Sie sind auf Seite 1von 10

Lainey Marquiss

Professor Leonard

English Composition

20 October 2019

Casebook

The goal of my essay is to discover more about how the impact of social media

influences the teen population today. I want to broaden my knowledge of how social media

affects my generation as people and what makes us different. I want to know if it has a more

positive or negative effect on our brains, our emotions, how we see the world, how we

communicate, how we see ourselves, and so on. Does social media have a hold on our lives

wherever we go? Is social media the reason our generation has such high standards about how

we’re “supposed to look and dress”?

Asmelash, Leah. “Social Media Use May Harm Teens' Mental Health by Disrupting

Positive Activities, Study Says.” CNN, Cable News Network, 15 Aug. 2019,

www.cnn.com/2019/08/13/health/social-media-mental-health-trnd/index.html.

This first source is called “Social Media Use May Harm Teens' Mental Health by

Disrupting Positive Activities, Study Says.”, it was written by Leah Asmelash, and it appeared

on the CNN website on Wednesday, August 14, 2019. The article is about how social media

might not be the problem for mental health issues seen in teenagers, but rather, it's the exposure

and the frequency of its use. The article discusses how in both sexes the very frequent use of

social media was associated with greater psychological distress, but it affects the girls more than
the boys. Then the article concluded with stating ways of how to help teenagers through the

anxiety of social media by bringing in more healthy lifestyle changes for a positive way of life.

The writer’s purpose of this article is to shed light on how it’s not social media itself

that’s causing harm, but the frequent use and the exposure of certain types of content that’s

leading to the lower well-being and problems of mental health in teens. The audience for this

piece is anyone who is responsible for teens such as parents, teachers, guardians, babysitters, and

so forth. Since the article was last updated about 3 months ago the information is relevant and

makes the source more trustworthy and reliable for the audience. The writer herself is also

trustworthy and reliable because she just recently graduated from UNC-Chapel Hill with a

bachelor’s degree, she studied Reporting and Global Studies, with a focus on politics and the

European Union.

I plan to use this source to benefit the argument that social media leads to a negative

affect in teens. One of my questions that I was hoping to find the answer to was, “Does social

media affect teen’s mental health in a more positive or negative way?” and with this article it

helped me discover that answer. In other words, this is a good source to use for my research.

Moreno, Megan Andreas, and Ana Radovic. Technology and Adolescent Mental Health.

Springer, 2018.

This second source is called “Technology and Adolescent Mental Health”, it was written

by Megan Andreas Moreno and Ana Radovic, and it is an ebook that was published by Springer

in 2018. The book provides information about the epidemiology of mental health, how both

worlds of offline and online affect mental health in a positive and negative way in adolescents,

how technology is used for observation for mental health conditions, and finally future
approaches to technology with certain tools that are going to be used for improving the treatment

for mental health concerns and illnesses.

The writer’s purpose of this book is to inform readers about how the mental health of

adolescents can be affected in a positive and negative way through the internet as well as offline.

The intended audience for this book is pediatricians, family physicians, internal medicine

providers, adolescent medicine and psychiatry specialists, psychologists, social workers, as well

as any other healthcare providers working with adolescents and mental health care. This book is

a trustworthy and reliable source of information because it was published last year, which is still

considered recent, which means that the information provided is updated to this generation of

adolescents and the book is unbiased because it includes both sides of positive and negative

effects. The authors are also trustworthy and reliable because Megan Andreas Moreno is a doctor

who earned her medical degree from George Washington University, she did her residency at the

University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, she did her fellowship in adolescent medicine at

the University of Washington Affiliated Hospitals, and she is board certified in adolescent

medicine. The other author, Ana Radovic, is also a doctor who got a MD at the University

Hospital of Cleveland Ohio, she specializes in Pediatrics while her Secondary Specialty is in

Adolescent Medicine, her board certifications are in Adolescent Medicine and Pediatrics, she did

her residency at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, she did her fellowship at the

University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and she is affiliated at the UPMC Children's

Hospital of Pittsburgh.

I plan to use this source when I want to learn more about the medical backgrounds of

how the internet affects the mental health of adolescents. This will be great information to use
when stating exact facts for those readers who rely on the appeal of logos to determine their view

on the topic.

Rocha, Sarah. “Talking with Teens and Families about Digital Media Use.” The Brown

University Child and Adolescent Behavior Letter, vol. 35, no. 3, 2019, pp. 1–7.,

doi:10.1002/cbl.30361.

This third source is called “Talking with Teens and Families about Digital Media Use.”,

it was written by Sarah Rocha, and it first appeared on February 12, 2019 on The Brown

University Child and Adolescent Behavior Letter. This article is about how there is evidence to

suggest that there is a correlation between the increasing use of social media and increasing rates

of adolescent depression, anxiety, and suicide. There are mental health clinicians that are

reporting that the use of social media is a frequent source of family conflict. The article then

starts to talk about how clinicians are facing challenges when assessing family digital media use

and then trying to provide evidence‐based recommendations to help these families.

The writer’s purpose of this article is to provide a set of ideas and reviews of expert‐

derived guidelines for talking with families about the use of social media. The intended audience

for this piece are experts who are trying to help families through their struggles by learning more

about how social media affected other families and getting more knowledge about

recommendations on how to provide a solution. This article is a trustworthy and reliable source

because it was published by a trusted university and it was also published earlier this year which

means that the information provided is from recent research. The author is also trustworthy and

reliable because she is a doctor who is a psychiatrist in Boston, Massachusetts. She received her
medical degree from the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine and has been in

practice between 3-5 years.

I plan to use this source to show that the use of social media doesn’t only affect the

teenagers involved, but also their families. This helps connect the older generations with the

younger ones, while also showing that the issue goes wider than what most people thought.

Roehl, Amy, and Alyssa Humphries Stewart. “Impact of Social Networking Sites and

Digital Applications Upon Teens.” Journal of Family & Consumer Sciences,

vol. 110, no. 2, 2018, pp. 37–42., doi:10.14307/jfcs110.2.37.

This fourth source is called “Impact of Social Networking Sites and Digital Applications

Upon Teens.”, it was written by Amy Roehl and Alyssa Humphries Stewart, and it is a research

article that appeared in the Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences on March 1, 2018. This

article focuses on the development of youth by examining the effects of the use of social

networking sites on teens. They also include research that demonstrates that using certain types

of social media increases the existing issues that the teen population is facing, talks about new

concerns that they are worried about, and describes new ideas to help.

The writer’s purpose of this article is to inform the audience about the issues of these

teens and encourage them to engage in conversations with them about their social media use, and

to make sure they model healthy behavior. The audience for this piece are adults that have taken

responsibility for teens that are struggling with these issues as well as anyone who wants to help

them through the struggle. This article is trustworthy and reliable because the journal that

provided the article is a very well-known journal that has knowledgeable information and

research. The authors are also trustworthy and reliable because Amy Roehl is a known author of
several articles on this journal who has written and done a lot of research on children and teens.

While Alyssa Humphries Stewart got her bachelor's degree at Baylor University and is now a

professor at TCU, who is also broadening her knowledge with the help of Amy Roehl.

I plan on using this research article to help me describe the topic in a way that comes

across as general and understandable. I want this article to further my way of thinking in a more

simple manor so I don’t use too much research and information that others might not

comprehend so quickly.

Velozo, Joana De Calheiros, and Johannes E.a. Stauder. “Exploring Social Media Use as a

Composite Construct to Understand Its Relation to Mental Health: A Pilot Study on

Adolescents.” Children and Youth Services Review, vol. 91, 2018, pp. 398–402.,

doi:10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.06.039.

This fifth source is called “Exploring Social Media Use as a Composite Construct to

Understand Its Relation to Mental Health: A Pilot Study on Adolescents.”, it was written by

Joana de Calheiros Velozo and Johannes E A Stauder, and it first appeared on the Children and

Youth Services Review in 2018. This volume is about the pilot study of trying to understand

whether it is relevant to explore social media as a composite measure while also thinking about

how the genders would differ. This study talks about how adolescents are spending a lot of time

on social media and studying how this factor is associated to their mental health has become an

important focus point of their research. Other studies have focused on just the social media use in

general and have overlooked the factor of social media activity. This means that the differences

in activities within social media can affect the results.


The writer's purpose of this volume is to try and involve more accurate evidence on the

association between social media and mental health in teens since their study includes more than

just the general use of social media. The audience for this piece are researchers who are trying to

discover more about social media and its use as a composite construct to try and explore more

about its relation with mental health. This article is reliable because even though its a pilot study,

the authors are discovering more about this topic than the other studies normally do because they

have another factor that could recall for more accurate results. The authors are also reliable

because Joana de Calheiros Velozo is a graduate from Maastricht University who is now a

Contextual Psychiatry and a researcher for KU Leuven. The other author, Johannes E A Stauder,

is also a graduated from Maastricht University with a PHD and now he is teaching at the

University in the psychology and neuroscience department.

I plan on using this source to help further my insight on how social media affects

adolescents mental health. If what this study says is true about how they have more accurate

information, then I can use a lot of information that's not going to be included in other studies.

Weinstein, Emily. “The Social Media See-Saw: Positive and Negative Influences on

Adolescents’ Affective Well-Being.” New Media & Society, vol. 20, no. 10,

2018, pp. 3597–3623., doi:10.1177/1461444818755634.

This sixth source is called “The Social Media See-Saw: Positive and Negative Influences

on Adolescents’ Affective Well-Being.”, it was written by Emily Weinstein, and it was first
published on February 21, 2018, but the issue was later published on October 1, 2018. This

research article is about the relationship between social media usage and the well-being of

teenagers, whether enhanced or degraded, and how its not confined to an “either/or” framework.

Both positive and negative influences have an important role in the “emotional see-saw” of

social media. The surveys they conducted portrayed social media use as, for the most part, a

positive influence, while the interviews that were conducted revealed both positive and negative.

The writer’s purpose of this research article is to inform both sides of the issue with

social media. She wanted people to have all the information about the effects it has on

adolescents. The audience for this piece is mainly for anyone that’s doing research, weather that

be a professional or even a parent, it’s out there for anyone that needs/wants it. This source is

reliable because it’s an unbiased research article that has a lot of trustworthy information. The

author used her own research in this article with surveys and interviews that she conducted

herself. The author herself is also reliable because she graduated from Harvard Graduate School

of Education and she has written a good amount of other articles that consider the health of

adolescents.

I plan on using this research article to learn and write about both the positive and negative

side of my topic. Doing this will make my essay come across as unbiased and trustworthy. I also

plan on using her information she found in her surveys and interviews to help with the legitimacy

of my evidence.

“Too Much Social Media Can Make Your Teen Depressed.” Pakistan Press International

Too Much Social Media Can Make Your Teen Depressed Comments,

ppinewsagency.com/too-much-social-media-can-make-your-teen-depressed/.
This final source is called “Too Much Social Media Can Make Your Teen Depressed.”, it

was written by the PPI, and it first appeared on July 18, 2019. This source is about how even

though in some ways the internet and social media can cause teens to be more social, it also

impacts their mental health in a negative way. It states that for many years now, social media has

been considered the main threat when it comes to the mental health of its users. Research has

linked social media platforms like Instagram and Facebook to high levels of anxiety and

depression on the teenagers of today’s society. They have a lot of research to suggest that the

more teens spend on these social media platforms, the more likely they are to be depressed. Since

the more technology advances, the more screen time teenagers get, but this also increases their

depressive state. The article concludes by talking about how early identification of depression

gives clinicians and parents a large window of time in which to intervene, so they can help these

teenagers have a more healthy lifestyle. Regulating these teens’ on how much social media and

television they use is one way to help young people manage their depression.

The writer’s purpose of this article is to help spread the word of this in their country to

their clinicians and parents. Since this is a Pakistan article, their goal is to inform the people

living there about the information and evidence they got from different studies. The audience for

this piece are the clinicians and parents in pakistan who need extra information on how social

media is affecting their teens. This article is reliable because it was posted on a popular Pakistan

Press International website, every source they used as evidence was cited in their article, so you

knew where their information was coming from.

I plan on using this article to see if Pakistan has the same results in their studies as we do

here in ours. It’s a good source to see how different these studies are and to see how the results
came out. It will be a good comparison to use when describing how teens are affected differently

by social media.