Sie sind auf Seite 1von 127

Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

i
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

ACRONYMS

AGENCIES/ ORGANIZATIONS

BAC Bids and Awards Committee


BMBA Barrio Maligaya Bagong Anyo
BPLS Business Permits and Licensing Services
CADAC Caloocan City Anti-Drug Abuse Council
CATS Cultural Affairs and Tourism Services
CBD City Budget Department
CCCDCO Caloocan City Cooperative Development and Coordinating Office
CCDRRMC Caloocan City Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council
CCDRRMO Caloocan City Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office
CCMBTF Caloocan City Manila Bay Task Force
CCMC Caloocan City Medical Center
CCNMC Caloocan City North Medical Center
CCPC City Council for the Protection of Children
CCPRAT Caloocan City Poverty Reduction Action Team
CCWS Caloocan City Waterworks Services
CDC City Development Council
CGSO City General Services Office
CHD City Health Department
CSOs Civil Society Organizations
CPDD City Planning and Development Department
CRD Civil Registry Department
CREATE Caloocan City Real Estate Administration Team
CRS Community Relations Services
CSWD City Social Welfare Department
CTO City Treasurer’s Office
DENR Department of Environment and Natural Resources
DILG Department of the Interior and Local Government
DOST Department of Science and Technology
DPSTM Department of Public Safety and Traffic Management
DPWH Department of Public Works and Highways
DSWD Department of Social Welfare and Development
EGSA Environmental Geographic Student Association
ESC Environmental Sanitation Center
ESS Environmental Sanitation Services
ExeCom Executive Committee
HDMF Home Development Mutual Fund
HGC Home Guaranty Corporation
HLURB Housing and Land Use Regulatory Board
HOAI Homeowners Association Inc.
HRMS Human Resource Management Services
HUDCC Housing and Urban Development Coordinating Council
IAS Internal Audit Services
ITS Information Technology Services
JICA Japan International Cooperation Agency
JJWC Juvenile Justice and Welfare Council
KMPC Kabayanihan Multi-Purpose Cooperative
LAC Local Advisory Council
LCE Local Chief Executive
LGUs Local Government Units
LHB Local Housing Board
LIAC Local Inter-Agency Committee

ii
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

AGENCIES/ ORGANIZATIONS (continuation)


LIRS Labor and Industrial Relations Services
LMB Land Management Bureau
LTO Land Transportation Office
MERALCO Manila Electric Company
MMA Metropolitan Manila Authority
MMC Metropolitan Manila Council
MMDA Metropolitan Manila Development Authority
MNTC Manila North Tollways Corporation
MWSI Maynilad Water Services, Inc.
NAI Neighborhood Association, Inc.
NAMRIA National Mapping and Resources Information Authority
NCR National Capital Region
NGAs National Government Agencies
NGOs Non-Government Organizations
NHA National Housing Authority
NHMFC National Home Mortgage Finance Corporation
NPA New People’s Army
NPC National Power Corporation
NSCB National Statistical Coordination Board
NSO National Statistics Office
OCBO Office of the City Building Official
OCM Office of the City Mayor
OCV Office of the City Veterinarian
OLUZA Office of the Land Use and Zoning Administrator
OSCA Office of the Senior Citizens Affairs
OUP Office for the Urban Poor
Pag-IBIG Pagtutulungan sa Kinabukasan: Ikaw, Bangko, Industria at Gobyerno
PCUP Presidential Commission for the Urban Poor
PHHC People’s Homesite and Housing Corporation
PHIVOLCS Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology
PLDT Philippine Long Distance Telephone Company
PLEB People’s Law Enforcement Board
PMT Performance Management Team
PNP Philippine National Police
PNR Philippine National Railways
POC Peace and Order Council
PSA Philippine Statistics Administration
PSB Personnel Selection Board
SAMAKASAWATA Samahan ng Magkakapitbahay sa SAWATA
SHFC Social Housing Finance Corporation
SP Sangguniang Panlungsod
SWMB Solid Waste Management Board
TLRC Technology Livelihood Resource Center
TMMED Third Metro Manila Engineering District
TWG Technical Working Group
UCC University of Caloocan City
UN United Nations
UNCHS United Nations Centre for Human Settlements
USNAI United Settler Neighborhood Association Inc.
WB-IFC World Bank - International Finance Corporation

iii
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

OTHERS
AIDS Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome
BSRP Bagong Silang Resettlement Project
BuB Bottom-Up Budgeting
CAMANAVA Caloocan-Malabon-Navotas-Valenzuela
CBD Central Business District
CCA Climate Change Adaptation
CCCAP City Climate Change Action Plan
CCDRRMP Caloocan City Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Program
CCGFPS Caloocan City Gender and Development Focal Point System
CBDs Central Business Districts
CDs Compact Discs
CIPH City Investment Plan for Health
CLUP Comprehensive Land Use Plan
CMP Community Mortgage Program
CPH Census of Population and Housing
CSCAND Collective Strengthening for Community Awareness on Natural Disasters
DDDP Dagat-Dagatan Development Project
DRR Disaster Risk Reduction
DU Dwelling Units
EDSA Epifanio de los Santos Avenue
ELA Executive-Legislative Agenda
EO Executive Order
FIES Family Income and Expenditure Survey
FY Fiscal Year
GAD Gender and Development
GMMA Greater Metropolitan Manila Area
GMMA Ready Project Enhancing Greater Metro Manila’s Institutional Capacities for Effective
Disaster/ Climate Risk Management towards Sustainable Development
GSS Gender Sensitivity Seminar
HDHP High Density Housing Program
HHs Households
HUC Highly Urbanized City
IRA Internal Revenue Allotment
ISFs Informal Settler Families
LCMP Localized Community Mortgage Program
LGC Local Government Code
LGPMS Local Governance Performance Management System
LOG Letter of Guaranty
LRB Low Rise Building
LRT Light Rail Transit
M&E Monitoring and Evaluation
MBCRP Manila Bay Clean-up, Rehabilitation and Preservation
MDG FACES Millennium Development Goals Family-based Actions for Children and
their Environs in the Slums
MOA Memorandum of Agreement
MRFs Materials Recovery Facilities
MMEIRS Metro Manila Earthquake Impact Reduction Study
MRB Medium Rise Building
NLEx North Luzon Expressway
PCF Performance Challenge Fund
PEIS PHIVOLCS Earthquake Intensity Scale

iv
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

OTHERS (continuation)
R&D Research and Development
RA Republic Act
RAE Rizal Avenue Extension
RPT Real Property Tax
RROWs Road Right-of-Ways
SLEx South Luzon Expressway
UDHA Urban Development and Housing Act
UNDP United Nations Development Programme
VFS Valley Fault System
4Ps Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program

v
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

TABLE OF CONTENTS
1 OVERVIEW

1.1 RATIONALE ...................................................................................................................... 1

1.1.1 LEGAL BASIS ............................................................................................................. 2


1.1.1.1 THE 1987 CONSTITUTION .................................................................................. 2
1.1.1.2 THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT CODE OF 1991 ........................................................ 2
1.1.1.3 THE URBAN DEVELOPMENT AND HOUSING ACT OF 1992................................. 3
1.1.1.4 REPUBLIC ACT NO. 10121 .................................................................................. 4
1.1.1.5 SUPREME COURT DECISIONS IN G.R. NOS. 171947 – 171948 ........................... 4

1.1.2 VISION ........................................................................................................................ 5

1.1.3 GOAL .......................................................................................................................... 5

1.1.4 SHELTER PLANNING OBJECTIVES ......................................................................... 5

1.2 TARGET POPULATION .................................................................................................... 6

1.3 SHELTER PLANNING PROCESS .................................................................................... 6

1.3.1 ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES .............................................................................. 6

1.3.2 PLANNING AND FORMULATION .............................................................................. 8

1.3.3 STRUCTURE AND TIME FRAME OF THE PLAN ...................................................... 9

2 CITY PROFILE

2.1 GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION AND FEATURES ................................................................ 10

2.1.1 GEOGRAPHY AND LOCATION ............................................................................... 10

2.1.2 CLIMATE................................................................................................................... 10
2.1.2.1 RAINFALL ......................................................................................................... 10
2.1.2.2 MAXIMUM OCCURRENCE................................................................................ 11
2.1.2.3 WIND DIRECTION ............................................................................................ 12

2.1.3 TOPOGRAPHY AND GEOMORPHOLOGY ............................................................. 13


2.1.3.1 GEOLOGY ......................................................................................................... 14
2.1.3.2 GEOMORPHOLOGY.......................................................................................... 15

2.1.4 HAZARD VULNERABILITY PROFILE ...................................................................... 18


2.1.4.1 SEISMIC HAZARD ............................................................................................. 18
2.1.4.2 GROUND SHAKING .......................................................................................... 18
2.1.4.3 LIQUEFACTION ................................................................................................ 19

vi
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

2.1.4.4 TSUNAMI ......................................................................................................... 19

2.2 URBAN DEVELOPMENT TRENDS ................................................................................ 23

2.2.1 POPULATION ........................................................................................................... 23


2.2.1.1 HISTORICAL GROWTH ..................................................................................... 23
2.2.1.2 POPULATION DISTRIBUTION ........................................................................... 25
2.2.1.3 POPULATION SIZE............................................................................................ 26
2.2.1.4 HOUSEHOLD POPULATION, HOUSEHOLD SIZE AND POPULATION DENSITY ... 26
2.2.1.5 AGE, SEX COMPOSITION ................................................................................. 32
2.2.1.6 POPULATION BY MARITAL STATUS ................................................................. 33

2.2.2 FAMILY INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ................................................................... 33

2.2.3 TRADE AND INDUSTRY .......................................................................................... 36

2.2.4 EMPOYMENT BY MAJOR SECTOR ........................................................................ 36

2.2.5 LAND USES .............................................................................................................. 37


2.2.5.1 GROWTH OF COMMERCIAL AND BUSINESS CENTERS ALONG MAJOR ............ 37
TRANSIT POINTS AND CORRIDORS ................................................................................. 37
2.2.5.2 EXPANSION OF INDUSTRIAL AREAS WITHIN EXISTING INDUSTRIAL ZONES .... 38
2.2.5.3 RAPID INCREASE OF RESIDENTIAL LAND AREA IN NORTH CALOOCAN ............ 38
2.2.5.4 GROWTH CORRIDORS ..................................................................................... 39

2.2.6 LAND USE PLAN ...................................................................................................... 43


2.2.6.1 LAND SUPPLY – DEMAND BALANCE ................................................................ 43
2.2.6.2 SOUTH CALOOCAN .......................................................................................... 44
2.2.6.3 NORTH CALOOCAN CITY .................................................................................. 47

2.2.7 INFRASTRUCTURE AND UTILITIES ....................................................................... 49


2.2.7.1 ROAD INVENTORY ........................................................................................... 49
2.2.7.2 PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION SERVICES .............................................................. 50
2.2.7.3 WATER SERVICES............................................................................................. 50
2.2.7.4 POWER SERVICES ............................................................................................ 51
2.2.7.5 TELECOMMUNICATION ................................................................................... 52
2.2.7.6 SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT ......................................................................... 52

2.2.8 INSTITUTIONAL ADMINISTRATION ....................................................................... 54


2.2.8.1 “TAO ANG UNA” (PEOPLE FIRST) POLICY OF GOVERNANCE............................ 54
2.2.8.2 ORGANIZATIONAL ADMINISTRATION ............................................................. 54

vii
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

2.2.8.3 SEAT OF GOVERNMENT - NORTH AND SOUTH CALOOCAN CITY HALLS .......... 58

2.2.9 LOCAL ECONOMY ................................................................................................... 59


2.2.9.1 INCOME GENERATION ..................................................................................... 59
2.2.9.2 RESOURCE ALLOCATION .................................................................................. 62

3 SHELTER NEEDS

3.1 BASIC DATA AND ASSUMPTIONS ............................................................................... 64

3.2 CURRENT HOUSING SITUATION ................................................................................. 66

3.2.1 BACKLOG ................................................................................................................. 68

3.2.2 ASSESSING FUTURE NEEDS ................................................................................. 73


3.2.2.1 SUMMARY OF SHELTER NEEDS........................................................................ 73

3.2.3 UPGRADING NEEDS ............................................................................................... 74


3.2.3.1 TENURE UPGRADING ....................................................................................... 74

4 AFFORDABILITY
5 RESOURCES FOR SHELTER
6 WORK AND FINANCIAL PLAN
7 MONITORING AND EVALUATION SCHEMES

7.1 MEANS OF IMPLEMENTATION ..................................................................................... 94

7.2 MONITORING AND EVALUATION OF THE FRAMEWORK .......................................... 94

8 SANGGUNIANG PANLUNGSOD APPROVAL


ANNEXES

BIBLIOGRAPHY........................................................................................................................... 95

REFERENCE MAPS .................................................................................................................... 97

DOCUMENTATIONS ................................................................................................................. 111

viii
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1 Flowchart of the Planning Process 9
Figure 2 NCR Map 10
Figure 3 Ten-Year Average Monthly Temperature 1981–2010, Caloocan City 12
Figure 4 Ten-Year Average Monthly Rainfall (in mm) 1981–2010, Caloocan City 12
Figure 5 Topographic Map, North Caloocan 13
Figure 6 Topographic Map, South Caloocan 14
Figure 7 Soil Map, North Caloocan 17
Figure 8 Soil Map, South Caloocan 17
Figure 9 Historical Growth of Population (1903-2015) 24
Figure 10 Comparative Population Result 25
Figure 11 Population Growth by Geographic Location 26
Figure 12 Population Growth by Political District 26
Figure 13 Population - Age, Sex Composition 32
Figure 14 Total Population 19 Years Old and Over by Marital Status 33
Figure 15 Annual Per Capita and Family Poverty Threshold, Poverty Incidence among
35
Families, NCR and CAMANAVA (3Rd District): 2006, 2009 and 2012
Figure 16 Annual Per Capita Food Threshold, Subsistence Incidence of Poor Families, NCR
35
and CAMANAVA (3rd District), 2006, 2009 and 2012
Figure 17 Growth Centers 2025, South Caloocan 40
Figure 18 Concept / Structure Plan 2025, South Caloocan 40
Figure 19 Growth Center 2025, North Caloocan City 42
Figure 20 Concept / Structure Plan 2025, North Caloocan 42
Figure 21 Proposed Residential Land Use Map, South Caloocan City, 2016 – 2025 45
Figure 22 Proposed Residential Land Use Map, North Caloocan, 2016 – 2025 47
Figure 23 Functional Flowchart, as of December 2014 55
Figure 24 Comparative Annual Income (2012 – 2015) 60
Figure 25 Comparative Annual Income by Source (2012 – 2015) 61
Figure 26 Comparative Annual Income by Source (2012 – 2015) 61
Figure 27 Percentage of Income by Source Four-Year Average (2012 – 2015) 61
Figure 28 Internal Revenue Allotment Dependency (2012 – 2015) 62
Figure 29 Average Expenditure by Function (2013 – 2015) 62
Figure 30 Average Expenditure by Expenses (2013 – 2015) 63
Figure 31 Five-Year Debt Service (2010 – 2014) 63
Figure 32 Proposed Socialized Housing Zones, South Caloocan 2017 - 2015 79
Figure 33 Proposed Socialized Housing Zones, North Caloocan 2017 - 2015 80
Figure 34 Population Map, North Caloocan 99
Figure 35 Population Map, South Caloocan 100
Figure 36 Land Suitability Mao, North Caloocan 101
Figure 37 Land Suitability Map, South Caloocan 102
Figure 38 Map of Informal Settlements, North Caloocan 2013 103
Figure 39 Map of Informal Settlements, South Caloocan 2013 104
Figure 40 Existing Land Use Map, North Caloocan 2013 105
Figure 41 Proposed Land Use Map, North Caloocan 2016 – 2025 106
Figure 42 Existing Land Use Map, South Caloocan 2013 107
Figure 43 Proposed Land Use Map, South Caloocan 2016 – 2025 108
Figure 44 Existing Residential Land Use Map, North Caloocan 2013 109
Figure 45 Proposed Residential Land Use Map, North Caloocan 2016 - 2025 110
Figure 46 Existing Residential Land Use Map, South Caloocan 2013 111
Figure 47 Proposed Residential Land Use Map, South Caloocan 2016 - 2025 112

ix
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

LIST OF TABLES
Table 1 Average Climatological Normals, 1981-2010 North Caloocany (Science Garden,
Diliman, Quezon City) 11
Table Average Climatological Normals, 1981-2010 South Caloocan (Port Area Station,
2
Manila) 11
Table 3 Land Area Distribution by Type of Geology 15
Table 4 Land Area Distribution by Soil Type, Caloocan City (1987) 15
Table 5 Soil Characteristics 16
Table 6 Geo-Hazard Inventory by Land Area Affected per Barangay 19
Table 7 Historical Growth of Population (1903 – 2010) 24
Table 8 Comparative Population Result 24
Table 9 Actual and Projected Population (1990-2025) 25
Table 10 Total Population, Household Population, Number of Households, Land Area and
Density per Barangay 27
Table 11 Age Sex Composition, Caloocan City, 2010 32
Table 12 Average Family Income and Expenditure, NCR, 2009 and 2012 34
Table 13 Number of Families by Main Source of Income, NCR, 2012 34
Table 14 Annual Per Capita and Family Poverty Threshold, Poverty Incidence among Families,
NCR and CAMANAVA (3rd District): 2006, 2009 and 2012 34
Table 15 Annual Per Capita Food Threshold, Subsistence Incidence of Poor Families, NCR and
CAMANAVA (3rd District) 2006, 2009 and 2012 35
Table 16 Distribution of Business Establishments by Major Sector, 2011-2015 36
Table 17 Number of Persons Employed by Major Economic Sector, 2011-2015 36
Table 18 Ten-Year Major Land Use Growth Trend – North and South Caloocan 39
Table 19 Land Use Demand Projections, South Caloocan, 2016-2025 46
Table 20 Land Use Demand-Supply Balance, South Caloocan, 2016-2025 46
Table 21 Land Use Demand Projections, North Caloocan, 2016-2025 48
Table 22 Land Use Demand-Supply Balance, South Caloocan, 2016-2025 48
Table 23 Length of National Roads by Type of Pavement (in km), Caloocan City, 2012 49
Table 24 Inventory of National Roads, Caloocan City, DPWH, 2012 49
Table 25 Number of Routes and Units of Public Transport, Caloocan City 50
Table 26 Volume of Water Consumed and Number of Accounts per Type of Classification,
Caloocan City 2012 – 2015 51
Table 27 Estimated Number of Residential Customers of MERALCO, Caloocan City, 2011 –
2015 51
Table 28 Annual Energy Sales per Type of Customer, Caloocan City, 2011 – 2015 52
Table 29 Solid Waste Generation and Cost of Collection, 2010-2025 53
Table 30 Comparative Annual Income (2012 – 2013) 60
Table 31 Comparative Annual Income by Source (2012 – 2015) 60
Table 32 Number of Households Needing Relocation 64
Table 33 Number of Households Needing Tenurial Upgrading 65
Table 34 Number of Households with Electricity Service 65
Table 35 Number of Households with Access to Potable Water, 2014 65
Table 36 Number of HHs by State of Repair of the Building/ House 66
Table 37 Income Groups 66
Table 38 Status of Housing Initiatives in Caloocan City 67
Table 39 Number of HHs by Construction of the Roof 67
Table 40 Number of HHs by Construction of the Outer Walls 68
Table 41 Housing Backlog 68
Table 42 Inventory of Families/ HHs in Danger/ Hazard Areas 69
Table 43 Inventory of Families/ HHs to be Affected by Infrastructure Projects 71

x
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Table 44 Inventory of Families/ HHs with Court Order for Demolition/ Eviction 72
Table 45 Inventory of Families/ HHs with Pending Threats of Demolition 72
Table 46 HHs Needed Due to Population Growth, 2017 – 2025 73
Table 47 Total HHs Needed for the Program Period 2017 - 2025 73
Table 48 Schedule of Implementation Period 74
Table 49 Total Number of Households by Tenurial Status, PSA 74
Table 50 List of CMP Qualified Sites for Tenurial Upgrading 74
Table 51 Affordability Analysis and Land Need Calculation 76
Table 52 Affordable Housing Option 76
Table 53 Inventory of Available Lands Suitable for Housing 77
Table 54 Estimated Financial Requirements for Housing Provisions, 2017 – 2025 77
Table 55 Potential Sources of Funds for Shelter Provision 81
Table 56 Work and Financial Plan Matrix 82
Table 57 Schedule of the Prioritization in the Proposed Implementation of the Shelter Plan,
2017 – 2025 92
Table 58 Housing Options for Income Groups and Corresponding Service Provider 94

xi
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

xii
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

1 OVERVIEW
1.1 RATIONALE
Caloocan City, classified as one of the country’s highly urbanized cities, has transformed itself
into an investment panorama owing to its strategic location and vast emergent land area in its
northern part. South Caloocan, in particular, has acclimatized to the transformations brought by
a commercial revolution. The demands of trade have been met in terms of business expectations.
The city now boasts of being the country’s Motorcycle Capital, which is substantiated by a
booming motorcycle industry along the Rizal Avenue and 10th Avenue areas.

For the past three years, the local government prided itself in the construction and improvement
of infrastructures such as school buildings, hospitals, parks and similar structures that aims to
improve the lives of its constituency. Roads and other accesses were improved, providing ease
in transport. North Caloocan is swiftly transforming into a formidable investment district. It has
significantly grown and has viably progressed into an income-generating locality.

Challenging these endeavors is the continuous growth of the populace. Caloocan City is ranked
as the third most populated city in the National Capital Region (NCR). The deficiency in housing
facilities is caused mainly by the influx of migrates -- displaced families affected by government
projects, and the intermittent increases in birth rate. These constrain the delivery of basic services
and create a vacuum that derails the implementation of the city’s public service agenda.
Nevertheless, the local government is always on-hand and capable of conveying assistance to
the citizenry in the assurance of providing proper and adequate shelter facilities.

The Local Government Code (LGC) of 1991 (Republic Act No. 7160) and the Urban Development
and Housing Act (UDHA) of 1992 (RA 7279) mandated the local government units (LGUs) to
implement programs and projects on low cost housing and other socialized dwellings especially
for the underprivileged and homeless. However, due to the scarcity of urban resources, the private
sector is thereby encouraged to participate and collaborate with the LGUs in the housing projects
in compliance to Executive Order (EO) No. 90 - Identifying the Government Agencies Essential
for the National Shelter Program and Defining their Mandates, Creating the Housing and Urban
Development Coordinating Council (HUDCC), Rationalizing Funding Sources and Lending
Mechanisms for Home Mortgages and for Other Purposes; and RA 7279 - An Act to Provide for
a Comprehensive and Continuing Urban Development and Housing Program, Establish the
Mechanism for its Implementation, and for Other Purposes.

Evident to these efforts are the assenting and constructive effects the city has achieved in
confronting housing issues. In a resolute attempt to lessen and/ or eliminate this predominant
state and augment the city’s shelter situation; and utilize the resources more effectively and
efficiently, the formulation of the Caloocan City 2017-2025 Shelter Plan is put into fore.

In the preparation of this plan, all aspects were taken into consideration. Concerned city
government offices and departments and national government agencies (NGAs) were consulted
in congruence to its feasibility. The assurance of proper allocation, the accountability of the
agencies involve will all be imperative components in the effectivity of this nine-year plan to foster
improvements in the city’s current state of shelter accessibility.

1|Page
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

1.1.1 LEGAL BASIS

The National Government issued a mandate to every LGU for the provision of housing services
in their respective territorial jurisdiction. The legal basis is found on the following statutes and
issuances:

1.1.1.1 THE 1987 CONSTITUTION

Art. 13. Social Justice and Human Rights

Sec. 9. The State shall, by law and for the common good undertake, in cooperation with the
private sector, a continuing program of urban land reform and housing which will make available
and affordable cost decent housing and basic services to underprivileged and homeless citizens
in urban centers and resettlement areas. It shall also promote adequate employment
opportunities to citizens. In the implementation of such programs the State shall respect the rights
of small property owners.

Sec. 10. Urban or rural poor dwellers shall not be evicted nor their dwellings demolished, except
in accordance with law and in a just and humane manner.

No resettlement of urban or rural dwellers shall be undertaken without adequate consultation with
the parties affected and the communities to where they will be relocated.

1.1.1.2 THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT CODE OF 1991


(Republic Act No. 7160)

Every LGU is mandated to safeguard and ensure the general welfare of its constituency. Among
the enumerated basic services and facilities that the LGU needs to provide to its people are
programs and projects for low-cost housing.

SEC. 16. General Welfare. - Every local government unit shall exercise the powers expressly
granted, those necessarily implied therefrom, as well as powers necessary, appropriate, or
incidental for its efficient and effective governance, and those which are essential to the promotion
of the general welfare. Within their respective territorial jurisdictions, local government units shall
ensure and support, among other things, the preservation and enrichment of culture, promote
health and safety, enhance the right of the people to a balanced ecology, encourage and support
the development of appropriate and self-reliant scientific and technological capabilities, improve
public morals, enhance economic prosperity and social justice, promote full employment among
their residents, maintain peace and order, and preserve the comfort and convenience of their
inhabitants.

SEC. 17. Basic Services and Facilities. - (a) Local government units shall endeavor to be self-
reliant and shall continue exercising the powers and discharging the duties and functions currently
vested upon them. They shall also discharge the functions and responsibilities of national
agencies and offices devolved to them pursuant to this Code. Local government units shall
likewise exercise such other powers and discharge such other functions and responsibilities as
are necessary, appropriate, or incidental to efficient and effective provision of the basic services
and facilities enumerated herein. x x x

Page|2
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

1.1.1.3 THE URBAN DEVELOPMENT AND HOUSING ACT OF 1992


(Republic Act No. 7279)

The UDHA law also stipulates the mandate of LGUs to provide for the housing needs of their
homeless constituents, thus justifying the need for them to implement their respective local
housing programs.

The specific tasks of LGUs mandated in RA 7279 are as follows:

1. Prepare a Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) for their respective localities aimed at
achieving the objectives of the UDHA; (Sec. 6 and 39)

2. Conduct an inventory of all lands and improvements thereon within their respective localities
in coordination with the Housing and Land Use Regulatory Board (HLURB) and assistance of
appropriate government agencies; (Sec. 7)

3. Furnish HUDCC with a copy of its inventory, which shall be updated every three years,
necessary for development planning purposes; (Sec. 7)

4. Identify lands for socialized housing and resettlement areas for immediate and future needs
of the underprivileged and homeless in the urban areas, in coordination with the National
Housing Authority (NHA), HLURB, National Mapping and Resources Information Authority
(NAMRIA), and the Land Management Bureau (LMB) under the Department of Environment
and Natural Resources (DENR); (Sec. 8)

5. Certify as to the blighted status of lands, which shall be considered as one of the factors in
the evaluation of the market value of land for socialized housing; (Sec. 13)

6. Identify and register all qualified socialized housing beneficiaries within their respective
localities; (Sec. 17)

7. Enter into joint venture projects with private developers, in pursuit of a balanced housing
development; (Sec. 18)

8. Provide basic services and facilities (potable water, power/ electricity and an adequate power
distribution system, sewerage facilities and an adequate solid waste disposal system; and
access to primary roads and transportation facilities) in the socialized housing or resettlement
areas in cooperation with the private sector and concerned agencies; (Sec. 21)

9. Provide the program beneficiaries or their duly designated representatives, the opportunity to
be heard and to participate in the decision-making process over matters involving the
protection and promotion of their legitimate collective interest, in coordination with the
Presidential Commission for the Urban Poor (PCUP) and concerned agencies; (Sec. 23)

10. Adopt measures to identify and effectively curtail the illegal operation of professional squatters
and squatting syndicates, in cooperation with the Philippine National Police (PNP) and the
PCUP-accredited urban poor organizations in the area. (Sec. 27)

11. Implement, in coordination with NHA, the prescribed procedures and guidelines on the
execution of eviction and demolition orders involving the underprivileged and homeless
citizens; and the provision of adequate relocation. Should relocation be not possible within the

3|Page
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

prescribed period, financial assistance in the amount equivalent to the prevailing minimum
daily wage multiplied by sixty days shall be extended to the affected families; (Sec. 28)

12. Implement, in coordination with NHA, the relocation and resettlement of persons living in
danger areas such as esteros, railroad tracks, garbage dumps, riverbanks, shorelines,
waterways and in other public places such as sidewalks, roads, parks and playgrounds;
(Sec.29)

13. Provide, in coordination with NHA, relocation or resettlement sites with basic services and
facilities, and access to employment and livelihood opportunities sufficient to meet the basic
needs of affected families; (Sec. 29)

14. Prevent the construction of any kind of illegal dwelling units or structures within their respective
localities; (Sec. 30)

15. Assist the National Home Mortgage Finance Corporation (NHMFC) in initiating the
organization of Community Mortgage Program (CMP) beneficiaries; (Sec. 33)

16. Promote, in coordination with NHA, the Technology Livelihood Resource Center (TLRC);
Department of Science and Technology (DOST), HUDCC, and other concerned agencies in
the production and use of indigenous, alternative, and low-cost construction materials and
technologies for socialized housing; (Sec. 34)

17. Submit, together with HUDCC, a detailed annual report, with respect to the implementation of
the Act, to the President and House of Representatives; (Sec. 41)

1.1.1.4 REPUBLIC ACT NO. 10121

“An Act Strengthening the Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management System,
Providing for the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Framework and
Institutionalizing the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan, Appropriating
Funds therefor and for other Purposes.”

The act dictates the integration of Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) and Climate Change Adaptation
(CCA) in the formulation of development plans to address and assess the vulnerabilities brought
about by these conditions; inclusive of these is the City Shelter Plan.

It shall be the policy of the state:


xxx

(g) Mainstream disaster risk reduction and climate change in development processes such as
policy formulation, socio-economic development planning, budgeting, and governance,
particularly in the areas of environment, agriculture, water, energy, health, education, poverty
reduction, land use and urban planning, and public infrastructure and housing, among others.

1.1.1.5 SUPREME COURT DECISIONS IN G.R. NOS. 171947 – 171948


(DECEMBER 18, 2008)

The ruling is referred to as the “Mandamus” ordering petitioners or the ten government agencies
to clean up, rehabilitate and preserve Manila Bay in their different capacities.
xxx

Page|4
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

(8) The Metro Manila Development Authority (MMDA), as the lead agency and implementer of
programs and projects for flood control projects and drainage services in Metro Manila, in
coordination with the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH), Department of the
Interior and Local Government (DILG), affected LGUs, PNP Maritime Group, HUDCC, and other
agencies, shall dismantle and remove all structures, constructions, and other encroachments
established or built in violation of RA 7279, and other applicable laws along the Pasig-Marikina-
San Juan Rivers, the NCR (Parañaque - Zapote, Las Piñas) Rivers, the Navotas-Malabon-
Tullahan-Tenejeros Rivers, and connecting waterways and esteros in Metro Manila.
xxx

1.1.2 VISION
“The historic City of Caloocan, center of sustainable economic growth, peopled by resilient,
peace-loving and dynamic communities, living in a safe and ecologically balanced environment,
served by a government that gives the highest value to the needs of the citizens.”

1.1.3 GOAL
To provide decent, affordable and disaster resilient and climate change adaptive shelter that has
adequate facilities towards the formation of a livable and socially responsible residential
community.

1.1.4 SHELTER PLANNING OBJECTIVES


1. To acquire/ access/ develop 123.13 hectares of land for housing and resettlement from 2017
until 2025;

2. To reduce the doubled-up households (HHs) by building no less than 613 units annually
between 2020-2025;

3. To relocate the 42,309 displaced HHs from 2017 to 2025 (refer to Table 33 for the annual
targets );

4. To facilitate the provision of security of tenure to 16,451 HHs needing land tenure upgrading
from 2017 until 2025;1

5. To upgrade the power facility of HHs from 2017 until 2025;

6. To upgrade/ provide access to potable water to 100% of the total number of HHs starting
2017;

7. To upgrade/ provide sanitation facility of 100% of the total number of HHs from 2017 until
2025;

8. To upgrade existing roads or provide access roads to 100% of the total number of HHs from
2017 until 2025;

9. To upgrade existing drainage system or provide drainage to 100% of the total number of HHs
from 2017 until 2025;

10. To aggressively advocate for structural upgrading of dilapidated HHs starting 2017 onwards,
to be resilient to hazards brought by climate change;
1
Office for the Urban Poor (OUP)

5|Page
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

11. To put in place local policies, local institutions, and institute the necessary mechanism to
implement the Caloocan City 2017-2025 Shelter Plan to address the housing needs of the
constituents;

12. To institute proper monitoring and evaluation of the implementation of the Caloocan City 2017-
2025 Shelter Plan;

13. To facilitate access to employment and income-generating activities of HH -beneficiaries.

1.2 TARGET POPULATION


2015 Population : 1,583,978 (Source: PSA 2015)
Households/ Dwelling Unit : 1.05 (Source: NSO 2010)
Annual Population Growth (%) : 1.18% (Source: PSA 2015)
Household Size : 4.3% (Source: PSA 2015)
Housing Stock : 350,640 (Source: PSA 2015e)

There are 62,315 HHs identified as informal settlers. Living in dangerous areas is recorded at
8,603 HHs -- 4,510 near waterways; 394 along landslide prone areas; 2,775 along road right-of-
ways (RROWs); 500 inside cemeteries; and 424 under the National Power Corporation (NPC)
lines in Barangay 165, Phases 1-12. Also identified are 4,096 HHs affected by infrastructure
projects of the national government, and 32,970 facing potential eviction -- 25,795 have pending
threat of demolition; and 7,175 with court orders. There are also 16,451 HHs needing tenurial
upgrading. Homeless HHs are registered at 195.

HHs that were considered as informal settlers in private lands, or rent free/ with consent category
are recorded at 40,145.

Housing needs due to population growth is estimated at 45,850 by year 2025.

1.3 SHELTER PLANNING PROCESS


1.3.1 ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Enumerated below are the primary actors and their respective involvement or roles in the
formulation and/ or crafting of the Local Shelter Plan:

Local Chief Executive (LCE)

 Instigates the formulation of the Local Shelter Plan;

 Ensures the technical capability of all personnel involved through participation in


enhancement seminars/ workshops facilitated by partners agencies under the umbrella of the
HUDCC;

 Build a strong partnership with the Key Shelter Agencies -- NHA, NHMFC, Home Guaranty
Corporation (HGC), HLURB, Home Development Mutual Fund (HDMF) or the Pag-IBIG
(Pagtutulungan sa Kinabukasan: Ikaw, Bangko, Industria at Gobyerno) Fund to accelerate
housing production through land use and local shelter planning, land inventory and creation
of Local Housing Boards (LHBs);

Page|6
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

 Allot development funds for local housing projects; and

 Set aside lands for socialized housing in accordance with UDHA.

Sangguniang Panlungsod (SP)

 Responsible for the review and approval of the local shelter plan.

Caloocan City Local Housing Board

 Adopt or formulate a continuing plan for the city-wide housing or shelter program and urban
development by establishing a database on population, land use, classification and utilization
of properties within the city to cope with the urban problems related to housing and
development;

 Define areas suitable for priority housing and urban development, acquire by sale, by grant or
by expropriation by the City Government, lands and to dispose the same, to identify and
ascertain sources of adequate financing, adopt planning for urban resettlement, and identify
and define qualified beneficiaries of the urban development and housing programs,
particularly the poor and low-income families in Caloocan City;

 Formulate and provide technical and financial support in building, repairing, extending and
undertaking complete or incremental house construction;

 Identify and tap adequate sources of financing and to define or device cost effective financing
schemes or modes which will assist the beneficiaries of the housing and urban development
program to acquire affordable, adequate and healthful housing;

 Undertake relocation and/ or resettlement of families residing in danger areas, such as along
esteros, riverbanks, waterways, railroad tracks, and in public places or lands devoted for
needed infrastructure projects, jointly and/ or in coordination with the agencies, department
and boards of the national government tasked to perform these functions with the objectives
of providing adequate and affordable housing to the families that will be relocated or resettled;

 Adopt and/ or install devices and mechanisms for the regular review and updating of the
housing needs of the city residents and to ensure preparedness in dealing with emergency
resettlements or housing, such as those arising from the effects of natural disasters and to
ensure environmental protection conservation and urban renewal; and

 Propose to the SP the budgetary requirement for each fiscal year (FY) in order to achieve its
priority housing and development programs and projects as well as to finance its day to day
operations.

HUDCC and the NCR Key Shelter Agencies

 Consolidate the housing agencies under the umbrella of the HUDCC -- NHA, NHMFC, (HGC),
HLURB, and HDMF or the Pag-IBIG Fund - which extensively orients the local government
on the available programs, and technical and financing assistance through loans and grants;

7|Page
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

 Put greater focus in empowering the LGUs as efficient urban managers with the capacity to
develop plans and deliver services to their growing urban population by rendering necessary
technical assistance through the conduct of a training workshop on the formulation of the
Local Shelter Plan; and

 Offer innovative housing solutions through the Key Shelter Agencies.

1.3.2 PLANNING AND FORMULATION

The shelter plan formulation process basically involved six main activities -- data gathering,
situational analysis, goals and objectives formulation, generation of shelter strategies; preparation
of an implementation plan; and designing of monitoring and evaluation scheme. The flow chart,
which includes the other but equally important sub-activities to complete the whole process, is
demonstrated below.

1. Data gathering/ collection is the process of gathering and measuring information on


targeted variables in an established systematic fashion, which then enables one to answer
relevant questions and evaluate outcomes. Documentation is a set of documents provided on
paper, or online, digital and analog media, such as audio tape or compact discs (CDs).
Examples are user guides, white papers, on-line help, and quick reference guides.

2. Situational Analysis is a process of looking into the current housing situation, e.g., housing
need; housing-related problems of the locality; and the type of assistance the LGU can extend.
In this phase, an assessment of affordability and resources is done. This is a critical activity
as the information and outputs of this particular phase will be the basis for formulating the
main strategies.

3. Goal and Objectives Formulation is wherein the vision, goals, objectives or targets of the
local housing programs are set. This activity is an essential step in preparing local shelter
plans because it provides the planners and evaluators of the housing program with a clear
perspective of the desired change and the processes involved.

4. Generation of Shelter Strategies is undertaken after the planner has been informed on the
shelter needs of the city/ municipality and a conclusion has been arrived at after an analysis
of affordability and resource requirements has been done.

5. Developing the Implementation Plan answers the question: “What needs to be done?” by
outlining the details involved in undertaking the strategy. In formulating strategies the planner
answers the question: “How can the problem be solved?

6. Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) System will provide immediate and relevant information
to the implementers to ensure effective and efficient delivery of shelter and related services.

Page|8
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 1. Flowchart of the Planning Process

Note: The flowchart illustrated above is officially adopted by the HUDCC from the United Nations (UN) Shelter Method, a technique
developed by the United Nations Centre for Human Settlements (UNCHS)/ Habitat in collaboration with the Government of Finland.
This shelter planning process has been reviewed and endorsed by housing experts from eight countries and field tested by HUDCC
in several areas in the Philippines.

1.3.3 STRUCTURE AND TIME FRAME OF THE PLAN

The plan has a timeframe of nine years, covering the periods 2017 to 2025. This is broken down
into three planning periods:
 First Planning Period : 2017 to 2019
 Second Planning Period : 2020 to 2022
 Third Planning Period : 2023 to 2025

9|Page
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

2 CITY PROFILE
Figure 2. NCR Map
2.1 GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION AND
FEATURES
2.1.1 GEOGRAPHY AND LOCATION

Caloocan City is situated in the northern part of


Metro Manila or NCR (Region IV-A), within
coordinates of 14°39'4"N latitude and 120°58'18"E
longitude. It is divided into two geographic locations
with a combined total land area of 5,333.40
hectares.

South Caloocan has an area of 1,362.50 hectares. It


is bounded on the north-northwest by Valenzuela,
Malabon and Navotas; on the east by Quezon City;
and on the south by the City of Manila. The greatest
length, north to south of the boundaries is about six
kilometers and the greatest width, east to west is
seven kilometers.

North Caloocan’s total expanse is at 3,970.90


hectares. It is bounded on the north-northwest by
the province of Bulacan; on the south-southeast by
Quezon City; and southwest by Valenzuela. Its
extreme southern boundary is about 1.7 kilometers
apart from the northern extreme boundary of South
Caloocan. The greatest length, north to south of the boundaries is eight kilometers and the
greatest width, east to west is ten kilometers.

2.1.2 CLIMATE

Just like the rest of the towns and cities of Metro Manila, Caloocan City falls under Type 1 of the
Philippine Climate Classification, which has two distinct seasons. The Dry High Pressure season,
which comes in the months of November until April, corresponds with the northeast monsoon
(October to January). The Wet season which starts from May and lasts up to October is consistent
with the southwest monsoon (June to September). Between these two well-defined monsoon
periods, the southeast trade winds blow from February to May.

2.1.2.1 RAINFALL

Since Caloocan City is divided into two separate geographical locations, two recording stations
were considered in the study of the city’s annual rainfall. The Port Area Station in Manila was
considered for South Caloocan and the Science Garden Station in Diliman, Quezon City for North
Caloocan.

P a g e | 10
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Table 1. Average Climatological Normals, 1981-2010 North Caloocan (Science Garden, Diliman, Quezon
City)2
Rainfall Rainy Temperature (oc) Mean Sea Level Prevailing Wind
Month
(mm) Days Maximum Minimum Mean Pressure Direction Speed (mps)
NORTH CALOOCAN (SCIENCE GARDEN, DILIMAN, QUEZON CITY)
January 18.5 4 30.6 20.8 25.7 1012.3 N 1
February 14.6 3 31.7 20.9 26.3 1012.0 NE 1
March 24.8 4 33.4 22.1 27.8 1011.3 SE 1
April 40.4 5 35.0 23.7 29.4 1009.7 SE 1
May 186.7 12 34.7 24.7 29.7 1008.5 S 1
June 316.5 18 33.1 24.6 28.8 1008.1 SW 1
July 493.3 22 31.9 24.1 28.0 1007.7 SW 2
August 504.2 23 31.3 24.2 27.8 1007.4 SW 2
September 451.2 22 31.6 24.0 27.8 1010.6 SW 1
October 296.6 18 31.6 23.5 27.6 1008.8 N 1
November 148.8 14 31.4 22.7 27.1 1010.1 N 1
December 78.7 8 30.5 21.6 26.0 1011.5 N 1
Annual 2574.4 153 32.2 23.1 27.7 1009.8 N 1

Table 2. Average Climatological Normals, 1981-2010, South Caloocan (Port Area Station, Manila)3
Rainfall Rainy Temperature (oc) Mean sea level Prevailing wind
Month
(mm) days Maximum Minimum Mean pressure Direction Speed (mps)
SOUTH CALOOCAN (PORT AREA STATION, MANILA)
January 17.3 4 29.6 23.8 26.7 1012.6 N 2
February 14.2 3 30.6 24.2 27.4 1012.4 E 3
March 15.8 3 32.1 25.3 28.7 1011.7 SE 3
April 23.7 4 33.5 26.6 30.1 1010.2 SE 3
May 147.2 10 33.2 26.9 30.0 1008.6 SW 3
June 253.5 17 32.2 26.4 29.3 1008.1 SW 3
July 420.5 21 31.2 25.9 28.5 1007.7 SW 3
August 432.4 21 30.8 25.8 28.3 1007.3 SW 4
September 355.1 20 31.0 25.7 28.4 1008.2 SW 3
October 234.8 17 31.1 25.7 28.4 1009.0 SW 3
November 121.7 12 30.9 25.1 28.0 1010.1 N 3
December 67.4 7 29.8 24.2 27.0 1011.8 N 2

Annual 2103.6 139 31.3 25.5 28.4 1009.8 SW 3

2.1.2.2 MAXIMUM OCCURRENCE

In 1994, maximum rainfall in North and South Caloocan occurred in the months of July, August
and September. The annual rainfall for South Caloocan was recorded at 2,115.90 mm with a
maximum of 761.70 mm in July and a minimum of 1.60 mm in February. On the other hand, North
Caloocan recorded 2,588.70 mm annual rainfall with a maximum of 518.30 mm.

2
http://pagasa.dost.gov.ph/index.php/climate/climatological-normals
3
http://pagasa.dost.gov.ph/index.php/climate/climatological-normals

11 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 3. Ten Year Average Monthly Temperature 1981–2010, Caloocan City

31 10-Year Average Monthly Temperature 1981-2010


30 30.1
29
26.7 29.70
28
27
26
25
25.70
24
23

May

September
March

June

October
July
February

August
April
January

November

December
South Caloocan (Port Area Station, Manila) North Caloocan (Science Garden, Diliman, Quezon City)

Figure 4. Ten Year Average Monthly Rainfall (in mm) 1981–2010, Caloocan City

600 10-Year Average Monthly Rainfall 1981-2010


500 504.2
400 432.4
300
200
100 14.6
0 14.2
May

August

September
March

June

October
July
February

April
January

November

December
South Caloocan (Port Area Station, Manila) North Caloocan (Science Garden, Diliman, Quezon City)

2.1.2.3 WIND DIRECTION

NORTH CALOOCAN

The north winds prevail during the months of January, March, October, November and December.
The southwest monsoon prevails from April until July. This explains the heavy rains experienced
during these months.

SOUTH CALOOCAN

The northeast winds prevail during the months of November and December. The west wind is
predominant in February, March and April. The southwest monsoon blows from May to October.
Heavy rain experienced during this period. Maximum wind speed recorded was 28 miles per
second, which occurs in October.

P a g e | 12
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

2.1.3 TOPOGRAPHY AND GEOMORPHOLOGY

NORTH CALOOCAN

Out of the total land area, 58.49% or 2,322.80 hectares are characterized to have gently to steeply
undulating to rolling topography with slopes ranging from 3% to 18%. This terrain is noted in the
northern and central portion and gradually transforming into a southward trend of flatlands down
to the southwestern tip of the boundary. Several industrial and residential subdivisions have
already been developed in these broadly to nearly level lands, because of its proximity to some
of the major access roads in the area.

Figure 5. Topographic Map, North Caloocan

SOUTH CALOOCAN

A westward trend of flatlands cover a land area of about 1,001.64 hectares or 74.25% of the whole
southern portion of the city, slopes of which ranging from 0% to 3%. Most of the commercial and
industrial establishments in the city can be found in South Caloocan, having flat terrain and highly
accessible to neighboring cities and municipalities.

Along the North Diversion Road, the topography of South Caloocan, gradually changes into gently
to moderately sloping to rolling, with slopes ranging from 3% to 18%. Adjacent to residential and
industrial areas within the sector, vast tracts of land still exist. In these areas lie the highest point
found to be 35.00 meters above mean sea level. The lowest is in the southernmost end of
Kaunlaran Village or the Dagat-Dagatan Development Project (DDDP) measuring about 0.993
meters above mean sea level.

13 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 6. Topographic Map, South Caloocan

2.1.3.1 GEOLOGY

ROCK FORMATION

The geologic formations of the two portions of Caloocan City vary in type and characteristics, and
are specifically classified as: quaternary alluvium, tuff and tuffaceous sediment, pyroclastic flow
deposit, and conglomerates4.

The formation on the eastern half of Metropolitan Manila extending to the coastline of Manila Bay
and including a greater part of South Caloocan is the quaternary alluvium -- consisting of
unconsolidated stream‐deposited sediments that include sand, silt, clay or gravel5.

Eastward of South Caloocan, large areas consisting of tuff and tuffaceous sediment can be
traced, spreading towards the whole eastern side of Metropolitan Manila. Tuff rocks or volcanic
ash are composed of pyroclastic materials that have been ejected from a volcano and formed like
"welded" rock mass6, composed largely of fragments that is less than 4 mm in diameter.
Tuffaceous sediments, on the other hand, are mass of organic or inorganic solid fragmented
materials that contain 50 % tuff. This sediment comes from weathering of rock and carried,

4/ Source: Metro Manila Earthquake Impact Reduction Study Geological Map (Raster Format), PHIVOLCS, MMDA, and JICA,
5/ Kurniawan, Alva, A. P., Jasmine; Mc. Kenzie, John, General Dictionary of Geology, Environmental, Geographic Student Association (EGSA) Bulaksumur,
Yogyakarta, Indonesia 2009.
6/ Hamblin and Christiansen, Glossary of Common Geological Terms, Pearson Education Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2003

P a g e | 14
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

suspended or dropped by air, water, or ice; or accumulated by any other natural agent forming in
layers on earth’s surface such as sand, gravel, silt, mud, fill, or loess (silt) 7.

Pyroclastic flow deposit or igneous rocks formed by the lithification of ash flow are likewise present
in the northern fringes of South Caloocan and in most part of North Caloocan. Lithification is a
process by which sediment is converted into sedimentary rock, including cementation and
compaction.

On the northeast borders of North Caloocan, conglomerate rocks were traced, crossing Tala
Estate; and extending to the province of Bulacan and the La Mesa Watershed. Conglomerates
are coarse grained sedimentary rocks composed of rounded fragments of pebbles, cobbles or
boulders8.

Table 3. Land Area Distribution by Type of Geology

Geologic Forms North Caloocan South Caloocan Total

Conglomerates 460.45 - 460.45


Pyroclastic Flow Deposit 3,069.03 65.53 3,134.56
Quaternary Alluvium - 866.96 866.96
Tuff and Tuffaceous Sediment 441.41 430.02 871.43
Total 3,970.90 1,362.50 5,333.40

2.1.3.2 GEOMORPHOLOGY

BASIC SOIL TYPES

Soil is an unconsolidated rock material over bedrock, containing an admixture of organic matter
and capable of supporting vegetation.

THE NOVALICHES SERIES

Soil found in Caloocan City predominantly falls under the Novaliches series. It covers 96.13% of
the total land area of the city, found in both North and South Caloocan. It is light reddish brown,
reddish brown to bright reddish brown in color. Surface and subsoil are friable in consistency and
granular in structure. Spherical concretions are present in the subsoil and underneath are
tuffaceous material of varying degrees of disintegration and weathering. Tuffaceous material is
exposed by extensive erosion in some places.
Table 4. Land Area Distribution by Soil Type, Caloocan City (1987)9
Typ Land Area (in hectares) Percentage Distribution
e Soil Type Characteristics
no. Total North South Total North South
Poor in organic matter,
Novaliches
11 869.70 869.70 - 16.31 16.31 - surface soil is friable and
Loam
easily eroded.

7
/McGraw Hill, Dictionary of Geology and Mineralogy, 2003
8
/Hamblin and Christiansen, Glossary of Common Geological Terms, Pearson Education Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2003
9
Source: Based on Topographic Map prepared by Almar Surveying Co., Inc., 1987

15 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Typ Land Area (in hectares) Percentage Distribution


e Soil Type Characteristics
no. Total North South Total North South
Surface soil is friable when
dry and slightly sticky when
Novaliches
12 2,538.87 2,170.65 368.22 47.60 40.70 6.90 wet, substratum are highly
Clay
weathered tuffaceous
materials
Novaliches Surface soil is friable and in
Clay, some places shallow,
17 1,195.94 408.30 787.64 22.43 7.66 14.77
Loam and substratum is compact
Adobe volcanic tuff / adobe rock.
Surface soil is loose and
granular, presence in some
Prensa
6 522.25 522.25 - 9.79 9.79 - places of volcanic
Clay
tuffaceous materials used
for building purposes.
Former body of water now a
Hydrosol
1 206.64 - 206.64 3.87 - 3.87 reclaimed area, presence of
(Rizal)
salt intrusion.
Total 5,333.40 1362.50 3,970.90 100.00 74.46 25.54

Table 5. Soil Characteristics10


Depth
Soil Type Characteristics
(in cm.)
Reddish brown, friable and fine to coarse granular loam. Concretions are present and the soil
20-40
is comparatively poor in organic matter. Being friable, the soil is easily eroded.
Novaliches 40-60 Brownish red, friable and granular clay loam with concretions and gravel.
Loam
60-111 Light brick to rusty red.
111-below Varying degrees of weathering.
Red to light reddish brown clay loam, granular and friable when seemingly dry and slightly
12-29
Novaliches sticky when wet. Presence of brown concretions in considerable amount.
Clay Loam 5-81 Brick red clay loam to clay with gravel reddish brown concretions
100-150 Highly weathered tuffaceous material
0-5 Brown loose and friable loam to clay loam.
Novaliches 5-20 Dark brown granular clay loam with gravel and concretions
Clay Loam 20-35 Adobe clay loam with concretions and gravel, highly weathered tuff.
Adobe 60 Weathered adobe rock, slightly compact
Downward Compact and massive adobe rock
Brown to dark yellowish brown clay loam, loose and granular with plenty of spherical iron
20-25
concretion.
Prensa Clay Gray, light yellowish gray to dull grayish brown, loose and gravelly clay grading to sandy clay
Loam 40-50
with plenty of concretions.
50-downward Gravelly clay, light grayish brown or dark brown in color.

10
Source: Soil Map based on Bureau of Soils Report, 1935

P a g e | 16
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 7. Soil Map, North Caloocan

Figure 8. Soil Map, South Caloocan

17 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

2.1.4 HAZARD VULNERABILITY PROFILE

Enhancing Greater Metro Manila’s Institutional Capacities for Effective Disaster/ Climate Risk
Management towards Sustainable Development or the GMMA Ready Project that started in 2011
identified at least six major natural hazards that could eventually affect the Greater Metropolitan
Manila Area in the future. Hazards identified during the implementation of the project are flooding,
rain-induced landslide, severe wind, ground shaking, liquefaction and tsunami. The project, a
multi-lateral aid granted to Collective Strengthening for Community Awareness on
Natural Disasters (CSCAND) agencies, conducted the Hazard Profiling and Risk Assessments
within the project boundaries and provided related technical assistance to LGUs, concerned
NGAs, academic institutions, and civil society organizations (CSOs). The project aims to
decrease the vulnerability of the Greater Metro Manila Area (GMMA) to natural hazards and
increase the resilience of concerned agencies by strengthening their institutional capacities in
managing disaster and climate change risks.11

Based from the results of the project study, only 28 among the 188 barangays in Caloocan City,
have the lowest risks to adverse impact of imminent disasters, while the remaining 160 barangays
have to contend with high to very high levels of susceptibility from natural hazards.

2.1.4.1 SEISMIC HAZARD

Seismic hazard is a natural phenomenon characterized by ground shaking, fault rupture, or soil
liquefaction generated by an earthquake. The hazards identified by the GMMA Ready Project
due to earthquake that would readily cause significant impacts on the city are ground shaking,
soil liquefaction and tsunami.

2.1.4.2 GROUND SHAKING

Ground shaking from earthquakes is the primary cause of damage to man-made structures.
Numerous geologic faults that could trigger earthquakes exist within and around Metropolitan
Manila such as the Valley Fault System (VFS), Philippine Fault, Lubang Fault, Manila Trench,
and Casiguran Fault. Among these faults, VFS has the highest potential to cause severe
earthquakes in GMMA including Caloocan City. The latest major earthquake triggered by the
West Valley Fault occurred in August 19, 1658 with a magnitude of 7.2. The succeeding
earthquake event occurred in February 1, 1771 triggered by the East Valley Fault with a
magnitude of 6.3.

The GMMA Ready Project Ground Shaking Map indicates that active phases of the VFS that
directly affect Caloocan City could result from a major earthquake with a magnitude scenario of
7.2, and ground shakes of PHIVOLCS Earthquake Intensity Scale (PEIS) 8.0 to 8.5. The
measurements of ground shake boundaries were derived from numerical modeling and seismic
micro-zoning techniques conducted by the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology
(PHIVOLCS) in the past years.

Likewise, the extent of land area where the highest intensity of PEIS 8.5 ground shakes could
occur covers up to 623 hectares (6.23 square km) in South Caloocan which involves 110
barangays. Barangay 28, having one of the largest barangay jurisdictions in South Caloocan with
a land area of 54 hectares (0.54 sq. km), would be most widely affected. The rest of the 110
barangays are located within the old districts of Sangandaan, Poblacion, Sampalukan, Maypajo,

11
United Nations Development Programme-UNDP, 2011

P a g e | 18
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

reclaimed area of Kaunlaran Village, Marulas, Bagong Grace Park (3 Rd to 8th Avenue - West),
Grace Park (8th to 10th Avenue - West), Calaanan-West, Bonifacio, Morning Breeze, Calaanan-
East, and Our Lady of Grace (8th to 11th Avenue-East).

2.1.4.3 LIQUEFACTION

Moderate to high susceptibility to liquefaction would possibly occur in 71 barangays all over the
city. The total area vulnerable to this hazard would reach up to 447 hectares, with Barangay 28
as the most to be affected.

2.1.4.4 TSUNAMI

Director RENATO U. SOLIDUM of PHIVOLCS said that if the Manila Trench triggers a magnitude
8.2 earthquake, Western Bataan can expect a wave up to 10 meters tall (around 32 feet) five to
ten minutes after the event. The tsunami could also hit Occidental Mindoro, Zambales, Batangas
and Cavite within minutes, he added.

With its tsunami detection equipment in Lubang Island (Mindoro) and Corregidor, a tsunami could
strike the former in five minutes, and the latter in 40 minutes, Dr. Solidum stressed. He pointed
out that the same quake could send a tsunami through Manila Bay and hit Malabon, Navotas,
Manila and Las Piñas.

In Caloocan City, the same tsunami could affect a total of 233 hectares of its land area. The
tsunami could rise as high as eight meters and post danger to 35 barangays in the low-lying areas
of the city, including Barangay 28 being the most susceptible to this hazard event.

Table 6. Geo-Hazard Inventory by Land Area Affected per Barangay12


GROUND RAIN-INDUCED
BGY. LIQUEFACTION TSUNAMI FLOOD SEVERE WIND LOCATION
SHAKING LANDSLIDE

1 0.67 0.04 Sangandaan


2 3.8 Sangandaan
3 2.64 1.87 Sangandaan
4 2.70 6.28 6.54 Sangandaan
5 6.66 0.04 Sangandaan
6 1.64 2.72 2.35 Sangandaan
7 1.97 3.32 2.5 Sangandaan
8 29.56 29.53 29.5 1.47 Sangandaan, Kaunlaran Village
9 9.52 Poblacion
10 0.45 3.67 0.35 Poblacion
11 2.35 4.23 1.26 Poblacion
12 31.32 31.35 31.12 1.97 Poblacion, Kaunlaran Village
13 4.52 Poblacion
14 27.30 27.66 6.29 Poblacion, Kaunlaran Village
15 5.83 Poblacion
16 4.48 6.26 5.06 6.26 Poblacion, Kaunlaran Village
17 4.57 Poblacion

12
Source: GMMA Ready Project

19 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

GROUND RAIN-INDUCED
BGY. LIQUEFACTION TSUNAMI FLOOD SEVERE WIND LOCATION
SHAKING LANDSLIDE

18 6.55 1.34 1.78 1.34 Poblacion, Kaunlaran Village


19 4.54 3.02 Sampalukan
20 15.35 18.79 1.38 11.28 Poblacion, Kaunlaran Village
21 3.30 4.87 3.43 Sampalukan
22 26.49 28.55 28.55 5.71 Sampalukan, Kaunlaran Village
23 3.64 3.64 2.88 Sampalukan
24 3.67 3.67 Sampalukan
25 2.47 2.72 2.72 Sampalukan
26 4.49 4.49 0.17 Maypajo
27 5.25 5.25 5.25 Maypajo
28 53.96 53.96 53.96 5.40 Maypajo, Kaunlaran Village
29 3.27 4.43 4.43 Maypajo
30 7.73 7.73 7.73 Maypajo
31 3.52 3.52 3.52 Maypajo
32 3.36 3.36 3.36 Maypajo
33 6.32 6.32 5.45 Maypajo
34 5.27 5.27 5.27 5.36 Maypajo
35 4.75 4.75 Maypajo
36 5.18 5.39 4.05 2.44 Marulas
37 4.21 5.20 0.26 5.22 Marulas
38 0.12 4.00 Marulas
39 0.26 1.79 Marulas
40 0.64 2.75 Marulas
41 1.34 3.60 3.6 Marulas
42 2.72 Marulas
43 3.52 0.5 2.00 Bagong Grace Park (3rd Avenue)
44 3.58 0.21 Bagong Grace Park (3rd Avenue)
45 1.78 3.67 Bagong Grace Park (3rd Avenue)
46 0.12 4.26 1.66 Bagong Grace Park (4th Avenue)
47 3.57 3.57 Bagong Grace Park (4th Avenue)
48 2.77 3.33 Bagong Grace Park (4th Avenue)
49 2.27 6.17 2.87 2.46 Bagong Grace Park (5th Avenue)
50 3.20 Bagong Grace Park (5th Avenue)
51 4.17 4.99 Bagong Grace Park (5th Avenue)
52 0.76 2.64 0.35 Bagong Grace Park (7th Avenue)
53 4.42 4.77 Bagong Grace Park (7th Avenue)
54 7.46 5.38 Bagong Grace Park (7th Avenue)
55 6.49 5.62 Bagong Grace Park (6th Avenue)
56 0.98 3.83 Bagong Grace Park (8th Avenue)
57 4.87 4.87 Bagong Grace Park (8th Avenue)
58 4.81 1.68 Bagong Grace Park (8th Avenue)

P a g e | 20
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

GROUND RAIN-INDUCED
BGY. LIQUEFACTION TSUNAMI FLOOD SEVERE WIND LOCATION
SHAKING LANDSLIDE

59 1.79 4.52 1.89 Grace Park (8th Avenue)


60 4.80 4.76 Grace Park (8th Avenue)
61 7.28 1.74 Grace Park (8th Avenue)
62 7.31 0.39 Grace Park (10th Avenue)
63 1.65 4.62 0.92 Grace Park (10th Avenue)
64 2.68 Calaanan West (10th Avenue)
65 2.32 Calaanan West (10th Avenue)
66 3.94 3.22 Calaanan West (10th Avenue)
67 5.32 Calaanan West (10th Avenue)
68 5.58 Calaanan West (10th Avenue)
69 2.29 0.82 3.19 Calaanan West
70 5.64 5.64 Calaanan West
71 3.43 Calaanan West
Calaanan West (Victory
72 4.70 Compound)
73 6.93 Calaanan West (Abbey Road)
74 4.52 Calaanan West (Abbey Road)
75 4.98 Calaanan West (Samson Road)
Calaanan West (Bonifacio
76 3.41 Monument Circle)
77 5.68 Bonifacio (Samson Road)
Bonifacio (Bonifacio Monument
78 2.69 Circle)
79 0.26 Bonifacio (Caimito Road)
80 2.96 0.67 Bonifacio (University Hills)
Bonifacio (Bonifacio Monument
81 2.42 Circle)
83 1.42 Morning Breeze
Morning Breeze (Bonifacio
84 3.43 Monument Circle)
85 0.65 Morning Breeze
86 6.86 Calaanan East (EDSA)
87 7.44 Calaanan East (EDSA)
Calaanan East (Rizal Avenue
88 9.13 Extension)
89 7.55 Calaanan East (11th Avenue)
90 6.19 Our Lady of Grace (11th Avenue)
91 8.51 Our Lady of Grace (11th Avenue)
92 4.95 Bo. Rodriguez (11th Avenue)
93 6.56 Bo. Rodriguez (11th Avenue)
94 0.84 Calaanan East (EDSA)
95 5.82 Calaanan East (EDSA)
96 8.25 Calaanan East (EDSA)
97 3.19 Bo. Galino (11th Avenue)
101 6.40 Bo. Galino (10th Avenue)
102 0.56 Bo. Galino (10th Avenue)

21 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

GROUND RAIN-INDUCED
BGY. LIQUEFACTION TSUNAMI FLOOD SEVERE WIND LOCATION
SHAKING LANDSLIDE

103 7.26 Our Lady of Grace (10th Avenue)


104 7.24 Our Lady of Grace (10th Avenue)
105 3.68 Bo. Galino (8th Avenue)
106 5.88 Our Lady of Grace (10th Avenue)
107 4.79 Our Lady of Grace (10th Avenue)
108 4.83 Our Lady of Grace (10th Avenue)
109 7.28 Our Lady of Grace (8th Avenue)
110 2.70 Bagong Silang (7th Avenue)
111 2.44 Bagong Silang (7th Avenue)
112 2.42 Bagong Silang (7th Avenue)
113 2.60 0.38 Bagong Silang (6th Avenue)
114 1.24 0.63 Bagong Silang (6th Avenue)
115 1.25 Bagong Silang (6th Avenue)
116 2.49 Bagong Silang (6th Avenue)
117 3.48 1.43 Bagong Silang (C-3 Road)
118 42.33 3.74 4.95 Bagong Silang (La Loma)
119 3.72 0.20 1.49 Bagong Silang (4th Avenue)
120 5.98 3.44 2.11 Bagong Silang (2nd Avenue)
121 4.92 Bagong Silang (7th Avenue)
122 3.13 Bo. Galino (7th Avenue)
123 2.57 Bagong Silang (C-3 Road)
124 2.96 Bagong Silang (C-3 Road)
125 2.49 Bo. Galino (6th Avenue)
126 2.77 Bo. San Jose
127 4.25 Bo. San Jose
128 3.96 Bo. San Jose
129 2.27 Bo. San Jose
130 2.22 Bo. San Jose
131 3.25 Bo. San Jose
134 0.18 Bo. San Jose
158 0.95 Bagong Barrio (EDSA)
159 69.29
160 14.83
161 2.73
162 0.66 9.85
163 0.23 7.21
164 0.93 12.50
165 4.46
166 46.93
167 29.43 38.15
168 35.55 62.21

P a g e | 22
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

GROUND RAIN-INDUCED
BGY. LIQUEFACTION TSUNAMI FLOOD SEVERE WIND LOCATION
SHAKING LANDSLIDE

169 14.37
170 3.87
171 34.52 227.92
172 8.26 13.63
173 7.62 32.58
174 6.18 4.41
175 66.96 7.58 8.35
176 127.32 11.66
177 9.87 5.76
178 11.19 1.95 7.27
179 32.59 4.84 143.76
180 1.12 93.86
181 16.27 78.92
182 1.54 43.39
183 37.60
184 5.99
185 11.76 17.34
186 13.36 31.37
187 2.32 15.35
188 7.24 12.27

2.2 URBAN DEVELOPMENT TRENDS


2.2.1 POPULATION13

2.2.1.1 HISTORICAL GROWTH

In 1903, the Census of Population and Housing (CPH) reported a population of 7,847 for Caloocan
City. In 1918, it significantly doubled the previous census figures. The population zoomed to
145,523 in 1960, and in 1980, the population was on the threshold of the half million mark at
467,816. In 1995, the city surpassed the one million mark at 1,023,159 which is 23.58% higher
from the census conducted in the year 1990.

The city’s population in 2010 accounted for 12.56% of NCR with a total population of 11,855,975;
and 1.61% of the Philippines’ total population of 92,337,852. By population size, Caloocan ranks
third among the cities and municipalities in NCR.

From 2010 to 2015, population of the city recorded a considerable decrease in growth rate. The
average annual growth rate for the 2015 actual census is registered at 1.18%. It is projected that
by the Year 2025 the population of the city will reach 1,781,871.

13
Source: National Statistics Office (NSO) 2010 Household Census Survey

23 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Table 7. Historical Growth of Population (1903 – 2015)14

Date Actual Population % Growth Rate


March 2, 1903 7,847 -
December 31, 1918 19,551 5.9674
January 1, 1939 38,320 3.3202
October 1, 1948 58,208 4.2423
February 15, 1960 145,523 8.4209
May 6, 1970 274,453 6.3853
May 1, 1975 397,201 7.6734
May 1, 1980 467,816 3.3268
May 1, 1990 761,824 4.9973
September 1, 1995 1,023,159 5.6858
May 1, 2000 1,177,604 3.0584
August 1, 2007 1,381,610 2.2282
May 1, 2010 1,489,040 2.3714
August 1, 2015 1,583,978 1.1842

Figure 9. Historical Growth of Population (1903-2015)

1,800,000 9.00%
8.42% 7.67%
1,600,000 8.00%
1,400,000 5.97% 5.69% 7.00%
5.00%
1,200,000 6.39% 6.00%
1,000,000 4.24% 5.00%
800,000 4.00%
600,000 2.23% 3.00%
3.32% 3.33%
400,000 3.06% 2.37% 2.00%
200,000 1.00%
1.18%
0 0.00%
1903 1918 1939 1948 1960 1970 1975 1980 1990 1995 2000 2007 2010 2015

Actual Population % Growth Rate

Table 8. Comparative Population Result

2000 2007 2015


GROWTH GROWTH GROWTH
POPULATION POPULATION POPULATION
RATE RATE RATE
PHILIPPINES 88,564,453 2.36% 92,337,852 1.90% 100,981,437 1.72%
NATIONAL
CAPITAL 11,566,325 2.04% 11,855,975 1.78% 12,877,253 1.58%
REGION
CALOOCAN
1,381,610 2.23% 1,489,040 2.37% 1,583,978 1.18%
CITY

14
Various Census Years, NSO/ Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA)

P a g e | 24
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 10. Comparative Population Result

110,000,000 3.50%

90,000,000 3.00%

2.50%
70,000,000
2.00%
50,000,000
1.50%
30,000,000
1.00%
10,000,000 0.50%

-10,000,000 2007 2010 2015 0.00%

PHILIPPINES POPULATION NCR POPULATION CALOOCAN POPULATION


PHILIPPINES GROWTH RATE NCR GROWTH RATE CALOOCAN GROWTH RATE

2.2.1.2 POPULATION DISTRIBUTION

The 1995 CPH conducted by NSO established that the population of South Caloocan exceeds
that of North Caloocan. In the succeeding census years beginning 2000, the statistics started to
show otherwise, that the north surpassed its southern counterpart in terms of populace.

Barangay 176 in North Caloocan was registered as the most populated barangay in the
Philippines. It registered a total of 246,515 individuals, accounting for 15.56% of the city’s total
populationin the year 2015. On the other hand, Barangay 76 in South Caloocan registered the
least number with three inhabitants. Barangays 176 and 178 had the fastest growing population
in the city with an annual growth rate of 15.6% and 6.8%, respectively.

Table 9. Actual and Projected Population (1990-2025)15


Based on Geographical Location Based on Political District
Year Total
North South District I District II
1990 781,824 277,635 484,189 421,517 340,307
1995 1,023,159 482,351 540,808 653,704 369,455
ACTUAL 2000 1,177,604 609,812 567,792 789,129 388,475
POPULATION 2007 1,381,610 809,731 571,879 984,530 397,080
2010 1,489,040 908,394 580,646 1,093,424 395,616
2015 1,583,978 998,887 585,091 1,193,419 390,559
2016 1,602,735 1,010,715 592,020 1,207,551 395,184
2017 1,621,715 1,022,685 599,030 1,221,851 399,864
2018 1,640,919 1,034,795 606,124 1,236,320 404,599
2019 1,660,351 1,047,049 613,302 1,250,961 409,390
PROJECTED 2020 1,680,013 1,059,449 620,564 1,265,775 414,238
POPULATION 2021 1,699,908 1,071,995 627,913 1,280,764 419,144
2022 1,720,038 1,084,689 635,349 1,295,931 424,107
2023 1,740,407 1,097,534 642,873 1,311,278 429,129
2024 1,761,017 1,110,531 650,486 1,326,806 434,211
2025 1,781.871 1,123,682 658,189 1,342,518 439,353

15
Projected based on the 2015 PSA Census of Population

25 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 11. Population Growth by Geographic Location

1,100,000

900,000

700,000

500,000

300,000

100,000

-100,000 1990 1995 2000 2007 2010 2015

-300,000
NORTH SOUTH VARIANCE

Figure 12. Population Growth by Political District

1,200,000

1,000,000

800,000

600,000

400,000

200,000

0
1990 1995 2000 2007 2010 2015

DISTRICT 1 DISTRICT 2 VARIANCE

2.2.1.3 POPULATION SIZE

Caloocan City recorded a total population of 1,583,978 in the last Census of Population survey
held last August 1, 2015, posting an increase of 94,938 persons over what was tallied in May
2010. The figures translate to an average annual population growth rate of 1.18% which is much
lower compared to the 2.37% recorded from 2000 to 2010.

2.2.1.4 HOUSEHOLD POPULATION, HOUSEHOLD SIZE AND POPULATION DENSITY

The city’s population represented 12.3% of NCR’s total population based on the statistics of the
2015 PSA (formerly NSO) Census of Population. It has a projected 367,512 HHs with an average
size of 4.31 occupants. The HH size considerably decreased from the 4.71 documented in 2000.
Bagong Silang (Barangay 176) holds the most number of HHs at 57,196 while Barangay 76 has
only a single domiciliary.

In terms of population density, South Caloocan is placed at 429.42 persons per hectare and North
Caloocan registered an average of 252 persons per hectare that is highly expected to reach the
600 and to reach over 300 marks in 2025, respectively. In general, population density was placed
at 288 persons per hectare in entirety (citywide), manifesting an increase of 3.22 % or nine
persons per hectare for the last 5 years.

P a g e | 26
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Table 10. Total Population, HH Population, Number of HH, Land Area and Density per Barangay16

Total Population HH Population Number of HHs 2015


Land Density
Barangay 2015 2017 2015 2017 2015 2017 Area per
Actual Projected Actual Projected Actual Projected Hectare
01 2,417 2,446 2,417 2,446 561 568 3.4 710.88
02 5,134 5,195 5,134 5,195 1,192 1,207 4.16 1234.13
03 2,621 2,652 2,621 2,652 609 616 3.8 689.74
04 2,809 2,842 2,809 2,842 652 660 5 561.80
05 3,004 3,040 3,004 3,040 698 706 6.18 486.08
06 1,221 1,235 1,221 1,235 284 287 2.36 517.37
07 2,619 2,650 2,619 2,650 608 616 4.68 559.62
08 23,766 24,047 23,766 24,047 5,520 5,586 30.44 780.75
09 1,986 2,010 1,986 2,010 461 467 8.8 225.68
10 1,339 1,355 1,339 1,355 311 315 3.26 410.74
11 1,652 1,672 1,652 1,672 384 388 3.72 444.09
12 32,427 32,811 32,427 32,811 7,531 7,621 40.72 796.34
Zone 1 80,995 81,955 80,995 81,954 18,811 19,036
13 1,411 1,428 1,411 1,428 328 332 5.26 268.25
14 21,579 21,835 21,579 21,835 5,012 5,072 18.7 1153.96
15 1,204 1,218 1,204 1,218 280 283 5.98 201.34
16 4,103 4,152 4,103 4,152 953 964 17.68 232.07
17 3,272 3,311 3,272 3,311 760 769 4.96 659.68
18 10,306 10,428 10,306 10,428 2,394 2,422 31.55 326.66
19 3,251 3,289 3,251 3,289 755 764 5.1 637.45
20 9,015 9,122 9,015 9,122 2,094 2,119 36.68 245.77
21 3,234 3,272 3,234 3,272 751 760 5.36 603.36
22 5,548 5,614 5,548 5,614 1,289 1,304 35.16 157.79
23 2,260 2,287 2,260 2,287 525 531 3.3 684.85
24 2,255 2,282 2,255 2,282 524 530 3.56 633.43
Zone 2 67,438 68,238 67,438 68,237 15,662 15,850
25 1,567 1,586 1,567 1,586 364 368 2.88 544.10
26 3,694 3,738 3,694 3,738 858 868 4.82 766.39
27 3,822 3,867 3,822 3,867 888 898 4.48 853.13
28 30,968 31,335 30,968 31,335 7,192 7,278 30.5 1015.34
29 1,491 1,509 1,491 1,509 346 350 3.9 382.31
30 3,652 3,695 3,652 3,695 848 858 6 608.67
31 4,997 5,056 4,997 5,056 1,161 1,174 17.08 292.56
32 2,548 2,578 2,548 2,578 592 599 3.95 645.06
33 5,668 5,735 5,668 5,735 1,316 1,332 3 1889.33
34 6,313 6,388 6,313 6,388 1,466 1,484 16.18 390.17
35 21,778 22,036 21,778 22,036 5,058 5,118 11.96 1820.90
Zone 3 86,498 87,523 86,498 87,522 20,089 20,329
36 5,266 5,328 5,266 5,328 1,223 1,238 4.8 1097.08

16
Projected based on the 2010 NSO and 2015 PSA Census of Population

27 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Total Population HH Population Number of HHs 2015


Land Density
Barangay 2015 2017 2015 2017 2015 2017 Area per
Actual Projected Actual Projected Actual Projected Hectare
37 2,964 2,999 2,964 2,999 688 697 6 494.00
38 4,300 4,351 4,300 4,351 999 1,011 4.1 1048.78
39 928 939 928 939 216 218 1.92 483.33
40 1,349 1,365 1,349 1,365 313 317 3.32 406.33
41 1169 1,183 1169 1,183 271 275 3.28 356.40
42 760 769 760 769 177 179 3.32 228.92
43 3,827 3,872 3,827 3,872 889 899 3.6 1063.06
44 700 708 700 708 163 165 3.64 192.31
45 651 659 651 659 151 153 3.64 178.85
46 1,426 1,443 1,426 1,443 331 335 4.16 342.79
47 395 400 395 400 92 93 3.64 108.52
48 652 660 652 660 151 153 3.64 179.12
Zone 4 24,387 24,676 24,387 24,676 5,664 5,732
49 6,080 6,152 6,080 6,152 1,412 1,429 4.88 1245.90
50 1,333 1,349 1,333 1,349 310 313 3.1 430.00
51 964 975 964 975 224 227 5.14 187.55
52 2,816 2,849 2,816 2,849 654 662 3.64 773.63
53 1,181 1,195 1,181 1,195 274 278 4.5 262.44
54 833 843 833 843 193 196 6.8 122.50
55 1,262 1,277 1,262 1,277 293 297 6.8 185.59
56 3,328 3,367 3,328 3,367 773 782 3.8 875.79
57 738 747 738 747 171 173 4.8 153.75
58 637 645 637 645 148 150 4.5 141.56
Zone 5 19,172 19,399 19,172 19,399 4,453 4,506
59 4,843 4,900 4,843 4,900 1,125 1,138 4.5 1076.22
60 1,944 1,967 1,944 1,967 451 457 4.5 432.00
61 1,055 1,067 1,055 1,067 245 248 6.9 152.90
62 354 358 354 358 82 83 6.9 51.30
63 3,423 3,464 3,423 3,464 795 805 4.2 815.00
64 1,345 1,361 1,345 1,361 312 316 2.8 480.36
65 1,021 1,033 1,021 1,033 237 240 2.15 474.88
66 1,361 1,377 1,361 1,377 316 320 4 340.25
67 2,509 2,539 2,509 2,539 583 590 5.02 499.80
68 1,173 1,187 1,173 1,187 272 276 5.7 205.79
69 3,191 3,229 3,191 3,229 741 750 3 1063.67
70 4,208 4,258 4,208 4,258 977 989 5.5 765.09
Zone 6 26,427 26,740 26,427 26,740 6,138 6,211
71 825 835 825 835 192 194 4.3 191.86
72 0 0 0 0 - - 4.24 0.00
73 17,993 18,206 17,993 18,206 4,179 4,229 13.7 1313.36
74 3,501 3,542 3,501 3,542 813 823 6.75 518.67
75 3,246 3,284 3,246 3,284 754 763 4.25 763.76

P a g e | 28
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Total Population HH Population Number of HHs 2015


Land Density
Barangay 2015 2017 2015 2017 2015 2017 Area per
Actual Projected Actual Projected Actual Projected Hectare
76 3 3 3 3 1 1 2.15 1.40
77 977 989 977 989 227 230 5.1 191.57
78 1,842 1,864 1,842 1,864 428 433 5.8 317.59
79 632 639 632 639 147 149 6.2 101.94
80 1,813 1,834 1,813 1,834 421 426 31.5 57.56
Zone 7 30,832 31,196 30,832 31,197 7,161 7,246
81 2,528 2,558 2,528 2,558 587 594 6.76 373.96
82 1,949 1,972 1,949 1,972 453 458 5 389.80
83 1,347 1,363 1,347 1,363 313 317 6.04 223.01
84 1,277 1,292 1,277 1,292 297 300 14.7 86.87
85 1,301 1,316 1,301 1,316 302 306 5.04 258.13
86 1,454 1,471 1,454 1,471 338 342 6.32 230.06
87 1,310 1,326 1,310 1,326 304 308 7.36 177.99
88 2,488 2,517 2,488 2,517 578 585 7.82 318.16
89 1,550 1,568 1,550 1,568 360 364 7.36 210.60
90 1,429 1,446 1,429 1,446 332 336 8.06 177.30
91 598 605 598 605 139 141 8.96 66.74
92 610 617 610 617 142 143 5.04 121.03
93 3,248 3,286 3,248 3,286 754 763 6.24 520.51
Zone 8 21,089 21,337 21,089 21,339 4,898 4,957
94 927 938 927 938 215 218 4.6 201.52
95 2,784 2,817 2,784 2,817 647 654 6.36 437.74
96 1,540 1,558 1,540 1,558 358 362 9.52 161.76
97 1,654 1,674 1,654 1,674 384 389 3.96 417.68
98 2,182 2,208 2,182 2,208 507 513 2.64 826.52
99 772 781 772 781 179 181 3.3 233.94
100 984 996 984 996 229 231 5.4 182.22
101 2,384 2,412 2,384 2,412 554 560 9.36 254.70
102 1,157 1,171 1,157 1,171 269 272 5.4 214.26
103 462 467 462 467 107 109 8.06 57.32
104 886 896 886 896 206 208 7.15 123.92
105 2,384 2,412 2,384 2,412 554 560 6.4 372.50
Zone 9 18,116 18,330 18,116 18,331 4,207 4,258
106 421 426 421 426 98 99 5.24 80.34
107 798 807 798 807 185 188 4.92 162.20
108 700 708 700 708 163 165 4.92 142.28
109 1,121 1,134 1,121 1,134 260 263 7.62 147.11
110 509 515 509 515 118 120 2.52 201.98
111 1,435 1,452 1,435 1,452 333 337 2.79 514.34
112 1,069 1,082 1,069 1,082 248 251 2.56 417.58
113 169 171 169 171 39 40 2.86 59.09
114 1,082 1,095 1,082 1,095 251 254 1.18 916.95

29 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Total Population HH Population Number of HHs 2015


Land Density
Barangay 2015 2017 2015 2017 2015 2017 Area per
Actual Projected Actual Projected Actual Projected Hectare
115 1127 1140 1127 1,140 262 265 1.92 586.98
116 1,179 1,193 1,179 1,193 274 277 1.92 614.06
117 1,414 1,431 1,414 1,431 328 332 4 353.50
118 4,651 4,706 4,651 4,706 1,080 1,093 2.64 1761.74
119 785 794 785 794 182 184 4.1 191.46
120 8,794 8,898 8,794 8,898 2,042 2,067 6.08 1446.38
Zone 10 25,254 25,552 25,254 25,553 5,865 5,935
121 299 303 299 303 69 70 5.12 58.40
122 2,062 2,086 2,062 2,086 479 485 4.8 429.58
123 903 914 903 914 210 212 2.56 352.73
124 328 332 328 332 76 77 2.56 128.13
125 1,278 1,293 1,278 1,293 297 300 3.6 355.00
126 1,083 1,096 1,083 1,096 252 255 5.4 200.56
127 2,113 2,138 2,113 2,138 491 497 3.96 533.59
128 1,752 1,773 1,752 1,773 407 412 2.2 796.36
129 1,839 1,861 1,839 1,861 427 432 2.2 835.91
130 3,055 3,091 3,055 3,091 710 718 2 1527.50
131 2,286 2,313 2,286 2,313 531 537 5 457.20
Zone 11 16,998 17,200 16,998 17,199 3,948 3,995
132 7,924 8,018 7,924 8,018 1,840 1,862 5.5 1440.73
133 5,694 5,761 5,694 5,761 1,322 1,338 3.6 1581.67
134 888 899 888 899 206 209 8.84 100.45
135 619 626 619 626 144 145 8.84 70.02
136 406 411 406 411 94 95 8.72 46.56
137 1,221 1235 1,221 1,235 284 287 8.72 140.02
138 1,535 1,553 1,535 1,553 357 361 8.84 173.64
139 3,414 3,454 3,414 3,454 793 802 8.5 401.65
140 1027 1,039 1027 1,039 239 241 5.56 184.71
141 3,010 3046 3,010 3,046 699 707 5.84 515.41
Zone 12 25,738 26,042 25,738 26,043 5,978 6,049
142 3,936 3,983 3,936 3,983 914 925 3 1312.00
143 3,673 3,716 3,673 3,716 853 863 2.3 1596.96
144 4,743 4,799 4,743 4,799 1,102 1,115 2.96 1602.36
145 4,507 4,560 4,507 4,560 1,047 1,059 3.4 1325.59
146 3,117 3,154 3,117 3,154 724 733 2.84 1097.54
147 3,664 3,707 3,664 3,707 851 861 3.92 934.69
148 3,754 3,798 3,754 3,798 872 882 3.12 1203.21
149 4,426 4,478 4,426 4,478 1,028 1,040 3.88 1140.72
150 4,161 4,210 4,161 4,210 966 978 4.04 1029.95
151 4,273 4,324 4,273 4,324 992 1,004 1.76 2427.84
152 3,916 3,962 3,916 3,962 909 920 5 783.20
153 4,078 4,126 4,078 4,126 947 958 2.9 1406.21

P a g e | 30
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Total Population HH Population Number of HHs 2015


Land Density
Barangay 2015 2017 2015 2017 2015 2017 Area per
Actual Projected Actual Projected Actual Projected Hectare
154 3,876 3,922 3,876 3,922 900 911 3 1292.00
155 3,531 3,573 3,531 3,573 820 830 5 706.20
Zone 13 55,655 56,312 55,655 56,314 12,926 13,081
156 5,266 5,328 5,266 5,328 1,223 1,238 6.4 822.81
157 2,883 2,917 2,883 2,917 670 678 2 1441.50
158 1,901 1,924 1,901 1,924 442 447 11.2 169.73
159 4,996 5,055 4,996 5,055 1,160 1,174 15.84 315.40
160 15,268 15,449 15,268 15,449 3,546 3,588 69.76 218.86
161 9,613 9,727 9,613 9,727 2,233 2,259 51.2 187.75
162 16,065 16,255 16,065 16,255 3,731 3,776 49.28 325.99
163 14,427 14,598 14,427 14,598 3,351 3,391 41.92 344.16
164 16,073 16,263 16,073 16,263 3,733 3,778 66.08 243.24
Zone 14 86,492 87,516 86,492 87,516 20,088 20,328
165 30,240 30,598 30,240 30,598 7,023 7,107 110.76 273.02
166 17,806 18,017 17,806 18,017 4,135 4,185 170.28 104.57
167 53,835 54,472 53,835 54,472 12,503 12,653 179.2 300.42
168 32,620 33,006 32,620 33,006 7,576 7,667 309.2 105.50
169 4,700 4,756 4,700 4,756 1,092 1,105 57.72 81.43
170 11,322 11,456 11,322 11,456 2,630 2,661 42.56 266.02
171 98,166 99,328 98,166 99,328 22,799 23,072 537.48 182.64
172 21,719 21,976 21,719 21,976 5,044 5,105 136.84 158.72
173 15,697 15,883 15,697 15,883 3,646 3,689 96.56 162.56
174 22,415 22,680 22,415 22,680 5,206 5,268 152.64 146.85
175 64,031 64,789 64,031 64,789 14,871 15,049 266.36 240.39
176 246,515 249,434 246,515 249,434 57,253 57,938 524.68 469.84
177 79,624 80,567 79,624 80,567 18,493 18,714 188.08 423.35
178 107,596 108,870 107,596 108,870 24,989 25,288 313.12 343.63
Zone 15 806,286 815,832 806,286 815,834 187,259 189,500
179 37,335 37,777 37,335 37,777 8,671 8,775 190.48 196.00
180 16,500 16,695 16,500 16,695 3,832 3,878 52 317.31
181 21,918 22,178 21,918 22,178 5,090 5,151 78.39 279.60
182 8,723 8,826 8,723 8,826 2,026 2,050 120.33 72.49
183 4,625 4,680 4,625 4,680 1,074 1,087 49.48 93.47
184 2,669 2,701 2,669 2,701 620 627 27.2 98.13
185 27,333 27,657 27,333 27,657 6,348 6,424 66.58 410.53
186 21,668 21,925 21,668 21,925 5,032 5,093 151.44 143.08
187 23,529 23,808 23,529 23,808 5,465 5,530 87.08 270.20
188 28,301 28,636 28,301 28,636 6,573 6,652 62.44 453.25
Zone 16 192,601 194,883 192,601 194,882 44,731 45,267
TOTAL 1,583,978 1,602,731 1,583,978 1,602,735 367,878 372,280 5,333.40 279.19
North 998,887 1,010,715 998,887 1,010,716 231,991 234,767 3,970.90 228.76
South 585,091 592,016 585,091 592,019 135,887 137,513 1,362.50 426.16

31 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Total Population HH Population Number of HHs 2015


Land Density
Barangay 2015 2017 2015 2017 2015 2017 Area per
Actual Projected Actual Projected Actual Projected Hectare
District 1 1,193,419 1,207,551 1,193,419 1,207,551 277,171 280,487 4,564.00 229.13
District 2 390,559 395,184 390,559 395,184 90,707 91,792 769.4 576.15

2.2.1.5 AGE, SEX COMPOSITION

Of the total HH population in 2015, 49.80% were males and 50.20% were females. These figures
equate to a ratio of 99 males for every 100 females. The census results likewise affirmed that the
sex ratio for the age groups 15 to 64 had more females than males while those below the 15 year
age group is contrasting in terms of proportion. Senior citizens (aged 60 and over) represent
5.17% of the total HH population while the school age group occupies about 41.45% as per the
2015 PSA Census of Population.

Figure 13. Population - Age, Sex Composition, 2015

80+ (1,873) 4,330


75-79 (2,800) 4,807
70-74 Male Female (5,583) 8,298
65-69 (8,645) 10,742
60-64 (16,303) 18,778
55-59 (24,205) 25,450
50-54 (34,241) 35,057
45-49 (42,233) 43,141
40-44 (50,089) 50,051
35-39 (55,410) 54,842
30-34 (64,893) 64,914
25-29 (70,330) 72,757
20-24 (75,147) 77,918
15-19 (79,334) 81,207
10-14 (84,065) 80,165
5-9 (85,977) 79,880
1-4 (69,766) 65,676
under 1 (17,983) 17,089

The dependency age covers about 34.57% of the population (14 and below age group at 32%).
This reflected a dependency ratio of 53 dependents for every 100 persons of the working
populace.

Table 11. Age Sex Composition, Caloocan City, 201517

Age Group Both Sexes Male Female Ratio


Under 1 35,072 17,983 17,089 105.23
1 to 4 135,442 69,766 65,676 106.23
5 to 9 165,857 85,977 79,880 107.63
10 to 14 164,230 84,065 80,165 104.86
15 to 19 160,551 79,344 81,207 97.71
20 to 24 153,065 75,147 77,918 96.44
25 to 29 143,087 70,330 72,757 96.66
30 to 34 129,807 64,893 64,914 99.97

17
PSA, 2015 CPH

P a g e | 32
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Age Group Both Sexes Male Female Ratio


35 to 39 110,252 55,410 54,842 101.04
40 to 44 100,140 50,089 50,051 100.08
45 to 49 85,374 42,233 43,141 97.90
50 to 54 69,298 34,241 35,057 97.67
55 to 59 49,655 24,205 25,450 95.11
60 to 64 35,081 16,303 18,778 86.82
65 to 69 19,387 8,645 10,742 80.48
70 to 74 13,881 5,583 8,298 67.28
75 to 79 7,607 2,800 4,807 58.25
80 to 84 6,203 1,873 4,330 43.26
Caloocan City 1,583,989 788,887 795,102 99.22

2.2.1.6 POPULATION BY MARITAL STATUS

There are 511,128 individuals with single status or 43.57% of the city’s total 10 and above
populace (NSO Marital Age Group). Data recorded by NSO accounted to 42.47% or 498,282
married individuals. The highest total of married individuals belongs to the 30-34 age group at
77,748 or 15.60%. An estimated of 0.72% or 3,575 are young individuals belonging to the 20 and
under age group.

Divorced and separated individuals registered a total of 24,346, and 92,687 are under the
common law or live-in stature.
Figure 14. Total Population 19 Years Old and Over by Marital Status

DIVORCED/ COMMON
LAW/ LIVE … UNKNOWN
SEPARATED
0.14%
WIDOWED
2.08%
3.85%

SINGLE
43.57%
MARRIED
42.47%

2.2.2 FAMILY INCOME AND EXPENDITURE

The Family Income and Expenditure Survey (FIES) conducted by NSO in 2012, showed that
among the families surveyed in NCR, 55.2% derived their income from salaries and wages, 14.8%
were engaged in entrepreneurial activities, and 30% obtained their income from pensions,
financial assistance from abroad and other sources. In the same year, NCR had an average family
income of PhP31,583.00 per month, an increase from PhP23,157.50 based from the 2009
records.

33 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Table 12. Average Family Income and Expenditure, NCR, Table 13. Number of Families by Main Source of Income, NCR,
2009 and 201218 2012
Average Family Average Family
Year Main Source of Income 2012
Income (Monthly) Expenditure (Monthly)

2009 23,157.50 19,496.58 Wages and Salaries 55.2 %

2012 31,583.00 27,083.00 Entrepreneurial Activities 14.8 %


Other Sources of Income (Cash Receipts,
Gifts and other forms of assistance from
30 %
abroad, Support, Pension and Retirement,
Social Security Benefits, etc.)

Based on the 2012 National Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB) data, poverty incidence in the
Caloocan-Malabon-Navotas-Valenzuela (CAMANAVA) Region was registered at 2.8%. This was
slightly higher than the average of NCR’s 2.6%. The poverty threshold for a family of five living
in NCR should be earning a monthly income of PhP8,476.66, to be able to sustain its minimum
basic food and non-food needs. Compared to the previous years 2006 and 2009, the 2012
poverty incidence of Caloocan in particular or CAMANAVA as a region had shown improvement.

Also to be considered are the Informal Settler Families (ISFs) and the need to provide assistance
in livelihood and employment in order to enhance their earning potential. Based on the 2015
data, there are 62,315 families or 16.97% considered as ISFs, of which 78.57% are located in
North Caloocan and 21.43% in South Caloocan. The city provides the proper venue, like
manpower training centers in response to the increasing demand for livelihood and skills
programs seminars as alternative to formal education.

The City Government aims to establish trading/ bagsakan centers in both parts of the city to
ensure the distribution of low-priced commodities that would sufficiently provide steady food
supply and stability in the pricing of basic goods.

Table 14. Annual Per Capita and Family Poverty Threshold, Poverty Incidence among Families, NCR and
CAMANAVA (3rd District): 2006, 2009 and 2012
Annual per Capita Poverty Annual income Poverty Threshold
Poverty Incidence Among Families
Year Threshold (Family of five - in pesos)
(in pesos) Annual Monthly NCR CAMANAVA
2006 15,699.00 78,495.00 6,541.25 2.9 3.3
2009 19,227.00 96,135.00 8,011.25 2.4 3.2
2012 20,344.00 101,720.00 8,476.66 2.6 2.8

18
2009 and 2012 FEIS

P a g e | 34
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 15. Annual Per Capita and Family Poverty Threshold, Poverty Incidence among Families, NCR and
CAMANAVA (3Rd District): 2006, 2009 and 201219

3.3 3.2
120,000.00 2.8 3.5
2.9
100,000.00 2.6 3
2.4
2.5
80,000.00
2
60,000.00
1.5
40,000.00
1
20,000.00 0.5
0.00 0
2006 2009 2012
ANNUAL PER CAPITA POVERTY THRESHOLD POVERTY THRESHOLD FAMILY OF 5 ANNUAL
POVERTY THRESHOLD FAMILY OF 5 MONTHLY POVERTY INCIDENCE NCR
POVERTY INCIDENCE CAMANAVA

Food threshold is the minimum amount required for a family to meet the basic food needs, which
satisfies the nutritional requirements for economically necessary and socially desirable physical
activities. Subsistence incidence for CAMANAVA improved from 0.70 in 2009 to 0.20 in 2012,
based on the PSA data.

Table 15. Annual per Capita Food Threshold, Subsistence Incidence of Poor Families, NCR and CAMANAVA
(3rd District), 2006, 2009 and 2012
Annual per Capita Subsistence Incidence Among Families
Food Threshold (Family of five)
Year Food Threshold (Family of five)
(in pesos) Annual Monthly NCR CAMANAVA
2006 10,963.00 54,815.00 4,567.92 0.50 0.70
2009 13,426.00 67,130.00 5,594.17 0.30 0.70
2012 14,206.00 71,030.00 5,919.17 0.30 0.20

Figure 16. Annual per Capita Food Threshold, Subsistence Incidence of Poor Families, NCR and CAMANAVA
(3rd District), 2006, 2009 and 2012
80,000.00 0.7 0.7 0.8
70,000.00 0.7
60,000.00 0.5 0.6
50,000.00 0.5
40,000.00 0.3 0.3 0.4
30,000.00 0.2 0.3
20,000.00 0.2
10,000.00 0.1
0.00 0
2006 2009 2012
ANNUAL PER CAPITA FOOD THRESHOLD ANNUAL FOOD THRESHOLD MONTHLY FOOD THRESHOLD
SUBSISTENCE INCIDENCE NCR SUBSISTENCE INCIDENCE CAMANAVA

19
NSCB/ PSA

35 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

2.2.3 TRADE AND INDUSTRY


With Caloocan City’s growing population and the rising demand for economic activities, there is
a need to develop more strategies to address the issues of poverty and unemployment, to provide
opportunities for investments, and to encourage the growth of commercial and other business
establishments in the city. These would serve as primary catalysts for a more balanced
development for Caloocan City. The city’s advantage is the presence of vacant land or open
areas in North Caloocan which remain untapped and are highly suitable for further development.
Considering that the current trends in both property and commercial development is the
movement towards the north of Metropolitan Manila, Caloocan City is precisely the gateway
towards Northern Luzon and its peripheries such as Malabon, Navotas, Valenzuela, Quezon City,
including Novaliches, Fairview and the Province of Bulacan.

Caloocan City’s registered establishments are categorized into three major sectors – the Trading
Sector (retailers wholesalers and merchandising); the Services Sector (contractors, real estate,
food establishments, amusement businesses, importers/ exporters and financial institutions); and
Manufacturing Sector. The Services Sector accounts for 55.65% of the total number of registered
establishments, followed by the Trading Sector at 39.13%, and Manufacturing Sector at 5.23%.
For the period 2011-2015, only the Service Sector showed an increase in the number of
establishments by about 4.53%.
Table 16. Distribution of Business Establishments by Major Sector, 2011-2015
Percentage Share Five- Five-
year year
Classification 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Ave. Growth
2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Share Rate
Trading/
4,320 4,149 4,275 4,014 4,185 41.55 40.72 40.70 35.91 36.75 39.13 -0.79
Merchandising
Services 5,530 5,490 5,688 6,601 6,601 53.18 53.88 54.15 59.05 57.97 55.65 4.53

Manufacturing 548 550 541 563 601 5.27 5.40 5.15 5.04 5.28 5.23 2.33

TOTAL 10,398 10,189 10,504 11,178 11,387 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 2.30

2.2.4 EMPOYMENT BY MAJOR SECTOR

The Service Sector consistently took the largest share of manpower in the employment pool from
2011 to 2015. The increase in the number of hiring from 35,489 in 2011 to 37,143 in 2015 resulted
to the employment rate of about 56% of the total labor force. The Retailers/ Merchandising Group
appropriated 27% totaling a little over 16,000 workers while the remaining 17% or 10,514
individuals went to the Manufacturing Sector (See Table 17). The slight increase in the number
of workers poses a challenge to the city’s drive to provide more employment opportunities for its
residents.
Table 17. Number of Persons Employed by Major Economic Sector, 2011-2015
Increas
Percentage Share e/
Ave. Decreas
Classification 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 e
Share
2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 (2011-
2015)
Trading/
16,925 16,669 16,481 15,395 16,569 27.00 27.00 28.00 26.00 26.00 27.00 -2.10
Merchandising
Services 35,489 33,480 33,518 33,253 37,143 56.00 55.00 57.00 56.00 57.00 56.00 4.66

P a g e | 36
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Increas
Percentage Share e/
Ave. Decreas
Classification 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 e
Share
2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 (2011-
2015)

Manufacturing 10,514 11,153 8,608 10,728 11,206 17.00 18.00 15.00 18.00 17.00 17.00 6.58

TOTAL 62,928 61,302 58,607 59,376 64,918 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 3.16

2.2.5 LAND USES

2.2.5.1 GROWTH OF COMMERCIAL AND BUSINESS CENTERS ALONG MAJOR


TRANSIT POINTS AND CORRIDORS

The city’s several business centers brought by various land use activities, have grown rapidly in
number and density for the past ten years. The changes eventually resulted to more economic
opportunities and challenges as well.

Commercial areas in South Caloocan increase in land area from 152.60 to 168.41 hectares. On
the average, properties being used for commercial purposes increased in area at about 1%
annually. These businesses were mostly small and large retail stores, supermarkets, specialty
service shops, wet and dry markets, food service outlets, commercial and industrial product
distributors, transport vehicle trading (heavy equipment, trucks, cars and motorcycle), hospitality
services (hotels and inns), and shopping malls.

One can observe major commercial activities in North Caloocan at vicinities surrounding the
following locations, whole stretch and some junctions
 Along Epifanio de los Santos Avenue (EDSA);
 Rizal Avenue Extension (RAE);
 General San Miguel Street and Samson Road;
 Mabini Street, C-3 (5th Avenue);
 10th Avenue;
 Tullahan - Santa Quiteria Road;
 Baesa Road; and
 Along several roads within the vicinities of Grace Park (East and W est) and Bagong Barrio
(Balintawak Estate).

Major infrastructure projects that have been recently completed or currently being proposed, form
the direction of business growth in South Caloocan, particularly those surrounding the Bonifacio
Monument Circle and General San Miguel – A. Mabini Junction (Sangandaan). The said projects
were generally proposed or implemented to improve mobility of people between major business
centers in northern Metro Manila and northern suburbs of Bulacan. The following are the
significant transportation projects:
 proposed North-South Commuter Railway from Tutuban to Malolos;
 completed Light Rail Transit (LRT) Line 1 extension as part of ‘Closing the Loop’ of various
LRT lines; and
 Stage 10 (Segment 10) of the North Luzon Expressway (NLEX) Harbor Link Project.

37 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

The North-South Commuter Line would have one boarding station within South Caloocan.

Other factors causing rapid business growth within the Central Business Districts (CBDs) of South
Caloocan are the on-going operation of several transit terminals that eventually rendered the
Bonifacio Monument Area as a major transit point of northern Metropolitan Manila.

In North Caloocan, commercial areas are growing annually at an average of 2.9% or an increase
of 33.2%, from 2003 to 2013. Total commercial land area in 2003 was 39.44 hectares and rose
to 52.47 hectares in 2013. Businesses in these zones were mostly small and large retail stores,
supermarkets, specialty service shops, wet and dry markets, and food service outlets.

Location of commercial activities in North Caloocan can be found in the vicinities surrounding the
following locations:
 Junction of Camarin-Susano Roads and Camarin-Zabarte Roads;
 Major junctions within Phases II, IV, and X of Bagong Silang Resettlement Project
(BSRP);
 Kiko Road up to junction of Sampaloc Road;
 Malaria-Barracks Road up to junction of Quirino Highway;
 Whole stretch and junctions along Camarin-Susano Roads;
 Junction of Deparo Road and T. Samson Street; and
 Junction of Quirino Highway and Apitong Road (Pangarap Village).

2.2.5.2 EXPANSION OF INDUSTRIAL AREAS WITHIN EXISTING INDUSTRIAL ZONES

The long-established zones for industrial activities are expanding in number and land area. These
industries are engaged generally in product (food and non-food) manufacturing, processing,
packaging and warehousing activities.

In the last ten years, industrial land area in North Caloocan grew from 177.74 to 197.49 hectares
or an added 19.76 hectares of land use, with average increases of 1.10% annually. Industrial
establishments generally thrive in the industrial zones of Kaybiga, Bagbaguin, Llano, Bagumbong,
Camarin, and Tala. However, there are still few existing industrial plants and warehouse that
could be found inside residential subdivisions particularly Amparo Subdivision that apparently
infringes against the provisions of subdivision’s zoning classification. Similarly, cluster of
industries can be seen in some parts of Bagumbong that is originally designated as Residential
Zone under Zoning Ordinance No. 0369 s. 2003, but existed before the enactment of the said
ordinance.
In South Caloocan, lands having industrial activities are larger than those lands being utilized for
commercial businesses. The said areas increased in size by 3.2% in the last ten years but still
cover a significant 14.5% part of South Caloocan. Parcels that are being used for industrial
purposes largely cover the Dagat-Dagatan Area, old districts of Grace Park (East and West),
Bonifacio, Morning Breeze, Bagong Barrio (Balintawak Estate), and Baesa.

2.2.5.3 RAPID INCREASE OF RESIDENTIAL LAND AREA IN NORTH CALOOCAN

For the past ten years, about 344.65 hectares of residential land area are added within several
vacant properties in North Caloocan. The total land covered with existing residential uses
increased in average of 1.73% per year or 19.0% in ten years. The said large sum of residential
lands are generally located within the new residential subdivisions, existing government relocation
areas, CMP Projects, government and private low-rise residences, informal settlements, and

P a g e | 38
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

newly occupied vacant residential lots. There are also low-rise private condominiums and
socialized housing complexes, currently being developed in the Camarin area that may alter the
overall character of residential districts from typical landed housing to multi-level housing units.

Table 18. Ten-Year Major Land Use Growth Trend – North and South Caloocan
Ten-Year
Land Area (in Land Area Annual Rate
Land Area Ten-Year
Land Use Classification hectares) (in hectares) of Increase
Increase / Increase
2003 2013 2003-2013
Decrease
North Caloocan
Residential 1,837.18 2,186.35 349.17 19.0% 1.8%
Commercial 39.44 52.47 13.03 33.0% 2.9%
Industrial 177.74 197.49 19.76 11.1% 1.1%
South Caloocan
Residential 545.62 561.07 15.45 2.8% 0.3%
Commercial 152.62 168.41 15.79 10.3% 1.0%
Industrial 191.44 197.61 6.17 3.2% 0.3%

2.2.5.4 GROWTH CORRIDORS

The growth corridors in Caloocan City are existing primary and secondary arterial roads where
businesses usually spread and increase in number and scale. These corridors include some
collector roads that serve as major route for public and private transportation while others provide
accessibility to most urban centers and commercial districts. Since ‘strip’ pattern of commercial
development attracts more vehicle and pedestrian traffic along major roads, the CLUP aims to
control these main commercial corridors on its land use intensity and density taking into account
concentration of future population and land use activities.

Identified corridors in South Caloocan with significant growth of economic activities and
investments are as follows:

 EDSA – Samson Road - General San Miguel Street Corridor


Known partly as C-4 Road segment, which is among the primary arterial road of Metro
Manila, stretches itself from Malabon – Caloocan City Boundary at the west-eastward to
Quezon City – Caloocan City Boundary; development of businesses along these 4.1
kilometer highways is observed to be part of blocks of commercial activities, more than
one block deep from the said arterial road and do not run in a ‘strip’ pattern; the growth
corridor crosses two major road intersections, one elevated toll road, and one at grade
commuter train line with future development of inter-modal terminal.

 RAE – McArthur Highway Corridor


A 2.7-kilometer secondary arterial road (R-9) which land use character is similar to C-4
corridor where commercial activities spread more than one block deep from the road right-
of-ways (RROWs); the corridor crosses several main avenues and two major intersections
-- A. Bonifacio Circle and C-3 Road that has records with the highest vehicle traffic volume
in South Caloocan.

 Mabini Street Corridor


A narrow 2.9-kilometer old highway that traverses from Malabon-Caloocan City Boundary
southward to Manila-Caloocan City Boundary; the said corridor has been part of the early
history of the city since it serves as major access road to the ‘Poblacion’ where the seat
of the first Municipal Government rested as well with early settlers of the city; commercial

39 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

businesses along this corridor were established in a strip arrangement mixed with some
old residences at one lot deep from the road; history tells the said corridor has been a
retail and amusement center in the past where you can find mixed of several furniture
shops and factories, convenience stores, retail shops, cinemas, medical institutions, and
the likes; A. Mabini Street crosses two major intersections of primary arterial roads - C-3
and C-4 Roads.
Figure 17. Growth Centers 2025, South Caloocan

Figure 18. Concept / Structure Plan 2025, South Caloocan

P a g e | 40
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

 C-3 Road (5th Avenue) Corridor


A 3.5-kilometer primary arterial road running across the city from Navotas – Caloocan City
Boundary eastward to Quezon City – Caloocan City Boundary; large portion of the corridor
is formerly known as 5th Avenue; the whole stretch of C-3 Road plays an important role as
route of truck and freight vehicles coming to and from North and South Harbor; the land
use characteristics and pattern along C-3 Road are mixed of old residences and large
trading establishments with more than one block deep from the road.

 10th Avenue – P. Burgos Street Corridor


A wide collector road where several rentable commercial spaces are found; the land use
characteristics along 10th Avenue are mixed of old residences and small to large business
establishments with more than one block deep from the road.

Growth corridors in North Caloocan are identified based on the increasing scale of
economic and business activities seen to thrive on parcels adjoining the RROWs; these
arterial roads serve as major transit route for most vehicles terminating or passing with the
city’s territorial jurisdiction.

 Camarin-Susano Road Corridor


A national road serving as a primary arterial road in North Caloocan with a total length of
4.3 kilometers; Susano Road corridor is one of the few arterial roads that moves good and
services to and from North Caloocan; new businesses are increasing in number and scale
along the corridor with mixed of old residences and new housing sites that forms a ‘strip’
pattern of development; said corridor starts from Quezon City (Barangay Novaliches) –
Caloocan City boundary northward to People’s Homesite and Housing Corporation
(PHHC) Camarin Area-D corner Sampaloc Street, crossing to about three major
intersections.

 Camarin-Zabarte Road – Captain Samano Road Corridor


A 3.8-kilometer national road (excluding segment of Captain Samano Road) that serves
as a primary arterial road starting from Quezon City – Caloocan City boundary northward
to corner of Bagong Silang Road; the lanes and geometric alignment of the said corridor
varies from one intersection to another; commercial land using activities are observed to
grow along this road artery particularly at the intersection of Camarin-Susano Road; the
pattern of development varies from ‘Block’ to ‘Strip’ at different segments of the said
corridor.

 Quirino Highway Corridor


A 4.5-kilometer primary arterial road that connects north-eastern part of Metro Manila to
the Bulacan Province; the segment of Quirino Highway that passes through boundaries of
Caloocan City does not have significant development in terms of new ventures to any
commercial activities except those to some private educational institutions, transport
terminals; retail stalls, and the likes, near Malaria Barracks area across Pangarap Village;
Quirino Highway was identified in the updating of CLUP as potential growth corridor that
requires strict land use control measure and policies, since it actually traverses along
peripheries of the La Mesa Watershed area.

 Bagumbong Road Corridor


A 4.5-kilometer national road that pass through several residential subdivisions in the old
district of Bagumbong; the corridor is a very narrow collector road that serves as main
access route for several residential subdivisions; new developments are taking place

41 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

along the said road such as opening of the southern end of Saranay Road Extension
perpendicular to its existing alignment, and the on-going construction of a large Sports
Center; development along the said road requires strict land use control in terms of density
and the implementation of green buffers for new constructions, so as to serve as easement
for future widening or other public space like promenade with planting strips.

Figure 19. Growth Centers 2025, North Caloocan

Figure 20. Concept / Structure Plan 2025, North Caloocan

 Zapote Road Corridor


A 2.0-kilometer city road where various transit route traverses coming from various city
barangays travelling to and from Quezon City; the City Hall Annex is located along the
Zapote Road opening potential growth of investments in the near future; the said corridor
starts from Camarin-Susano Road southward to Zapote Road and turns to Maligaya Drive

P a g e | 42
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

within Maligaya Subdivision; a collector road that distributes traffic to the Quezon City’s
main shopping district in the north where you can find three large shopping malls and
transport terminals that supports daily inter-modal transfers of travelling commuters;
growth of businesses along this corridor would be encouraged under the CLUP to form
one block deep pattern of non-residential land use activity to avert strip pattern of
development.

 Bagong Silang Road Corridor


A three-kilometer national road that serves as a major arterial road of the Bagong Silang
Resettlement Project (BSRP); the corridor cuts across the resettlement area with more
than 150,000 population and observed to have a rising number of small scale commercial
activities forming along the alignment of the said road, in ‘strip’ pattern; similar to other
corridors, the growth of businesses along this corridor would be encouraged under the
CLUP to designate specific areas for commercial activities to avoid linear growth along
the road.

 T. Samson Street Short Corridor


A 1.4-kilometer corridor linking Llano Road and Deparo-Bagumbong Road, that has
potential for growth and development under strict land use control; commercial activity
along this line should be of neighborhood scale and should not cause traffic or nuisance
on its surrounding subdivisions.

 Malaria Barracks Road Short Corridor


A 0.8-kilometer short route that links BSRP and Tala Development Project to Quirino
Highway; the large settlers of Malaria-Barracks Housing Project require commercial
amenities that is lacking in the area, but recently thriving along strips of parcel of Malaria
Barracks Road; commercial activity along this corridor would be at a neighborhood scale
and should not cause traffic or nuisance on its surrounding subdivisions.

2.2.6 LAND USE PLAN

The Caloocan City CLUP is based on long-term development goal and objectives. Its regional
role within the GMMA is to be a risk-sensitive, sustainable, and economically viable plan that
would extend in a ten-year horizon period. The updating of the CLUP integrates the elements
that plays significant role in the city’s long-term development, such as the transportation network,
public facilities, economic development, ecologically critical areas, and natural hazards. Along
with the said processes, land use conflicts would be reconciled and adjusted in accordance with
the city’s development goals and vision.

2.2.6.1 LAND SUPPLY – DEMAND BALANCE

The updated CLUP allocates the uses of land according to its physical, social, and economic
characteristics that would achieve long-term development goals and objectives of the city.
However, since Caloocan City has a very large built-up area, 95% at the South and 80% at the
North, the demand for more land using activities has to balance with required area for protection
of local communities against natural hazards and improvement of their living condition in general.
The allocation scheme did not consider much of using land area ratio standard with population
since this will result to very large area requirements for each land use. The measure of future
land use demands are estimated according to rate of expansion of each land using activity in the
span of ten years or land use data of 2003 and 2013.

43 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Each parceled area of the city is classified according to major urban uses -- Residential,
Commercial, Industrial, Parks and Recreation, River ways, Infrastructure and Utilities, Cemetery,
and RROWs.

2.2.6.2 SOUTH CALOOCAN

RESIDENTIAL LAND USE PLAN

Land area for residential uses in South Caloocan expands at an average of 0.3% per year. The
low rate of increase in residential space is due to relocation of ISFs along Philippine National
Railways’ (PNR) railroads for the past ten years. However, by 2025, residential land area would
exceed the planned land area prescribed by the CLUP. The densification of residential areas in
terms of increase of floor levels or mix with non-residential buildings would curve the said growth.
Residential buildings at the DDDP with high exposure to threat of multiple hazards may compel
owners to add more floors on their buildings in the future. Likewise, the rate of expansion of
residential spaces would decelerate in the coming years as soon as ISFs along river ways are
relocated. The proposed land area is 429.44 hectares from the existing 561.07 hectares with a
decrease of 31.5% or a total of 131.63 hectares. The projected demand is 576.95 hectares by
the year 2025. The increasing demand for residential land would be eventually met in the future
by densification of existing residential areas and through promotion of mixed use development on
commercial areas, combining multi-storey residential units atop commercial building spaces
(retailing goods and services).

RECOMMENDED POLICIES FOR THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF RESIDENTIAL


AREAS IN SOUTH CALOOCAN

Physical Upgrading of Blighted Communities


The Updated CLUP defined the settlement areas that are blighted or with poor structural quality
and lacking of basic utility services and community facilities. Likewise, the CLUP shall designate
and propose policies and programs for blighted communities needing long-term development
using acceptable and viable redevelopment or upgrading schemes, strategies and urban designs.

The approaches for the recommended policy would range from upgrading or development of new
utilities and infrastructures (e.g. water lines, drainage, roadways and footpaths) up to the
establishment of new housing units with multiple storeys, public spaces like parks and plazas,
and other community facilities and services. Redevelopment of blighted areas within privately-
owned properties shall be in partnership with concerned estate owners and public-private partner
developers.

Preservation of Residential Subdivisions to Residential Uses


Residential subdivisions shall be protected by the updated CLUP from encroachment of non-
residential uses that would post threat to safety and welfare of its residents such as industrial and
high-density commercial land use activities. All subdivisions that are covered by commercial and
industrial zone classifications from the approved 2003 CLUP shall be converted to residential
zone in order to sustain the updated CLUP’s goals and objectives which are to protect and
manage communities exposed to natural hazards against human encroachments and other
unsustainable human activities.

P a g e | 44
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 21. Proposed Residential Land Use Map, South Caloocan City, 2016 – 2025

RISKS REDUCTION POLICY RECOMMENDATION FOR RESIDENTIAL LAND USES –


SOUTH CALOOCAN

Minimize Exposures of Residential Communities from Threats of Natural Hazards


Residential areas lying above or along areas susceptible to natural hazards namely flooding,
tsunami inundation, and soil liquefactions, will be either relocated or regulated in improving their
sites and structures, through enforcement of appropriate zoning and building regulations.

New residential structures within tsunami and flooding areas shall be encouraged to elevate finish
grade lines, minimize functional use of ground floors and construct the buildings in multiple levels.

The following are the existing areas/ parcels declared as residential in South Caloocan:
 Areas classified as residential use under the Zonal Improvement Program (ZIP)/ Areas
for Priority Development (APD) Projects;
 Existing residential blocks with limited road capacity/ minimal block sizes and lot sizes
and has no potential for land use change such as those parcels facing major roads/
growth corridors;
 Existing residential blocks with informal tenurial status on government and private
properties without future planned use but found suitable for dwelling;
 Existing residential land within residential subdivision; and
 Existing blocks that are predominantly residential in character but not part of informal
settlements that exist on areas that has very high susceptibility to natural hazards.

45 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Table 19. Land Use Demand Projections, South Caloocan, 2016-2025


Land Area Annual
(in Growth
Land Use Classification 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025
hectares) Rate
2013 2003-2013
Residential 561.07 0.003 562.63 564.21 565.78 567.37 568.95 570.54 572.14 573.74 575.34 576.95
Commercial 168.41 0.010 173.46 175.17 176.91 178.66 180.43 182.21 184.01 185.83 187.67 189.53
Industrial 197.61 0.003 199.50 200.13 200.77 201.41 202.05 202.69 203.33 203.98 204.63 205.28
Institutional 53.84 0.001 54.07 54.14 54.22 54.29 54.37 54.45 54.52 54.60 54.68 54.75
Parks and Recreation 1.30 - 1.76 2.23 2.69 3.15 3.61 4.07 4.53 5.00 5.46 5.92
River and Creeks 1.80 - 3.07 4.34 5.60 6.87 8.14 9.41 10.68 11.95 13.22 14.49
Infrastructure and Utilities 33.34 (0.008) 34.67 35.99 37.32 38.64 39.97 41.30 42.62 43.95 45.27 46.60
Cemetery 49.05 - 49.05 49.05 49.05 49.05 49.05 49.05 49.05 49.05 49.05 49.05
Vacant Land 71.20 59.41 52.36 45.28 38.18 31.05 23.9 16.74 9.52 2.3 -4.95
Road ROWs 224.88 (0.000) 224.88 224.88 224.88 224.88 224.88 224.88 224.88 224.88 224.88 224.88
TOTAL 1,362.50 (0.031) 1,362.50 1,362.50 1,362.50 1,362.50 1,362.50 1,362.50 1,362.50 1,362.50 1,362.50 1,362.50

Table 20. Land Use Demand-Supply Balance, South Caloocan, 2016-2025


Projected Land Area
Land Area Planned Land Surplus -
Land Area Land Area Percentage
Percentage 2025 Proposed Land Use Area Percentage Deficit
Existing Land Use (in hectares) Increase Increase
Share as per (CLUP) (in hectares) Share (Planned less
2013 (Decrease) (Decrease)
expansion 2025 Demand
Growth Rate Projection)
Residential 561.07 41.18% 576.95 Residential 429.44 31.52% (131.63) -23.4% (147.51)
Commercial 168.41 12.36% 189.53 Commercial 247.98 18.20% 79.57 47.25% 58.45
Industrial 197.61 14.50% 205.28 Industrial 284.66 20.89% 87.57 44.05% 79.38
Institutional 53.84 3.95% 54.75 Institutional 59.47 4.36% 5.63 10.46% 4.72
Parks and Recreation 1.30 0.10% 5.92 Parks and Recreation 5.92 0.43% 4.62 355.38% -
Open Space
1.80 0.13% 14.49 River and Creeks 14.5 1.06% 12.70 705.56% 0.01
(Green Buffer)
Infrastructure and Infrastructure and
33.34 2.45% 46.60 46.6 3.42% 13.26 39.77% -
Utilities Utilities
Cemetery 49.05 3.60% 49.05 Cemetery 49.05 3.60% - 0.00% -
Vacant Land 71.21 5.23% (4.95) Vacant Land 0.00% (71.21) -100.00% 4.95
Road ROWs 224.88 16.50% 224.88 Road ROWs 224.88 16.50% - 0.00% -
TOTAL 1,362.50 100.00% 1,362.50 TOTAL 1,362.50 100.00%

P a g e | 46
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

2.2.6.3 NORTH CALOOCAN CITY

RESIDENTIAL LAND USE PLAN

In North Caloocan, residential use grows rapidly because of recent resettlement of ISFs in the
Bagumbong area. The increase of land area expansion is in the average of 1.7% annually.
Similar to South Caloocan, the demand for more residential land are greater than the planned
area under the updated CLUP. The planned residential land area for year 2025 would be 2,561
hectares as compared from the existing 2,189.80 hectares, an increase of 17% in land area or
371.20 hectares.

The following are the existing areas/ parcels declared as residential in North Caloocan:
 Areas classified as residential use under NHA Projects (BSRP and PHHC) except
residential blocks with large parcels adjoining growth corridors and growth centers;
 Existing residential blocks with limited road capacity/ minimal block sizes and lot sizes
and has no potential for land use change such as those parcels facing major roads/
growth corridors;
 Existing residential blocks with informal settlers on government and private properties
without future planned for other uses but found suitable for dwelling;
 Existing residential blocks and parcels within residential subdivisions; and
 Existing blocks that is predominantly residential in character but not part of informal
settlements that exist on areas that has very high susceptibility to natural hazards.

Figure 22. Proposed Residential Land Use Map, North Caloocan 2016 – 2025

47 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Table 21. Land Use Demand Projections, North Caloocan, 2016-2025


Annual
Land
Growth
Area (in
Land Use Classification Rate 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025
hectares)
2003-
2013
2013
Residential 2,189.76 0.017 2,305.20 2,345.02 2,385.52 2,426.73 2,468.64 2,511.28 2,554.66 2,598.79 2,643.68 2,689.34
Commercial 51.82 0.029 56.48 58.12 59.81 61.55 63.34 65.19 67.08 69.03 71.04 73.11
Industrial 197.70 0.015 206.63 209.70 212.81 215.96 219.16 222.42 225.71 229.06 232.46 235.91
Institutional 94.65 0.031 103.62 106.79 110.07 113.44 116.92 120.50 124.19 128.00 131.92 135.96
Parks and Recreation 78.52 0.002 78.71 78.89 79.07 79.26 79.44 79.63 79.82 80.00 80.19 80.38
River and Creeks 21.50 - 28.49 35.47 42.46 49.45 56.43 63.42 70.41 77.40 84.38 91.37
Infrastructure Utilities 34.90 (0.047) 39.17 43.43 47.70 51.97 56.24 60.51 64.78 69.04 73.31 77.58
Cemetery 23.21 - 23.21 23.21 23.21 23.21 23.21 23.21 23.21 23.21 23.21 23.21
Vacant Land 868.33 714.31 650.63 586.05 520.57 454.19 386.85 318.59 249.36 179.13 107.90
Road ROWs 410.51 0.000 415.08 419.64 424.20 428.76 433.33 437.89 442.45 447.01 451.58 456.14
TOTAL 3,970.90 3,970.9 3,970.9 3,970.9 3,970.9 3,970.9 3,970.9 3,970.9 3,970.9 3,970.9 3,970.9

Table 22. Land Use Demand-Supply Balance, North Caloocan, 2016-2025


Projected Land Area
Land Area Planned Land Surplus -
Land Area Land Area Percentage
Percentage 2025 Proposed Land Use Area Percentage Deficit
Existing Land Use (in hectares) Increase Increase
Share as per (CLUP) (in hectares) Share (Planned less
2013 (Decrease) (Decrease)
expansion 2025 Demand
Growth Rate Projection)
Residential 2,189.76 55.15% 2,689.34 Residential 2,561.78 64.51% 372.02 16.99% (127.56)
Commercial 51.82 1.31% 73.11 Commercial 222.49 5.60% 170.67 329.35% 149.38
Industrial 197.70 4.98% 235.91 Industrial 305.65 7.70% 107.95 54.6% 69.74
Institutional 94.65 2.38% 135.96 Institutional 105.59 2.66% 10.94 11.56% (30.37)
Parks and Recreation 78.52 1.98% 80.38 Parks and Recreation 127.09 3.20% 48.57 61.86% 46.71
Open Space
21.50 0.54% 91.37 River and Creeks 91.37 2.30% 69.87 324.98% -
(Green Buffer)
Infrastructure and Utilities and
34.90 0.88% 77.58 77.58 1.95% 42.68 122.29% -
Utilities Infrastructure
Cemetery 23.21 0.58% 25.14 Cemetery 23.21 0.58% 0.00 0.00% (1.93)
Vacant Land 868.33 21.87% 105.97 Vacant Land - 0.00% -868.33 -100.00% (105.97)
Road ROWs 410.51 10.34% 456.14 Road ROWs 456.14 11.49% 45.63 -
TOTAL 3,970.90 100.00% 3,970.90 TOTAL 3,970.90 100.00%

P a g e | 48
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

2.2.7 INFRASTRUCTURE AND UTILITIES

2.2.7.1 ROAD INVENTORY

Caloocan City, like the rest of Metropolitan Manila, highly depends on urban transportation for
mobility of goods and people. The condition, efficiency and level of transportation services are
proportionate to the road structure in place and the pace of road infrastructure development.
Currently, the road network system serving the city consists of two circumferential roads, 26
national roads and various city thoroughfares. These roads are under the supervision of the City
Government and the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH). In South Caloocan,
the major arterial roads are RAE, EDSA, A. Mabini St., C-3 Road (5th Avenue), C-4 Road (Gen.
San Miguel - Samson Road), and part of North Diversion Road. Major businesses have set up
their offices and workplaces along these major arteries. In North Caloocan, the primary roads
that serve as major transit channels are Camarin Road (Susano Road), Old Zabarte Road,
Quirino Highway, and General Luis Road.

About 64.20% or 37.07 km of the total road length are made of asphalt and the remaining 35.80%
or 20.67 km are made of concrete. The stretch of the Central Luzon Leprosarium road has the
longest concrete road section at 3.12 km while the Deparo-Bagumbong stretch has the longest
asphalt pavement at 4.27 kms.

Table 23. Length of National Roads by Type of Pavement (in km), Caloocan City 2012
Concrete % Distribution Asphalt % Distribution Total % Distribution
North Caloocan 10.06 48.70 14.21 38.33 24.27 42.03
South Caloocan 10.61 51.30 22.86 61.67 33.47 57.97
Total 20.67 100.00 37.07 100.00 57.74 100.00

Table 24. Inventory of National Roads, Caloocan City, DPWH, 201220


Length (km) Condition
Name of Roads No Total
Concrete Asphalt Good Fair Poor Bad Assessment
NORTH CALOOCAN
Central Luzon Leprosarium Road 3.12 1.03 2.52 0.90 0.44 0.24 0.04 4.14
Deparo-Bagumbong Road 0.08 4.27 1.61 2.07 0.59 - 0.08 4.35
Deparo - Camarin Road 2.81 3.41 1.95 3.36 0.75 0.17 - 6.23
Kaybiga Road 0.19 1.94 0.44 1.38 0.33 - - 2.15
Malaria Field Control Road 0.50 - - 0.50 - - - 0.50
San Jose - Novaliches Road 1.08 3.56 3.44 1.16 - - 0.05 4.65
Congressional Road 2.28 - - - 0.25 2.03 2.28
Total 10.06 14.21 9.96 9.37 2.11 0.66 2.20 24.30
SOUTH CALOOCAN
EDSA 2.75 0.46 1.11 1.33 0.78 - - 3.22
McArthur Highway 0.27 6.94 5.38 1.77 - 0.06 7.21
East Service Road
0.60 - - 0.44 - 0.16 - 0.60
(North Expressway)
Gen. San Miguel Street 0.69 0.07 - - 0.69 - 0.07 0.76
West Service Road 0.56 0.13 0.56 - - 0.13 - 0.69

20
Inventory of National Roads, Third Metro Manila Engineering District, Department of Public Works and Highways (TMMED-DPWH), October, 2012

49 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Length (km) Condition


Name of Roads No Total
Concrete Asphalt Good Fair Poor Bad Assessment
(North Expressway)
A. Mabini Street -
Bonifacio Monument Circle - 0.22 - - 0.22 - - 0.22
Rizal Avenue Extension - 4.53 0.56 3.85 - 0.13 - 4.54
C-3 Road 5.03 1.45 3.25 2.29 0.27 - 0.68 6.49
A. Mabini Street 0.38 2.48 2.31 0.17 - 0.38 2.86
B. Serrano St. 0.11 1.30 0.11 0.96 - 0.34 - 1.41
7th Avenue East 0.05 1.17 - 0.90 0.26 0.05 1.21
7th Avenue West 0.17 0.65 - 0.17 0.14 0.51 0.82
10th Avenue East 1.20 1.00 0.20 1.20
10th Avenue West 1.20 1.00 0.20 1.20
Samson Road (Left Lane) 1.06 0.14 - - - 0.92 1.06
Total 10.61 22.86 15.42 12.28 2.36 1.71 1.72 33.49

The Caloocan City Engineering Department supervises the construction, repair, maintenance and
improvement of city streets, bridges and related infrastructure. The department also initiates,
reviews, and recommends changes in policies and objectives, plans and programs, techniques,
procedures and practices in road and other infrastructure. The average width of local roads
ranges from 3.00 to 6.00 meters.

2.2.7.2 PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION SERVICES

Caloocan City serves as a terminal for various public transportation services in Metropolitan
Manila, especially for buses, jeepneys, tricycles, UV Express (a type of pick-up service) and taxis.
Two points in the city also serve as terminals for the LRT.

Table 25. Number of Routes and Units of Public Transport, Caloocan City21

City Provincial
Routes Units Routes Units
Bus 26 1,668 229 3,939
Jeepney - - 16 968
UV Express 15 474 5 142
Tricycle 100 14,844 - -

2.2.7.3 WATER SERVICES

The source of potable water in Caloocan City, like the rest of Metropolitan Manila area, comes
from Angat Dam in Norzagaray, Bulacan, which supplies 97% of the water needs of the
metropolis. The distribution of water supply is presently served by Maynilad Water Services
Incorporated (MWSI) except in some areas in North Caloocan where deep wells are the main
source of water.

21
Land Transportation Office (LTO), July 2013

P a g e | 50
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

WATER DISTRIBUTION

In 2011, MWSI provided 144,257 waterline connections in Caloocan City. Residential customers
share 89.6% or 129,297 lines of treated water. Semi-business clientele accounts for 8,206 lines
or 5.69% followed by commercial and industrial customers with 5,292 and 1,462 connections,
respectively.

Water Consumption

MWSI reported that about 48 million cubic meters of water were consumed in 2011. Residential
consumption accounted for the biggest volume with 72.56% or 34.84 million cubic meters of the
total municipal consumption. However, on a per customer basis, industrial customers consumed
the largest daily unit consumption at an average of nine cubic meters per customer. Residential
HHs, on the other hand, consumed the least at an average of 0.738 cubic meters per day while
semi-business and commercial customers used 1.21 and 2.6 cubic meters of clean water daily,
respectively.
Table 26. Volume of Water Consumed and Number of Accounts per Type of Classification, Caloocan City,
2012 – 201522
Number of Accounts Volume of Water Consumed (cu.m.)
Billing Class North South North South
2012 2013 2014 2015 2012 2013 2014 2015
Residential 67,274 71,662 55,348 57,635 15,444,656.00 16,954,712.00 17,025,261.00 17,883,692.00
Semi-Business 3,017 3,154 5,127 5,052 1,631,405.00 1,753,482.00 1/789/778.00 1,890,994.00
Commercial 1,111 1,324 3,996 3,968 2,448,339.00 2,417,513.00 2/700/667.00 2,615,530.00
Industrial 200 243 1,255 1,219 2,502,551.00 2,337,966.00 2,719,262.00 2,518,749.00
TOTAL 71,602 76,383 65,726 67,874 22,026,951.00 23,103,673.00 24,237,968.00 24,908,965.00

2.2.7.4 POWER SERVICES

An estimated 1.60% or 5,940 HHs are still without or have not availed of the electric services
provided by the Manila Electric Company (MERALCO) as of 2015. Residential customers
partakes an average 51% of the total generated power annually in the last five years. The second
biggest consumers are the industrial group utilizing 26% followed by the commercial sector at
22%.
Table 27. Estimated Number of Residential Customers of MERALCO, Caloocan City, 2011 – 201523
Estimated Number of HHs Percentage of HHs with
Year Number of HHs
with Service Connection Service Connection
2011 355,639 344,425 98.85%
2012 359,657 351,749 97.80%
2013 363,721 356,632 98.05%
2014 367,831 366,375 98.24%
2015 371,988 366,048 98.40%

22
Source: Number of Accounts Cubic Meter Billed Per Billing Class, Maynilad, Inc., January 2013
23
Technical and Sales Statistics 2015, MERALCO

51 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Table 28. Annual Energy Sales per Type of Customer, Caloocan City, 2011 – 201524
Residential Commercial Industrial Streetlight Total
Year
(mw/h) (mw/h) (mw/h) (mw/h) (mw/h)
2011 438,959 212,761 210,266 4,776 866,762
2012 459,417 208,584 229,672 4,493 902,166
2013 478,557 209,503 241,261 4,579 933,900
2014 482,433 211,259 243,674 4,638 942,004
2015 510,093 221,480 249,974 4,640 986,187

2.2.7.5 TELECOMMUNICATION

The Philippine Long Distance Telephone Company (PLDT) is the largest telephone franchise in
Metropolitan Manila as well as in Caloocan City. Nonetheless, different companies provide
competition to PLDT, such as Eastern Telecommunications Philippines, Inc., LBC Express, Inc.,
and Bayan Telecommunications, Inc. (BayanTel) which operate various telecommunication
facilities including telephone -- mobile or land line. There are also other communication
companies that provide non-conventional telephoning system in the city, particularly cellular and
radio/ telephone services.

There are a total of 129 cellular telephone sites (Globe Telecom, Inc. - 60; Smart
Communications, Inc. - 43; and Sun Cellular - 26) installed in the city.

2.2.7.6 SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT

Solid Waste Management in Caloocan City is presently under the supervision of the
Environmental Sanitation Services (ESS) with two sections -- Garbage Collection and Disposal
Services, and Street Cleaning Services. ESS was the former Environmental Sanitation Center
(ESC) that was supervised by then Metropolitan Manila Authority (MMA) (now MMDA). Pursuant
to the Metropolitan Manila Council (MMC) Resolution No. 15, series of 1991 and through a
Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) signed on August 7, 1992, the supervision of services of ESC
was devolved to the City Government. Thus, the refuse collection operations at present are being
managed by a Public Services Officer who serves as the assistant to the City General Services
Officer in the delivery of this basic service.

Within the ESS service areas, the major collection services are the door-to-door collection,
station-to-station collection, and street cleaning. Along with these services, ESS also implements
different cleaning and environmental projects such as cleaning of barangays, clearing of
signboards and post bills, tree planting, educational and information campaign drives, fogging
and fumigation of public markets and temporary dumpsites, and watering of plants and trees in
public areas.

As of 2014, ESS employs 296 personnel, 263 of whom are street sweepers. All collectors and
street sweepers are supervised by personnel composed of foremen, dispatchers, public service
officers and other administrative staff. Daily garbage collection is mostly handled by private
contractors including graders and bulldozers. Records indicate that there are about 101 dump
trucks dispatched daily for garbage collection.

24
Utility Economics, Technical Operational Data 2015, MERALCO

P a g e | 52
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

PROCESSING FACILITIES (MATERIALS RECOVERY FACILITY)

There are 111 Materials Recovery Facilities (MRFs) in the city. However, RA 9003, otherwise
known as the Ecological Solid Waste Management Act mandates the establishment of MRFs in
every barangay resulting to a deficit of 77 MRFs.

Some barangays have more than one MRF while others share a single MRF. Several
subdivisions belonging to a certain barangay have also acquired their own MRF. Barangay 178
MRF located at Phase VI, Camarin has the most number of pushcarts at 50, as well as the most
number of garbage collectors at 75. Barangay 179 received the highest number of recyclable
materials at 123 kg/ day while Barangay 41 had the least at 0.16 kg/ day.

MRFs receive mixed waste for final sorting, segregation, composting and recycling. The resulting
residual wastes shall then be transferred to long-term storage, a disposal facility or sanitary
landfill.

Table 29. Solid Waste Generation and Cost of Collection, 2010-202525

Waste Generation Waste Recovery


Daily Yearly Daily Yearly
Cost of Operation
Year Population per Year
Cubic Cubic Cubic Cubic
Tons Tons per Tons Tons per
Meter Meter per meter Meter per
per Day Year per Day Year
per Day Year per day Year

2010 1,489,040 745 2,256 271,750 823,484 260 788 94,902 287,581 421,968,334
2011 1,524,393 762 2,310 278,202 843,036 266 806 97,067 294,144 552,418,334.40
2012 1,560,586 780 2,365 284,807 863,051 272 825 99,360 301,092 497,693,472.47
2013 1,597,638 799 2,421 291,569 883,542 279 845 101,781 308,426 468,277,380.45
2014 1,635,570 818 2,478 298,492 904,520 285 865 104,201 315,760 479,395,479.55
2015 1,674,403 837 2,537 305,579 925,996 292 885 106,621 323,095 490,777,667.20
2016 1,714,157 857 2,597 312,834 947,981 299 906 109,169 330,815 502,429,805.53
2017 1,754,855 877 2,659 320,261 970,488 306 927 111,717 338,535 514,358,635.98
2018 1,796,520 898 2,722 327,865 993,530 313 950 114,392 346,642 526,570,900.00
2019 1,839,174 920 2,787 335,649 1,017,119 321 973 117,194 355,134 539,073,045.91
2020 1,882,840 941 2,853 343,618 1,041,268 328 995 119,869 363,240 51,871,815.15
2021 1,927,463 964 2,920 385,493 1,065,946 336 1,020 122,799 372,119 565,931,847.14
2022 1,973,144 987 2,990 394,628 1,091,208 344 1,044 125,729 380,997 579,344,431.92
2023 2,019,908 1,010 3,060 403,982 1,117,070 352 1,068 128,659 389,875 593,074,894.95
2024 2,067,780 1,034 3,133 413,556 1,143,545 361 1,094 131,716 399,140 607,130,769.96
2025 2,116,786 1,058 3,207 423,357 1,170,555 369 1,119 134,773 408,404 621,471,060.60

25
Estimates Cost of Operation Based on the Estimated Solid Waste Generation, at PhP530 per cubic meter volume, Diversion Rate: 34.9%

53 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

2.2.8 INSTITUTIONAL ADMINISTRATION

The city government faces the formidable challenge of instigating and institutionalizing
administrative reforms in order to respond to the tasks and responsibilities that accompany rapid
urbanization and the demands of a growing population.

2.2.8.1 “TAO ANG UNA” (PEOPLE FIRST) POLICY OF GOVERNANCE

When Hon. OSCAR G. MALAPITAN accepted the


responsibility as the city’s duly elected mayor in
2013, he formulated his Six Pillars of Development
based on his “Tao ang Una” (People First) policy of
governance. These pillars are: education; health and
social services; crime prevention and anti-drug
campaign; infrastructure and community
development; investment, business and job
generation; and good governance. These are the
priority concerns to guide his administration for an
effective and efficient delivery of basic public
services, within the framework of the city’s urban development. He envisions each resident of
the city living in a united, healthy, progressive and peaceful community.

Learning from the dynamics of bureaucratic paradigms, the present administration has focused
on the clamor for meaningful adjustments in the political administrative system. With strength
and dynamism as the local chief executive, Mayor Malapitan has instituted changes in the local
government administration by adopting various innovations which has become necessary for
advancement in local governance. Being accountable for local policy formulation and
implementation, he has committed himself to strengthen the present local government structure,
administratively and legislatively, and to facilitate growth and development, consistent with the
development thrust of the city.

2.2.8.2 ORGANIZATIONAL ADMINISTRATION

EXECUTIVE BODY

Caloocan City is presently classified as one of the country’s highly urbanized cities, having met
the minimum requirements in terms of income, land area and population.

The city government is headed by an elected city mayor and vice mayor, both serving a three-
year term. As the chief executive, the city mayor provides the overall leadership in the formulation
and actual implementation of the city’s socio-economic and physical programs. He is assisted by
33 offices directly under his supervision, 26 of which are mandated by the provisions of the Local
Government Code of 1991, and seven are mandated by other national legislations.

Four offices, also mandated by the code, are incorporated in other existing offices and
departments - Public Information Division and Caloocan City Cooperative Development and
Coordinating Office (Office of the City Mayor), Office for Agricultural Services (Parks
Administration Services), and Population Management Office (City Health Department).

P a g e | 54
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Mandated by the Local Government Code of 1991:


1. Office of the City Mayor (OCM)/ Office of the Secretary to the Mayor
 Public Information Division
 Caloocan City Cooperative Development and Coordinating Office (CCCDCO)
2. Barangay Secretariat
3. Business Permits and Licensing Services (BPLS)
4. Caloocan City Waterworks System (CCWS)
5. Community Relations Services (CRS)
6. Cultural Affairs and Tourism Services (CATS)
7. Environmental Sanitation Services (ESS)
8. Human Resource Management Services (HRMS)
9. Information Technology Services (ITS)
10. Internal Audit Services (IAS)

Figure 23. Functional Flowchart, as of December 201449

11. Labor and Industrial Relations Services (LIRS)


12. Office of the City Veterinarian (OCV)
13. Office of the Land Use and Zoning Administration (OLUZA)
14. Parks Administration Services
 Office for Agricultural Services

49
2014 Annual City Budget, Caloocan City

55 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

15. Sports and Recreation Services


16. City Accountant’s Office
17. City Administrator’s Office
18. City Assessor’s Office
19. City Budget Department (CBD)
20. City Engineering Department
21. City General Services Office (CGSO)
22. City Health Department (CHD)
 Population Management Office
23. City Legal Department
24. City Planning and Development Department (CPDD)
25. City Treasurer’s Office (CTO)
26. Civil Registry Department (CRD)
27. City Social Welfare Department (CSWD)

Mandated by other national legislations:


28. Caloocan City Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office (CCDRRMO)
29. Caloocan City Medical Center (CCMC)
30. Department of Public Safety and Traffic Management (DPSTM)
31. Office for the Urban Poor (OUP)
32. Office of the City Building Official (OCBO)
33. Office of the Senior Citizens Affairs (OSCA)
34. University of Caloocan City (UCC)

SANGGUNIANG PANLUNGSOD

The Sangguniang Panlungsod, as the legislative body of the city, is headed by the City Vice-
Mayor as the presiding officer. It has 12 elected councilors and two appointed sectoral
representatives as its members, who are all serving the same term with that of the city mayor.
The Secretariat Services of the Sangguniang Panlungsod provides assistance to the Legislative
Services in its task of pursuing a legislative agenda. Through legislative research and further
enactment of ordinances and passage of resolutions, such agenda ensures that matters tackled
by the Sangguniang Panlungsod are responsive to the needs of the constituents.

COMMITTEES, COUNCILS, BOARDS, TECHNICAL WORKING GROUPS (TWGs), TEAMS


AND TASK FORCES

To facilitate coordination and linkage systems between and among the different offices and
departments, the city mayor had reorganized several multi-sectoral committees and local special
bodies, each to undertake specific functions and activities. Most of these are project
development, whose objectives are geared towards maximum utilization of the city's resources.
The mandatory councils as per LGC of 1991 -- Bids and Awards Committee (BAC), City
Development Council (CDC), City Health Board, City Peace and Order Council (POC), and City
School Board, are all reorganized and reconstituted in accordance with the provisions of its
respective republic acts.

One of the important council created was the Caloocan City Disaster Risk Reduction and
Management Council (CCDRRMC), it was organized pursuant to the provisions of RA No. 10121,
also known as the Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act of 2010, which was
passed on July 27, 2009. The council shall approve, monitor and evaluate the implementation of

P a g e | 56
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

the Caloocan City Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Program (CCDRRMP). It would
also ensure the integration of disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation (DRR/ CCA)
into the local development plans, programs and budgets.

The following are the committees, councils, boards, technical working groups, teams and task
forces created/ organized/ reorganized to perform specific functions through issuance of
executive orders by the city mayor:

Social Development Sector


 City People’s Law Enforcement Board (PLEB)
 Caloocan City Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Council
 Caloocan City Anti-Drug Abuse Council (CADAC)
 Caloocan City Barangay Bottom-Up Budgeting (BuB) Assessment Team
 Caloocan City Census Coordinating Board
 Caloocan City Committee on Subdivision, Housing and Memorial Park
 Caloocan City Comprehensive Local Integration Program for Former New People’s Army
(NPA) Rebels
 Caloocan City Council for the Protection of Children (CCPC)
 Caloocan City Gender GAD Focal Point System (CCGFPS)
 Caloocan City GAD M&E Team
 Caloocan City Health Board
 Caloocan City Juvenile Justice and Welfare Council (JJWC) Project Management Team
 Caloocan City Housing and Urban Development Board
 Caloocan City Millennium Development Goals Family-based Actions for Children and
their Environs in the Slums (MDG FACES) Project Team
 Caloocan City Nutrition Committee and Caloocan City Nutrition Cluster
 Caloocan City POC
 Caloocan City Poverty Reduction Action Team (CCPRAT)
 City Reach Out to Street Children Grievance Committee
 Local Advisory Council (LAC) for the Implementation of the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino
Program (4Ps)
 Local Inter-Agency Committee (LIAC) for the Clearing and Relocation of Affected
Families along the Waterways and Other Danger Areas in the City of Caloocan
 LIAC for the Disposal and Proper Distribution of Non-Core Real Properties of the PNR
located in Grace Park, Caloocan City
 LIAC for the Disposal and Proper Distribution of Non-Core Real Properties of the PNR
located in Sagrada Familia, Barangay 46, Caloocan City
 LIAC for the Disposition of the Camarin Phase 1 and 2 Project for Socialized Housing to
the Qualified Bonafide Occupants
 LIAC for the Disposition of the Excluded 14 Hectares Socialized Housing Site from the
Parcel of Land Reserved as Civic Center located in Camarin, Caloocan City
 LIAC for the Disposition of the Manotok Property to Qualified Informal Settler
Beneficiaries
 LIAC to Provide the Overall Implementation of Mindanao Avenue Extension Segment 2C
ROW Project in Caloocan City
 LIAC to Provide the Overall Implementation of the NLEx, Harbor Link Segment 10 Exit
Ramp in the City of Caloocan
 LIAC to Provide the Overall Implementation of the NLEx, Phase 2 Project ROW and C-5
North Link Project Segment 10 in the City of Caloocan

57 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

 Research Team for the Proposed Management and Operation of the Serenity Memorial
Park
Economic Development Sector
 Caloocan City Investments and Assets Management Business Coordination Committee
 Caloocan City Tripartite Industrial Peace Council
 Insurance Companies Accreditation Committee
Environmental Management Sector
 Caloocan City Climate Change Action Plan (CCCAP) Core Team
 CCDRRMC
 Caloocan City Integrated Coastal Management TWG
 Caloocan City Manila Bay Task Force (CCMBTF) for Manila Bay Clean-up,
Rehabilitation and Preservation (MBCRP) Program
 Caloocan City Solid Waste Management Board (SWMB)
Institutional Development Sector
 Caloocan City Bids and Awards BAC, BAC TWG, and BAC Secretariat
 CDC and Executive Committee (ExeCom)
 Caloocan City Executive-Legislative Agenda (ELA)Team
 Caloocan City Finance Committee
 Caloocan City Governance Transition Team
 Caloocan City Government Appraisal Committee for Real Properties Owned by the City
which are Subject of Sale and/ or Disposal
 Caloocan City Government Disposal Committee for Unserviceable Equipment,
Properties and Supplies
 Caloocan City Lupong Tagapamayapa Incentives Awards Committee
 Caloocan City Muslim Affairs Coordinating Council
 Caloocan City Performance Management Team (PMT)
 Caloocan City Real Estate Administration Team (CREATE)
 City Investments and Assets Management Business Coordination Committee for the City
of Caloocan
 Caloocan City Personnel Selection Board (PSB)
 Local Governance Performance Management System (LGPMS) Team
 Performance Challenge Fund (PCF) Project Management Team
 TWG for the Updating and Revision of 2004 Revised Revenue Code of the City of
Caloocan

2.2.8.3 SEAT OF GOVERNMENT - NORTH AND SOUTH CALOOCAN CITY HALLS

The Office of the City Mayor,


together with its operational (line)
and staff (management support)
offices and departments, are all
housed at the Caloocan City Hall –
Main situated along A. Mabini
Street, in front of the historical
Cathedral of San Roque Parish in
South Caloocan. Considering the
prevailing hazards affecting the
present city hall, construction of a

P a g e | 58
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

new city hall is now being done on an acquired lot located at 8th Avenue between 8th and 9th
Street, Grace Park, Caloocan City.
On the other hand, North Caloocan City Hall is located along Zapote Road, Camarin. It is headed
by a general manager reporting directly to the city mayor and is supported by extension offices
and departments. The city government, because of the two non-contiguous areas of the city with
each separated by travel distance of almost 20 kilometers, now focuses on coordinating its
operational and administrative services in North Caloocan in terms of socio-economic and
infrastructure development.
Prevailing issues and problems in the city are discussed, deliberated on and brought to the
attention of the city mayor through regular department heads’ meetings. Every Friday, the chief
executive holds office at the North Caloocan City Hall to ensure that basic services are also being
delivered effectively to its residents.

2.2.9 LOCAL ECONOMY


2.2.9.1 INCOME GENERATION

The City Government is continuously pursuing its Revenue Generation and Resource Mobilization
Program. It has continually invested great amount of resources in terms of manpower training,
equipment and system to effectively interlink the City Assessor’s Office, BPLS and the CTO to
improve inter-office coordination, therefore expedite services.

To maximize income opportunities in real estate, the city successfully conducted public auction
on all delinquent real properties and achieve a 100% inventory of assessment on all real
properties. A City Appraisal Committee was created to check and review the valuation of
properties in the city.

Guided by the City Revenue Code and relevant revenue legislations and policies, the city provided
incentive schemes to promote efficiency in real property assessment and tax collection and
ensure that civil remedies on tax delinquencies are enforced.

The City Assessor’s Office maintains updated real property tax (RPT) maps for property
identification. In close coordination with ITS, property records and information are electronically
indexed to facilitate access at the very least time possible by real property owners.

The city, in coordination with the World Bank -


International Finance Corporation (WB-IFC) through
the Doing Business in the Philippines Program,
embarked on re-engineering and shortening the
business processes and procedures, thus, making it
easier to do business in the city. Pay-off on these
reforms brought higher ranking for the city, vis-à-vis
other cities in the service areas such as starting a
business, dealing with construction permits and
registering property. Impressive results are associated
with more firms entering the city, more job
opportunities and a more business-friendly city.

The BPLS maintains an electronically generated and


computerized business tax records management and

59 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

regularly conducts tax mapping activities resulting to an updated list of taxpayers and easy
implementation of revenue enhancement measures.

Table 30. Comparative Annual Income (2012 – 2015)50

Year Actual Income Increase/ Decrease Annual Rate of Change


2012 3,350,803,076.32 (17,317,004.82) -0.51%
2013 3,868,442,851.25 517,639,774.93 15.45%
2014 4,099,444,370.35 245,813,079.29 6.38%
2015 4,408,181,520.21 308,737,149.86 7.53%
Average 7.21%

Figure 24. Comparative Annual Income (2012 – 2015)

5,000,000,000.00 18.00%
4,500,000,000.00 16.00%
4,000,000,000.00 14.00%
3,500,000,000.00 12.00%
3,000,000,000.00
10.00%
2,500,000,000.00
8.00%
2,000,000,000.00
6.00%
1,500,000,000.00
1,000,000,000.00 4.00%

500,000,000.00 2.00%
- 0.00%
(500,000,000.00) 2012 2013 2014 2015 -2.00%

ACTUAL INCREASE/DECREASE ANNUAL RATE OF CHANGE

Table 31. Comparative Annual Income by Source (2012 – 2015)

Income by Source 2012 2013 2014 2015 Rate of Change


Real Property Tax 624,497,776.77 610,490,042.25 794,256,039.67 738,754,603.66 7.98%

Business Tax 749,724,461.64 1,127,436,752.37 920,430,910.12 1,052,374,636.20 15.11%

Other Taxes 167,361,610.20 188,795,478.64 189,644,646.39 207,490,198.91 5.80%


Services and
136,853,812.84 142,763,914.77 148,126,918.95 151,966,834.46 1.59%
Operations
Business Income 78,741,836.83 84,103,335.96 90,116,956.26 72,349,450.75 -3.14%

Permits and Licenses 134,821,216.99 146,329,142.02 174,847,513.81 177,277,281.07 6.44%


Internal Revenue
1,402,399,173.00 1,539,442,435.00 1,728,454,338.00 1,975,785,774.00 6.21%
Allotment
Others Revenues 56,403,188.05 29,081,750.24 53,567,047.15 46,994,301.35 17.98%
4,422,993,080.40
TOTAL 3,350,803,076.32 3,868,442,851.25 4,099,444,370.35 11.60%
(4,408,181,520.21)
PLUS gains on sale of 2013 disposed assets amounting to PhP 662,017.15
NOTATION
LESS losses on sale of 2015 disposed assets amounting to PhP 14,811,560.19

50
City Accountant’s Office

P a g e | 60
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 25. Comparative Annual Income by Source (2012 – 2015)

2015

2014

2013

2012

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%
Real Property Tax Business Tax Other Taxes Services and Operations
Business Income Permits and Licenses Internal Revenue Allotment Others Revenues

Figure 26. Comparative Annual Income by Source (2012 – 2015)

2,000,000,000

1,500,000,000

1,000,000,000

500,000,000

0
2012 2013 2014 2015

Real Property Tax Business Tax Other Taxes


Services and Operations Business Income Permits and Licenses
Internal Revenue Allotment Others Revenues

Figure 27. Percentage of Income by Source Four-Year Average (2012 – 2015)


Others Revenues
1.18%
Internal Revenue
Allotment Real Property Tax
42.22% 17.58%

Permits and Business Tax


Licenses 24.46%
4.02%

Business Income
2.07%
Services and
Operations Other Taxes
3.68% 4.79%

Because of these revenue reforms, the city achieved a total gross income of more than Four
Billion Pesos for two consecutive years derived through locally sourced revenues, Internal
Revenue Allotment (IRA) share and other city income. As a result, the city continuously achieves
lower dependency on IRA share from the National Government as reflected by a four-year 42.2%
average per annum (lower than the national average of 64.98%) and income stability and
reliability in reference to the proportion of regular revenues.

61 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 28. Internal Revenue Allotment Dependency (2012 – 2015)

4,500,000,000.00 46.00%
4,000,000,000.00 44.82% 45.00%
3,500,000,000.00 44.00%
3,000,000,000.00 43.00%
2,500,000,000.00 41.85% 42.16% 42.00%
2,000,000,000.00 41.00%
1,500,000,000.00 39.95% 40.00%
1,000,000,000.00 39.00%
500,000,000.00 38.00%
- 37.00%
2012 2013 2014 2015
Locally Sourced IRA Dependency

Cost to collect revenues is at 4.5%, generally lower and more cost efficient as compared to the
14.34% national average.

Administrative measure was also put into place through the reorganization of the City Finance
Committee to assist the city mayor in the establishment of the city’s revenue policy direction, and
formulation of strategies. This will also accomplish essential revenue requirements; estimation
or projection of revenues to be generated from all income sources; monitor and evaluate the
efficiency of income-generating offices and departments; and propose revenue collection
enhancements.

2.2.9.2 RESOURCE ALLOCATION

The general welfare of the citizenry will always be the priority concern of the administration. The
city government continues to mainstream Gender and Development (GAD) programs and projects
in the different frontline services of the city, even exceeding the 5% required appropriation as
mandated by RA No. 7192. Numerous projects were also implemented by OSCA to address the
welfare of the senior citizens of the city in accordance with RA No. 9257. The part and parcel of
the City Investment Plan for Health (CIPH) are appropriations for the monitoring or surveillance
of the magnitude of AIDS in compliance with RA No. 8504. An equivalent of 1% of IRA was also
appropriated for the strengthening and implementation of programs for the Local Council for the
Protection of Children as mandated by RA No. 9444.

Figure 29. Average Expenditure by Function (2013 – 2015)

SOCIAL GENERAL
SERVICES SERVICES

34.37% 28.56%

ECONOMIC
SERVICES
37.07%

P a g e | 62
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Without sacrificing the quality of public service and welfare of both the general public and the civil
service workforce of the city, the proportion of personal services to total city expenditures was
maintained at 22.88%, much lower than what is allowed in RA No. 7160 and the highly urbanized
city (HUC) average of 32.50%.

Public infrastructure projects such as roads, schools, health centers, public multi-purpose
buildings and facilities for disaster preparedness remained to be a high priority in terms of meeting
the needs and aspirations of the community. In order to augment the limited resources and be
able to deliver all these services in time, the City Government took advantage of the financial
assistance extended by various financial institutions through loans.

Figure 30. Average Expenditure by Expenses (2013 – 2015)


PERSONAL
SCO SERVICES
23.70% 22.88%
SAF
10.07%
MOOE
37.13%
CAPITAL
OUTLAY
6.23%

Debt service ratio in terms of loans, payables and interest expense was likewise maintained at an
average of 7% for the last five years which is way below the 20% cap allowed by existing rules
and regulations.

Figure 31. Five-Year Debt Service (2010 – 2014)

20% DEBT CAP

9.14%
7.71% 7.56%
5.58% 5.52%

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

63 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

3 SHELTER NEEDS
3.1 BASIC DATA AND ASSUMPTIONS
1. The Planning period is nine years from 2017–2025, in correspondence to the coverage of the
CLUP.

2. The population growth rate is 1.18% based on 2010 and 2015 NSO/ PSA population data and
will remain constant throughout the planning period.

3. The Actual Housing Stock for 2015e is 350,174 derived from the 367,878 number of HHs
minus the 195 homeless HHs and divided by 1.05, the ratio of HHs per dwelling unit. Ratio
of HHs/ DU is based on the 2010 NSO data.

4. HH size of 4.3, based on the 2010 and 2015 NSO/ PSA data, will remain the same throughout
the nine-year planning period.

5. There are 195 homeless HHs in the city.

6. Number of HHs needing relocation (displaced units) totaled to 45,669. They are found in the
following areas:

Table 32. Number of HHs Needing Relocation


Areas Total Number of Displaced HHs
Sidewalks 2,775
Waterways 4,510
Landslide-prone areas 394
National Power Corporation (NPC) Lines 424
Tala Cemetery 500
Infrastructure Projects 4,096
With Pending Threat of Demolition 25,795
With Court Order Demolition 7,175
TOTAL 45,669

7. Adequate land tenure refers to lands that are being owned, amortized, and covered by lease
or usufruct agreements.

8. Number of HHs needing tenurial upgrading totaled to 16,451. They are composed of both on-
site and off-site qualified recipients of LGU housing assistance through direct purchase, CMP/
Localized Community Mortgage Program (LCMP) and other housing strategies and programs
of the government, non-government organizations (NGOs) and private entities. (See List of
CMP Projects for validation with Social Housing Finance Corporation - SHFC)

P a g e | 64
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Table 33. Number of HHs Needing Tenurial Upgrading

Tenurial Upgrading Number of HHs


Expropriation 5,512
Cemetery Excess Lot Ph.7 (Outside) 424
Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Property 1,500
Civic Center 2,250
Tala Civic Center Boundary 200
Camarin 1 and 2 Project 639
Malaria Barracks 450
PNR Non -Core Property (EO 48) 4,782
PNR Heroes del 96 (EO 48) 258
Samson Road 247
PNR Property (P. Burgos) 143
NHA Property (Dagat-Dagatan) 46
TOTAL 16,451

9. Adequate power supply is defined as having the presence of primary and secondary lines of
a legitimate power provider in the area.

Table 34. Number of HHs with Electricity Service51


Total Number of Estimated Estimated Percentage Hh
Year
HHs Electrified HHs Electrification
2011 355,639 344,425 98.85
2012 359,657 351,749 97.80
2013 363,721 356,632 98.05
2014 367,831 366,375 98.24
2015 371,988 366,048 98.40

10. Adequate potable water supply is water from the local water district, government-installed
deep wells, and licensed commercial water refilling stations.

Table 35. Number of HHs with Access to Potable Water, 201452


HHs with access
Number of HHs Percentage
to Improved or Safe Water Supply
Level III (Residential) 325,844 99.00
No Record 3,291 1.00
TOTAL 329,135 100.00

11. HHs with Sanitary Toilet Facilities based from the 2014 NSO data accounted for 325,844
(99%). Adequate sanitary facility refers to water-sealed toilet with depository that is
exclusively used by a HH.53

51
Technical and Sales Statistics 2015, MERALCO
52
Field Health Services Information System Annual Report ,2014, CHD
53
Ibid

65 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

12. Adequate garbage disposal system. Regular garbage collection by the garbage trucks -- at
the main road - daily; market - daily; and barangay - thrice a week.54

HH with Satisfactory Disposal of Solid Waste (2014) - 325,844 (99%)


HH with Complete Basic Sanitation Facilities (2014) - 322,552 (98%)

13. Units needing structural upgrading refer to unacceptable housing units such as dilapidated or
condemned housing structures which do not have proper roofing, walling and flooring
materials.
Table 36. Number of HHs by State of Repair of the Building/ House55

State of Repair Number of HHs


Needs no repair/ needs minor repair 282,158
Needs major repair 32,774
Dilapidated/ condemned 909
Under renovation 1,702
Under construction 1,496
Unfinished construction 4,329
Not applicable/ not reported 5,580
TOTAL 328,948

14. The target HH beneficiaries’ estimated income groupings are based on the 2015 PSA – FIES.
Below are the assumed income groups and its composition.
Table 37. Income Groups

Income Group Monthly Income in Philippine Peso


1st Income Group families earning 3,332 and below
2nd Income Group families earning 3,333 to 4,999
3rd Income Group families earning 5,000 to 8,333
4th Income Group families earning 8,334 to 20,833
5th Income Group families earning 20,834 and above

3.2 CURRENT HOUSING SITUATION


Relocating urban poor families outside Metro Manila transcends to high social and economic cost
for the LGU. Problems include absence of viable livelihood opportunities, inadequate provision of
basic services, poor cost recovery due to erratic collection practices of the government, and
absence of clear rules and regulations concerning tenurial rights among others. These conditions
preempt the livability factor prompting relocatees to return to their site of displacement. Learning
from these, the local chief executive is pushing for the in-city relocation of current and future
resettlement activities, whenever possible.

54
Ibid
55
National Statistics Office, 2010

P a g e | 66
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Likewise, there is a need for clear and simple institutional arrangements at various government
levels in the planning and implementation of housing programs for the poor since the involvement
of too many agencies add to the complexity and costs of implementation.

The continuous coordination of the OUP with the different NGAs, NGOs and other stakeholders
concerned eases the technical burdens confronted by the recipients in securing access to these
shelter initiatives. To date, a total of more than 1.2 Billion Pesos from both local and national
sources has been allocated to fund the city’s housing deficit.

Table 38. Status of Housing Initiatives in Caloocan City


Number of Projects Number of
Status Member
LGU NGOs/ Loan Amount
(as of October 2016) Beneficiaries
mobilizers Foundations (MBs)
CMP Loan Application 8 21 1,949 152,760,688.62
Pipeline 2 12 896 64,553,522.07
With Request for Pre-appraisal 2 0 400 20,000,000.00
Submitted with Incomplete
0 9 591 62,810,229.05
requirements
LCMP-Pipeline 4 62 5,396,937.50
Approved Projects 3 7 804 73,552,344.69
ExeCom Approved 0 2 200 19,386,350.00
Letter of Guaranty (LOG) Approved 3 5 604 54,165,994.69
Proposed Projects for 2017 and 2018
during October 2016 Budget 8 5 802 73,000,000.00
Consultation
2017 Proposed Projects 7 3 462 58,400,000.00
2018 Proposed Projects 1 2 340 37,000,000.00
Taken Out (CMP and LCMP) 206 14,814 927,809,139.20
TOTAL 225 33 18,369 1,227,122,172.51

Table 39. Number of HHs by Construction of the Roof


Construction Materials of the Roof Number of HHs Percentage
Galvanized Iron/ Aluminum 294,459 89.52
Tile Concrete/ Clay Tile 9,456 2.87
Half Galvanized Iron and Half Concrete 23,435 7.12
Wood 6 0.00
Cogon/ Nipa/ Anahaw 97 0.03
Asbestos 93 0.03
Makeshift/ Salvaged/ Improvised Materials 1,264 0.38
Others 138 0.04
TOTAL 328,948

67 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Table 40. Number of HHs by Construction of the Outer Walls

Construction Materials of the Wall Number of HHs Percentage


Concrete/Brick 238,404 72.47
Wood 25,026 7.61
Half Concrete 60,702 18.45
Galvanized Iron 1,986 0.60
Bamboo/ Sawali/ Cogon/ Nipa 312 0.09
Asbestos 112 0.03
Glass 21 0.01
Makeshift 1,674 0.51
Others 128 0.04
No Walls 38 0.01
Not Reported 545 0.17
TOTAL 328,948

3.2.1 BACKLOG

The homeless, doubled-up HHs and displaced HHs are all composites of the current backlog in
the housing provision. The homeless are those that have no shelter of any kind. A doubled-up
HH is a housing or a dwelling unit shared by two or more HHs. Displaced HHs are those that
need to be relocated because they live in danger zones or areas prone to hazards. They are to
be evicted or demolished due to a court order or an impending implementation of a government
infrastructure project in the area that they are occupying.

To cope with the mounting difficulties brought about by transport congestion, the national
government embarked on infrastructure projects that are critical to economic growth.

Progress has its setbacks, the relocation of thousands of both formal and informal settlers are
quintessential for these developments to be undertaken. The displaced HHs add up to the current
number of arrears in shelter provision. The table below evenly sums up the city’s present housing
backlog.
Table 41. Housing Backlog
Backlog Number of HHs
Homeless 195
Doubled-up (1.05% of Housing Stock) 3,673
Displaced 45,669
Sidewalk 2,775
Waterways 4,510
Landslide 394
NPC Line 424
Tala Cemetery 500
Infrastructure Project 4,096
With Pending Threat of Demolition 25,795
With Court Order Demolition 7,175
TOTAL 49,537

P a g e | 68
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Table 42. Inventory of Families/ HHs in Danger/ Hazard Areas

Number of
Location/ Owners Remarks
Families/ HHs
SIDEWALKS (RROW)
Barangay 4 Government Property 48
Barangay 5 12
- P. Gomez St.
- Torres Bugallon St.
Barangay 8
- San Miguel SAMATASA 53
- Sabalo 74
- Gen. San Miguel, Tambakan 82
- Dagat-Dagatan Avenue 12
- Salmon 32
Barangay 14
- Samahang Magkaisa 120
- Sabalo corner Tulingan 26
- Labahita Extension 312
- Tanigue St. 333
Barangay 20
- Talimusak Dagat-Dagatan, Samahang Nagkakaisa 11
Barangay 41
- J. Teodoro St. 19
Barangay 45
- Teodoro and del Mundo Sts., 3rd Avenue 70
Barangay 51
- P. Gomez St. 52
- Del Mundo St. corner 5th Avenue 69
- Del Mundo St. corner 3rd Avenue 23
Barangay 55
- P. Sevilla St., 5th Avenue 25
- F. Roxas St. 9
Barangay 58
- TEADEL HOAI, Teodoro and Del Mundo Sts. 42
Barangay 67
- Stotsenberg St. 49
Barangay 73
- Kapitan Junio 25
Barangay 75 45
- Gonzales St.
Barangay 78
- Bukang Liwayway Livelihood Association - Alley Pio 45
Barangay 104 20

69 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Number of
Location/ Owners Remarks
Families/ HHs
- 7th St. corner 7th to 9th Avenues
Barangay 109
- Caloocan High School–Ma. Clara Annex, 8th Avenue 9
Barangay 121 45
- 7th St
Barangay 125 7
- Barangay San Jose, Tagaytay
Barangay 134 39
- Gen. Concepcion, Zapote, Bagong Barrio
Barangay 135 90
- Zapote, Bagong Barrio
Barangay 137 - 65
- Malvar St., Bagong Barrio
Barangay 139 - 285
- F. Aguilar St.
Barangay 140 - 7
- Terrana St., Bagong Barrio
Barangay 141 - 23
- Pangako St., Bagong Barrio
Barangay 161
- Reparo Road 291
- Zapote Road/ Don Vicente/ Gen. Tirona St. 36
- Katipunan Road/ Aguilar St./ Pilares St. 114
WATERWAYS
Barangay 2 136 Cantarilla Creek
Barangay 4 96 Panaca Creek
Tanigue Creek (prioritized due
Barangay 14 342
to Supreme Court Mandamus)
Barangay 17 66
Barangay 19 111
Barangay 32 79
Barangay 43 13 Casili Creek (prioritized due to
Barangay 46 37 Supreme Court Mandamus)
Barangay 59 139
Barangay 63 85
Barangay 67
Barangay 118 115 Maligaya Creek ( prioritized due
Barangay 120 130 to Supreme Court Mandamus)
Barangay 167 104 Bignay, Llano
Barangay 168
- Sto. Tomas and San Beda 11
- Villa Maria Tibagan 15

P a g e | 70
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Number of
Location/ Owners Remarks
Families/ HHs
- Deparo Dulo 19
Barangay 170
- Brookside St. 99 Creekside
Houses along Matarik Creek
Barangay 175 622 (prioritized due to landslide-
prone areas)
Barangay 175 and 177 398 Camarin Creek
Barangay 176 Phase 7,8,9 and 10 174 Along Bagong Silang Creek
Barangay 177 Purok Area 10 82 Calamansian Creek
Marilao Creek (prioritized due to
Barangay 181, 182, 184, 185 and 186 1,637
Supreme Court Mandamus)
LANDSLIDE
Barangay 12 394 Houses are beside the garbage
dump (Tambakan) in Barangay
- NPC Lines 8.
Barangay 165 424 Some houses were demolished
- Phases 1 - 12 due to NPC Project.
Barangay 176
- Tala Cemetery 500
TOTAL 11,418

Table 43. Inventory of Families/ HHs to be affected by Infrastructure Projects


Owner
Public Number of Remarks
Type of Location (indicate the reserve/ (description of the site/ date of
Families/ HHs
Infrastructure Project (sitio, street, barangay) administrator) implementation and implementer
Private (indicate the Affected of the infrastructure project)
owner/ claimants)
Public
Manila North Tollways Most of the affected Ongoing project of MNTC-
Barangays 1, 2, 9, 21, 1,698
Corporation (MNTC) ISFs are within the NLEX, DPWH, Japan
22, 49, 52, 56, 63, 64 PNR Property.
NLEx Segment 10 International Cooperation
and 73 Private
Project 120 Agency (JICA)
120 are private owners.
Census and Tagging Activity
MNTC
scheduled on the First
NLEX – South Luzon Barangays 14, 21, 22,
500 Quarter of 2017; to be
Expressway (SLEX) 28 and 49
implemented on the Second
Connect
Quarter of 2017
MNTC
NLEX Segment 10 Unidentified yet 1200
Spur Road
Public
C3 Road Widening Barangays 21 and 49 The affected ISFs are 278 DPWH
within the RROWs
Public
Mindanao Avenue Barangay166, DPWH Property
300 DPWH
Extension Segment 2C Sitio Gitna, Kaybiga Private
100 Privately-owned
TOTAL 4,096

71 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Table 44. Inventory of Families/ HHs with Court Order for Demolition/ Eviction
Owner
Public Number of Remarks
Type of Location (indicate the reserve/ (description of the site/ date of
Families/ HHs
Infrastructure Project (sitio, street, barangay) administrator) implementation and implementer
Private (indicate the Affected of the infrastructure project)
owner/ claimants)
Pangarap Village 67
Carmel Development
Writ of Demolition Barangay 181 5,085 2015 PSA Actual Census
Corporation
Barangay 182 2,023
TOTAL 7,175

Table 45. Inventory of Families/ HHs with Pending Threats of Demolition


Remarks
(description of the
Owner
Number of site/ date of
Public (indicate the reserve/
Families/ implementation
administrator)
Location (sitio, street, barangay) and implementer
Private (indicate the owner/ HHs of the
claimants) Affected infrastructure
project)
Barrio Maligaya Bagong Anyo (BMBA) Roman Catholic 1,077
Sitio Uno, Sangandaan Caloocan Neighborhood
Roque and Noel Diaz 147
Association, Inc. (NAI)
L8 B7 Dagat-Dagatan, Caloocan City Ben Tan 18
B39 Ph 3F1 Alamang Alley, DDDP Ma. Cristina Ramos 9
Samahan ng Kapatiran ng Barangay 19 P. Zamora St.,
Javier Property 25
Caloocan City
Magtanggol St., Caloocan City Nadurata Property 11
Samahang Magkakapitbahay ng Barrio Isla Fontanilla Property 196
Barangay 102 Gallena Property 17
6th and 7th Avenues, Grace Park Flamenco Property 5
Barangay 138 Balintawak Property 68
Samahan ng Munting Nayon along Progreso De Castro Property 36
Ugnayan ng Maralita sa East Libis Manotok Property 99
Bagong Sibol Homeowners Association, Inc. (HOAI) ng
Rivera Simplicio 65
Gumamela St. Reparo, L72
Area D Diamond St. (Interville) BSA1 Talipapa, Barangay
145
164
SMMAC 108 J.P. Talipapa Azcon Compound Property 113
Brilliant View Ph II NAI 313
Robes Franville 5,235
Lot 581 15,688
Amparo Subdivision 2,000
Miramonte Lower Camarin 28
Miramonte Heights 300
United Settler Neighborhood Assn Inc. NHA 200
TOTAL 25, 795

P a g e | 72
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

3.2.2 ASSESSING FUTURE NEEDS

The average population growth rate from 2010 to 2015 was computed to be at 1.18%. The 2017
to 2025 population was projected utilizing the same constant in order to estimate the increase in
the number of HHs or what is referred to as future needs. This translates to an estimated total
increase of 45,850 HHs for the entire planning period partial to population growth.

Table 46 HHs Needed Due to Population Growth, 2017 - 2025


.
Year Population Number of HHs Shelter Needs
2015 Actual 1,583,978 368,367 -
2017 1,602,669 372,714 4,347
2018 1,621,580 377,112 4,398
2019 1,640,715 381,562 4,450
2020 1,660,076 386,064 4,502
2021 1,679,664 390,620 4,556
2022 1,699,484 395,229 4,609
2023 1,719,538 399,893 4,664
2024 1,760,359 409,386 9,493
2025 1,781,131 414,217 4,831
TOTAL NEEDS 45,850

3.2.2.1 SUMMARY OF SHELTER NEEDS

Table 47 Total HHs Needed for the Program Period 2017 - 2025

Housing Needs Total Annual Program Period


Doubled-up (1.05% of Housing Stock) 3,673 613 2020-2025
Displaced 45,669
Sidewalk 2,775 2018-2025
Waterways 4,510 2017
Landslide 394 2018
NPC Line 424 2018
Tala Cemetery 500 2018
Infrastructure Project 4,096 2017-2018
With Pending Threat of Demolition 25,795 3,225 2018-2025
With Court Order Demolition 7,175
Homeless 195 2017
Sub-Total 49,537
Due to Population Growth 45,915
TOTAL 95,452

The total new units needed due to backlog and future growth or population increase for the period
2017-2025 is 95,387 or a total of almost 32,000 units of shelter for each planning period. The
local government needs to establish its priority in the provision of shelter according to the level of
need. Housing units should primarily be made available to the displaced households. They need
to be relocated to an appropriate site which will grant them security of tenure and decent shelter.

73 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

The sharers (doubled-up) should likewise be afforded with their own dwelling units in realization
of a one house-one HH standard.

Table 48. Schedule of Implementation Period

Period Period Total Annual Housing Needs


Planning Period (2017-2018) 31,793 15,896.5
Planning Period (2019-2021) 31,797 10,599
Planning Period (2022-2024) 31,797 10,599

3.2.3 UPGRADING NEEDS

3.2.3.1 TENURE UPGRADING

Table 49. Total Number of Households by Tenurial Status, PSA

Number of HHs Percentage


Tenurial Status
Owned/Amortized 176,534 53.67
Rented 88,380 26.87
Ren-free with consent of owner 42,713 12.98
Rent-free without consent of owner 16,806 5.11
Not Applicable 4,515 1.37
TOTAL 328,948

Private and government owned land tracts in different areas within the city are currently occupied
by ISFs. A number of private land owners expressed willingness to sell these parcels from where
these informal settlers resides. The city government in cooperation with SHFC plans to upgrade
the status of these households between 2017 and 2025 through the implementation of CMP. The
occupants will be granted tenurial security by way of long-term loans to a legally-organized
association consisting of the residents of the deprived community. The loans enable the
association and its qualified members to acquire ownership or tenurial rights on the property and
the land they occupy. (Refer to Table 50 for the list of qualified sites)

Table 50. List of CMP Qualified Sites for Tenurial Upgrading


Number of
Owners Families/ Remarks
Location/ Organization
HHs
Barangay 32 63
Barangay 67 59
Barangay 69 296
Baello Property Expropriation
Barangay 70 391
Barangay 71 8
Barangay 75 85
Barangay 26 – Lerma, Dimasalang Manotok Property 315
Barangay 27 213
Barangay 29 10
Barangay 30 268

P a g e | 74
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Number of
Owners Families/ Remarks
Location/ Organization
HHs
Barangay 31 104
Barangay 19 - Sampalukan and P. Zamora 63 Expropriation
Barangay 21 265
Barangay 25 185
Barangay 97 - 10th Avenue Manotok Property 174 Expropriation
Barangay 98 151
Barangay 33 - A. Mabini St., Maypajo
141
P. Casimiro NAI
Barangay 3 - Sangandaan
154 Ongoing expropriation
Villa Gutierrez NAI
Barangays 19, 21, 25, 26, 27, 30 and 31 Manotok Property 1,210
Barangay 166 Dan Gomez Property 141
Barangay 165 UN Development Corp. 366
200 596 sq.m.
Crisini Property 50
Torchiva Property 300
Villaflor Property 200
Cemetery Excess Lot Ph.
Barangay 176 424 7, BSRP Outside Tala
Cemetery
Barangay 178 DSWD Property 1,500
Civic Center; 14 hectares
Barangay 178 2,000 proclaimed as Socialized
Housing
Batching Plant; within the
Barangay 178 250 six hectares reserved for
institutional use
Boundary of Tala and
Barangay 178 200
Civic Center
Un-awarded lots in
Barangay 174, 175, 177 and 178 Caloocan City Government 297
Camarin I and II Project
Barangay 186 - Barracks Malaria 450
Barangay 174 - Block 96 Open Space 97
Block 105 Open Space 68
Caloocan City Government Camarin I and II Project
Block 63 Open Space 57
Block 107 Bicol Area 120
Barangays 38, 43, 46, 49, 52, 56, 59 and 63 Pres Proclaimed Area
PNR Non-Core Property 4,782
Grace Park EO 48
Pres Proclaimed Area
Barangay 73 PNR Heroes del 96 258
EO 48
Barangay 74 - Samson Road 247
Barangay 9 - P. Burgos St.
PNR Property 143
Kabayanihan Multi-Purpose Cooperative HOAI
Padas P3 E1 L4 Kaunlaran Village DDDP
AWALUP NHA Property 46
TOTAL 16,451

75 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

4 AFFORDABILITY
In determining the affordability for housing of the target HHs, the income or the paying capacity
is basically considered. The HHs were grouped into five income classes using the 2015 FIES of
the PSA, of which the total land area required is 123.13 hectares. The following assumptions are
drawn in assigning the income groupings:

Table 51. Affordability Analysis and Land Need Calculation

Income Group 1st Income Group 2nd Income Group 3rd Income Group 4th Income Group 5th Income Group
Income (minimum, maximum) 3,332 & below 3,333 - 4,999 5,000 - 8,333 8,334-20,833 20,834 & over
Percentage of New Units 4.72% 6.77% 9.91% 72.35% 6.25%
Total Number of Units 2,775 3,976 5,828 42,508 3,673
Typical Monthly Income 2,000.00 4,166.00 6,667 14,584 30,000.00
Potential Percentage of Income
0.12 0.12 0.128 0.15 0.20
for Upgrading/ New Housing
Potential Capital Cost of
2,880.00 5,999.04 10,239.74 26,250.30 72,000.00
Housing (Annually)
Potential Capital Cost of
240.00 499.92 853.31 2,187.53 6,000.00
Housing (Monthly)
Loan Terms 30 30 30 30 30
Interest Rate 0.06 0.06 0.06 0.06 0.06
Repayment Period 30 30 30 30 30
Affordable Housing Loan 39,643.20 82,576.79 140,950.08 361,335.38 991,080.00
Off-site relocation Off-site relocation
Affordable Options NHA LRB Off-City and In-City relocation (CMP)
(CMP) (CMP)
Required Land Area/ Unit 45 45 45 45 45
Lot Size 32 32 32 32 32
Required Land (in hectares) 9.00 22.26 3.43 71.92 16.53

Table 52. Affordable Housing Option


Land House
Income Land Cost Total Unit Cost
Main Option Development Cost Construction Cost Indirect
Group Cost
Per sq.m. Per Unit Per sq.m. Per Unit Per sq.m. Per Unit SHFC Equity
Off-site Relocation CSWD
1st Income
(Near City -lot only) Rental
Group Assistance
except for the
2nd Income homeless with 32
3125 100,000
Group sq.m.) 100,000
3rd Income
In-city Relocation 3500 112,000 1,050 33,600 10,000 320,000 55,872 450,000 71,472
Group
4th Income
3500 112,000 1,050 33,600 10,000 320,000 55,872 450,000 71,472
Group Off-site Relocation
5th Income (Near City and In-city)
3500 112,000 1,050 33,600 10,000 320,000 55,872 450,000 71,472
Group

P a g e | 76
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

5 RESOURCES FOR SHELTER


The total land area requirement for the city’s socialized housing program is about 123.13
hectares. Due to lack of available space, land availability becomes an impediment to the shelter
provision program in terms of in-city relocation. In order to compensate for lack of such resource,
vertical development was considered favorably by the local and national governments.

Table 53. Inventory of Available Lands Suitable for Housing

Land Area
Location Type of Ownership Remarks
(in hectares)
NORTH CALOOCAN
Lot adjacent to Parview Heights, Bagumbong 6.50 Private Property Off-site housing for acquisition
Property back of
4.28 Private Property Off-site housing for acquisition
La Consolacion College
CMP Project- Bagumbong 5.06 Private Property Off-site OUP CMP Projects
Government Property
Printing Press Area, Congress Village 0.86 On-site for re-blocking
- NHA
Open Space PHHC,
Block 49, Camarin 1 3.97 Government Property
On-site re-blocking project
On-site DSWD
DSWD Property 10.40 Government Property
Re-blocking Project
On-site Caloocan City
Vicente Ferrer (Civic Center) 13.34 Government Property
Re-blocking Project
Civic Center 2.00 Government Property
On-site NHA Re-blocking Project
Tala Development Project 127.39 Government Property
–RA 7999
Off-site NHA -MRB Project – RA
Tala Development Project 3.32 Government Property
7999
Bagong Silang Phase VIII 2.77 Government Property NHA-MRB Project
Bagong Silang Residences 3.80 Government Property
Cardinal Ceramics (Tala) 6.20 Private Property
People’s Plan High Density
Various sites 6.65 Private Property
Housing
SOUTH CALOOCAN
KBS Tower (NHA) 1.60 Government Property - NHA On-site for Re-blocking
Samahan ng Magkakapitbahay sa SAWATA
13.65 Private Property
(SAMAKA SAWATA)
Private Property
LaLoma Cemetery – Maligaya Creek 3.25 On-site MRB Project
- Diocese of Kalookan
TOTAL 215.04

Table 54. Estimated Financial Requirements for Housing Provision, 2017-2025

Income Group Option Number of Units Unit Cost Total Cost


1st Income Group On-site, lot only 195 100,000 19,500,000

1st Income Group


Off-site Relocation (near city), lot only 6,751 100,000.00 675,100,000.00
2nd Income Group

3rd Income Group In-city Relocation 5,828 450,000.00 2,622,600,000.00


4th Income Group 25,570 450,000.00 11,506,500,000.00
Off-site and On-site Relocation
16,743 100,000.00 1,674,300,000.00

77 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Income Group Option Number of Units Unit Cost Total Cost


5th Income Group 3,673 100,000.00 367,300,000.00
Total 58,760 16,865,300,000.00

P a g e | 78
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 43. Proposed Socialized Housing Zones, South Caloocan 2017 – 2025

79 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 44. Proposed Socialized Housing Zones, North Caloocan 2017 – 2025

P a g e | 80
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Table 55. Potential Sources of Funds for Shelter Provision, 2017

Cost
Agency/ Organization Name of Program Component
(In Million PhP)

Low-rise Building (LRB) - Site Development


261.36
Bagong Silang II - Housing (360 units)
LRB - Site Development
304.92
Bagong Silang III - Housing (420 units)
NHA Five-storey LRB - Site Development
468.00
Bagong Silang Residences - Housing(780 units)
LRB - Site Development
108.00
Camarin Residences 4 - Housing(240 units)
LRB - Site Development
27.00
Tala Residences 3 - Housing(60 units)
Acquisition of lands for Socialized
- Land Acquisition
Caloocan City LGU Housing Programs 222.00
(Cardinal Ceramic Sites)
- Site Survey
Civic Center Property (2.0 Ha) 1.00
- Site Development
- Land Acquisition (3,555
CMP Member Beneficiaries) 299.19
- Site Development
Public - Private Partnership
- Land Acquisition
People’s Plan - Site Development 1,396.35
- High Density Housing
(3,103 Beneficiaries)
TOTAL 3,087.82

81 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

6 WORK AND FINANCIAL PLAN


Goal: To provide decent, affordable and disaster resilient and climate change adaptive shelter that has adequate facilities towards
the formation of a livable and socially responsible residential community
Table 56. Work and Financial Plan Matrix

RESOURCES NEEDED
PROGRAM / PROJECT / RESPONSIBE
OBJECTIVE STRATEGY WHAT? HOW MUCH? FUND WHEN?
ACTIVITY AGENCY
HOW MANY? (PhP) SOURCE
Provision of grocery package
945,500 Local -CSWD
To clear waterways of to relocatees at P500/HH
Relocation of ISFs NHA, LGU 1,891 2017
ISF(Mandamus) Provision of housing (LRB) at
850,950,000 SHFC
PhP 450,000.00/HH
Provision of grocery package
364,000 Local - CSWD
to relocatees at P500/HH
To clear other waterways Relocation of ISFs NHA, LGU 728 2017
Acquisition of lot: at
72,800,000 SHFC
PhP100,000/HH (lot only)
Assists in the relocation of Provision of grocery package
849,000 Local-CSWD
affected families on the to relocatees at P500/HHs
NHA, LGU 1,698 2017
construction of MNTC- Acquisition of lot through CMP
169,800,000 SHFC
NLEX segment 10 at PhP100,000.00(lot only)
Provision of grocery package
250,000 Local-CSWD
to relocatees at P500/HHs
MNTC NLEX-SLEX Connect NHA, LGU 500 2017
Acquisition of lot: at
To clear road –right of way 50,000,000 SHFC
PhP100,000/HH (lot only)
MNTC-NLEX Segment 10
Provision of grocery package
Project 139,0000 Local-CSWD
to relocatees at P500/HHs
C-3 Road Widening NHA, LGU 278 2017
Acquisition of lot: at
27,800,000 SHFC
PhP100,000/HH (lot only)
Provision of grocery package
150,000 Local-CSWD
to relocatees at P500/HHs
Mindanao Ave. Ext. Seg. 2-c NHA, LGU 300 2017
Acquisition of lot: at
30,000,000 SHFC
PhP100,000/HH (lot only)
To provide rental assistance  Rental assistance for 1 year
780,000 DSWD-NCR 2017
to homeless at 4,000/month
 Grocery package and 195
Relocation of homeless
livelihood assistance to LGU 2,515,500 Local-UPAO 2017
families living on shanties,
homeless families at P10,500

P a g e | 82
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

RESOURCES NEEDED
PROGRAM / PROJECT / RESPONSIBE
OBJECTIVE STRATEGY WHAT? HOW MUCH? FUND WHEN?
ACTIVITY AGENCY
HOW MANY? (PhP) SOURCE
along roads, streets or push  Provision of trucking
carton assistance to transport the
personal belongings of the
affected ISFs at P 1,100/HH
 Provision of transportation
assistance to ISFs at
P1,300/HH
Acquisition of lot: at
19,500,000
PhP100,000/HH (lot only)
To provide security of tenure Upgrade tenurial status Acquisition of lot: at
2,550 255,000,000 Local 2017
through acquisition of land through On-site CMP PhP100,000/HH (lot only)
SUB-TOTAL FOR 2017 8,140 1,481,843,000
 Provision of trucking
assistance to transport the
personal belongings of the
affected ISFs at P2,750/HH
Relocation of ISFs (CMP – Local-UPAO
To clear sidewalk of ISF  Provision of transportation 360 1,638,000 2018
off-site) CSWD
assistance to ISFs at
P1,300/HH
 Provision of grocery package
to ISFs at P500/HH
 Provision of lot at
36,000,000 SHFC
Php100,000/HH
Provision of grocery package
945,500 Local -CSWD
To clear waterways of to relocates at P500/HHs
Relocation of ISFs NHA, LGU 1,891 2018
ISF(Mandamus) Provision of housing through
850,950,000 SHFC
LRB at PhP450,000/HH

83 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

RESOURCES NEEDED
PROGRAM / PROJECT / RESPONSIBE
OBJECTIVE STRATEGY WHAT? HOW MUCH? FUND WHEN?
ACTIVITY AGENCY
HOW MANY? (PhP) SOURCE

 Provision of trucking
assistance to transport the
personal belongings of the
affected ISFs at P2,750/HH
 Provision of transportation 1,318 5,996,900 Local-UPAO
To relocate ISF living in assistance to ISFs at
danger areas (landslide, NPC Relocation of ISFs P1,300/HH NHA, LGU 2018
line, cemetery)  Provision of grocery package
to ISFs at P500/HH

Provision of housing through


593,100,000
LRB at PhP450,000/HH

Provision of grocery package


600,000 Local-UPAO,
Assist in the relocation of to relocates at P500/HH
To relocate ISF affected by
ISFs affected by the MNTC- NHA, LGU 1,200 2018
infrastructure Project
NLEX Seg. 10 Spur Road Provision of lot at
120,000,000 SHFC
Php100,000/HH
Provision of financial
assistance to affected families
LGU 88,884,000 Local-UPAO 2018
To relocate ISF with Court Relocation of ISFs with at P 450 x 60 days {R.A. 7279
Sec. 28 (8) UDHA} 3,292
Order for Demolition pending threat of demolition
Provision of housing through
1,481,400,000 SHFC 2018
People’s Plan (HDHP)
Upgrade tenurial status
To provide security of tenure Acquisition of lot through CMP
through expropriation of 1,108 110,800,000 SHFC 2018
through acquisition of land at PhP100,000/HH
Manotok Property

Upgrade tenurial status


To provide security of tenure Acquisition of lot through CMP
through expropriation of 424 42,400,000 SHFC 2018
through acquisition of land at PhP100,000/HH
Cemetery Excess Lot Ph. 7
SUB-TOTAL FOR 2018 9,593 3,332,714,400

P a g e | 84
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

RESOURCES NEEDED
PROGRAM / PROJECT / RESPONSIBE
OBJECTIVE STRATEGY WHAT? HOW MUCH? FUND WHEN?
ACTIVITY AGENCY
HOW MANY? (PhP) SOURCE
 Provision of trucking
assistance to transport the
personal belongings of the
affected ISFs at P2,750/HH
Relocation of ISF on
To clear sidewalk of ISF  Provision of transportation 360 1,638,000 2019
sidewalk (RROW)
assistance to ISFs at
P1,300/HH
 Provision of grocery package
to ISFs at P500/HH

 Acquisition of lot at PhP


36,000,000
100,000/HH
Provision of financial
Local-
assistance to affected families
87,075,000 UPAO/Private
To relocate ISF with Court Relocation of ISFs with at P 450 x 60 days {R.A. 7279
3,225 Lot Owner 2019
Order for Demolition pending threat of demolition Sec. 28 (8) UDHA}
Provision of housing through
1,451,250,000 SHFC
People’s Plan (HDHP)
Upgrade tenurial status
To provide security of tenure Acquisition of lot at PhP
through On-site CMP of 639 63,900,000 NHA,SHFC 2019
through acquisition of land 100,000/HH
Camarin 1 & 2 Project

Upgrade tenurial status


To provide security of tenure Acquisition of lot at PhP
through On-site CMP of 450 45,000,000 NHA 2019
through acquisition of land 100,000/HH
Barracks Malaria
SUB-TOTAL FOR 2019 4,674 1,648,863,000
 Provision of trucking
assistance to transport the
Provide assistance for the personal belongings of the
To clear sidewalk of ISF relocation of ISF on sidewalk affected ISFs at P2,750/HHs LGU 360 1,638,0000 Local - UPAO 2020
(RROW)  Provision of transportation
assistance to ISFs at
P1,300/HHs P500/HHs

85 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

RESOURCES NEEDED
PROGRAM / PROJECT / RESPONSIBE
OBJECTIVE STRATEGY WHAT? HOW MUCH? FUND WHEN?
ACTIVITY AGENCY
HOW MANY? (PhP) SOURCE
 Provision of grocery package
to ISFs at P500/HHs

 Acquisition of lot at PhP


36,000,000 SHFC
100,000/HH

Provision of financial
Local-
assistance to affected families
Relocation of ISFs from 87,075,000 UPAO/Private
To relocate ISF with Court at P 450 x 60 days {R.A. 7279
various Barangays based on Sec. 28 (8) UDHA} 3,225 lot owner 2020
Order for Demolition
PCUP
Provision of housing through
1,451,250,000 SHFC
People’s Plan (HDHP)
To provide security of tenure Provision of lots to Doubled Acquisition of lot at
613 61,300,000 SHFC 2020
through acquisition of land Up HHs PhP100,000/HH
Relocation of ISF - Samson Provision of housing through Local-
People’s Plan (HDHP) 247 111,150,000 UPAO,SHFC 2020
Road
To relocate ISF in Relocation of ISF - PNR Provision of housing through Local-
People’s Plan (HDHP) 143 64,350,000 UPAO,SHFC 2020
government owned lands Property(P.Burgos)
Relocation of ISF - NHA Provision of housing through Local-
People’s Plan (HDHP) 46 20,700,000 2020
Property (Dagat-Dagatan) UPAO,SHFC
SUB-TOTAL FOR 2020 4,634 1,833,463,000
 Provision of trucking
assistance to transport the
personal belongings of the
affected ISFs at P2,750/HHs
Relocation of ISF on
To clear sidewalk of ISF  Provision of transportation 360 1,638,000 Local-UPAO, 2021
sidewalk (RROW)
assistance to ISFs at
P1,300/HHs
 Provision of grocery package
to ISFs at P500/HHs
 Acquisition of lot at
36,000,000 SHFC
PhP100,000/HH

P a g e | 86
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

RESOURCES NEEDED
PROGRAM / PROJECT / RESPONSIBE
OBJECTIVE STRATEGY WHAT? HOW MUCH? FUND WHEN?
ACTIVITY AGENCY
HOW MANY? (PhP) SOURCE
Provision of financial
assistance to affected families
87,048,000 2021
Relocation of ISFs from at P 450 x 60 days {R.A. 7279
To relocate ISF with Court
various Barangays based on Sec. 28 (8) UDHA} 3,224
Order for Demolition
PCUP Provision of housing through
People’s Plan (HDHP) at 1,450,800,000 2021
PhP450,000/HH
To provide security of tenure
To reduce the number of Acquisition of lot at
through acquisition of land 612 61,200,000 2021
Doubled Up HHs PhP100,000/HH
for Double Up HHs
SUB-TOTAL FOR 2021 4,196 1,636,686,000
 Provision of trucking
assistance to transport the
personal belongings of the
affected ISFs at P2,750/HHs
Relocation of ISF on
To clear sidewalk of ISF  Provision of transportation 360 1,638,000 2022
sidewalk (RROW)
assistance to ISFs at
P1,300/HHs
 Provision of grocery package
to ISFs at P500/HHs
 Acquisition of lot at
36,000,000 SHFC
PhP100,000/HH

Provision of financial
assistance to affected families
87,048,000 Local-UPAO
Relocation of ISFs from at P 450 x 60 days {R.A. 7279
To relocate ISF with Court
various Barangays based on Sec. 28 (8) UDHA} 3,224 2022
Order for Demolition
PCUP Provision of housing through
People’s Plan (HDHP) at 1,450,800,000 SHFC
PhP450,000/HH
To provide security of tenure
To reduce the number of through acquisition of land Acquisition of lot at
612 61,200,000 2022
Doubled Up HHs PhP100,000/HH
for Double Up HHs
SUB-TOTAL FOR 2022 4,196 1,636,686,000

87 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

RESOURCES NEEDED
PROGRAM / PROJECT / RESPONSIBE
OBJECTIVE STRATEGY WHAT? HOW MUCH? FUND WHEN?
ACTIVITY AGENCY
HOW MANY? (PhP) SOURCE
 Provision of trucking
assistance to transport the
personal belongings of the
affected ISFs at P2,750/HHs
Relocation of ISF on
To clear sidewalk of ISF  Provision of transportation 360 1,638,000 2023
sidewalk (RROW)
assistance to ISFs at
P1,300/HHs
 Provision of grocery package
to ISFs at P500/HHs
 Acquisition of lot at
36,000,000 SHFC
PhP100,000/HH

Provision of financial
assistance to affected families
87,048,000 Local-UPAO
Relocation of ISFs from at P 450 x 60 days {R.A. 7279
To relocate ISF with Court
various Barangays based on Sec. 28 (8) UDHA} 3,224 2023
Order for Demolition
PCUP Provision of housing through
People’s Plan (HDHP)at PhP 1,450,800,000 SHFC
450,000.00/HH
To provide security of tenure
To reduce the number of Acquisition of lot at
through acquisition of land 612 61,200,000 2023
Doubled Up HHs PhP100,000.00/lot
for Double Up HHs
Acquisition of lot at
Manotok Property 1,435 143,500,000 2023
PhP100,000.00/lot
Acquisition of lot at
DSWD Property 500 50,000,000 2023
To provide security of tenure PhP100,000.00/lot
through acquisition of land PNR Non-Core Properties Acquisition of lot at
1,594 159,400,000 2023
(EO 48) PhP100,000.00/lot
Acquisition of lot at
PNR Heroes del 96 (EO 48) 258 25,800,000 2023
PhP100,000.00/HH
SUB-TOTAL FOR 2023 7,983 2,015,386,000
 Provision of trucking
Relocation of ISF on assistance to transport the
To clear sidewalk of ISF 360 1,638,000 2024
sidewalk (RROW) personal belongings of the
affected ISFs at P2,750/HHs

P a g e | 88
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

RESOURCES NEEDED
PROGRAM / PROJECT / RESPONSIBE
OBJECTIVE STRATEGY WHAT? HOW MUCH? FUND WHEN?
ACTIVITY AGENCY
HOW MANY? (PhP) SOURCE
 Provision of transportation
assistance to ISFs at
P1,300/HHs
 Provision of grocery package
to ISFs at P500/HHs
 Acquisition of lot at
36,000,000 SHFC
PhP100,000.00/HH

Provision of financial
assistance to affected families
Relocation of ISFs from 87,048,000 Local-UPAO
To relocate ISF with Court at P 450 x 60 days {R.A. 7279
various Barangays based on Sec. 28 (8) UDHA} 3,224 2024
Order for Demolition
PCUP
Provision of housing through
1,450,800,000 SHFC
People’s Plan (HDHP)
To provide security of tenure
To reduce the number of Acquisition of lot at
through acquisition of land 612 61,200,000 2024
Doubled Up HHs PhP100,000.00/HH
for Double Up HHs
Acquisition of lot at
Manotok Property 1,435 143,500,000 2024
PhP100,000.00/HH
To provide security of tenure Acquisition of lot at
DSWD Property 500 50,000,000 2024
through acquisition of land PhP100,000.00/HH
PNR Non-Core Properties Acquisition of lot at
PhP100,000.00/HH 1,594 159,400,000 2024
(EO 48)
SUB-TOTAL FOR 2024 7,725 1,989,586,000
 Provision of trucking
assistance to transport the
personal belongings of the
affected ISFs at P2,750/HHs Local-
Relocation of ISF on
To clear sidewalk of ISF  Provision of transportation 255 1,160,250 UPAO/CSWD, 2025
sidewalk (RROW)
assistance to ISFs at NHA
P1,300/HHs
 Provision of grocery package
to ISFs at P500/HHs

89 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

RESOURCES NEEDED
PROGRAM / PROJECT / RESPONSIBE
OBJECTIVE STRATEGY WHAT? HOW MUCH? FUND WHEN?
ACTIVITY AGENCY
HOW MANY? (PhP) SOURCE
 Acquisition of lot at
25,500,000
PhP100,000.00/HH
Provision of financial
assistance to affected families
87,048,000 Local-UPAO
Relocation of ISFs from at P 450 x 60 days {R.A. 7279
To relocate ISF with Court
various Barangays based on Sec. 28 (8) UDHA} 3,224 2025
Order for Demolition
PCUP Provision of housing through
People’s Plan (HDHP) at 1,450,800,000 SHFC
PhP450,000/HH
To provide security of tenure Acquisition of lot at
To reduce the number of PhP100,000.00/HH
through acquisition of land 612 61,200,000 2025
Doubled Up HHs
for Double Up HHs
Acquisition of lot at
Manotok Property 1,434 143,400,000 2025
PhP100,000.00/HH
To provide security of tenure Acquisition of lot at
DSWD Property 500 50,000,000 2025
through acquisition of land PhP100,000.00/HH
PNR Non-Core Properties Acquisition of lot at
PhP100,000.00/HH 1,594 159,400,000 2025
(EO 48)
SUB-TOTAL FOR 2025 7,619 1,978,508,250
9-YEAR TOTAL (2017 – 2025) 58,760 17,589,735,650

P a g e | 90
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Table 57. Schedule of the Prioritization in the Proposed Implementation of the City Shelter Plan (2017 – 2025)

Type of HH/ Shelter Needs 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025
1 DANGER HAZARD AREAS 8,603
Sidewalk (RROW) 2,775 360 360 360 360 360 360 360 360
Waterways 4,510
Mandamus 3,782 1,891 1,891
Other waterways 728 728
Landslide (Bgy 12 Tambakan) 394 394
NPC Line (Bgy. 166) 424 424
Tala Cemetery 500 500

AFFECTED BY
2 3,976
INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS
MNTC Segment 10 Project 1,698
ISFs within PNR Property 1,698 1,698
MNTC NLEX-SLEX Connect 500 500
MNTC NLEX Seg. 10 Spur Rd. 1,200 1,200
C-3 Road Widening 278 278
Mindanao Ave. Ext. Seg. 2-c 300 300

WITH COURT ORDER FOR


3 67
DEMOLITION
Various Barangay based on
67 67
PCUP

WITH PENDING THREATS FOR


4 25,795
DEMOLITION
Various Private Properties 25,795 3,225 3,225 3,225 3,224 3,224 3,224 3,224 3,224

5 HOMELESS 195 195

6 DOUBLED UP 3,673 613 612 612 612 612 612


SUB-TOTAL 42,309

91 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Type of HH/ Shelter Needs 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025
7 TENURE UPGRADING 16,451 2,550 1,532 1,089 649 213 213 3,787 3,529 3,528
1,435 1,435 1,434
Expropriation 5,412 1,108
Cemetery Excess Lot Ph7
424 424
(Outside)
DSWD Property 1,500 500 500 500
Civic Center 2,250 2250
Tala Civic Center Boundary 300 300
Camarin 1 and 2 Project 639 639
Barracks Malaria 450 450
PNR Non-Core Properties
4,782 1594 1594 1594
(EO 48)
PNR Heroes Del 96 (EO 48) 258 258
Samson Road 247 247
PNR Property (P. Burgos) 143 143
NHA Property (D. Dagatan) 46 46
SUB-TOTAL 16,451
TOTAL HHs PRIORITIZE 58,760

Type of HH/ Shelter Needs 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025
AFFECTED BY
1
INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS
MNTC Segment 10 Project
Private Owners 120 120
WITH COURT ORDER FOR
2 7,108
DEMOLITION
Pangarap Village
7,108
(Bgy. 181 and 182)
3 DUE TO POP. GROWTH 45,915 8,860 8,861 4,616 4,616 4,782 4,782 4,782 4,782
TOTAL 53,143

OVER ALL TOTAL 111,903

P a g e | 92
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Table 58. Housing Options for Income Groups and Corresponding Service Provider

Income Level Housing Options Agency


1st 1 CSWD Rental Assistance CSWD
2 Relocation
NHA Low Rise Buildings
3rd Ready Available/ On going NHA
3rd For Construction/ Bidding NHA
3rd Proposed Additional LRB NHA
Off-site Near City (lot only) NHA
1st/ 2nd Off-site Near City (lot only) LGU
3 Community Mortgage Program
4th/ 5th On Site (Where is, As is) CMP
4th/ 5th On Site Near City (lot only) CMP
People’s Plan (High Density Housing)
4th/ 5th Off Site (In City) People’s Plan

Note: Color-coded to match implementation plan

93 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

7 MONITORING AND EVALUATION SCHEMES


7.1 MEANS OF IMPLEMENTATION

The following Strategies in the areas of governance, coordination, financing, valuation and
partnerships are adopted to facilitate the implementation of the framework of this plan. Other
mechanism that may be appropriated during the formulation of the Action Plan shall be
included.

 Establish appropriate management and institutional arrangements and coordination


mechanisms for shelter initiatives at the national, sub-national and local levels.

 Maximize government financing instruments and local levels as source of funds for the
National Framework Strategy.

 Install policy and incentive mechanism to facilitate and leverage private sector investments
in shelter provision.

 Provide and access scaled-up, new and additional financial resources to support the
requirements of the National Framework, including sectoral and local financing
requirements.

 Development of appropriate assessment tool such as carrying capacity assessment


incorporating an appropriate valuation methodology to improve decision-making, policy
development, research and development (R&D), payment and incentive mechanism, and
other shelter-related endeavors.

 Establish partnerships among national and local government agencies, business,


professional and other private groups, community-based organizations, academic and
scientific organizations, and civil society organizations.

7.2 MONITORING AND EVALUATION OF THE FRAMEWORK

The Caloocan City Local Housing Board, in coordination with concerned agencies and
stakeholder groups, shall install a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) system to track the
implementation progress of the provisions of this Framework and its conformity to the National
Climate Change Action Plan and Local Climate Change Action Plan.

As per Section 48, Article X of Republic Act 7279, “The Housing and Urban Development
Coordinating Council and the local government units shall submit a detailed annual report with
respect to the implementation of this Act to the President and the Congress of the Republic of the
Philippines”.

P a g e | 94
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

8 SANGGUNIANG PANLUNGSOD APPROVAL


(See attached documents)

ANNEXES
BIBLIOGRAPHY
2010 Census of Population and Housing. National Statistics Office, 2010. Print and web.

2015 Census of Population. Philippine Statistics Authority, 2016. Print and web.

2016 - 2025 Comprehensive Land Use Plan – Integrating Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change
Adaptation. Caloocan City Government, 2016. Print.

LGU’s Guidebook for Local Housing Project/ Program. Makati City: Housing and Urban Development
Coordinating Council. Print

Training Workshop on the Local Shelter Plan Formulation. Modules I-VI, Manila: Housing and Urban
Development Coordinating Council, April 2016. Print

95 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

REFERENCE MAPS
North Caloocan Population Maps

South Caloocan Population Maps

North Caloocan Land Suitability Map

South Caloocan Land Suitability Map

Map of Informal Settlements, North Caloocan

Map of Informal Settlements, North Caloocan

Existing Land Use Map - North Caloocan City

Proposed Land Use Map – North Caloocan City

Existing Land Use Map - South Caloocan City

Proposed Land Use Map – South Caloocan City

Existing Residential Land Use Map, North Caloocan City 2013

Proposed Residential Land Use Map, North Caloocan City

Existing Residential Land Use Map, South Caloocan City 2013

Proposed Residential Land Use Map, South Caloocan City

P a g e | 96
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 34. Population Map, North Caloocan

97 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 35. Population Map, South Caloocan

P a g e | 98
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 36. Land Suitability Map, North Caloocan City

99 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 37. Land Suitability Map, South Caloocan City

P a g e | 100
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 38. Map of Informal Settlements, North Caloocan 2013

101 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 39. Map of Informal Settlements, South Caloocan 2013

P a g e | 102
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 40. Existing Land Use Map 2013, North Caloocan City

103 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 41. Proposed Land Use Map, North Caloocan City 2016 - 2025

P a g e | 104
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 42. Existing Land Use Map 2013, South Caloocan City

105 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 43. Proposed Land Use Map, South Caloocan City 2016 – 2025

P a g e | 106
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 44. Existing Residential Land Use Map, North Caloocan City 2013

107 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 45. Proposed Residential Land Use Map, North Caloocan City 2016 – 2025

P a g e | 108
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 46. Existing Residential Land Use Map, South Caloocan City 2013

109 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

Figure 47. Proposed Residential Land Use Map, South Caloocan City 2016 – 2025

P a g e | 110
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

DOCUMENTATIONS
SANGGUNIANG PANLUNGSOD RESOLUTION NO.2651 S.2017
”A resolution Adopting and Approving the City Development Council (CDC) Resolution
No. CM-OGM 17-001”.

CDC RESOLUTION CM-OGM 17-001


“A Resolution Endorsing to the Sangguniang Panlungsod the Proposed Caloocan City
2017 – 2019 Local Shelter Plan for Review, Adoption and Approval of the same”.

RESOLUTION NO. 01-17


“A Resolution Approving the Draft of the Local Shelter Plan of Caloocan City”.

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 023-16


Reorganization of the Caloocan City Housing and Urban Development Board

CALOOCAN CITY HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT BOARD


- Minutes of the Meeting
February 28, 2017 – Bulwagang Katipunan, Caloocan City Hall – Main
- Attendance

PHOTOS

111 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

PHOTO DOCUMENTATION
SHELTER PLAN REVIEW
February 26, 2017 – Bulwagang Katipunan

P a g e | 112
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

SHELTER PLAN REVIEW


February 26, 2017 – Bulwagang Katipunan

113 | P a g e
Caloocan City 2017 – 2025 Local Shelter Plan

SHELTER PLAN REVIEW


February 26, 2017 – Bulwagang Katipunan

P a g e | 114