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1.

0 INTRODUCTION

Field hockey is a team sport of the hockey family. The earliest origins of the game date
back to the Middle Ages in England, Scotland, France and the Netherlands. The game can be
played on a grass field, turf field or synthetic field as well as an indoor board surface. Each
team plays with eleven players, including the goalie. Players use sticks made out of wood,
carbon fibre, fibre glass or a combination of carbon fibre and fibre glass in different quantities
(with the higher carbon fibre stick being more expensive and less likely to break) to hit a round,
hard, plastic ball. The length of the stick depends on the player's individual height.

Goalies often have a different kind of stick, however they can also use an ordinary field
hockey stick. The specific goal-keeping sticks have another curve at the end of the stick, this
is to give them more surface area to save the ball. The uniform consists of shin guards, shoes,
shorts, a mouth guard and a jersey.

During play, goal keepers are the only players who are allowed to touch the ball with
any part of their body (the player's hand is considered 'part of the stick' if on the stick), while
field players play the ball with the flat side of their stick. Goal keepers also cannot play the ball
with the back of their stick. Whoever scores the most goals by the end of the match wins. If the
score is tied at the end of the game, either a draw is declared or the game goes into extra time
or a penalty shootout, depending on the competition's format.
1.2 Field Measurement

Field hockey is a widely played team sport of the hockey family. The game can be
played on grass, watered turf, artificial turf or synthetic field, as well as an indoor boarded
surface. Each team plays with ten field players and a goalie. Players commonly use sticks made
out of wood, carbon fibre, fibre glass or a combination of carbon fibre and fibre glass in
different quantities (with the higher carbon fibre stick being more expensive and less likely to
break) to hit a round, hard, plastic ball. The length of the stick is based on the player’s
individual height, the top of the stick usually comes to the players hip, taller players typically
have taller sticks. The pitch on which field hockey is played has a length of 299 feet, 10 inches
(91.4 meters) and a width of 180 feet, 5 inches (55.0 meters). This boundary is marked on the
turf and the shorter lines are called backlines.

Figure 1: Field measurement of hockey field


1.2.1 Dimension and Markings for the Field Hockey

DIMENSION AND MARKINGS DESCRIPTION


Pitch boundary The pitch on which field hockey is played
has a length of 299 feet, 10 inches (91.4
meters) and a width of 180 feet, 5 inches
(55.0 meters). This boundary is marked on
the turf and the shorter lines are called
backlines.

Center line A straight line is drawn midway between the


backlines, and parallel to them. This center
line divides the pitch into two equal parts.

25-yard line In each half, another parallel line is drawn at


a distance of 75 feet, 2 inches (22.9 meters)
from the backline. This distance converts to
25 yards, hence this is called the 25-yard line.
Now the pitch is divided into four equal
parts.

Striking circle or “D” From the center of each backline, a point is


marked 6 feet (1.8 meters) away and a
quarter-circle arc having a radius of 48 feet
(14.6 meters) is drawn from here on the
inside of the field. The two quarter-circles
are joined at the top by a straight line
measuring 12 feet (3.7 meters) to form the D-
shaped striking circle, also referred to as the
“D”. Another set of quarter circles are drawn
outside these and 18 feet, 1 inch (5.5 meters)
away. These arcs are not solid, but dashed.

Penalty Spot From the center of the baseline, this point is


marked 21 feet (6.4 meters) towards the
inside of the pitch with a width of 6 inches
(0.2 meter).

Penalty Corner Defender’s and At 16 feet, 5 inches (5.0 meters) and 32 feet,
Attacker’s Marks 10 inches (10.0 meters) away from the center
of each backline in either direction, a line
having a length of 1 foot (0.3 meter) is
drawn. Thus, each backline will have four
such markings. These are known as the
penalty corner defender’s and attacker’s
marks, respectively.

Long Corner Attacker’s Mark Along each side line at 16 feet, 5 inches (5.0
meters) from the backline, a line 1 foot (0.3
meter) long is drawn to form this mark.

Goal Post Each goal post has a height of 7 feet (2.14


meters) and a width of 2 inches (0.05 meter).
These posts are white.
1.3 Player Position
To start with, field hockey positions can be broken into four different groups: offensive,
defensive, midfield and finally the goalkeeper. The offense are traditionally the left and right
wings and the centre forward, although having players set into these positions is relatively
uncommon in recent years, and offensive players will usually rotate through the wings and
centre positions during the game.
The goalkeeper is the most unique field hockey position – they are the only ones
restricted by where they can move to on the field, and they are the only ones permitted to
play the ball with their body. Goalkeepers should work on improving their explosive speed
off the mark, flexibility, hand-eye coordination and most importantly –nerves of steel!
Despite the padding and protective gear that goalkeepers can wear, the ball can still hurt
when it hits, and the helmet and face mask can restrict vision. Keep your eye on the ball.

Figure 2: Player position


POSITION ROLES
Midfield Midfield in field hockey are the inside-left
and inside-right (inners) positions, and the
centre half. They will roam the field and are
used to link the defense with the offense, and
are often required and expected to do a lot of
running to make this happen.

Defensive Defensive line up consists of the left and


right halfbacks, two fullbacks and
goalkeeper. Unlike their striker
counterparts, the half line will usually stay
in their allotted positions, and might only
move from right to left to cover injury or
substitution. The left and right halfbacks
will focus on defending against the wingers
and wide strikers, although the half-line is
also used in attacking situations, but are
vulnerable to counter-attacks if they do run
upfield.

Fullbacks Fullbacks will invariably stay in the


defensive half of the field, although they
can venture into the midfield or forward
positions if there is room and opportunity to
do so. There are traditionally a high and low
fullback in field hockey – one who will
mark the opposition centre-forward or
striker, and the other will mark any roving
or break-away players.

Goalkeeper Usually stay within the goal-circle, which is


the only place they are allowed to use their
body to play the ball. If a keeper leaves the
circle, they are only able to play the ball
with their stick. The goalkeeper’s main
focus is to stop the ball from crossing the
goal line.
Figure 3

Figure 4

Figure 5

Figure 6
3.0 BACKGROUND OF THE TEAM

 Females hockey athletes


 Represent UiTM Negeri Sembilan for KARISMA 2019
 Represent by 3 branch such as UiTM Seremban 3, UiTM Kuala Pilah and UiTM
Rembau
 Range age between 18 years old to 22 years old

ATHLETE’S PROFILE

NO. NAME AGE POSITION


1. ARISSA NAJIHAH BT ABD MAJID @ 22 TOP STRIKER
RAZALI
2. AQILAH QISTINA BINTI NADI @ 20 RIGHT WINGER
LATIF
3. HALIMATUN NAJIHAH BT ASRI 20 DEFEND
4. HUSNA NAZIRAH BT HASIM 18 TOP DEFEND
5. NOOR SYAZANA IZZATI BT MOHD 21 LEFT WINGER
AZMI
6. NUR ALIA NATASHA BT MOHD 22 DEFEND
7. MAWAZINI AZWA BT MOHD FITRI 20 DEFEND
8. NASUHA BT IMRAN 22 FOWARD
9. NUR HANIS BT AHMAD 21 MIDFIELD
10 NUR ILLYA MAISARAH BT 18 FOWARD
MOHAMAD ZULKIFLI
11 NURUL MARDHIAH BT 20 DEFEND
KHAIRUNIZAM
12 NURUL QAMARINA BT ROSTAM 18 FOWARD
13 NURUL FARZANA BT MOHAMAD 20 FOWARD
FAUZI
4.0 PERIODIZATION

Periodization can be defined as a training plan, whereby peak performance is brought


about through the potential of biomotors and the management of fatigue and
accommodation (Anthony Turner,2011). The basic principle of periodization is a shift
from an emphasis of high volume (exercises x sets x repetitions) and low intensity (percent
of maximum effort) training to low volume and high intensity training. The goal of
periodization is to maximize the potential of the athlete to reach peak condition by
manipulating both training volume and training intensity (Jay R. Hoffman, nd)

4 years training program such as Olympic Games will called as quadrennial training
plan and one competition season season per year will called as monocycle. The training
year is divided into distinct phases known as mesocycles. Each mesocycle relates to a
change in the volume and intensity of training, and may last for 2 – 3 months depending
upon the athlete. Typically each mesocycle reflects a specific training emphasis for that
phase of training. Bicycle is two competition season per year and tricycle is three
competition season per year.

According to Bomba and Haff (2009), 2 major phases of periodization the preparatory
phase and the competitive phase. The preparatory phase has divided into two which is
general phase and sport specific phase. The objective for general phase is to improve the
athlete’s work capacity and maximize adaptations in preparation for future workloads
(Bomba and Haff, 2009). The objective for sport specific phase is to improve and focus on
the skills. For the competition phase, the training must include tactical and sport specific
fitness. The intensity must be maintained during this phase.