hope you are well.
I've got some great news. My sister Jan e found a job last
week! You know she left school and didn't find a job. She
was very unhappy. Last w eek, a new hairdresser's opened
near our house and they gave her an interview. She got
the job! She starts next week.
Apart from that, last week was quite good. I had a
physics exam on Tuesday and I think I did really w ell. On
W ednesday, I had a football match and we won. W e're
third in the league now.
How about you? How was your w eek? Write back soon
and let me know.
Best wishes,
Greg

Hi Greg,
Good to hear from you. That's great news about Jane!
That job is very important for her - she was so unhappy.
Say hi to her from me and give her my congratulations.
I was really busy last week too. Did I tell you it was my
brother's birthday? W e had a big party on Saturday night
with all our family and friends.
Do you rem em ber Sam from the Theatre Club? Jack
and I met him at the cinema. He has a part in the play
at the Town Hall. Anyway, we decided to m eet up this
w eekend. Do you want to com e?
That's all for now. W rite back soon.
Best wishes,
Harry

This page is taken from G atew ay 2nd Edition A1 + Teacher's Book. It is photocopiable and may be used within class.
Macmillan Publishers Limited 2016 Unite 135
Vocabulary revision p i l l
Language checkpoint: Unit 8
JOBS

» > FAST TRACK 1 Students look at the objects and name the jobs.
Answers
The extra support provided on the Gram m ar and
Vocabulary reference sections makes the Gram m ar 1 chef 2 nurse 3 hairdresser 4 shop assistant
and Vocabulary revision sections ideal for setting 5 builder 6 mechanic 7 waiter
for homework. You could get students to complete
the whole revision page or just certain exercises for PERSONAL QUALITIES
homework.
2 Students write the adjectives.

Answers
Grammar revision pi 11 —
1 kind 2 cheerful 3 clever 4 calm 5 creative
6 hard-working 7 friendly

1 Students look at the sentences and decide if they are ADJECTIVES TO DESCRIBE JOBS
correct. If not, ask students to correct them.
3 Students match the correct halves of the words to make
Answers adjectives describing jo b s. Remind them they can use
1 My mum didn't work in an office when she was young. the words in column В more than once.
2 My dad didn't go to work yesterday.
Answers
3 correct
1 full-time 2 indoor 3 outdoor 4 part-time
4 correct
5 unskilled/unpaid 6 well-paid
5 She didn't like her old job but she likes her new one.
6 Today people don't usually work seven days a week. HOMEWORK
7 My friend didn't know all the answers.
Assign students page 77 in their Workbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
Past simple - question forms

2 Students write the questions in the past simple.

Answers
1 W here did you watch the film last night?
2 W ho did they go out with last w eekend?
3 W hy did your friend study last Saturday?
!j 4 W hat time did you get up this morning?
5 When did your first class start this morning?

Past simple - question forms and short answers ■

3 Students look at the information about what people did


yesterday. Ask them to use the prompts to write Yes/No
questions and short answers.
Answers
1 Q : Did Lee walk to school?
A: Yes, he did.
| 2 Q : Did Kate and Am y work?
A: No, they didn't.
3 Q : Did Max_ and Luke watch a film?
A: Yes, they did.
4 Q : Did Lily go shopping?
A: No, she didn't.
ateway to exam s: units
ж
7 *
/
Reading Pn 2 Writing pi i3 /
/
/
/
TIP FOR READING EXAMS > TIP FOR WRITING EXAMS /
/
Elicit from students what tense(s) they should be /
Students read the tip for activities where you match
using when they write a story. Ask students to read /
people and information. Ask them to look at Exam
the tip to compare their ideas and then look at Exam /
Success on page 153 for more ideas. /
Success on page 152 for more tips. /
1 In pairs, students discuss what the good and bad things /
7 SPEAKING In pairs, students discuss what they can see in the /
about being a young sports star are. Elicit answers from /
pictures. Elicit ideas in open class.
students around the class. /
/
2 READING Ask students to read the text to find out if they
8a Refer students to the start of the story. /
/
talk about any of the students ideas in exercise 1. Elicit 8b Ask students to continue the story. Remind them to use /
ideas from students around the class. the past tense and some of the words from the boxes. /
/
Answers /
8c W hen they have finished, ask students to check their /
Good: get to do what they are good at; win medals and /
story or swap texts and correct a partner's story. Ask
com petitions; m eet famous athletes; com pete in the /
them to count up how many words from exercise 8b
Olym pics /
they used. /
Bad: no time for friends or a social life; may have to /
------- /
move or live away from their family
Model text /
3 Ask students to read the text and say if the information Last week Ryan started his first job. The job was as a chef /
/
is about Dina Asher-Smith (DA), Rebecca Tunney (RT) or at a very important restaurant. On the first day there was a /
both (B). Remind them to check for the answers in both lot of work! The chef worked very fast and there were lots /
texts. Check their answers. /
of orders. It was very hot in the kitchen. Ryan didn't see the
/
name of a container and put salt over some ice cream. Next /
Answers
i; В 2 DA 3 RT 4 RT 5 DA 6 В 7 DA 8 DA
two people spoke to the waiter. They were unhappy about
the dessert because it was salty. After that, the angry waiter
/
/
/
took the ice cream back to the kitchen and complained to /
/
Listening Pn 2 the boss. In the end, Ryan spoke to the boss. The boss said it
/
was his first day, but it is always important to read the label. /
r /
/
> TIP FOR LISTENING EXAMS /
Speaking Рпз /
Students read the tip on how to improve their /
performance in a listening exam. Ask them to turn to /
/
Exam Success on page 152 for more ideas. > TIP FOR SPEAKING EXAMS /
/
Students read the tip about what to do in a speaking /
LISTENING О 80 Tell students that it was Alex's first day at
exam and turn to Exam Success on page 153 for /
work yesterday. Explain that he worked as an actor in a /
more ideas.
studio and he filmed an advert. Play the track for students /
/
to listen and answer the questions. Elicit answers. See 9 Ask students to look at the questions and think about /
p172 for the audioscript for this exercise. the answers. Remind them that they need to give an /
/
Answers extended response to the questions 'Tell me a b o u t...'. /
1 two dogs /
1 0 In pairs, students take it in turns to ask and answer the /
2 a long black coat and boots questions in exercise 9. /
/
3 Actors spend a long time just waiting and waiting.
/
HOMEWORK
/
5 @ 80 Play the track again for students to listen for what /
Assign students pages 78-79 in their Workbook or
Alex did at each time. Ask students to write a letter (a-h) /
the relevant sections of the Online Workbook. /
next to the times (1-5). Play the track twice if necessary.

гL
/
Remind them there are eight letters but only five times. /
Check their answers. /
/

I Answers
lb 2 g 3 c 4a Se
Ask students to read the 'can do' statements and
reflect on their own ability. Students mark from
/
/
/
1-4 how well they can do each thing in English. /
6 SPEAKING W hat about you? Ask students to discuss the /
questions in pairs or small groups. Ask students to look at their marks and decide /
/
what they need to do to improve. Elicit ideas from /
students around the class. /
/
/
Л .
'ms page is taken from G a te w a y 2nd Edition AT + Teacher's Book, it is photocopiable and may be used within class.
Macmillan Publishers Limited 2016 Gateway to exams: Units 7-8 137
.\ Ш Н 1 I er nature

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES


Students will be able to:
■ compare animals, people and things using talk about different animals and parts of the body
CEF
i
comparative and superlative adjectives talk about the geographical features of their country
■ talk about experiences in the past using the present use expressions to agree or disagree with others
perfect with ever/never
write a simple blog post

г »

UNIT OVERVIEW DIGITAL OVERVIEW


Animals and insects
Presentation Kit
Parts of the body
Vocabulary ► Flipped classroom video Unit 9: Com parative /N
adjectives
The animal Olym pics
► Life skills video Unit 9: Reducing pollution
Reading CRITICAL THINKING Respecting animals
► Q Vocabulary tool: Animals and insects; Parts of
Com parative adjectives
the body; Geographical features

Grammar in ► Interactive versions of Student's Book activities


context ► Integrated audio and answer key for all activities
G eographical features ► Workbook pages with answer key

Vocabulary Teacher's Resource Centre trc


The world around you: Reducing ► Flipped classroom video Unit 9: Comparative
BaP pollution adjectives
Life skills ► Life skills video Unit 9: Reducing pollution
A great explorer ► Grammar communication activity Unit 9: Check
the facts
Listening ► W orksheets for this unit, including:
Superlative adjectives - Grammar Practice worksheet Unit 9
Present perfect with ever and - Flipped classroom video worksheet Unit 9: Comparative
Grammar in n ever adjectives
context - Literature worksheet Units 9 and 10
Agreeing and disagreeing - Culture worksheet Unit 9
- Life skills video worksheet Unit 9
Developing
- Everyday English worksheet Unit 9
speaking
A blog post
Student's App
Developing G ateway 2nd Edition wordlist for the award-winning
writing Sounds App (available for download)
Reading: Multiple-choice
Listening: Com pleting sentences
Exam su ccess

✓ TESTING AND ASSESSMENT


Resources for exam preparation and measuring student progress

► Test G enerator Units 1-9 ► Printable tests ► Gateway to exam s Units 9 and 10
Unit 9 and Review (Units 7-9) (end of Unit 10)
у _
Mother nature

sound of the singular w ord; foot/feet, tooth/teeth. Drill


Vocabulary Pm the pronunciation of stom ach /'stAmsk/.

6 LISTENING© 82 Play the track for students to listen to the


Talking about different animals and insects and parts
descriptions and decide which of the animals and insects
o f the body
in exercise 2 they describe. Check their answers and
elicit the key words that helped them decide on their
» > FAST TRACK answers. See p172 for the audioscript for this exercise.
You could ask students to do exercises 2 and 4 at home
so that less confident students are prepared for these I Answers
1 antelope (two horns) 2 kangaroo (strong legs, jump)
activities.

3 beetle (small, black, wings, horns) *


WARMER
7a Individually, students think of three animals or insects
Ask students to look at the unit title M other nature
and prepare a description of them using the parts of the
and describe the photos in the images. Point out
body in exercise 5. Walk around the class, monitoring
to students that Mother nature is sometimes called
students and helping them if necessary.
Mother Earth and it is used to describe the force
that controls the w eather and all living things. Ask 7b SPEAKING Divide the class into small groups. Ask students
students to brainstorm what they think the unit is to take turns to describe their animals or insects for the
going to be about (the environment, animals and other people in the group to identify. Remind students
insects, pollution, etc.). not to say the name of the animal. Round off this activity
by asking students to read out their descriptions in open
0 Animals and insects class for others to guess.
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
1 In pairs, ask students to think of the name of an animal
or insect for each letter of the alphabet. Remind Students can find out interesting facts for the five
students that if they can't think of a word, they can omit other animals in exercise 2 not mentioned in the
the letter and continue. Elicit answers from pairs around listening (cheetah, whale, penguin, frog, rhino)
the class and ask what they know about the different and share them with the class, either orally or by
animals and insects. preparing a poster/piece of writing.

Suggested answers
alligator, bear, cat, dolphin, elephant, fish, giraffe, hippo, HOMEWORK
iguana, jellyfish, kangaroo, lion, monkey, newt, owl, Assign students page 80 in their W orkbook or the
penguin, queen bee, rabbit, seal, tiger, unicorn, viper, relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
whale, yak, zebra

2 Ask students to match the words in the box to the


photos. Check their answers. Reading Pii5
I Answers
1 cheetah 2 antelope 3 whale 4 penguin 5 frog
Understanding a simple text about animals

6 kangaroo 7 rhinoceros/rhino 8 beetle » > FAST TRACK


3 © 81 Play the track for students to listen and repeat the You could ask students to do exercises 1, 2 and 3 at
words. See p172 for the audioscript for this exercise. home and spend more time on the communicative
activities in class.
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
Ask students to decide on the stress pattern in the WARMER
words (underlined in the answers above).
W rite four words related to animals, insects or
parts of the body on the board - three that have
0 Parts of the body something in common and one 'odd one out'. In
4 Ask students to put the words in order to make parts of pairs, ask students to say which word is the odd one
the face. Check their answers. out and to say why. Elicit answers from different pairs
around the class. Students can then write a similar
( Answers
1 ear 2 eye 3 hair 4 mouth 5 nose 6 teeth
odd-one-out using vocabulary from the previous
lesson to test their partner.
5 Refer students to the photo of an aye-aye, a type of ear, mouth, nose, horn (horn - all the others you can
lemur from Madagascar. In pairs, students talk about find on a human face)
the aye-aye using the words in the box. Draw students' kangaroo, antelope, penguin, rhino (penguin - it's
attention to the model dialogue. Remind them to use the only bird)
their dictionaries if necessary. Remind students that frog, whale, cheetah, beetle (beetle - it's the only
the plural is som etim es formed by changing the vowel insect)
1 In pairs, ask students to look at the photos and the title Ask students to look at the underlined words in the text
of the text and say what they think the text is going to and guess their meaning. Encourage students to then
be about. Elicit ideas from around the class. check in their dictionaries.

TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: STUDENT TRAINING Answers


compete: to try to be more successful than others
Text titles
alive: living
Remind students that text titles often give you a speed: the rate at which someone or something moves
summary or description of the text. It is therefore useful
hunters: people who chase and kill wild animals
to look at them before reading the text to try to work out
lift: move to a higher position
what the text might be about. Titles may also include key
words that appear in the text. holes: spaces in the ground
dive: jum p into water
2 READING Set a time limit of two minutes for students to length: a m easurem ent of how long something is in size
read the text to check their ideas in exercise 1. Ask floors: levels in buildings
students if they were right.
SPEAKING What about y o u ? Divide the class into pairs or
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: CLASSROOM TIPS small groups and ask them to discuss which piece of
information was the most surprising and if they know
Setting tim e limits
any other surprising facts about animals or insects. Elicit
Setting short time limits helps to focus on the general some answers from different pairs/groups and discuss in
meaning of a text, without getting stuck on difficult open class.
vocabulary. Students can train them selves to scan a text
and pick out the important words. Set a two-minute (or HOMEWORK
an even shorter!) time limit, say Go and then start timing.
Assign students page 81 in their Workbook or the
Say Stop. Ask students to write down all the words they
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
can remember. Elicit the key words from the class and
write them on the board and discuss the general idea of
the text.
Grammar in context PPn 6-117
] Students discuss why it is useful to give
C om p arin g anim als using co m p a ra tive a d je ctiv e s
yourself a time limit the first time you read a text. Tell
them to turn to page 153 (Reading: Multiple choice) to
compare their ideas and read other tips. » > FAST TRACK
You could ask students to do exercises 1 and 2 at home.
3 Ask students to read the text again and choose the You could then check their answers and do the other
correct answer, a, b or c. G ive students time to compare activities in class.
in pairs before you check their answers in open class.
Elicit how they decided on their answers.
Test before you teach: Flipped classroom
Answers
I lb 2c 3b 4a 5a
Set the Flipped classroom video and tasks for
homework before the lesson. This will allow you
to assess? the needs of the students before the class.
CRITICAL THINKING | Individually, students think if the Students can then move on to the relevant grammar
text can help people respect animals more and reflect practice activities.
on why or why not. In a less confident class, ask
students to make notes before they compare their
ideas with the rest of the class. Comparative adjectives
Example answer l a Ask students to look at the sentences and match the
I think it helps people respect animals more because com parative adjectives (in blue) with a normal adjective
you understand how animals can be more amazing than (1-7). Check their answers.
humans. W e think we are more intelligent and better in
every way, but many animals and insects are better than I Answers
a 2 b 6 с 7 d 1,4 e5 f3
humans in many ways.
1b Elicit from students what word comes after comparative
adjectives.
Answer
than
Mother nature

2a Ask students to look at the table and put the adjectives 3 A sk students to correct the mistakes in each sentence
and com parative adjectives from exercise 1a in the and write the sentence correctly. You could elicit a
correct section (1-5). mistake in open class as an exam ple for this exercise.
Check their answers.
Answers
Answers
A d je c tiv e C o m p a r a tiv e R u le
1 African elephants are stronger than humans.
a d je c tiv e
2 Humans are more intelligent than other mammals.
(1) hard, s m a l l , harder, s m a l l e r , One-syllable 3 Dogs are often friendlier than cats.
fa s t, s tro n g fa s te r, s tro n g e r adjectives - add
4 Cheetahs are thinner than rhinos.
-er.
5 I think beetles are worse than frogs.
(2) fat, thin, b i g fatter, thinner, One-syllable 6 Rhinos are bigger than antelopes.
b ig g e r adjectives I 7 I think animals are more amazing than humans.
ending in one
vowel and one » > FAST F IN IS H E R S
consonant,
In p a i r s , s t u d e n t s t a k e i t in t u r n s t o s a y a n
- double the
a d je c tiv e fr o m th e ta b le f o r th e ir p a r tn e r to s a y th e
consonant and
c o m p a r a tiv e fo r m .
add -er.

(3) easy, silly, easier, sillier, Two-syllable 4 Elicit the names of the most dangerous animals in the
heavy h e a v ie r adjectives sea and ask students what they know about a fish called
ending in - y - the piranha. Ask students to read the text and tell you
omit -y and add a few facts about them. Then ask them to com plete the
-ier. text with the com parative form of the adjectives given.
Check their answers.
(4) beautiful, more beautiful, Adjectives with
interesting, more interesting two syllables Answers
p o w e rfu l m o re p o w e rfu l or more - put a sm aller b more dangerous С drier d worse
m ore before the e hungrier f more aggressive g more careful
adjective. h better
(5) bad, far, worse Irregular 5a Divide the class into groups of three. Ask students to
good farther, further, look at the photos and write as many sentences as
b e tte r possible com paring the different animals. Remind them
to use the com parative form of the adjectives in the box
2b Ask students to write the num ber of where the adjectives or any other adjectives they like. Set a five-minute time
go in the table and write the com parative form of each limit.
adjective on the line. Draw students' attention to the
Suggested answers
exam ple.
Dogs are sm aller than whales.
Answers Dolphins are more intelligent than tarantulas.
2 kinder (1) 3 friendlier (3) 4 more dangerous (4) W hales are heavier than dolphins.
5 older (1) 6 fitter (2) 7 quicker (1)
Elephants are bigger than snakes.
8 shorter (1)
Dogs are friendlier than tarantulas.

TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE 5b Ask students to count their sentences to see who
has more. Ask the winning group to read out their
C o m p a r a tiv e a d je c tiv e s
sentences. You could ask them to com e up and write
E ■olain to students that we usually use the comparative
them on the board to check spelling. Ask students from
•: тп when we are speaking about two different things
other groups if their answers are sim ilar and elicit similar
r : we want to show a difference between them. The
or different sentences.
: re p a ra tive adjective is usually followed by than. Point
: that, in spoken English, people aren't always strict 6a Ask students to make sentences comparing the two
--:::ut the rules in section 3. With some two-syllable things, giving their own true opinion. Remind students
i : ectives, m ore + adjective is preferred to adjective that they can use any com parative adjectives, but they
- -er, e.g. m ore clever vs. cleverer, m ore friendly vs. cannot use the same adjective twice.
т e^dlier, etc. This is usually because the m ore +
- : ective form is easier to pronounce. Students should, 6 b SPEAKING In pairs, students take turns to compare their
• : .’.ever, follow the rules in their written English. sentences. Walk around and monitor students, helping
them if necessary. Draw students' attention to the model
dialogue.

U nit?___________ 141
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY Gateway to life skills РРп 8 - п 9 ^
Play Twenty questions. Students have to guess
the animal by asking a volunteer 20 Yes/No type Reducing pollution
questions. Ask a volunteer student to think of an To learn about pollution caused by plastic, to think about
animal and sit at the front of the class. The other how we can reduce pollution caused by plastic and to
students take it in turns to ask Yes/No questions in make an action plan to reduce pollution from plastic
order to guess what it is. When a student correctly
guesses the name of the animal, he or she comes to » > FAST TRACK
sit at the front of the class. A yes response earns the
You could ask students to do exercises 1, 2 and 3 for
questioner another chance to ask another question.
homework in preparation for the lesson.
Refer students to the Gram m ar reference on page 124 if
necessary. EDBACKGROUND INFORMATION
HOMEWORK The G rea t Pacific G arb a g e Patch
Assign students page 82 in their Workbook or the The G reat Pacific G arbage Patch is an area of rubbish in
relevant sections of the Online Workbook. the north Pacific O cean. Its exact area is unknown, but
scientists say that it could be as big as up to 15,000,000
km2. The Patch is made up of plastics, chemicals and
Vocabulary Pm other rubbish that has been trapped by currents and is
now floating in the water. The Patch has had a terrible
Describing geographical features impact on marine life. Some of the plastic has ended up
inside birds, animals and their young, and many of these
fish are then eaten by humans, meaning humans are
» > FAST TRACK
eating chem icals. Research has shown that the rubbish
Ask students to do exercise 1 at home. affects at least 267 species worldwide. Efforts are now
being made to clean up the Patch, but the process will
Q G eographical features be long and educating people about the effect the Patch
1 In pairs, students match the photos with some of the is having is of great importance.
words. Elicit answers in open class.
Suggested answers WARMER

1 island 2 waterfall 3 forest 4 desert 5 beach Play Snowman with the word ENVIRONM ENT. Draw
6 lake 11 spaces on the board and ask students to choose
letters from the alphabet to try and complete the
2 Q 83 Play the track for students to listen and repeat. word. If they guess correctly, fill in the blank with
Drill the pronunciation of de se rt (dez-ert) - a dry arid that letter(s) in the right place(s). If the word does
region, and highlight the stress on the first syllable. not contain the suggested letter, draw one element
Contrast this with d e sse rt as (di-zurt), the sw eet treat. of a snowman. The objective is to guess the word
See p172 for the audioscript for this exercise. before the snowman is complete (about ten steps).
You could give students a tip at the end of the game.
3 Divide the class into small groups. A sk them to do
Elicit the meaning and drill the pronunciation:
the Geography quiz to see if they know what all the
/in 'va iran m a n t/. In pairs, ask students to brainstorm
geographical features are. Draw their attention to the
as many causes, problems and solutions connected
exam ple. Tell students to go to page 154 to check their
with this topic. Ask students to turn to Key concepts
answers.
on page 118 to check the meaning of other key
Answers words related to this lesson.
2 a lake 3 a mountain 4 a forest 5 a waterfall
6 a river 7 an island 8 a desert 9 a beach 1 In pairs, students say what they can see in the photos.
Elicit answers in open class.
4a Individually, ask students to think of a different exam ple
of each geographical feature in their country or in any 2 In pairs students discuss if they think the statements
other. are true or false. Encourage them to guess if they don't
know the answers.
4b SPEAKING In pairs, ask students to take it in turns to say
their exam ples for their partner to guess the type of 3 READING Ask students to read the text and check their
geographical feature. Draw students' attention to the answers in exercise 2. Ask students to say why if a
model dialogue. statem ent is false.

HOMEWORK
Assign students page 83 in their Workbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.
Mother nature

Answers Suggested answers


1 T Stop using plastic straws.
2T G ive up gum. Gum is made of a type of plastic.
3 F Scientists think that about 20% of the plastic in the Buy boxes instead of bottles.
oceans com es from ships or platform s in the sea. Purchase food, like cereal, pasta and rice from bulk bins
4 F Most plastic is not biodegradable. It stays in the sea and fill a reusable bag or container. You save money and
for hundreds of years. unnecessary packaging.

5 T Reuse containers.

6 F It isn't just a problem in the Pacific. Pack your lunch in reusable containers and bags.

4 Ask students to read the text again and say why the ++ EXTRA ACTIVITY
numbers and places appear. Check their answers in Write the following sentences on the board and ask
open class. students to find ten mistakes and correct them. Play
Answers the video or audio track again if necessary.

1 17 kilos of plastic were found in a whale's stomach Superm arkets in England gave more than eight billion
near the south of Spain. plastic bags to shoppers last year.

2 Scientists collected 750,000 pieces of plastic in one Buy plastic bottles if possible.
square kilometre. It's much easier to recycle plastic than glass.
3 The G reat Pacific G arbage Patch is more or less the Normal water usually com es in glass bottles.
size of Texas. Experts think that the water in plastic bottles is bad
4 90% of the rubbish in oceans is plastic. for us when the bottle is cold.
5 Plastic stays in the sea for hundreds of years. Mineral water is less expensive than normal water.
6 20% of the plastic in the oceans com es from ships or When your water isn't so clean, buy it.
platforms in the sea. Paper isn't so g o o d for the environment. You can't
recycle it easily.
5 SPEAKING In pairs, students discuss the three questions. Answers
In a less confident class, ask students to note down
Superm arkets in England gave more than seven billion
their answers first. Elicit answers from different students
plastic bags to shoppers last year.
around the class.
Buy glass bottles if possible.
6 LISTENING О 84 Tell students they are going to It's much easier to recycle glass than plastic.
ш Я watch or listen to a podcast made by a student. Mineral w ater usually com es in plastic bottles.
K | j ^ | Ask students to listen for how she Experts think that the w ater in plastic bottles is bad for
answers the questions in exercise 5. Ask students to us when the bottle is warm.
com pare in pairs before you elicit answers from different
Mineral water is more expensive than normal water.
students around the class. See pp172—173 for the
W hen your w ater isn't so clean, use a w ater filter.
videoscript/audioscript for this exercise.
Paper isn't so bad for the environment. You can recycle
Answers it easily.
1 She thinks it's a really big and important problem.
2 Don't take plastic bags in supermarkets! Don't buy
drinks in plastic bottles. Drink normal w ater if you can. LIFE TASK
Don't buy all of your food in plastic.
Divide the class into groups. A sk students to follow
3 If you need to use plastic and plastic bags, try to use the plan:
biodegradable plastic.
■ Step 1
7 a © 84 In pairs, students try to rem em ber Charlotte's five Students decide on the top five things they can
ideas to stop using so much plastic. Ask them to make do to stop using so much plastic. Refer them to
a list as in the exam ple. Play the video or track again if the ideas given in exercise 7a and their ideas in
necessary. Elicit answers in open class. exercise 7b, as well as ideas on the Internet.
■ Step 2
Answers
Students make a poster to explain and illustrate
2 Don't buy drinks in plastic bottles.
their top five ideas.
3 Drink normal water if you can.
* Step 3
4 Don't buy all of your food in plastic.
Students exhibit their posters in the classroom.
5 If you need to use plastic and plastic bags, try to use
Encourage students to walk round and look at each
biodegradable plastic.
other's posters. They could vote on the best poster.
7b Ask students to add other ideas of their own to the list. ■ Step 4
Encourage students to do the things on their
poster. After a month, students evaluate the
difference they are making to the environment.

Unit 9___________ 143


TEAC H ER D EV ELO P M E N T: S TU D E N T T R A IN IN G
Listening P i 20
Spelling in listening exam s
Understanding a spoken text about a great explorer In many official exam inations, spelling matters not
just in the writing paper but in listening and reading,
WARMER too. If a word is m isspelled, students may not get a
Write this table on the board. In pairs, ask students mark. Students need to test them selves on spelling:
to make five correct sentences in the past simple look at the words, cover them, write them and check
about famous explorers. Set a time limit of four them. Repetition is an important part of language
minutes. The first pair to finish shouts Stop! Check learning. Teach students to look for spelling patterns,
their answers. Ask students if they know the names combinations of letters and common endings for nouns,
of any other famous explorers. verbs and adjectives. Good spellers are often good
readers; you get used to 'seeing' the right spelling of
Sir Edmund fly on the moon a word without having to learn it if you read a lot in
Hillary English.
John Alcock climb Everest
4 SPEAKING What about you? In pairs, students discuss
and Arthur
which of Sir Ranulph Fiennes's adventures they think was
Brown
the most difficult and say why. Ask students to compare
Marco Polo walk the South Pole their answers in open class.

Neil Armstrong reach China

Roald explore the first non­


Amundsen stop flight
across the
Atlantic Ocean

Answers
Sir Edmund Hillary climbed Everest.
John Alcock and Arthur Brown flew the first non-stop adjectives and talking about experiences using the
flight across the Atlantic O cean. present perfect with ever and never
Marco Polo explored China.
Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. » > FAST TRACK
Roald Amundsen reached the South Pole.
Students could do exercises 1 and 2 at home. Start the
class on exercise 3.
1 In pairs, students look at the photo and answer the
questions. Discuss students' answers in open class.
Test before you teach
2 Ask students to look at the sentences about the man in In pairs, ask students to make sentences ending in ... in
the photo, Sir Ranulph Fiennes and say what words or the world, for these record-breaking animals and insects.
types of words they think are missing. cheetah/fast
giraffe/tall
Answers
mosquito/deadly
I age 2 year 3 year 4 place 5 place 6 verb
golden poison dart frog/poisonous
7 num ber 8 num ber 9 num ber 10 number
Monitor to see if they are familiar with superlative
I I number 12 type of film
adjectives. If they know how to form superlative
3 LISTENING Q 85 Play the track for students to listen and adjectives, you could go quickly through exercises 1 and
com plete the sentences with one or two words, or a 2 in open class.
number. Have students compare in pairs before you
check their answers in open class. See p173 for the
audioscript for this exercise.
Answers
1 65 2 1979 3 1982 4 South Pole 5 North
Pole 6 walked 7 7/seven 8 7/seven
9 7/seven 10 million 11 20 12 Jam es Bond
✓ EXAM SUCCESS Students read about completing
sentences in listening activities and say if it is a good
idea to put four or five words in each space and say why
or why not. Ask students if they think that spelling is
important in this type of exercise. Tell them to turn to
page 153 (Listening: Completing sentences) to compare
their answers.
Mother nature

(4) beautiful, the most A djectives with


Superlative adjectives
interesting, beautiful, two syllables or
l a Refer students to the sentences and the superlative difficult the most more - put the
adjectives in blue. Ask them to match each superlative interesting, m ost before the
adjective with a normal adjective (1-7). Check their the most adjective.
answers. difficult

I Answers
a 6 b 7 с 2,3 d 1 e5 f 4
(5) far, bad,
good
the farthest, the
furthest, the
Irregular.

worst, the best


1b Elicit which word com es before the superlative
adjectives.
2 b Elicit from students where the adjectives go in the table
Answers
I the and ask them to write the superlative form of each
adjective. Draw students' attention to the exam ple.

l c Refer students to sentences a, b and f and ask them if I 2Answers


the shortest (1) 3 the most interesting (4)
we use the preposition in or o f with the superlative.

I Answers
in
4 the funniest (3) 5 the sm allest (1) 6 the hottest (2)

3 a Ask students to choose the correct alternative.


TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE
I Answers
1 best 2 more 3 worst 4 most 5 easier 6 in
Su p erlative ad jectives
7 biggest
Explain to students that we usually use the superlative
form when speaking about three or more objects to show 3 b SPEAKING In pairs, students discuss what they think of the
which object stands out in some way from the others, statements in exercise 3a. Draw students' attention
e.g . the person who is taller than the other people is the to the model dialogue. Elicit opinions from different
tallest person. We always use 'the' before a superlative students around the class.
and, unlike the com parative, we do not use 'than' after it.
4 a Ask students to com plete the sentences with the
2 a Students look at the table and put the adjectives and superlative form of the adjectives given and decide on
superlative adjectives from exercise 1a in the correct the place. W hen they have finished, ask them to turn to
section (1-5). Check their answers. page 154 to check their answers.

Answers 4 b © 86 Play the track for students to listen and check


their answers. See p173 for the audioscript for this
Adjective Superlative Rule
exercise.
adjective
Answers
(1) hard, fast, the hardest, One-syllable
g re a t, high the fastest, th e adjectives - 1 The Sahara, largest, most famous
greatest, the add -est. 2 China, m ost p o p u la ted
highest 3 The Nile, longest
4 A n g e l Falls, highest
(2) fat, thin, big the fattest, the One-syllable
5 Lake Baikal, deepest
thinnest, the adjectives
biggest ending in one 6 G alapagos, best
vowel and one 7 hottest, Death (Valley), driest
consonant -
double the
consonant and
add -est.

(3) happy, silly, the happiest, Two-syllable


easy the silliest, the adjectives
easiest ending in - y -
omit -y and add
-/est.
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY HOMEWORK
Assign students page 84 in their Workbook or the
relevant sections of the Online Workbook.

Developing speaking ртггФ ф


Using expressions to agree or disagree with others

» > FAST TRACK


5 Ask students to look at the sentences and choose the You could set exercise 1 for students to prepare at home
correct alternative. Elicit that we use the present perfect and come to class to talk about.
with ever and n ever to talk about events that have
happened at some point in our lives. Ever is used in WARMER
questions and n ever is used with affirmative verbs.
Play H ot seat to start the class. Divide the class into
Answers
( 1 don't say 2 have 3 any 4 no
two teams: A and B. A volunteer from Team A sits
with their back to the board. Write the name of an
animal on the board. Team A defines the animal in 30
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: LANGUAGE seconds for their team member to guess. Play then
passes to Team B. Each time a team member guesses
Contractions
an animal correctly within one minute, their team
Draw attention to the contracted form of has: 's, which is wins a point. The team with the most points at the
for the third person form. Point out that, although this is end of the game wins.
the same as the contraction for is, the context will always
help them work out which verb is being contracted.
Explain that we do not use the contracted form in short Agreeing and disagreeing
answers. T SPEAKING In pairs, students discuss their opinion of the
animals in the photos. Draw students' attention to the
6 Ask students to match the verbs and the past participles. model dialogue. Elicit some opinions from students
Draw attention to the irregular verbs (see, be, run, swim). around the class.
Refer students to the irregular verb list on page 158.
2a SPEAKING In pairs, students discuss which pets in exercise
Answers 1 are good or bad for Mrs Henderson, an older lady
1 seen 2 walked 3 been 4 run 5 climbed who lives alone. Elicit some ideas from students in open
6 jum ped 7 swum class.

7a Ask students to put the verbs in the correct form of the 2b LISTENING © 87 Play the track for students to listen to two
present perfect. people, Evelyn and Miles, talking about the different
Answers animals in exercise 1. Ask them to note down which two
pets they think are best for Mrs Henderson and which
1 Have, swum 2 Have, walked 3 Has, climbed
two pets are worst. Elicit answers and ask students if the
4 Have, seen 5 Has, run 6 Have, been
two people had ideas that were similar to theirs. See
7b SPEAKING In pairs, students take it in turns to ask and p173 for the audioscript for this exercise.
answer the questions in exercise 7a. Refer students to
Answers
the model dialogue for the correct short answers.
The two best are the cat and the goldfish.
++ EXTRA ACTIVITY The worst are the snake and the turtle.
Ask students to think of some things they have 3 Refer students to the expressions in the Speaking bank.
done in their life. Ask them to write four sentences In pairs, ask them to use different expressions to give
in the present perfect about things they have done. their true opinion of the things that Evelyn and Miles say
Encourage them to think of things that only they in (1-8).
have done in the class, e.g. I've been to China., I've
swum in a lake., I've run in a half-marathon. Divide
the class into small groups and ask the students to
take turns to say a sentence in the present perfect.
They win a point if they have done something that no
one else in the class has done.

Refer