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CITY SCHOOLS DIVISION OF TAYABAS

Tayabas City

LESSON EXEMPLAR
Grade 9-English

Quarter: THIRD
Theme: Connecting to the World
Sub-Theme: Through Technology

Content Standard: Performance Standard:


The learner demonstrates understanding The learner skillfully performs in one-act
of how Anglo-American literature and play through utilizing effective verbal and
other text types serve as means of non-verbal strategies and ICT resources
connecting to the world; also how to use based on the following criteria: Focus,
ways of analyzing one-act play and Voice, Delivery, and Dramatic
different forms of verbals for him/her too Conventions.
skillfully perform in a one-act play.

I. LEARNING COMPETENCY
EN9WC-IIIa-9: Compose forms of literary writing
EN9LC-IIIi-8.2: Judge the relevance and worth of information/ideas

Objectives:
1. Analyze the meaning and message of the poem
2. View an informative video clip and extract information from it
3. Compose an acrostic poem about the given topic
4. Relate poem content to particular social issues, concerns, or dispositions in
real life regarding the use of telephone and other technologies

II. LEARNING CONTENT


Lesson: “The Telephone” by Edward Field
Materials:
1. Laptop
2. Projector/Monitor
3. Speaker
References:
1. K to 12 Curriculum Guide (May 2016) p. 206, 208
2. A Journey through Anglo-American Literature Learner‘s Material for English
pp. 236-239
3. Online References

III. LEARNING TASKS


Introduction: How do you imagine the world without telephone?
Preliminary Activity:
TASK 1: THE TELEPHONE AND ITS BEGINNING
1. The students will be asked to watch a video about the telephone‘s short
history.

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrLObtDvsa8

2. Guide Question:
 Who invented the telephone?
 When was the first phone call?
 How was the first telephone invented?

Activity:
TASK 2: THE TELEPHONE AND ITS IMPORTANCE

Pair Work:

1. Work with a partner.

2. Interview each other on


what one thinks is the
greatest importance of
a telephone.

3. Write a one-sentence
answer of your partner
in the speech bubble.

Analysis:
TASK 3: BREAKING BARRIERS
Listen carefully as your teacher reads the poem, ―The Telephone‖ by Edward
Field. Then, read it with your partner. (LM in English, p.237)
The Telephone
by Edward Field
My happiness depends on an electric appliance
And I do not mind giving it so much credit
With life in this city being what it is
Each person separated from friends
By a tangle of subways and buses
Yes my telephone is my joy
It tells me that I am in the world and wanted
It rings and I am alerted to love or gossip
I go comb my hair which begins to sparkle
Without it I was like a bear in a cave
Drowsing through a shadowy winter
It rings and spring has come
I stretch and amble out into the sunshine
Hungry again as I pick up the receiver
For the human voice and the good news of friends
*Source: "The Telephone" by Edward Field, from Counting Myself Lucky. © Black Sparrow Press, 1992.

TASK 4: BONDING TOGETHER


Students work in five (5) groups to discuss the message of the poem. (LM, pp. 238-239)
GRATITUDE
My happiness depends on an electric appliance
Group 1
And I do not mind giving it so much credit

1. What is the predominant feeling of the speaker in these


lines?
2. Why does he feel that way?

OBSTACLE
Group 2 With life in this city being what it is
Each person separated from friends

1. Why are friends disconnected?

PLEASURE
Yes my telephone is my joy
Group 3 It tells me that I am in the world and wanted
It rings and I am alerted to love or gossip
I go comb my hair which begins to sparkle

1. How does the speaker justify his joy of having a


telephone?

SPRING
Without it I was like a bear in a cave
Group 4 Drowsing through a shadowy winter
It rings and spring has come
1. To what does the speaker compare man‘s situation
before the advent of the telephone?
2. What value do people give to the telephone when he
has the access to it?
3. What literary device is used here?

CONNNECTION
I stretch and amble out into the sunshine
Group 5 Hungry again as I pick up the receiver
For the human voice and the good news of friends

1. What does the speaker hunger for? Is he capable of


connecting to the world? Explain.
Abstraction:
TASK 5: PRO’S AND CON’S OF TELEPHONE USE

Although telephone proves to have a lot of benefits, there are still drawbacks in
its use. Use the diagram to list the advantages and disadvantages of using a
phone.

ADVANTAGES DISADVANTAGES

Application:
TASK 6: FUN IN ACROSTIC
Now that you have explored the wonders and downside of a telephone and its
use, create an acrostic poem featuring your own version of ―The Telephone‖.

E
WRITING AN ACROSTIC POEM RUBRIC
Criteria Exceeding Meeting Approaching Below
Standards Standards Standards Standards
4pts. 3pts. 2pts. 1pt.
Meaning and Poem is creative and Poem is thoughtful
Most of the poem is
original. It is evident and creative. A Poems appear to be
Originality that the poet put couple of phrases or
creative, but appears
thoughtless or rushed.
to be rushed. This is
thought into their ideas may be Work is very
evident in the poet's
words and uniquely revisited, but the repetitive, and ideas
redundancy or use of
conveyed their ideas overall product is are unoriginal.
cliches.
and emotions. carefully written.
Sensory Details Vivid, detailed
images and intensely Clear sensory images
Some use of image, Difficult to visualize
felt emotion make are used to portray
idea, or emotion image or emotion
the poem come ideas or emotions
alive.
Form The poem is The poem is written in The poem is The poem is not
complete and follows its proper forms with a somewhat written in written in its proper
its intended form. few mistakes. its proper form. form.
Grammar A couple of spelling
Proper use of English There are numerous
or grammar mistakes The poet's intended
spelling and grammar spelling or grammar
are evident, but do meaning is confusing
is used consistently errors, making the
not diminish the by several spelling or
throughout each poems difficult to
meaning of the grammar errors.
poem. Punctuation is understand.
poem. Punctuation is Punctuation may be
utilized when Punctuation is used
utilized when misused.
necessary. incorrectly.
necessary.
Source: http://www.rcampus.com/rubricshowc.cfm?sp=yes&code=J2359Bhttp://www.rcampus.com/rubricshowc.
cfm?sp=yes&code=J2359B

Assessment:
Students with best outputs will share their work to the class.
CITY SCHOOLS DIVISION OF TAYABAS
Tayabas City

LESSON EXEMPLAR
Grade 9-English

Quarter: THIRD
Theme: Connecting to the World
Sub-Theme: Through Technology

Content Standard: Performance Standard:


The learner demonstrates understanding The learner skillfully performs in one-act
of how Anglo-American literature and play through utilizing effective verbal and
other text types serve as means of non-verbal strategies and ICT resources
connecting to the world; also how to use based on the following criteria: Focus,
ways of analyzing one-act play and Voice, Delivery, and Dramatic
different forms of verbals for him/her too Conventions.
skillfully perform in a one-act play.

I. LEARNING COMPETENCY
EN9LT-IIIa-16: Analyze literature as a means of connecting to the world
EN9LC-IIId-6.5: Provide appropriate and critical feedback/reaction to a specific
context or situation

Objectives:
1. Analyze the radio play and relate it to actual experiences in the modern
world
2. Listen to the radio play and share thoughts regarding the values gained
from the text
3. Create infographics and disseminate information to the community
4. Share insights, feedback, and reaction to given situations that require
critical processing

II. LEARNING CONTENT


Lesson: “Sorry, Wrong Number” (A Radio Play) by Lucille Fletcher
Materials:
1. Laptop
2. Projector/Monitor
3. Speaker
References:
1. K to 12 Curriculum Guide (May 2016) pp. 206-207
2. A Journey through Anglo-American Literature Learner‘s Material for English
pp. 240-253
3. Online References
III. LEARNING TASKS
Introduction: How do you respond to emergency situations? How willing are you
to help others caught in emergency situations?

Preliminary Activity:
TASK 1: LOOKING UP
How do you respond to an emergency situation? Whom do you call for help?
Group Work:
In strips of paper are critical situations. Present the situation in a role play
(maximum of 3 minutes) and focus on depicting your solution if you‘ll be
confronted with such. (LM, p. 235)

Somebody
A woman’s in fear and in
Your
purse is snatched panic calls on
neighbor’s
in front of you your cell phone
house is on fire.
inside a jeepney. asking for your
help.

Your mother A hazardous


complains of chemical in the
dizziness and falls Chemistry Lab spills
to the ground producing smoke
unconscious. and a suffocating
scent.

ROLE PLAY RUBRIC

Exceptional Admirable Acceptable Attempted


Criteria
4pts. 3pts. 2pts. 1pt.

Understanding  Indicates a clear  Good


 Fair understanding  Presentation is off
of Topic understanding of understanding of
of topic topic
topic topic

 All members  Some members  Few members  Group does not


Cooperation contribute by contribute by contribute by work together in
playing role well playing role well playing role well playing their roles

 Shows confidence  Shows some


 Unsure of
 Informative confidence  Portrayal stalls
responsibility
 Entertaining;  Presents some  Lacks information
 Somewhat
engages information  Audience bored
Presentation audience  Engages
informative
 Mumbles
 Engages audience
 Speaks loudly and audience  Body language is
intermittently
clearly  Can be heard lacking;
 Hard to hear
 Appropriate use of  Some use of body inappropriate
 Some movement
body language language
Source: cte.sfasu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/Skit.doc
Activity:

TASK 2: MUSIC CORNER

Listen to the song Reach Out by Take That.


Interpret the message of the song.

Source:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8tszVim_dk

TASK 3: TOUCHING YOU, TOUCHING ME

View the powerpoint slides to be presented by the teacher and respond to it by


interpreting the meaning expressed in the song ―Reach Out‖ by Take That.
(LM, p.236)

SLIDE 1
________________________________________
________________________________________
________________________________________

SLIDE 2
________________________________________
________________________________________
________________________________________

SLIDE 3
________________________________________
________________________________________
________________________________________

SLIDE 4
________________________________________
________________________________________
________________________________________

SLIDE 5
________________________________________
________________________________________
________________________________________

Analysis:
TASK 4: LISTENING HUB

Listen to the radio excerpt as you read along the


copy of the script in your Learner‘s Material on
pages 240-251.

Source:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_uDmNc8j9gA

TASK 5: COMPREHENSION CHECK


A. Crossing Difficulties
Give the meaning of the underlined words in these sentences.
Choose your answers from the synonyms in the box. (LM, p.252)
bossy complaining soft tolerant demoralize overbearing
1. Mrs. Stevenson is identified as a querulous and self-centered neurotic.
2. She became imperious when she could not connect to the number she
dialed.
3. When she dialed again, she only got a bland buzzing signal and heard the
conversation on the cross line.
4. The telephone operator‘s failed attempts to connect to her husband‘s office
number unnerved her.
5. She gave a highhanded reply when she answered Sgt. Duffy did not take
action on her complaint.

B. Tracking of Events
Arrange the events according to their occurrence in the play. Enter your
answer in the box. (LM, p. 252)
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
a. She accidentally overheard a conversation between two men planning
murder.
b. Desperate to prevent the crime, she began a series of calls – to the
operator, to the police, and others.
c. Mrs. Stevenson is an invalid confined to her bed and her only life line was
the telephone.
d. One night, while she was waiting for her husband to return home, she
picked up the phone and called his office.
e. Her conversation with Sgt. Duffy made her realize the description of the
crime scene and victim.
C. Discovering Traits
Describe the characters by putting traits on the strands. (LM, p.253)

Mrs.
Stevenson

Sgt.
Duffy

Abstraction:
TASK 6: FIRMING UP
Answer the following questions. (LM, p. 253)
1. Which parts of the story can you find heightened
tension and suspense? Which is its effect on you?
2. Was Mrs. Stevenson able to connect to get help? How?
3. Would you be willing enough to face danger just to help
somebody in trouble? Explain your answer.

TASK 7: GETTING THE CHILL


1. Think of Filipino horror or suspense movies
that you have watched and enjoyed.
2. Enter the movie title on the first column and
write on the second column the word to
describe their effect on you: suspenseful,
frightening, horrifying, terrifying.

CHILL FACTOR CHART


Movie Effect
Application:
TASK 8: MOCK RADIO PLAY

Each group will be assigned a portion of the Sorry,


Wrong Number‘s script. They are to perform the
radio drama.
Group 1: pp. 240-242
Group 2: pp. 243-244
Group 3: pp. 245-246
Group 4: pp. 247-248
Group 5: pp. 249-251

MOCK RADIO PLAY RUBRIC


Criteria 4pts. 3pts. 2pts. 1pt.
All vocals are clear
The majority of Less than half of the
and easy to Most vocals are not
vocals are clear vocals are clear
Clarity understand
and easy to and easy to
clear and easy to
throughout the understand.
understand. understand.
entire radio play.
Most vocals are at Less than half of the Most vocals are not
All vocals are at an
an appropriate vocals are at an at an appropriate
appropriate volume
Volume throughout the
volume throughout appropriate volume volume throughout
the entire radio throughout the the entire radio
entire radio play.
play. entire radio play. play.
All music and sound Most music and Some music and Most music and
effects enhance sound effects sound effects sound effects
Music/ the overall radio enhance the distract from the distract from the
Sound Effects play in a positive overall radio play in main content of the main content of the
way. a positive way. radio play. radio play
The play is not very There is little to no
The play is told and
The play shows original and little originality or
performed in an
Originality interesting and
some originality creative storytelling creativity in the
and creativity. is done or presentation of the
creativity way.
attempted. play.
Students indicate a
Some Characterization is
strong character.
characterization is lacking for the most
Vocal choices are Very little
heard and part or not
specific, well characterization is
Characters thought out and
attempted. Some apparent. Little to
heard or
good vocal no vocal choices
applicable for attempted.
choices are made are made or
chosen
and presented. attempted.
character(s).
Group members Group members Group members Little expression is
Vocal are vocally are vocally are vocally attempted or heard
Expression expressive expressive for the expressive some of from group
throughout. most part. the time. members.
Presentation is for
Presentation is well The presentation is The presentation is
the most part well
put together, well put together completed, but
Presentation organized and
put together,
and organized but poorly ordered and
organized and
professional. inconsistently. put together
professional.
Source: https://mkistheatreanddrama.wikispaces.com/file/view/Radio+Play+Rubric.pdf

Assessment:
TASK 9: COMMUNITY INFORMANTS
Group Mission:
1. To create an infographic informing the public about
local hotlines to contact during emergency
situations;
2. Post or distribute the infographics to members of the
community (e.g. relatives, friend, neighbors); and,
3. Provide evidence of information dissemination by
taking pictures
Sample Infographics

Source: http://www.mommypracticality.
com/2012/08/MonsoonEmergency
PH.html

Source: https://kalongkong.wordpress.com/2012/08/07/pub
lic-service-emergency-hotlines-in-the-philippines/

Research. Make sure not to fabricate information.


Conduct research on the contact information of
the local agencies.

Be creative. Use your design and page layout


skills and creativity to come up with a catchy
infographic.

Take part. Keep in mind


your responsibilities as a
community member and
accomplish your task from
there.
INFOGRAPHIC RUBRIC

Exceeds
Meets Expectations Needs More Work
Component Expectations
3pts. 1pt.
5pts.
Data Visualization The data visualization
The data visualization Other data visualization
formats chosen showcase
formats chosen make the formats should be chosen
the data, but some may
data presented easy for the to best showcase the data
make it difficult for the
viewer to understand the presentation for the viewer`
viewer to understand the
information.
points.
Fonts The infographic includes an
The infographic includes The font(s) used in the
appropriate font to both
multiple fonts and/or the infographic make the text
complement the content
fonts do not seem related almost unreadable.
and make the text
to the infographics topic.
readable.
Colors The color choices enhance
The color choices for the
the visibility of the The color choices are fine,
infographic are not visually
infographic. Different but too many colors may
pleasing and detract from
saturations of the same have been used.
the infographic.
color are used wisely.
Layout The layout of the The layout of the
The infographic is lacking
infographic adheres to the infographic includes all
one or two of the
inverted pyramid style - three components - main
components of good
main point on top, point, secondary point, and
infographic design - main
secondary point next, and supporting details - but is
point, secondary point, or
supporting details at the not organized in the
supporting details.
bottom. inverted pyramid style.
Objects Some objects included in
The objects included in the
the infographic are Too many different types of
infographic are repeated
repeated but the objects are used in the
to support various data
infographic did not seem to infographic and that makes
points and to make it easier
include enough repeated it hard for the viewer to
for the viewer to
elements to make it understand the content.
understand the infographic.
understandable.
Source: http://www.schrockguide.net/uploads/3/9/2/2/392267/schrock_infographic_rubric.pdf
SORRY, WRONG NUMBER
Copy of the Script

SOUND: NUMBER BEING DIALED ON TELEPHONE -- THEN A BUSY SIGNAL

MRS. STEVENSON: (A QUERULOUS, SELF-CENTERED NEUROTIC) Oh -- dear ... !

SOUND: SLAMS DOWN RECEIVER IMPATIENTLY AND DIALS OPERATOR ... RINGS FOUR TIMES

OPERATOR: (ON FILTER) Your call, please?

MRS. STEVENSON: Operator, I've been dialing Murray Hill 7-0093 now for the last three quarters of
an hour and the line is always busy. I don't see how it could be busy that long. Will you try it for
me, please?

OPERATOR: (ON FILTER) I will be glad to try that number for you. One moment, please.

SOUND: OPERATOR DIALS NUMBER UNDER FOLLOWING

MRS. STEVENSON: (RAMBLING, FULL OF SELF-PITY) I don't see how it could be busy all this time. It's
my husband's office. He's working late tonight, and I'm all alone here in the house. My health is
very poor and I've been feeling so nervous all day.

OPERATOR: (ON FILTER) Ringing Murray Hill 7-0093.

SOUND: TELEPHONE RINGING ... ALL CLEAR ... MRS. STEVENSON SIGHS IN RELIEF ... RINGS FOUR
TIMES ... THE RECEIVER IS PICKED UP AT THE OTHER END

MAN'S VOICE: (FILTER) (HEAVY, TOUGH VOICE) Hello?

MRS. STEVENSON: Hello...? (A LITTLE PUZZLED) Hello. Is - is Mr. Stevenson there?

MAN'S VOICE: (AS THOUGH HE HAD NOT HEARD) Hello? (LOUDER) Hello?

2ND MAN'S VOICE: (FILTER) (ALSO OVER TELEPHONE BUT FARTHER AWAY ... A VERY DISTINCTIVE
QUALITY) Hello.

1ST MAN: Hello. George?

GEORGE: Yes, sir. This is George speaking.

MRS. STEVENSON: (LOUDER AND MORE IMPERIOUS) Hello. Who's this? What number am I calling,
please?

1ST MAN: I'm here with our client.

GEORGE: (PLEASED) Oh ... good. Is everything okay? Is the coast clear for tonight?

1ST MAN: Yeah, George. He says the coast is clear for tonight.

GEORGE: Okay, okay.

1ST MAN: Where are you now?

GEORGE: In a phone booth. Don't worry. Everything's okay.

1ST MAN: Very well. You know the address?

GEORGE: Yeah, yeah, I know. At eleven o'clock the private patrolman goes around to the bar
on Second Avenue for a beer.

1ST MAN: That's right. At eleven o'clock.

GEORGE: I will make sure that all the lights downstairs are out.

1ST MAN: There should be only one light, visible from the street.
GEORGE: Yeah, yeah, I know. At eleven-fifteen a train crosses the bridge. It makes a noise, in
case her window's open and she should scream.

MRS. STEVENSON: (SHOCKED) Oh! ... Hello? What number is this, please?

GEORGE: Okay. I understand, I tell you. That's eleven-fifteen, the train.

1ST MAN: Yeah. You remember everything else, George?

GEORGE: Yeah, yeah, I make it quick. As little blood as possible ...

MRS. STEVENSON: (GASPS IN HORROR)

GEORGE: ... because ... (AS IF AMUSED) our client does not wish to make her suffer long.

1ST MAN: That's right. You'll use a knife?

GEORGE: Yes. A knife will be okay. And afterwards I remove the rings and the bracelets and the
jewelry in the bureau drawer. Because ... our client wishes it to look like simple robbery. Don't
worry. Everything's okay. I never ma--

SOUND: THE CONVERSATION IS SUDDENLY CUT OFF ... AGAIN, MRS. STEVENSON HEARS A
PERSISTENT BUZZING SIGNAL

MRS. STEVENSON: (CLICKING PHONE) Oh... ! Oh, how awful. How unspeakably awful!

SOUND: SHE HANGS UP, THEN PICKS UP PHONE AND DIALS, MUMBLING "OPERATOR" TO HERSELF,
AMONG OTHER THINGS ... RING THRICE

OPERATOR: (FILTER) Your call, please?

MRS. STEVENSON: (UNNERVED AND BREATHLESS) Operator, I've just been cut off.

OPERATOR: (FILTER) I'm sorry. What number were you calling?

MRS. STEVENSON: (RAPIDLY) Why, it was supposed to be Murray Hill 7-0093 but it wasn't. Some
wires must have crossed -- I was cut into a wrong number and I -- I - I've just heard the most
dreadful thing -- something about a - a murder and -- operator, you simply have to retrace that
call at once!

OPERATOR: (FILTER) I beg your pardon? May I help you?

MRS. STEVENSON: (FRANTIC) Oh, I know it was a wrong number, and I had no business listening,
but these two men -- they were cold-blooded fiends -- and they were going to murder
somebody, some poor innocent woman, who was all alone in a house near a bridge and we've
got to stop them -- we've got to --

OPERATOR: (FILTER) (PATIENTLY) Uh, what number were you calling, please?

MRS. STEVENSON: Well, that doesn't matter. This was a wrong number. And you dialed it for me.
And we've got to find out what it was immediately!

OPERATOR: (FILTER) What number did you call?

MRS. STEVENSON: Oh, why are you so stupid? What time is it? Do you mean to tell me you can't
find out what that number was just now?

OPERATOR: (FILTER) I'll connect you with the Chief Operator.

MRS. STEVENSON: Oh, I think it's perfectly shameful. Now, look. Look -- it was obviously a case of
some little slip of the finger. I told you to try Murray Hill 7-0093 for me. You dialed it but your finger
must have slipped and I was connected with some other number -- and I could hear them, but
they couldn't hear me. Now, I - I - I simply fail to see why you couldn't make that same mistake
again on purpose -- why you couldn't try to dial Murray Hill 7-0093 in the same sort of careless
way --

OPERATOR: (FILTER) Murray Hill 7-0093?


MRS. STEVENSON: Yes!

OPERATOR: (FILTER) I'll try to get it for you.

MRS. STEVENSON: Well, thank you.

SOUND: OPERATOR DIALS -- THEN THE BUSY SIGNAL

OPERATOR: (FILTER) I'm sorry. Murray Hill 7-0093 is busy. I'll call you in twenty minutes--

MRS. STEVENSON: (FRANTICALLY CLICKING RECEIVER) Operator! Operator! Operator! Operator!

OPERATOR: (FILTER) Your call, please?

MRS. STEVENSON: You didn't try to get that wrong number at all. I asked you explicitly and all you
did was dial correctly.

OPERATOR: (FILTER) I'm sorry. What number are you calling?

MRS. STEVENSON: Well, can't you, for once, forget what number I'm calling and do something for
me? Now I want to trace that call. It's my civic duty and it's your civic duty to trace that call and
to apprehend those dangerous killers -- and if you won't...

OPERATOR: (FILTER) I will connect you with the Chief Operator.

MRS. STEVENSON: Please!

SOUND: RINGS FOUR TIMES

MRS. STEVENSON: (UNDER HER BREATH) Oh, dear ...

SOUND: THE PHONE PICKS UP

CHIEF OPERATOR: (FILTER) This is the Chief Operator.

MRS. STEVENSON: Oh, uh, Chief Operator. I want you to trace a call, a telephone call,
immediately. I don't know where it came from, or who was making it, but it's absolutely
necessary that it be tracked down. Because it was about a murder that someone's planning -- a
terrible, cold-blooded murder of a poor innocent woman, tonight, at eleven-fifteen.

CHIEF OPERATOR: (FILTER) I see.

MRS. STEVENSON: (HIGH-STRUNG, DEMANDING) Well, can you trace it for me? Can you track
down those men?

CHIEF OPERATOR: (FILTER) I'm not certain. It depends.

MRS. STEVENSON: Depends on what?

CHIEF OPERATOR: It depends on whether the call is still going on. If it's a live call, we can trace it
on the equipment. If it's been disconnected, we can't.

MRS. STEVENSON: Disconnected?

CHIEF OPERATOR: (FILTER) If the parties have stopped talking to each other.

MRS. STEVENSON: Oh, but of course they must have stopped talking to each other by now. That
was at least five minutes ago and they didn't sound like the type who would make a long call.

CHIEF OPERATOR: (FILTER) Well -- I can try tracing it. May I have your name, please?

MRS. STEVENSON: Mrs. Stevenson. Mrs. Elbert Stevenson. But, listen --

CHIEF OPERATOR: (FILTER) (INTERRUPTING) And your telephone number, please?

MRS. STEVENSON: Plaza 4-2295. But if you go on wasting all this time --

CHIEF OPERATOR: (FILTER) Why do you want this call traced, please?
MRS. STEVENSON: Wha--? I-- Well -- no reason. I - I mean, I merely felt very strongly that something
ought to be done about it. These men sounded like killers -- they're dangerous, they're going to
murder this woman at eleven-fifteen tonight and I thought the police ought to know.

CHIEF OPERATOR: (FILTER) Have you reported this to the police?

MRS. STEVENSON: Well ... No. Not yet.

CHIEF OPERATOR: (FILTER) You want this call checked purely as a private individual?

MRS. STEVENSON: Yes, yes. But meanwhile --

CHIEF OPERATOR: (FILTER) I'm sorry, Mrs. Stevenson, but I'm afraid we couldn't make this check for
you and trace the call just on your say-so as a private individual. We'd have to have something
more official.

MRS. STEVENSON: Oh, for heaven's sake. You mean to tell me I can't report that there's gonna be
a murder without getting tied up in all this red tape? Why, it's perfectly idiotic! (BEAT) Well, all
right. I'll call the police.

CHIEF OPERATOR: (FILTER) Thank you. I'm sure that would be the best way to--

SOUND: SHE SLAMS DOWN THE RECEIVER

MRS. STEVENSON: Ridiculous! Perfectly ridiculous!

SOUND: SHE DIALS THE OPERATOR ... RINGS FIVE TIMES

MRS. STEVENSON: (UNDER HER BREATH) The thought of it! ... I can't see why I have to go to all this
trouble... (IMPATIENT AT THE THIRD RING) Oh ...!

SOUND: OPERATOR FINALLY PICKS UP

OPERATOR: (FILTER) Your call, please?

MRS. STEVENSON: The Police Department. Get me the Police Department -- please!

OPERATOR: (FILTER) Thank you.

SOUND: OPERATOR DIALS

MRS. STEVENSON: (FRUSTRATED) Oh, dear! Do you have to dial? Can't you ring them direct?

OPERATOR: (FILTER) Ringing the Police Department.

SOUND: RINGS THREE TIMES ... MRS. STEVENSON KEEPS MUTTERING UNDER HER BREATH

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) (BORED WITH HIS NIGHT DUTY ASSIGNMENT) Police Station, Precinct
43, Sergeant Martin speaking.

MRS. STEVENSON: Police Department? Ah, this is Mrs. Stevenson -- Mrs. Elbert Smythe Stevenson
of 53 North Sutton Place. I'm calling up to report a murder. I mean (FUMBLING FOR WORDS) -- the
murder hasn't been committed yet but I just overheard plans for it over the telephone -- over a
wrong number that the operator gave me. I've been trying to trace down the call myself -- but
everybody is so stupid -- and I guess in the end you're the only people who can do anything.

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) (NOT TOO IMPRESSED BY ALL THIS) Yes, ma'am.

MRS. STEVENSON: (TRYING TO IMPRESS HIM) It was a perfectly definite murder. I heard their plans
distinctly. Two men were talking and they were going to murder some woman at eleven-fifteen
tonight. She lived in a house near a bridge. (BEAT) Are - are you listening to me?

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) Yes. Uh, yes, ma'am.

MRS. STEVENSON: And there was a private patrolman on the street. He was going to go around
for a beer on Second Avenue. And there was some third man -- a client who was paying to
have this poor woman murdered. They were going to take her rings and bracelets and - and use
a knife... Well -- it - it's unnerved me dreadfully -- (REACHING THE BREAKING POINT) -- and I'm not
well -- and I feel so nerv--

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) I see. (STOLIDLY) When was all this, ma'am?

MRS. STEVENSON: About eight minutes ago. (RELIEVED) Then - then you can do something? You
do understand --

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) What is your name, ma'am?

MRS. STEVENSON: (IMPATIENT) Mrs. Stevenson. Mrs. Elbert Stevenson.

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) And your address?

MRS. STEVENSON: 53 North Sutton Place. Five-three North Sutton Place. That's near a bridge. The
Queensboro Bridge, you know and -- and - and we have a private patrolman on our street...
and Second Avenue --

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) And what was that number you were calling?

MRS. STEVENSON: Murray Hill 7-0093. But that wasn't the number I overheard. I mean Murray Hill 7-
0093 is my husband's office. He's working late tonight and I was trying to reach him to ask him to
come home. I'm an invalid, you know, and it's the maid's night off and I hate to be alone, even
though he says I'm perfectly safe as long as I have the telephone right beside my bed.

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) (STOLIDLY) Well, we'll look into it, Mrs. Stevenson, and see if we can
check it with the telephone company.

MRS. STEVENSON: (GETTING IMPATIENT) But the telephone company said they couldn't check the
call if the parties had stopped talking. I've already taken care of that!

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) (A FAINT HINT OF SARCASM) Oh, you have?

MRS. STEVENSON: (HIGH-HANDED) Yes. And, personally, I feel you ought to do something far
more immediate and drastic than just check the call. What good does checking the call do if
they've stopped talking? By the time you tracked it down they'll already have committed the
murder.

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) (GIVING HER THE "BRUSH OFF") Well, we'll take care of it. Don't you
worry.

MRS. STEVENSON: Well, I'd say the whole thing calls for a search, a complete and thorough
search of the whole city. Now, I'm very near the bridge and I'm not far from Second Avenue --
and I know I'd feel a whole lot better if you sent around a radio car to this neighborhood at
once!

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) And what makes you think the murder's going to be committed in
your neighborhood, ma'am?

MRS. STEVENSON: Well, I -- Oh, I don't know. Only the coincidence is so horrible. Second Avenue -
- the patrolman -- the bridge.

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) Second Avenue is a very long street, ma'am. And you know how
many bridges there are in the city of New York alone?

MRS. STEVENSON: Yes, I know--

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) Not to mention Brooklyn, Staten Island, Queens, and the Bronx.

MRS. STEVENSON: I know that!

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) How do you know there isn't some little house on Staten Island on
some little Second Avenue you've never even heard about? How do you know they're even
talking about New York at all?

MRS. STEVENSON: But I heard the call on the New York dialing system.

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) Maybe it was a long-distance call you overheard.


MRS. STEVENSON: Oh, don't--

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) Telephones are funny things. Look, lady, why don't you look at it this
way? Supposing you hadn't broken in on that telephone call? Supposing you'd got your
husband the way you always do. You wouldn't be so upset, would you?

MRS. STEVENSON: Well, no, I suppose not. Only it sounded so inhuman -- so cold-blooded.

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) A lot of murders are plotted in this city every day, ma'am. We
manage to prevent almost all of 'em.

MRS. STEVENSON: But--

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) But a clue of this kind is so vague -- it isn't much more use to us than
no clue at all.

MRS. STEVENSON: But, surely, you --

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) Unless, of course, you have some reason for thinking this call was
phony and -- that someone may be planning to murder you.

MRS. STEVENSON: Me? Oh -- oh, no -- no, I hardly think so. I -- I mean, why should anybody? I'm
alone all day and night. I see nobody except my maid, Eloise, and -- she's a big girl, she weighs
two hundred pounds -- she's too lazy to bring up my breakfast tray and -- the only other person is
my husband, Elbert. He's crazy about me -- he - he just adores me. He waits on me hand and
foot. He's scarcely left my side since I took sick, well, twelve years ago....

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) Well, then, there's nothing for you to worry about. Now, if you'll just
leave the rest of this to us, we'll take care of it.

MRS. STEVENSON: (NOT COMPLETELY MOLLIFIED) But what will you do? It's so late ... it's nearly
eleven now!

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) (MORE FIRMLY) We'll take care of it, lady.

MRS. STEVENSON: Will you broadcast it all over the city? And send out squads? And warn your
radio cars to watch out -- especially in suspicious neighborhoods like mine --

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) Lady, I said we'd take care of it. Just now I've got a couple of other
matters here on my desk that require immediate attention. Good night, ma'am, and thank you.

MRS. STEVENSON: Oh, you--! You--!

SOUND: SHE SLAMS DOWN THE RECEIVER HARD

MRS. STEVENSON: Idiot! Oh, now, why did I hang up the phone like that? He'll think I am a fool!
(PAUSE) Oh -- why doesn't Elbert come home? Why doesn't he? Why doesn't he come home?

SOUND: SHE SOBS, MUTTERS, AND DIALS THE OPERATOR ... RINGS FIVE TIMES

OPERATOR: (FILTER) Your call, please?

MRS. STEVENSON: Operator, for heaven's sake, will you ring that Murray Hill 7-0093 number
again? I can't think what's keeping him so long!

OPERATOR: (FILTER) I will try it for you.

SOUND: OPERATOR DIALS UNDER FOLLOWING

MRS. STEVENSON: Well, try! Try! (TO HERSELF) I don't see why he doesn't answer it...

SOUND: BUSY SIGNAL

OPERATOR: (FILTER) I'm sorry. Murray Hill 7-0093 is busy. I will--

MRS. STEVENSON: (NASTY) I can hear it. You don't have to tell me. I know it's busy...

SOUND: SHE SLAMS DOWN THE RECEIVER AND SIGHS


MRS. STEVENSON: (NERVOUSLY QUERULOUS) If I could only ... get out of this bed for a little while. If
I could get a breath of fresh air, just lean out the window and see the street ...

SOUND: THE PHONE BELL RINGS ... SHE PICKS IT UP INSTANTLY

MRS. STEVENSON: Hello, Elbert? Hello? Hello? Hello?! Oh, what's the matter with this phone?
HELLO! HELLO!

SOUND: SHE SLAMS DOWN THE RECEIVER ... A SECOND'S PAUSE ... THE PHONE RINGS AGAIN,
ONCE ... SHE PICKS IT UP

MRS. STEVENSON: Hello? Hell--? Oh, for heaven's sake, who is this? Hello, Hello, HELLO!

SOUND: SHE SLAMS DOWN RECEIVER

MRS. STEVENSON: (TO HERSELF) Oh, who's trying to call me ... ?

SOUND: DIALS OPERATOR ... RINGS FOUR TIMES

MRS. STEVENSON: (TO HERSELF, ON THE SECOND RING) Why doesn't she answer?

OPERATOR: (FILTER) Your call, please?

MRS. STEVENSON: Hello, Operator, I don't know what's the matter with this telephone tonight, but
it's positively driving me crazy. I've never seen such inefficient, miserable service. Now, now, look.
I'm an invalid, and I'm very nervous, and I'm not supposed to be annoyed. But if this keeps on
much longer...

OPERATOR: (FILTER) What seems to be the trouble, please?

MRS. STEVENSON: Well, everything's wrong! I haven't had one bit of satisfaction out of one call
I've made this evening! The whole world could be murdered for all you people care. And now
my phone keeps ringing and ringing and ringing and ringing every five seconds and when I pick
it up there's no one there!

OPERATOR: (FILTER) I'm sorry. If you will hang up, I will test it for you.

MRS. STEVENSON: I don't want you to test it for me! I want you to put that call through, whatever
it is, at once!

OPERATOR: (FILTER) I'm afraid I cannot do that.

MRS. STEVENSON: You can't?!? And why -- why, may I ask?

OPERATOR: (FILTER) The dial system is automatic.

MRS. STEVENSON: (GASPS IN EXASPERATION)

OPERATOR: (FILTER) If someone is trying to dial your number, there is no way to check it if the call
is coming through the system or not -- unless the person who's trying to reach you complains to
his particular operator.

MRS. STEVENSON: Well, of all the stupid -- and meanwhile I've got to sit here in my bed, suffering
every time that phone rings, imagining everything ...

OPERATOR: (FILTER) I will try to check the trouble for you.

MRS. STEVENSON: Check it! Check it! That's all anybody can do! Oh, what's the use of talking to
you? You're so stupid!

SOUND: SHE SLAMS DOWN THE RECEIVER.

MRS. STEVENSON: (TO HERSELF) Oh, I'll fix her! Of all the impudent ... How dare she speak to me
like that? How dare she?

SOUND: DIALS OPERATOR


MRS. STEVENSON: (TO HERSELF) Call the operator ...

SOUND: RINGS FIVE TIMES

MRS. STEVENSON: (TO HERSELF, ON THE SECOND RING) Oh, why does it take so long?

OPERATOR: (FILTER) Your call, please?

MRS. STEVENSON: Young woman, I don't know your name. But there are ways of finding you out.
And I'm going to report you to your superiors for the most unpardonable rudeness and insolence
it's ever been my privilege-- Give me the business office at once!

OPERATOR: (FILTER) You may dial that number direct.

MRS. STEVENSON: Dial it direct? I'll do no such thing! I don't even know the number...

OPERATOR: (FILTER) The number is in the directory or you may secure it by dialing Information.

MRS. STEVENSON: Listen, here, you-- Oh, what's the use!

SOUND: SLAMS DOWN THE RECEIVER

MRS. STEVENSON: Oh, dear ...

SOUND: ALMOST INSTANTLY, THE PHONE RINGS

MRS. STEVENSON: Oh, for heaven's sake, I'm going out of my mind! Out of my--

SOUND: SHE PICKS UP THE RECEIVER

MRS. STEVENSON: Hello?! HELLO! Stop ringing me, do you hear? Answer me! Who is this? Do you
realize you're driving me crazy? Who's calling me? What are you doing it for? Now stop it! Stop it!
Stop it! HELLO! HELLO! I - I - If you don't stop ringing me, I'm going to call the police, do you
hear?! THE POLICE!

SOUND: SHE SLAMS DOWN THE RECEIVER

MRS. STEVENSON: (SOBBING NERVOUSLY) Oh, if Elbert would only come home!

SOUND: THE PHONE RINGS SHARPLY, SEVEN TIMES UNDER THE FOLLOWING

MRS. STEVENSON: (TO HERSELF) Oh, let it ring. Let it go on ringing. It's a trick of some kind. I won't
answer it. I won't. I won't. I won't, even if it goes on ringing all night. Oh, you ring. Go ahead and
ring.

SOUND: THE PHONE SUDDENLY STOPS -- THEN SILENCE

MRS. STEVENSON: (A TERRIFIED NOTE IN HER VOICE) Stopped. Now, now what's the matter? Why
did they stop ringing all of a sudden? Oh... (HYSTERICALLY) What time is it? Where did I put that ...
clock? Oh, here it is. Five to eleven ... oh, they've decided something. They're sure I'm home.
They heard my voice answer them just now. That's why they've been ringing me -- why no one
has answered me --

SOUND: SHE PICKS UP THE PHONE

MRS. STEVENSON: (TO HERSELF) I'll call the operator again.

SOUND: SHE DIALS OPERATOR ... RINGS FIVE TIMES

MRS. STEVENSON: (TO HERSELF, ON THE SECOND RING) Oh, where is she? Why doesn't she
answer? Why doesn't she answer?

OPERATOR: (FILTER) Your call, please?

MRS. STEVENSON: Where were you just now? Why didn't you answer at once? Give me the
Police Department.

SOUND: OPERATOR PUTS CALL THROUGH ... BUSY SIGNAL


OPERATOR: (FILTER) I'm sorry. The line is busy. I will call you--

MRS. STEVENSON: Busy? But that's impossible! The Police Department can't be busy. There must
be other lines available.

OPERATOR: (FILTER) The line is busy. I will try to get them for you later.

MRS. STEVENSON: (FRANTIC) No, no! I've got to speak to them now or it may be too late. I've got
to talk to someone!

OPERATOR: (FILTER) What number do you wish to speak to?

MRS. STEVENSON: (DESPERATELY): I don't know! But there must be someone to protect people
beside the police department! A - a - a -- detective agency -- a --

OPERATOR: (FILTER) You will find agencies listed in the Classified Directory.

MRS. STEVENSON: But I don't have a Classified! I mean -- I'm - I'm too nervous to look it up -- and I
- I don't know how to use the--

OPERATOR: (FILTER) I'll connect you with Information. Perhaps she will be able to help you.

MRS. STEVENSON: (AGONIZEDLY) No! No! (FURIOUSLY) Oh, you're being spiteful, aren't you? You
don't care, do you, what happens to me? I could die and you wouldn't care.

SOUND: HANGS UP RECEIVER ... PHONE RINGS

MRS. STEVENSON: Oh! Stop it! Stop it! Stop it! I can't stand any more.

SOUND: SHE PICKS UP RECEIVER

MRS. STEVENSON: (YELLING FRENZIEDLY INTO PHONE) Hello! What do you want?! Stop ringing, will
you?! Stop it...!

3RD MAN: (FILTER) Hello, is this Plaza 4-2295?

MRS. STEVENSON: (IN A MORE SUBDUED VOICE): Yes. Yes, I'm .. I'm sorry. This ... this is Plaza 4-2295.

3RD MAN: (FILTER) This is Western Union. I have a telegram here for Mrs. Elbert Stevenson. Is there
anyone there to receive the message?

MRS. STEVENSON: (TRYING TO CALM HERSELF): I'm ... I'm Mrs. Stevenson.

3RD MAN: (FILTER) The telegram is as follows: Mrs. Elbert Stevenson, 53 North Sutton Place, New
York, New York. Darling. Terribly sorry. Tried to get you for last hour, but line busy. Leaving for
Boston eleven P.M. tonight, on urgent business. Back tomorrow afternoon. Keep happy. Love.
Signed, Elbert.

MRS. STEVENSON: (BREATHLESSLY, ALMOST TO HERSELF) Oh, no --

3RD MAN: (FILTER) Do you wish us to deliver a copy of the message?

MRS. STEVENSON: No. No, thank you.

3RD MAN: (FILTER) Thank you, madam. Good-night.

SOUND: WESTERN UNION HANGS UP

MRS. STEVENSON: (MECHANICALLY) Good-night.

SOUND: SHE HANGS UP

MRS. STEVENSON: (SUDDENLY BURSTING OUT) Oh, no. No -- I don't believe it. He couldn't do it. He
couldn't do it. Not when he knows I'll be all alone. It's some trick -- some fiendish trick --

SOUND: SHE DIALS OPERATOR ... RINGS FIVE TIMES


MRS. STEVENSON: (TO HERSELF, SOBBING) ... some trick .. why doesn't she ...?

OPERATOR: (FILTER) Your call, please?

MRS. STEVENSON: Operator, try that Murray Hill 7-0093 number for me, just once more, please.

OPERATOR: (FILTER) You may dial that number direct ...

SOUND: MRS. STEVENSON HANGS UP

MRS. STEVENSON: (WRETCHEDLY) Oh ...

SOUND: SHE PICKS UP AND NERVOUSLY DIALS THE NUMBER DIRECT, SOUNDING OUT THE NUMBERS
UNDER HER BREATH ... IT GOES THROUGH, RING AFTER LONG RING ... SEVEN TIMES ... NO ANSWER

MRS. STEVENSON: Oh ... He's gone. He's gone. Oh, Elbert, how could you? How could you --?

SOUND: SHE HANGS UP THE PHONE

MRS. STEVENSON: (SOBS, PITYING HERSELF) How could you? I - I can't be alone tonight. I can't. If
I'm alone one more second, I'll go mad. I don't care what he says -- or what the expense is -- I'm
a sick woman ... I'm entitled ... I'm entitled ...

SOUND: SHE DIALS INFORMATION ... RINGS THREE TIMES

INFORMATION: (FILTER) Information. May I help you?

MRS. STEVENSON: I - I want the telephone number of Henchley Hospital.

INFORMATION: (FILTER) Henchley Hospital? Do you have the street address?

MRS. STEVENSON: No. No. It's somewhere in the seventies. It's a very small, private, and exclusive
hospital where I had my appendix out two years ago. Henchley -- uh, H-E-N-C --

INFORMATION: (FILTER) One moment, please.

MRS. STEVENSON: Please hurry. And please -- what is the time?

INFORMATION: (FILTER) You may find out the time by dialing Meridian 7-1212.

MRS. STEVENSON: (IRRITATED) Oh, for heaven's sake ... I've no time to be dialing ...

INFORMATION: (FILTER) The number of Henchley Hospital is Butterfield 7-0105.

MRS. STEVENSON: Butterfield 7-0105.

SOUND: SHE HANGS UP BEFORE SHE FINISHES SPEAKING, AND DIALS NUMBER EVEN AS SHE SPEAKS
... RINGS FOUR TIMES

WOMAN: (FILTER) (SOLID, FIRM, PRACTICAL) Henchley Hospital. Good evening.

MRS. STEVENSON: Nurses' registry.

WOMAN: (FILTER) Who was it you wished to speak to, please?

MRS. STEVENSON: (HIGH-HANDED) I want the nurse's registry, at once. I want a trained nurse. I
want to hire her immediately for the night.

WOMAN: (FILTER) I see. And what is the nature of the case, madam?

MRS. STEVENSON: Nerves. I'm very nervous. I need soothing -- companionship. You see, my
husband is away and I'm--

WOMAN: (FILTER) Have you been recommended to us by any doctor in particular, madam?

MRS. STEVENSON: No. But I really don't see why all this catechizing is necessary. I just want a
trained nurse. I was a patient in your hospital two years ago. And after all, I do expect to pay this
person for attending me.
WOMAN: (FILTER) We quite understand that, madam. But these are war times, you know.

MRS. STEVENSON: Well--

WOMAN: (FILTER) Registered nurses are very scarce just now -- and our superintendent has asked
us to send people out only on cases where the physician in charge feels that it is absolutely
necessary.

MRS. STEVENSON: (HIGH-HANDED) Well, it is absolutely necessary. I'm a sick woman. I'm - I'm very
upset. Very. I'm alone in this house -- and I'm an invalid -- and tonight I overheard a telephone
conversation that upset me dreadfully. In fact (BEGINNING TO YELL) if someone doesn't come at
once, I'm afraid I'll go out of my mind!

WOMAN: (FILTER) (CALMLY) I see. Well -- I'll speak to Miss Phillips as soon as she comes in. And
what is your name, madam?

MRS. STEVENSON: Miss Phillips? And when do you expect her in?

WOMAN: (FILTER) Well, I really couldn't say. She went out to supper at eleven o'clock.

MRS. STEVENSON: Eleven o'clock! But it's not eleven yet! (SHE CRIES OUT) Oh -- oh, my clock has
stopped. I thought it was running down. What time is it?

WOMAN: (FILTER) (PAUSING AS THOUGH GLANCING AT WRIST WATCH) Just fifteen minutes past
eleven....

SOUND: TELEPHONE RECEIVER BEING LIFTED ON THE SAME LINE AS MRS. STEVENSON'S

MRS. STEVENSON: (CRYING OUT) What - what was that?

WOMAN: (FILTER) What was ... what, madam?

MRS. STEVENSON: That -- that click -- just now, in my own telephone. As though someone had
lifted the receiver off the hook of the extension telephone downstairs.

WOMAN: (FILTER) Well, I didn't hear it, madam. Now, about this--

MRS. STEVENSON: (TERRIFIED): But I did. There's someone in this house. Someone downstairs in the
kitchen. And they're -- they're listening to me now. They're --

SOUND: MRS. STEVENSON HANGS UP

MRS. STEVENSON: (IN A SUFFOCATED VOICE) I won't pick it up. I -- I won't let them hear me. I'll be
quiet and they'll think... (WITH GROWING TERROR) Oh, but if I don't call someone now while
they're still down there, there'll be no time... .

SOUND: SHE PICKS UP RECEIVER AND DIALS OPERATOR ... RING THREE TIMES

OPERATOR: (FILTER) Your call, please?

MRS. STEVENSON: (IN A DESPERATE WHISPER) Operator. Operator. I'm in desperate trouble.

OPERATOR: (FILTER) I'm sorry. I cannot hear you. Please speak louder.

MRS. STEVENSON: (STILL WHISPERING) I don't dare. I -- there's someone listening. Can you hear me
now?

OPERATOR: (FILTER) I'm sorry.

MRS. STEVENSON: (DESPERATELY) But you've got to hear me. Oh, please. You've got to help me.
There's someone in this house. Someone who's going to murder me. And you've got to get in
touch with ...

SOUND: CLICK OF RECEIVER BEING PUT DOWN ON MRS. STEVENSON'S LINE

MRS. STEVENSON: (BURSTING OUT WILDLY) Oh -- there it is. There it is. Did you hear it? He's put it
down -- he's put down the extension phone. He's coming up... (HER VOICE IS HOARSE WITH FEAR)
He's coming up the stairs. Give me the Police Department ... the police department ... police
department ... give it to me ...

OPERATOR: (FILTER) One moment, please -- I will connect you.

SOUND: CALL IS PUT THROUGH

MRS. STEVENSON: I can -- I can hear him. He's nearer. (WEAKLY) Oh, I hear him, I hear him. Hurry.
Hurry. Hurry.

SOUND: AS MRS. STEVENSON BECOMES INCOHERENT WITH FEAR AND BEGINS TO SCREAM, A
TRAIN APPROACHES AND ROARS OVER A NEARBY BRIDGE ... AS IT FADES, WE HEAR A BODY
THUMP TO THE FLOOR ... THEN IT PASSES AND WE HEAR THE PHONE STILL RINGING AT THE OTHER
END ... THE TELEPHONE IS PICKED UP

SERGEANT MARTIN: (FILTER) Police Department, Sergeant Martin speaking ... Police Department.
Sergeant Martin speaking ... Police Department. Sergeant Martin speaking ... Police Department.
Sergeant Martin speaking.

GEORGE: (SAME DISTINCTIVE VOICE AS IN BEGINNING OF PLAY) Police Department? Oh, I'm
sorry. Must have got the wrong number. Don't worry. Everything's okay.
CITY SCHOOLS DIVISION OF TAYABAS
Tayabas City

LESSON EXEMPLAR
Grade 9-English

Quarter: THIRD
Theme: Connecting to the World
Sub-Theme: Through Technology

Content Standard: Performance Standard:


The learner demonstrates understanding The learner skillfully performs in one-act
of how Anglo-American literature and play through utilizing effective verbal
other text types serve as a means of and non-verbal strategies and ICT
connecting to the world; also how to use resources based on the following
ways of analysing one-act play and criteria: Focus, Voice, Delivery, and
different forms of verbals for him/her to Dramatic Conventions.
skillfully perform in one-act play.

I. LEARNING COMPETENCY
EN9G-IIIa-21: Use verbals

Objectives:
1. Give the meaning of gerund
2. Identify the gerund and its uses in given sentences
3. Use verbals in the form of gerunds in making observations about pictures
shown to them
4. Demonstrate ease in using gerunds to sentences depicting pictures with
local relevance

II. LEARNING CONTENT


Lesson: Gerund and Its Uses
Materials:
1. Worksheets
2. Illustrations
References:
1. K to 12 Curriculum Guide (May 2016) p. 206
2. A Journey through Anglo-American Literature Learner‘s Material for English
pp. 255-257
3. Interactive English pp.153-155
4. Online References

III. LEARNING TASKS


Introduction: What activities do you usually do in your everyday living? Form an
inventory in your mind with action words ending in –ing.
Preliminary Activity:
TASK 1: GUESS THE –ING WORD
Volunteers will be picking a slip of paper containing an – ing
word. S/he will act it out to let their classmates guess the
action word.
e.g. reading, singing, dancing, painting

Activity:
TASK 2: PICTURE ANALYSIS
Students will be given some pictures and they will write on the board what they
have observed.

Source: https://societyofhonor.files.wordpress.com /2014/ Source: http://www.asianews.it/news-en/Two-fishermen-killed-


11/technology-inquirer.jpg demonstrating-in-defence-of-their-fishing-turf-14458.html

Source: https://internationalneeds.wordpress.com/2014/05/ Source: http://pba.inquirer.net/64035/meralco-bolts-vs-alaska-


aces-dec-3

Source: https://twitter.com/rapplerdotcom/status/69589647
Source: http://www.sarahgeronimo.com/forums/index.
5155435521
php /topic /26734-sarah-geronimo-receives-ani-ng-dangal
-award-ncaa-names-her/page-2
Analysis:

TASK 3: SPOT THE DIFFERENCES


Analyse the underlined words in Set A and Set B. What can you say
about the words ending in -ing in set A? Set B?
A B
1. Team Eagles is winning the game. 1. Winning is less important than
sportsmanship.
2. Bea is reading a poem. 2. During her free time, Michelle enjoys
reading.
3. She is singing a rock song.
3. Her favourite activity is singing

Abstraction:
Sample sentences will be given leading to the discussion of the different
functions of a gerund in a sentence as presented in the powerpoint.

References: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/owlprint/627/
LM, p. 255

Application:
TASK 4: PRACTICE ZONE
Underline the gerund in each sentence and give its use.

1. Helping a friend is an automatic yes in your book.


2. Individuals may even get mad for saying no to them.
3. Won‘t people see you as jerk in refusing to help them?
4. Her pastime, baking cakes, proved very lucrative.
5. Our art teacher encouraged experimenting on different colors.
6. She suggested going to museum.
7. The miser hated spending money.
8. Staying at home is her form of relaxation.
9. He is afraid of hurting your feelings.
10. Her par time job, encoding data, gave her extra money.
Assessment:

TASK 5: TEST YOURSELF

Underline the gerund in the sentence and give its


use. Write your answer on the spaces provided
before each number.

__________ 1. Soaking in a hot tub is relaxing after a long day at work.


__________ 2. Ellie loves playing in the sandbox.
__________ 3. Before mopping the floor, you must sweep it thoroughly.
__________ 4. Max became ill from eating too much ice cream at the party.
__________ 5. A major challenge was writing my persuasive essay on animal communication.
__________ 6. I certainly dislike receiving calls from telephone solicitors.
__________ 7. The group‘s project was creating a butterfly garden.
__________ 8. I enjoy watching fireworks every 31st of December.
__________ 9. Making good grades requires time and effort.
__________ 10. Elena does not mind lending the money.
__________ 11. Listening to Bach‘s music helped the class understand his greatness.
__________ 12. My favourite sport, running, takes a great deal of effort.
__________ 13. Smoking costs a lot of money.
__________ 14. Paul avoids using chemicals on the vegetables he grows.
__________ 15. He remembered sending the fax.
CITY SCHOOLS DIVISION OF TAYABAS
Tayabas City

LESSON EXEMPLAR
Grade 9-English

Quarter: THIRD
Theme: Connecting to the World
Sub-Theme: Through Technology
Content Standard: Performance Standard:
The learner demonstrates understanding The learner skillfully performs in one-act
of how Anglo-American literature and play through utilizing effective verbal and
other text types serve as means of non-verbal strategies and ICT resources
connecting to the world; also how to use based on the following criteria: Focus,
ways of analysing one-act play and Voice, Delivery, and Dramatic
different forms of verbals for him/her to Conventions.
skillfully perform in a one-act play.

I. LEARNING COMPETENCY
EN9LT-IIIa-20.1: Explain how elements specific to a one-act play contribute to the
development of its theme
EN9LT-IIIa-16.1: Identify the distinguishing features of Anglo-American one-act
plays

Objectives:
1. Identify the characters, setting, problem, solution, beginning, middle, and
end of a one-act Anglo-American play
2. Create a character map, setting illustration, problem/solution graphic
organizer, events and theme graphic organizer to distinguish features of
one-act plays
3. Demonstrate understanding of the theme presented in a one-act play by
explaining the elements that contributed to its development
4. Foster enthusiasm in the classroom activities related to the featured play

II. LEARNING CONTENT


Lesson: Elements of One-Act Play
Materials:
1. Monitor and Speaker
2. Worksheets
3. Illustration Boards
References:
1. K to 12 Curriculum Guide (May 2016) p. 206
2. A Journey through Anglo-American Literature Learner‘s Material for English
pp. 257-258
3. Online References
III. LEARNING TASKS
Introduction: How would you recount a story that captured your interest?

Preliminary Activity:
Students recall the play/drama they have watched before and narrate the
events to the class.

Activity:
TASK 1: GETTING INTO THE WORLD OF LAUGHTER AND TEARS
A. AGREEING-DISAGREEING
Put a check mark if you agree with the statement; if you disagree.
Explain your answer to your partner. (LM, p.257)
______ 1. Theater is the same as theatre.
______ 2. Drama is different from a play.
______ 3. A script is written conversation in a play.
______ 4. A change in time is one scene in a play.
______ 5. A one-act play has all the elements of
drama.

Analysis:
TASK 2: CHARACTER MAP
Students choose a seatmate and describe him or her by completing the
character map.

Source: https://www.pinterest.com/johufford/character-traits/

TASK 3: SET IT IN!


Students, in a group of three, describe something they
see inside the classroom. The teacher guides a discussion
about setting by saying, "If we were characters in a story,
then our classroom would be the setting. It is where our
story takes place. The setting can be location, weather,
or time." Then, students have to illustrate their setting in an illustration board.
TASK 4: PROBLEM AND SOLUTION
Students watch the story of the ―Three Little Pigs‖ and identify the problem and
the solution of the problem in the story.

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QLR2pLUsl-Y

Source: http://oakdome.com/k5/lesson-
plans/word/common-core-graphic-
organizer-problem-and-solution.php

TASK 5: PAIR-SHARE A LOVELY SATURDAY


Students think about their ideal Saturday. Ask them to
turn to their partners and describe their day from
beginning to end. Ask a few volunteers to share their
descriptions with the whole class.

Abstraction
TASK 6: REVISITING THE RADIO PLAY
Refer to the one-act radio play script to answer these
questions:
1. Is Sorry, Wrong Number a one-act play?

2. The elements of a one-act play are found in the script. Fill in the grid below
with the needed information.

ELEMENTS OF ONE-ACT PLAY DETAILS

1. Setting

2. Plot and Plot Structure

3. Character and Characterization

4. Conflict

5. Theme

6. Suspense and Atmosphere


Application
TASK 7: COMPLETE ME
Based from the radio one-act play, ―Sorry, Wrong Number”, complete the Theme
Graphic Organizer.

Source: http://www.gridgit.com/post_thematic-essay-graphic-organizer_498445/
CITY SCHOOLS DIVISION OF TAYABAS
Tayabas City

LESSON EXEMPLAR
Grade 9-English

Quarter: THIRD
Theme: Connecting to the World
Sub-Theme: Through Technology

Content Standard: Performance Standard:


The learner demonstrates understanding The learner skillfully performs in one-act
of how Anglo-American literature and play through utilizing effective verbal
other text types serve as means of and non-verbal strategies and ICT
connecting to the world; also how to use resources based on the following criteria:
ways of analyzing one-act play and Focus, Voice, Delivery, and Dramatic
different forms of verbals for him/her to Conventions.
skillfully perform in a one-act play.

I. LEARNING COMPETENCY
EN9WC-IIIb-9.4: Identify types and features of a play synopsis
EN9WC-IIIe-9.5: Use literary devices and techniques to craft a play synopsis

Objectives:
1. Identify the features and format of a play synopsis
2. Follow the guidelines on writing a synopsis
3. Craft a play synopsis applying the techniques learned
4. Exhibit giving importance to following proper format when writing a play
synopsis

II. LEARNING CONTENT


Lesson: Writing a Plot Summary
Materials:
1. PowerPoint Presentation
2. Paper and Pen
References:
2. K to 12 Curriculum Guide (May 2016) p. 206-207
3. A Journey through Anglo-American Literature Learner‘s Material for English
p. 259
4. Online References

III. LEARNING TASKS


Introduction: Have you already seen a stage play? Are you familiar with
techniques and guidelines on how to craft a play synopsis if you will be asked to
write one?
Preliminary Activity:
TASK 1: BRAINSTORMING
In writing a play synopsis, can we include anything that does not
appear in the original text? Are we to include personal comments
or evaluation?

Activity:
TASK 2: LOOKING CLOSER
Read the following plot summary or synopsis of ―Sorry, Wrong
Number‖. (LM, p.259)

Mrs. Stevenson is sick and confined to her bed. Her only lifeline is the
telephone. One night, while waiting for her husband to return home, she
impatiently tries to locate him. She picks up the phone and accidentally
overhears a conversation through a crossline, between two men planning to
murder a woman who lives near a bridge on Second Avenue at 11:15 at night
on that day. She begins a series of calls--to the operator, to the police, and
others, desperate to prevent the crime.

 Are you satisfied with how it is written? Rate from 1 to 10.

Analysis
TASK 3: SYNOPSIS CRITIQUING
Analyze further the given synopsis above. Use the checklist
below in evaluating. Put in the statements that are
satisfied.
Time and place are indicated at the beginning of the
synopsis.

Brief description of the main characters is given.

The events are told chronologically the same manner as


they took place in the story.

Dramatic scenes are described within the synopsis.

It‘s less than 250 words.

The synopsis is told in present tense and in third person.

Dialogues are not included.


Abstraction:
Guidelines in Writing a Play Synopsis
1. The time and place should be indicated at the beginning of
the synopsis.
2. A brief description of the main characters should be given as
they appear in the story.
3. The synopsis should begin at the opening of the story and told in
the same order as the play, and end at the play‘s conclusion.
4. Dramatic scenes that propel the story forward, including climatic scenes
should be described within the synopsis.
5. The synopsis must be no longer than 250 words long.
6. The story must be told in the present tense and in the third person.
7. When telling the story, dialogue should not be included. The story should
be related in an informal way.

Application
TASK 4: WRITE SHOP
In a small group of 5, students will write their own version of the
synopsis of the play ―Sorry, Wrong Number‖.

SYNOPSIS WRITING RUBRIC

Criteria Excellent Good Below Average Ineffective


Main Idea Main idea is unclear-
Main idea is The main idea is not
Main idea is clear. not specifically stated
established. present.
in the writing.
Supporting Important details are
All important details Some critical Synopsis contains only
included but some
Details are included.
might be missing.
information is missing. some details.

Format Details are in logical Ideas are not in a


Most of the ideas are Ideas are in random
order because the logical order because
in logical order. order and not logical.
format is followed. format is not observed.
Content Clear understanding Adequate Basic understanding of Little or no
of information in the understanding is information in text is understanding is
text is demonstrated. demonstrated. demonstrated. demonstrated.

Source: www.studyzone.org/testprep/ela4/h/summaryrubric.htm

Assessment:
TASK 5: MY LEARNINGS
Complete the statement:
This lesson enables me to ____________________________________
_____________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________.
CITY SCHOOLS DIVISION OF TAYABAS
Tayabas City

LESSON EXEMPLAR
Grade 9-English

Quarter: THIRD
Theme: Connecting to the World
Sub-Theme: Making a Difference

Content Standard: Performance Standard:


The learner demonstrates understanding The learner skilfully performs in one-act
of how Anglo-American literature and play through utilizing effective verbal and
other text types serve as a means of non-verbal strategies and ICT resources
connecting to the world; also how to use based on the following criteria: Focus,
ways of analysing one-act play and Voice, Delivery, and Dramatic
different forms of verbals for him/her to Conventions.
skilfully perform in one-act play

I. LEARNING COMPETENCY
EN9LT-IIIc-16: Analyze literature as a means of connecting to the world
EN9LT-IIIg-2.11: Determine tone, mood, technique, and purpose of the author

Objectives:
1. Analyze a selection and understand its relevance to the modern world
2. Determine the tone, mood, technique, and purpose of the author in the
prose piece
3. Perform different tasks highlighting the value of human interaction
4. Make a poster depicting the importance of human interaction rather than
the use of communications technology
5. Show cooperation in performing the different tasks related to the piece
6. Summarize and reflect on the topic by writing their own quotation

II. LEARNING CONTENT


Lesson: “For Conversation, Press # 1” by Michael Alvear
Materials:
1. Illustrations
2. Pen and Paper
3. Art Materials
References:
1. K to 12 Curriculum Guide (May 2016) p. 207
2. A Journey through Anglo-American Literature Learner‘s Material for English
pp. 265-268
3. Teacher‘s Guide
4. Online References
III. LEARNING TASKS
Introduction: Give your comments about this quote.

Source: http://bernardgoldberg.com/einstein-may-not-have-said-it-but-its-still-true/

Preliminary Activity:
TASK 1: PICTURE ANALYSIS
What can you say about these pictures? Do you think they are important in our
everyday living?

Source: http://www.bu.edu/geneva/life-housing/cellphones/

Source: http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/ Source: http://marlacummins.com/adhdemail-


cardsloans/article-2097807/Sold-19-British-bank- productivity/
customers-credit-card-details-avai lable-Russian-
websites.html

Activity:

TASK 2: WORD BANK


Give a synonym for the following words:

1. Option – c __ o __ c __
2. Setback - __ r o __ l e __
3. Consequences - __ u t c __ m e
4. Conceivable - p __ s s __ b l __
Analysis:

For Conversation, Press # 1


By Michael Alvear

A funny thing happened in the way to communications revolution: we


stopped talking to one another.
I was walking in the park with a friend recently, and his cell phone rang,
interrupting our conversation. There we were, walking and talking on a
beautiful sunny day and ----poof!----I became invisible, absent from the
conversation because a gadget designed to make communication easier.
The park was filled with people talking on their cell phones. They were
passing other people without looking at them, saying hello, noticing their
babies or stopping to pet their puppies. Evidently, the untethered electronic
voice is preferable to human contact.
The telephone used to connect you to the absent. Now it makes people
sitting next to you feel absent.
Why is it that the more connected we get, the more disconnected I feel?
Every advance in communication technology is a setback to the intimacy of
human interaction. Write e-mail and instant messaging over the Internet, we
can now communicate without seeing or talking to one another. In making
deposit at the bank, you can just insert your card into the ATM. With voice
mail, you can conduct entire conversations without ever reaching anyone. If
my mom has a question, I just leave the answer on her machine..
As almost every conceivable contact between human beings gets
automated, the alienation index goes up.
I am no Luddite. I own a cell phone, an ATM card, a voice-mail system,
and an e-mail account. Giving them up isn‘t an option---they‘re great for
what they‘re intended to do. It‘s their unintended consequences that make
me cringe.
So I‘ve put myself on technology restrictions: no instant messaging with
people who live near me, no cell-phoning in the presence of friends, no
letting the voice mail pick up when I‘m home.
Readers Digest pp. 143-145, July 2000

TASK 3: UNDERSTANDING THE TEXT


Answer the following questions related to the text that you
have read. Encircle the letter of the answer that best
completes the statements.

1. The author‘s purpose in writing the article is to make us realize that ___________.
a. communications technology is interfering with human contact
b. people are communicating less than they did in the past
c. the advances in communications technology are unnecessary
d. people are forgetting how to communicate with others
2. The question ―Why is it that the more connected we get, the more disconnected
I feel?‖ _____________.
a. reveals the author‘s confusion about technology.
b. invites the reader to disagree with the author
c. highlights the author‘s examples and arguments
d. challenges the reader to find answers to problems.
3. The author‘s tone throughout the selection is _____________.
a. amusement c. hostility
b. criticism d. indifference
4. The third and fourth paragraphs give emphasis on how cell phone ___________.
a. provides convenience c. isolate people
b. threatens safety d. efficiently works
5. The idea that bothers the author most about the effect of communications
technology on his life is _______________.
a. Limited communication with strangers
b. Lack of social formula
c. Extreme preference for cell phone
d. Deviation from meaningful interaction

Abstraction:
TASK 4: DIFFERENTIATED ACTIVITIES
Form five groups to work on these activities:

Group 1 – ACTORS
In a role play, show the proper etiquette when using a
cell phone and telephone.

Group 2 – DANCERS
Through a dance, interpret a song that discusses the author‘s desire to have
human contact rather than use of technology in communication.

Group 3 – MATHEMATICIANS
Make a computation on how much your weekly expenses allotted for load
and phone bills amount to. Think of how you can still use technology but lessen
the expenses.

Group 4 – RESEARCHERS
List the advantages and disadvantages of communications technology. Use
the chart below.
COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY
Unit Advantages Disadvantages
Telephone
Cell phone
Fax Machine
E-mail
Voice mail

Group 5 – SINGERS
Compose a jingle about communications technology highlighting its
importance but not losing interaction with others, then sing it.
Application:
TASK 5: POSTER MAKING
Make a poster depicting the importance of human interaction
rather than the use of communications technology. Be guided
by the rubric.

POSTER MAKING RUBRIC


CRITERIA 10pts. 8pts. 6pts. 4pts.
Relevance All graphics are All graphics are
related to the topic related to the topic All graphics relate to Graphics do not
and make it easier to and most make it the topic. Most relate to the topic OR
understand. All easier to understand. borrowed graphics several borrowed
borrowed All borrowed have a source graphics do not have
graphics have a graphics have a citation. a source citation.
source citation. source citation.
Originality Several of the
One or two of the
graphics used on the The graphics are
graphics used on the
poster reflect a made by the student, No graphics made by
poster reflect student
exceptional degree but are based on the the student are
creativity in their
of student creativity designs or ideas of included.
creation and/or
in their creation others.
display.
and/or display.
Attractiveness The poster is
The poster is The poster is The poster is
exceptionally
attractive in terms of acceptably distractingly messy or
attractive in terms of
design, layout and attractive though it very poorly designed.
design, layout, and
neatness. may be a bit messy. It is not attractive.
neatness.
Source: http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php?screen=ShowRubric&rubric_id=1357669&

Assessment:
TASK 6: WRITESHOP
Write your own definition or meaning of ―human interaction‖ as if
writing a quotation such as that of Einstein that was presented in
the lesson‘s introduction.

QUOTATION WRITING RUBRIC


1 2 3 4 5
Does Not Partially Does Not Meets Exceeds
Meet Meets Fully Meet
Content/Ideas Writing is
Writing is
extremely limited Writes related, Writing is
Writing is limited confident and
in quality purposeful and
in clearly focused.
communicating sentences, but focused. Piece
communicating It holds the
knowledge, with with little or no contains some
knowledge. reader‘s
no central details. details.
attention.
theme.
Vocabulary/ Careless or
inaccurate word Shows some use Effective and
Word Choice choice, which
Language is trite,
of varied word
Purposeful use of
engaging use of
vague or flat. word choice.
obscures choice. word choice.
meaning.
Reference: http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/lesson_images/lesson401/Rubric.pdf
CITY SCHOOLS DIVISION OF TAYABAS
Tayabas City

LESSON EXEMPLAR
Grade 9-English

Quarter: THIRD
Theme: Connecting to the World
Sub-Theme: Making a Difference

Content Standard: Performance Standard:


The learner demonstrates understanding The learner skillfully performs in one-act
of how Anglo-American literature and play through utilizing effective verbal
other text types serve as means of and non-verbal strategies and ICT
connecting to the world; also how to use resources based on the following criteria:
ways of analyzing one-act play and Focus, Voice, Delivery, and Dramatic
different forms of verbals for him/her to Conventions.
skillfully perform in a one-act play.

I. LEARNING COMPETENCY
EN9F-IIIb-3.11: Produce the English sounds correctly and effectively when
delivering lines in a one-act play

Objectives:
1. Produce words with ―th‖ sounds correctly and effectively
2. Deliver lines from a one-act play observing the correct pronunciation of
words with ―th‖ sounds
3. Demonstrate active participation in practicing saying of words with
voiced and voiceless ―th‖ sounds
4. Pay particular attention to words with voiced and voiceless ―th‖ sounds
when encountered in texts

II. LEARNING CONTENT


Lesson: Sounding Words Correctly - Voiced and Voiceless TH
Materials:
1. Video Clip
2. Tarpapel
3. Bucket with Hearts
References:
1. K to 12 Curriculum Guide (May, 2016) p. 206
2. A Journey through Anglo-American Literature Learner‘s Material for English
pp. 271-272
3. Teacher‘s Guide pp. 147-148
4. Online References
III. LEARNING TASKS
Introduction: How well can you distinguish ―th” sounds?

Preliminary Activity:
TASK 1: WORD BANK
Fill in each blank with the appropriate word from the bank.

Missing Word Sentences

Questions to Answer:
 How is th pronounced in the following words?
Thursday, three, think, thin, thick, tooth, thunder, father

 Did you notice any difference?

Activity:

TASK 2: VIEWING
View this clip from
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2jxm7EeVXWs

A
n The IPA symbol for the voiced th sound is /ð/.
a The IPA symbol for the voiceless th sound is /θ/.
l
y The /ð/ is the sound you hear at the beginning of frequently used

s words such as the, this, that, those. You also hear this

i sound in the middle of many common words such as: mother, father, brother

s and rather. To make the /ð/ sound, place your tongue slightly between your

: teeth. Your tongue and teeth should be touching. Since this is a voiced sound
you should feel your vocal chords vibrate when you make the sound.
To make the/θ/ sound, place your tongue slightly between your teeth. Your
tongue and teeth should be touching lightly. When the air flows out of your
mouth it should feel gentle. The /θ/ is the sound you hear in words such as:
thanks, Thursday, birthday and month, tongue.
Abstraction:
TASK 3: GAME OF HEARTS
Directions:
1. Prepare as many as you can a heart shape card with words
with th sound.
2. Place them in a pile (bucket or box)
3. Have your students to pick one and read. If the word is said correctly, the
student keeps it; if not, card goes back into pile.
4. The student with most cards by the end of the session wins.

Application:

TASK 4: TRY THIS!

Using the following words with the th sound complete the table
below.

throw Math theme


thanks those month
with thing thirst
mother their then
anything something thematic
brother Thursday that
there father
The 'voiced th' /ð/ The 'voiceless th' /θ/

Assessment:
TASK 5: SAY THEM IN LINES
Deliver the following lines taken from William Shakespeare‘s
Romeo and Juliet. Pay particular attention to the words with th
sounds. Pronounce them correctly.

Servant: When good manners shall lie all in one or two men's hands and they
unwashed too, 'tis a foul thing.
First Servant: Away with the joint-stools, remove the court-cupboard, look to the
plate.
Second Capulet: 'Tis more, 'tis more, his son is elder, sir; His son is thirty.
Capulet: Will you tell me that?
Romeo: Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear!
Tybalt: Come hither, cover'd with an antic face.
Capulet: Go to, go to; You are a saucy boy: is't so, indeed? This trick may
chance to scathe you, I know what:
DELIVERING LINES RUBRIC
Criteria Exceptional Good Fair Poor
4pts. 3pts. 2pts. 1pt.
Voice Student projects their Student strives to
Student exhibits
voice clearly and Student varies enunciate and add
poor vocal
utilizes their voice to voice pitch and variations, but
enunciation and
include variations of tone, and reflects overall effect is
no variations in
pitch, rate, volume, some level of flimsy - due to
volume and/or
and tone consistent to expressiveness. either too much or
pitch.
their character. too little expression.
Pronunciation Students fail to
Students fail to Students fail to
Students are able to pronounce three
pronounce one pronounce two
pronounce all words or more words
word with th words with th sound
with th sound correctly. with th sound
sound correctly. correctly.
correctly.
Reference: http://www.rcampus.com/rubricshowc.cfm?code=S3WX6B&sp=true
CITY SCHOOLS DIVISION OF TAYABAS
Tayabas City

LESSON EXEMPLAR
Grade 9-English

Quarter: THIRD
Theme: Connecting to the World
Sub-Theme: Making a Difference

Content Standard: Performance Standard:


The learner demonstrates understanding The learner skillfully performs in one-act
of how Anglo-American literature and play through utilizing effective verbal and
other text types serve as means of non-verbal strategies and ICT resources
connecting to the world; also how to use based on the following criteria: Focus,
ways of analyzing one-act play and Voice, Delivery, and Dramatic
different forms of verbals for him/her too Conventions.
skillfully perform in a one-act play.

I. LEARNING COMPETENCY
EN9V-IIId-29: Get familiar with the technical vocabulary for drama and theatre
(like stage directions)

Objectives:
1. Familiarize oneself with technical vocabulary for drama and theatre
specifically stage directions
2. Illustrate correctly the different types of stage regarding the audience
and stage location
3. Apply knowledge on stage directions in accomplishing a task in labeling a
blank stage layout
4. Apply knowledge in recognizing the type of stage when given the
chance to watch an actual play

II. LEARNING CONTENT


Lesson: Types of Stage and Stage Directions
Materials:
1. Laptop
2. Projector/Monitor
3. Pen and Paper
References:
1. K to 12 Curriculum Guide (May 2016) p. 207
2. A Journey through Anglo-American Literature Learner‘s Material for English
pp. 275-276
3. Online References
III. LEARNING TASKS
Introduction:
Have you ever seen a stage play? Are you familiar with the type of stage used?
If you will be a stage actor/actress, do you know stage directions if the director
prompts you during blockings?

Preliminary Activity:
TASK 1: STAGE PLAY TICKETS ON THE HOUSE
It‘s your lucky day. You will be given a chance to have a free ticket to one of
these Filipino stage plays. You will be picking a number via draw lots and your
teacher will announce later to which play you‘ll be an audience.

Maxie The Musical: Ang Pagdadalaga ni Maximo Oliveros is an


original Filipino stage musical adapted from the award-winning
movie Ang Pagdadalaga ni Maximo Oliveros. It‘s about a 12-year-
old gay boy Maxie fell in love with a cop. This play directed by
Dexter M. Santos provided a rollercoaster of entertainment. It will
make you laugh out loud, cry, and then, laugh once more. More
than the kilig and funny moments, one thing is for sure – the play
will transport you back to those days of kulitan with your family,
times when things were simpler.

Sources:
*http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/338412/ lifestyle/theater-review-a-whirlwind-bromance-in-maxie-the-musicale
* https://joyfullyurs.blogspot.com/2013_11_01_archive.html

"Bona" is a contemporary stage adaptation of the 1980 Lino Brocka


movie classic, with Domingo taking on the iconic film role of
veteran actress Nora Aunor. Director Soxy Topacio and playwright
Layeta Bucoy traded the film's melodrama to create a laugh-out-
loud comedy. In the stage version, Bona is a middle-aged, single
call center agent who becomes obsessed with Gino Sanchez (film
actor Edgar Allan Guzman), a contestant of the TV talent search
"Star of Tomorrow." She spearheads his fan club, Gino's Angels, and
stalks the wannabe actor on social networking sites, as well as in
mall tours.
Sources:
* http://news.abs-cbn.com/lifestyle/08/24/12/review-bona-eugene-domingo-show
* http://www.vintersections.com/2012/08/peta-relives-film-bona-onstage-august.html

Take a local rock band‘s songs of broken hearts and


unrequited love, add a talented cast of singer-actors, mix
them up with a compelling narrative by an award-winning
playwright, and you‘ve got the recipe for a successful
rock/comedy musical. The Philippine Educational Theater
Association‘s (PETA) latest offering, ―Rak of Aegis‖, uses
Aegis‘s songs in the key of sawi to tell a story of human
resilience and recovery after a devastating natural
calamity. The title is a pun on ―Rock of Ages‖, the five-time
Tony-nominated rock musical featuring classic rock songs
Sources:
*from
http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/349642/lifestyle/theater-
‗80s glam metal bands.
review-rak-of-aegis-is-joyful-storm-of-humor-and-music
* http://3xhcch.blogspot.com/2014/02/review-of-rak-of-aegis-singing-in-flood.html
* http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/349642/lifestyle/theater-review-rak-of-aegis-is-joyful-storm-of-humor-and-music
Stories of magical spells, kings, and their kingdoms are back to
enchant young audiences as Christine Bellen‘s “Mga Kuwento
ni Lola Basyang” returns to the Philippine Educational Theater
Association (PETA). PETA‘s longest-running play coincides with
the 20th National Children‘s Month, which promotes freedom
of expression among children and encourages them to
participate in public activities. PETA‘s ―Mga Kuwento ni Lola
Basyang‖ includes three stories that are rich in morals, namely
―Ang Prinsipeng Mahaba ang Ilong,‖ ―Ang Binibining Tumalo
sa Mahal na Datu,‖ plus a new story, ―Ang Mahiwagang
Kuba.‖

Sources:
http://petatheater.com/2012/10/12/celebrate-national-childrens-month-with-petas-mga-kuwento-ni-lola-basyang/
http://www.aktivshow.com/category/musical-play/

Activity:
TASK 2: WHERE’S MY SEAT?
Now, you are already given your free tickets for the stage play. You might be
curious to how the seats of the audience are arranged so you‘ll check
beforehand. The next pictures will show you the picture of the theatre for each
play. Indicate in which parts you as the audience can sit. (e.g. front of the stage,
side of the stage)
 For the play “Maxie” (1)

Where can you possibly sit? ___________________________________________

 For the play “Bona” (2)

Where can you possibly sit? ____________________________________________

 For the play “Rak of Aegis” (3)

Where can you possibly sit? ____________________________________________


 For the play “Mga Kwento ni Lola Basyang” (4)

Where can you possibly sit? ____________________________________________

Analysis:
TASK 3: FAMILIARIZING WITH TYPES OF STAGES
When you’re devising a drama, you’ll need to think about how to stage your
performance and what type of stage to use. With a partner, study the four types
of stage. Rearrange the letters to find out the term for the particular stage and
identify the play assigned with this type of stage in your previous activity.
(LM, pp. 275-276)

Source: https://cassstudio6.wordpress.com/types/
R T H T U S
This stage is the oldest known fixed type of staging in the world, and it is
thousands of years old. The play __________________________ is assigned with this
type of stage.
Source: https://cassstudio6.wordpress.com/types/

O P E U I R C N M S
This is a stage where the audience sits on one side only. The audience
faces one side of the stage directly, and normally sits at a lower height. The play
__________________________ is assigned with this type of stage.

Source: https://theatredesigner.wordpress.com/theatre-design-101/stage-types-theatre-in-the-round/

N I - H E T - N R U O D
This stage is positioned at the center of the audience - i.e., there is
audience around the whole stage. This type of stage creates quite an intimate
atmosphere, and is good for drama that needs audience involvement. The play
__________________________ is assigned with this type of stage.

Source: https://theatredesigner.wordpress.com/theatre-design-101/stage-types-traverse/

V T R A E S E R
This is a stage where the audience sits on two sides. Also, this type of stage
is good for creating an intimate atmosphere. The play
__________________________ is assigned with this type of stage.
Abstraction:

TASK 4: FAMILIARIZING WITH STAGE DIRECTIONS

 In a play, stage directions are instructions from the playwright to the


actors and stage crew. Though usually placed in brackets within scripts,
they are not spoken. Stage directions relate the author's intentions for
actors' entrances, exits, movement, intonation and essential behaviors. In
addition, they provide guidance for the crew regarding their
responsibilities, including what the lighting should be and any sounds,
such as music, that must be added.
 Stage directions sometimes provide information about what is
happening on stage in the background, away from the main action.
They also indicate the mood and environment envisioned by the
playwright.
 Stage directions often tell actors how they should speak, and these are
indicated at the beginning of lines.
 An important aspect of stage directions tells the actors
their locations on stage.
Source: https://www.reference.com/art-literature/stage-directions-play-9baa44c85fc89b56#

Study the stage layout below. Directions are indicated based on the
actor‘s perspective.
Application:

TASK 5: WORK WITH CELEBRITIES


Below are pictures of famous teen celebrities
nowadays. Cut out their picture and paste them
to their stage assignment. The last portion
indicates where they should be positioned in the
stage layout.

STAGE LAYOUT

1. Kathryn Bernado should be on DOWNSTAGE LEFT.


2. Alden Richards should be on UPSTAGE LEFT.
3. Liza Soberano should be on UPSTAGE CENTER.
4. Dhaniel Padilla should be on DOWNSTAGE CENTER.
5. Nadine Lustre should be on STAGE RIGHT.
6. Enrique Gil should be on STAGE LEFT
7. Maine Mendoza should be on DOWNSTAGE RIGHT.
8. James Reid should be on UPSTAGE RIGHT
Assessment:
TASK 6: CHECKPOINT
A. Illustrate the different types of stage. Use rectangles to
represent the audience and circle to represent the stage.
Example:
Traverse Stage

1 2 3 4
Proscenium In-the-round Traverse Thrust

B. Label this stage layout with the correct stage direction terms.
CITY SCHOOLS DIVISION OF TAYABAS
Tayabas City

LESSON EXEMPLAR
Grade 9-English

Quarter: THIRD
Theme: Connecting to the World
Sub-Theme: Despite Differences in Points of View

Content Standard: Performance Standard:


The learner demonstrates understanding The learner skillfully performs in one-act
of how Anglo-American literature and play through utilizing effective verbal
other text types serve as means of and non-verbal strategies and ICT
connecting to the world; also how to use resources based on the following criteria:
ways of analyzing one-act play and Focus, Voice, Delivery, and Dramatic
different forms of verbals for him/her to Conventions.
skillfully perform in a one-act play.

I. LEARNING COMPETENCY
EN9LC-IIId-6.5: Recognize faulty logic, unsupported facts, and emotional appeal
EN9VC-IIId-4.3/5.3: Analyze the information contained in the material viewed

Objectives:
1. Recognize faulty logic, unsupported facts, and emotional appeal in
statements and advertisements
2. Explain faulty logic, unsupported facts, and emotional appeal found in
the material viewed or listened to
3. Promote openness and transparency in evaluating statements and
advertisements commonly encountered

II. LEARNING CONTENT


Lesson: Logic, Facts or Appeal
Materials:
1. PowerPoint Presentation
2. Paper and Pen
3. Laptop, Speaker and Projector
References:
1. K to 12 Curriculum Guide (May 2016) p. 207
2. A Journey through Anglo-American Literature Learner‘s Material for English
pp. 282-283
3. Teacher‘s Guide p. 154
4. Online References
III. LEARNING TASKS
Introduction: Have you ever found yourself arguing with a friend over something
you knew to be true but you just couldn‘t find a way to convince him to believe
you? In everything we do and say we have to be wise. We need to be a critical
thinker to determine the worth of our ideas.

Preliminary Activity:
TASK 1: SHARING THOUGHTS
How are you going to sell someone a product you
know nothing about?
What are you going to do to convince someone of
what you are talking about?

Activity:

TASK 2: PHILIPPINE TV ADS


The students will be shown three (3) TV commercials in the
Philippines.

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-VSN Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Vd


qAWD5c0 G8eCxors

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oG2jPG
pN0Zs
Analysis:
Questions to Answer:
1. In which of the commercials are you most convinced?
2. What makes the commercial convincing? If not, what‘s
wrong with them?
3. In the first commercial, is there any connection with the
tag line and the situation?
4. In the second commercial, are you convinced to buy the products more than
you‘re moved with the story it presents?
5. In the third commercial, is there an evidence supporting the claim that the
product is the best?

Abstraction:
TASK 3: FIRMING UP
Read the discussion below and decide which among the commercials falls
under each.

1. Faulty logic is a kind of persuasive technique having fault or


imperfect reasoning or sound judgment.
2. Unsupported fact is not upheld by evidence or facts;
unsubstantiated (unconfirmed).
3. An emotional appeal is a method of persuasion appealing to
both the brain and the heart.

Application:

TASK 4: BE WISE
In everything you do and say you have to be wise. You
should choose whether it is something to believe or not.
Likewise, you have to think several times before making a
claim so you can convince people to believe you.

Let us test your critical thinking skill in determining the worth of ideas. Listen to the
following statements. Identify the statements which have faulty logic,
unsupported facts, or emotional appeal.

1. I argued with Mrs. Bam before I turned in my homework so I got a bad grade
on my paper.
2. A teenager argues against the family's vacation plans and mother responds
by saying, "When you pay the bills, you can make the decisions."
3. After making it clear that he values employee "loyalty" a supervisor asks for
"volunteers" to help a fellow supervisor move on the weekend.
4. Exercising makes you feel good.
5. I know why you failed all your classes last semester. You study.

Faulty Logic Unsupported Facts Emotional Appeal


1
2
3
4
5

Assessment:
TASK 5: CHECKPOINT
Identify the statements which have faulty logic, unsupported
facts or emotional appeal.
1. Everyone wants to get married someday. A good self-
concept is important in attracting a husband or wife.
Therefore, everyone should develop a good self-concept.
2. An ordinary Jew was required to wash and change his clothes before visiting
the inner court of the temple.
3. Students who take earth science instead of physics are lazy. Susie took earth
science instead of physics. She should be kicked out of school.
4. ―I loved that movie we saw last night with Brad Pitt. I am going to rent all of his
movies, and I am sure I‘ll like all of them.‖
5. Ms. Bauer is an incompetent math teacher. She is "a big fat idiot."
6. "Science shows that the Earth is billions of years old!"
7. There must be objective rights and wrongs in the universe. If not, how can
you possibly say that torturing babies for fun could ever be right?
8. As Mayor, my top priority will be improving education. So my first act of office
will be to cut funding for our public schools.
9. I know why you failed all your classes last semester. You don‘t study.
10. I met a little boy with cancer who lived just 20 miles from a power line who
looked into my eyes and said, in his weak voice, ―Please do whatever you
can so that other kids won‘t have to go through what I am going through.‖
CITY SCHOOLS DIVISION OF TAYABAS
Tayabas City

LESSON EXEMPLAR
Grade 9-English

Quarter: THIRD
Theme: Connecting to the World
Sub-Theme: Despite Differences in Points of View

Content Standard: Performance Standard:


The learner demonstrates understanding The learner skilfully performs in one-act
of how Anglo-American literature and play through utilizing effective verbal
other text types serve as a means of and non-verbal strategies and ICT
connecting to the world; also how to use resources based on the following
ways of analysing one-act play and criteria: Focus, Voice, Delivery, and
different forms of verbals for him/her to Dramatic Conventions.
skilfully perform in one-act play.

I. LEARNING COMPETENCY
EN9LT-IIIe-16: Analyze literature as a means of connecting to the world
EN9V-IIIe-29: Get familiar with the technical vocabulary for drama and theatre (like
stage directions)

Objectives:
1. Analyze the initial scenes of a world renowned Shakespearean play
2. Familiarize oneself with theatre related terminologies
3. Identify sensory images used in the text
4. Write their own act and version of Romeo and Juliet
5. Exhibit active participation in discussing Romeo and Juliet through
collaborative activities

II. LEARNING CONTENT


Lesson: “Romeo and Juliet” (First Encounter) by William Shakespeare
Materials:
1. Copy of the Text
2. Laptop, Speaker, Projector
References:
1. K to 12 Curriculum Guide (May 2016) pp. 207
2. A Journey through Anglo-American Literature Learner‘s Material for English pp.
283-293
3. Teacher‘s Guide pp.154-159
4. Online References
III. LEARNING TASKS
Introduction: ―To believe in love, to be ready to give up anything for it,
To be willing to risk your life for it, is the ultimate tragedy.‖

Preliminary Activity:
TASK 1: EYES HERE
Watch a music video from popular romantic and tragic play ―Romeo
and Juliet‖.
Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4FHpmn-KYec

 Fill up the requited information in the Visualization Plot Worksheet below to


analyze the music video. (LM, p. 284)

The story begins with…

A problem the character has is …

They try to solve the problem by…

They finally solve the problem when …

TASK 2: UNSCRAMBLE THE LETTERS


As Romeo and Juliet is a stage play, learn who are the persons involved in the
performance of a play. Arrange the letters on the right to define what is being
described on the left. (LM, pp. 284-285)

The backstage technical crew responsible for


running the show
In small theater companies the same persons GSATE WECR
build the set and handle the load-in. Then, during
the performances, they change the scenery and
handle the curtain.

A male or female person who performs a role in a


TRSAIT
play, television, or movie

\
The person who oversees the entire process of
CREORDTI
staging a production

A group of theatrical artists working together to


create theatrical production.
BNSELNEM

Activity:
TASK 3: SEARCH AND MATCH
Look for the words in the chart that match the meanings below.
(LM, p. 285-286)

P E R N I C I O U S
U W R D S A H T S T
N D R Q L S F G W A
I S P I I L X C B B
S B E N V G J L M W
H F A D E A M O O Q
M B F D G A L E D P
E L D N M O S L S E
N A L T O M B E R S
T L S M O P Q R S T

1. Send away from a country or place as an official punishment


___________________________________________________________
2. A wound produced by a pointed object or weapon
___________________________________________________________
3. Causing great harm or damage often in a way that is not easily seen or
noticed
___________________________________________________________
4. A penalty inflicted on an offender through judicial procedure
___________________________________________________________
Analysis:
TASK 4: READING CORNER
Read ―The Story of Romeo and Juliet‖ on pages 286 to 291 of your
English module.

TASK 5: MAKING CONNECTIONS


A. What the Text Says
Each group will choose a question word. Afterwards the teacher will
reveal the complete question. (LM, p. 292)

What two families are


feuding? Explain the
reason for the family feud.

Who are the characters


in the story? Make a
character diagram.

Where does the


story take place?

When does the story


take place?

Why does Lady


Capulet want Juliet to
marry Paris?

B. What the Text Means


Answer the questions below. (LM, p.293)
B1. Discuss the relationships between parents and children in Romeo and
Juliet . How do Romeo and Juliet interact with their parents? Are they
rebellious, in the modern sense? Explain your answer. How do the
parents feel about them?
B2. What is Romeo‘s fear ? What does the line? ―some consequence, yet
hanging in the stars‖ has to do with his feeling of dread? What does it
convey?
B3. The feud between the families seems to be an ever-present concern for
the characters. How do the characters manifest this feud?

C. Take to Mean
Who said the following lines and why? (LM, p. 292)
a. ―Is she a Capulet? O, dear, account, my lie is a foe of debt!‖
b. ―My only love sprung from m only hate. Too early seen unknown and
known too late.‖

Abstraction:

TASK 6: PICK A CARD


Group yourselves into two. Get one card and act out the conversation
in the given situation.

CARD 1 CARD 2

You are 15. You know a very You are 15. You‘ve heard
beautiful girl called Juliet and from your friends that a boy
you would like to marry her. called Paris would like to
You have decided to go and marry you. He‘s very rich and
talk to her. Prepare what you handsome but not really your
are going to say to make a type and you don‘t love him.
good impression. Let her know What are you going to say
how you feel. You are rich when he comes to speak to
and handsome and know you.
that you are good catch.

ROLE PLAY RUBRIC


RATING
CRITERIA
5 4 3 2 1
Speech was clear with appropriate volume and inflection.

Role was played in a convincing, consistent manner.

Arguments and viewpoints expressed fit role played.

Role-play was organized.

Role-play captured and maintained audience interest.

Total

Application:

TASK 7: SENSORY IMAGES

From the excerpted play of Romeo and Juliet identify the scenes that appeal to the
senses. Accomplish the graphic organizer on the next page. Use another sheet of
paper for this task. (LM, p. 293)
Sight
Hearing

Taste

Touch

Smell

Assessment:

TASK 8: LIGHTS CAMERA ACTION!


1. Group yourselves into three, act out the first part of the
play Romeo and Juliet.
2. You are given time to work on a rough script (15
minutes) and then to practice (15 minutes).
3. You must write out the dialogue in modern English.
Refer to your text. (LM, p. 301)

ROLE PLAY RUBRIC

Exceptional Admirable Acceptable Attempted


Criteria
4pts. 3pts. 2pts. 1pt.

Understanding  Indicates a clear  Good


 Fair understanding  Presentation is off
of Topic understanding of understanding of
of topic topic
topic topic

 All members  Some members  Few members  Group does not


Cooperation contribute by contribute by contribute by work together in
playing role well playing role well playing role well playing their roles

 Shows confidence  Shows some


 Unsure of
 Informative confidence  Portrayal stalls
responsibility
 Entertaining;  Presents some  Lacks information
 Somewhat
engages information  Audience bored
Presentation audience  Engages
informative
 Mumbles
 Engages audience
 Speaks loudly and audience  Body language is
intermittently
clearly  Can be heard lacking;
 Hard to hear
 Appropriate use of  Some use of body inappropriate
 Some movement
body language language
Source: cte.sfasu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/Skit.doc
The Story of ROMEO & JULIET
Based on the play by William Shakespeare, as told by Bart Marks

In the town of Verona lived two families, the Capulets and the Montagues, engaged in
a bitter feud. Among the Montagues was Romeo, a hot-blooded lad with an eye for the
ladies.

One day, Romeo was recounting for his friends his love for Rosaline, a haughty beauty
from a well-to-dofamily. Romeo's friends chided him for his "love of love" but agreed to a
plan to attend the feast of the Capulets', a costume party where Rosaline was expected to
make an appearance. The disguises would provide Romeo and his friends a bit of sport and
the opportunity to gaze undetected upon the fair Rosaline. Once there, however, Romeo's
eyes fell upon Juliet, and he thought of Rosaline no more.

Asking around to learn the identity of Juliet, Romeo's voice is recognized by Tybalt, a
member of the Capulet clan. Tybalt calls for his sword, but the elder Capulet intervenes,
insisting that no blood be shed in his home. So Romeo is tolerated long enough to find an
opportunity to speak to Juliet alone, still unaware of her identity.

A hall in Capulet's house.


Musicians waiting.
Enter Servingmen with napkins
First Servant
Where's Potpan, that he helps not to take away?
He shift a trencher? He scrape a trencher!

Second Servant
When good manners shall lie all in one or two men's
hands and they unwashed too, 'tis a foul thing.

First Servant
Away with the joint-stools, remove the
court-cupboard, look to the plate. Good thou, save
me a piece of marchpane; and, as thou lovest me, let
the porter let in Susan Grindstone and Nell.
Antony, and Potpan!

As yonder lady o'er her fellows shows.


The measure done, I'll watch her place of stand,
And, touching hers, make blessed my rude
hand.
Did my heart love till now? forswear it, sight!
For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night.

TYBALT
Second Capulet
'Tis more, 'tis more, his son is elder, sir;
His son is thirty.

CAPULET
Will you tell me that?
His son was but a ward two years ago.

ROMEO
[To a Servingman] What lady is that, which doth
enrich the hand
Of yonder knight?

Servant
I know not, sir.

ROMEO
O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!
It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night
Like a rich jewel in an Ethiope's ear;
Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear!
So shows a snowy dove trooping with crows, 2

CAPULET
He shall be endured:
What, goodman boy! I say, he shall: go to;
Am I the master here, or you? go to.
You'll not endure him! God shall mend my soul!
You'll make a mutiny among my guests!
You will set cock-a-hoop! you'll be the man!
This, by his voice, should be a Montague.
Fetch me my rapier, boy. What dares the slave
Come hither, cover'd with an antic face,
To fleer and scorn at our solemnity?
Now, by the stock and honour of my kin,
To strike him dead, I hold it not a sin.

CAPULET
Why, how now, kinsman! wherefore storm you so?

TYBALT
Uncle, this is a Montague, our foe,
A villain that is hither come in spite,
To scorn at our solemnity this night.

CAPULET
Young Romeo is it?

TYBALT
'Tis he, that villain Romeo.

CAPULET
Content thee, gentle coz, let him alone;
He bears him like a portly gentleman;
And, to say truth, Verona brags of him
To be a virtuous and well-govern'd youth:
I would not for the wealth of all the town
Here in my house do him disparagement:
Therefore be patient, take no note of him:
It is my will, the which if thou respect,
Show a fair presence and put off these frowns,
And ill-beseeming semblance for a feast.

TYBALT
It fits, when such a villain is a guest:
I'll not endure him.

CAPULET
He shall be endured: 3
Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer
What, goodman boy! I say, he shall: go to;
Am I the master here, or you? go to.
You'll not endure him! God shall mend my soul!
You'll make a mutiny among my guests!
You will set cock-a-hoop! you'll be the man!

TYBALT
Why, uncle, 'tis a shame.
CAPULET
Go to, go to;
You are a saucy boy: is't so, indeed?
This trick may chance to scathe you, I know what:
You must contrary me! marry, 'tis time.
Well said, my hearts! You are a princox; go:
Be quiet, or--More light, more light! For shame!
I'll make you quiet. What, cheerly, my hearts!

TYBALT
Patience perforce with wilful choler meeting
Makes my flesh tremble in their different greeting.
I will withdraw: but this intrusion shall
Now seeming sweet convert to bitter gall.
Exit

ROMEO
[To JULIET] If I profane with my unworthiest hand
This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this:
My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand
To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.

JULIET
Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much,
Which mannerly devotion shows in this;
For saints have hands that pilgrims' hands do
touch,
And palm to palm is holy palmers' kiss.

ROMEO
Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too?

JULIET
Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer.

ROMEO
O, then, dear saint, let lips do what hands do;
They pray, grant thou, lest faith turn to despair.

CAPULET
Go to, go to;
You are a saucy boy: is't so, indeed?
This trick may chance to scathe you, I know
what:
You must contrary me! marry, 'tis time.
Well said, my hearts! You are a princox; go:
Be quiet, or--More light, more light! For shame!
I'll make you quiet. What, cheerly, my hearts!

TYBALT
Patience perforce with wilful choler meeting
Makes my flesh tremble in their different
greeting.
I will withdraw: but this intrusion shall
Now seeming sweet convert to bitter gall.
Exit

ROMEO
[To JULIET] If I profane with my unworthiest
hand
This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this:
My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand
To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.

JULIET
Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too
much,
Which mannerly devotion shows in this;
For saints have hands that pilgrims' hands do
touch,
And palm to palm is holy palmers' kiss.

ROMEO
Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too?

BENVOLIO
Away, begone; the sport is at the best.

ROMEO
Ay, so I fear; the more is my unrest.

CAPULET
Nay, gentlemen, prepare not to be gone;
We have a trifling foolish banquet towards.
Is it e'en so? why, then, I thank you all
I thank you, honest gentlemen; good night.
More torches here! Come on then, let's to bed.
Saints do not move, though grant for prayers'
sake.

ROMEO
Then move not, while my prayer's effect I take.
Thus from my lips, by yours, my sin is purged.

JULIET
Then have my lips the sin that they have took.

ROMEO
Sin from thy lips? O trespass sweetly urged!
Give me my sin again.

JULIET
You kiss by the book.

Nurse
Madam, your mother craves a word with you.

ROMEO
What is her mother?

Nurse
Marry, bachelor,
Her mother is the lady of the house,
And a good lady, and a wise and virtuous
I nursed her daughter, that you talk'd withal;
I tell you, he that can lay hold of her
Shall have the chinks.

ROMEO
Is she a Capulet?
O dear account! my life is my foe's debt.

JULIET
My only love sprung from my only hate!
Too early seen unknown, and known too late!
Prodigious birth of love it is to me,
That I must love a loathed enemy.

Nurse
What's this? what's this?

JULIET
A rhyme I learn'd even now
Ah, sirrah, by my fay, it waxes late:
I'll to my rest.

Exeunt all but JULIET and Nurse

JULIET
Come hither, nurse. What is yond gentleman?

Nurse
The son and heir of old Tiberio.

JULIET
What's he that now is going out of door?

Nurse
Marry, that, I think, be young Petrucio.

JULIET
What's he that follows there, that would not dance?

Nurse
I know not.

JULIET
Go ask his name: if he be married.
My grave is like to be my wedding bed.

Nurse
His name is Romeo, and a Montague;
The only son of your great enemy.
Of one I danced withal.
One calls within 'Juliet.'

Nurse
Anon, anon!
Come, let's away; the strangers all are gone.
CITY SCHOOLS DIVISION OF TAYABAS
Tayabas City

LESSON EXEMPLAR
Grade 9-English

Quarter: THIRD
Theme: Connecting to the World
Sub-Theme: Despite Differences in Points of View

Content Standard: Performance Standard:


The learner demonstrates understanding The learner skillfully performs in one-act
of how Anglo-American literature and play through utilizing effective verbal and
other text types serve as means of non-verbal strategies and ICT resources
connecting to the world; also how to use based on the following criteria: Focus,
ways of analyzing one-act play and Voice, Delivery, and Dramatic
different forms of verbals for him/her too Conventions.
skillfully perform in a one-act play.

I. LEARNING COMPETENCY
EN9LT-IIIe-20.2: Explain the literary devices used

Objectives:
1. Define the different literary devices
2. Explain the literary devices used in given passages or lines
3. Express appreciation in the use of different literary devices in creating own
sample statements

II. LEARNING CONTENT


Lesson: Literary Devices - Simile, Foreshadowing, Rhyme,
Repetition, Oxymoron, Metaphors
Materials:
1. Manila Paper and Marker
References:
1. K to 12 Curriculum Guide (May 2016) p. 207
2. A Journey through Anglo-American Literature Learner‘s Material for English
pp. 293-295
3. Online References

III. LEARNING TASKS


Introduction: The English language encompasses a host of literary devices that make
it so rich and expressive. They provide a broad structure under which all the types of
literature are classified, studied, and understood. The importance of literature in the
portrayal of human emotions is best understood by the application of these devices.
Preliminary Activity:
TASK 1: WORD HUNT
Search in the puzzle the following words:
Simile, Foreshadowing, Rhyme,
Repetition, Oxymoron, Metaphor

A K B F O R E S H A D O W I N G
B Q K F X R S I V T C U T M L C
F C X B Y F J M E T A P H O R J
A R H Y M E C I W C K A H N L S
P D O E O D A L H B I G J B H R
A G Y B R E P E T I T I O N B C
P N Z G O D Y J X M L E K V W Q
O J E F N E U G I J D I L H M P

Activity:

TASK 2: AN OVERVIEW

Match the given passages or lines in Box A to the technique employed in Box B.

A B

Life is like a book, full of Description gives us the clue with


chapters and stories. something that is about to
happen
Life is a rose, beautiful yet full of
thorns. Two objects or ideas are
compared in an obvious way
The deafening silence is creepy.
Word is mentioned twice in the
O Tyger, Tyger, burning bright!
line
I think that I shall never see,
Two objects or ideas are
A poem as lovely as a tree.
compared without using word
that would make it obvious
He didn‘t bring his umbrella but
the ominous clouds told him he Last word in each line sound alike
made the wrong move.
Two contradicting words are put
next to each other within the
sentence
Analysis:
TASK 3: IN THE KNOW
The meaning of the different literary devices encountered in the puzzle will be
revealed. Find out which statement in Task 2 fall under each literary device. Place
the statements on the wooden board provided for the sample under each type of
literary device. (LM, pp. 293-295)

 SIMILES are one of the most commonly used


literary devices; referring to the practice of
drawing parallels or comparisons between two
unrelated and dissimilar things, people, beings,
places, and concepts. They are marked by the
use of words ―as‖ or ―such as‖ or ―like‖.

 FORESHADOWING refers to the use of


indicative words/phrases and hints that set
the stage for a story to unfold and give the
reader a hint of something that is going to
happen without revealing the story or
spoiling the suspense. Foreshadowing is
used to suggest an upcoming outcome to
the story.

 RHYME is the practice of placing rhyming


words often at the end of the lines in prose or
poetry. It refers to the corresponding of
sounds between words or the ending of
words,
 REPETITION is just the simple repetition of a
word, within a sentence or a poetical line,
with no particular placement of the words.
This is such a common literary device that
it is almost never even noted as a figure of
speech.

 OXYMORON is a significant literary device


as it allows the author to use
contradictory, contrasting concepts
placed together in a manner that actually
ends up making sense in a strange and
slightly complex manner. It helps to
perceive a deeper level of truth and
explore different layers of semantics while
writing.

 METAPHORS are one of the most


extensively used by way of another. In a
metaphor, one subject is implied to be
another so as to draw a comparison
between their similarities and shared traits.

Abstraction:
TASK 4: WRITE ON!
Try writing your own sample statements using the
literary device prescribed in each item to make
them more interesting. On the left box is the
original statement. Write the improved statement on the right box.

Example:
Metaphor
Before: Love can bring happiness to a person’s life.
After: Love is a fire that envelopes one in warmth and bliss.
SIMILE

Life is both easy


and hard.

METAPHOR

Love is the most


wonderful feeling
in the world.
FORESHADOWING

Today is my lucky
day.

REPETITION

President, hear our


pleas.

RHYME

High school life is


the best…

Application:
TASK 5: COLLABORATIVE WRITING
The class will be divided into six (6) groups. Each group will be
assigned to one literary device discussed. The group is to come up
with five examples for the literary device assigned to them. Outputs
will be written in a manila paper.
Assessment:

TASK 6: CHECKPOINT
Identify the literary device used in the following lines lifted from
Romeo and Juliet. Write SIM for simile, MET for metaphor, OXY for
oxymoron, REP for repetition, RHY for rhyme, and FOR for
foreshadowing. (LM, p. 296)
___________1. Parting is such a sweet sorrow.
___________2. Oh loving hate!
___________3. Romeo, Romeo, where art thou Romeo?
___________4. My life is a foe of debt!
___________5. ―And to ‗thy go like lightning‖
___________6. Romeo: By some vile forfeit of the untimely death
___________7. Prodigious birth of love is it to me,
That I must love a loathed enemy.
CITY SCHOOLS DIVISION OF TAYABAS
Tayabas City

LESSON EXEMPLAR
Grade 9-English

Quarter: THIRD
Theme: Connecting to the World
Sub-Theme: Despite Differences in Points of View

Content Standard: Performance Standard:


The learner demonstrates understanding The learner skillfully performs in one-act
of how Anglo-American literature and play through utilizing effective verbal and
other text types serve as means of non-verbal strategies and ICT resources
connecting to the world; also how to use based on the following criteria: Focus,
ways of analysing one-act play and Voice, Delivery, and Dramatic
different forms of verbals for him/her to Conventions.
skillfully perform in a one-act play.

I. LEARNING COMPETENCY
EN9G-IIIe-21: Use verbals

Objectives:
1. Recognize the use of infinitives in sentences
2. Match sentence halves with verbs and expressions that are followed by
infinitives
3. Use the correct form of infinitives in completing sentences
4. Share personal insights through constructing sentences with verbals such as
infinitives

II. LEARNING CONTENT


Lesson: Infinitives
Materials:
1. Worksheets
2. Metacards
References:
1. K to 12 Curriculum Guide (May 2016) p. 207
2. A Journey through Anglo-American Literature Learner‘s Material for English
pp. 295-296
3. Teacher‘s Guide
4. Online References
III. LEARNING TASKS
Introduction: Why do we do something? In this lesson, you will have to explain why
you do things and complete the phrases by using a particular grammatical
construct.
Preliminary Activity:
TASK 1: COMPLETE ME BOARD GAME
Draw a dice and complete the phrases on the board.

Source: https://en.islcollective.com/resources/printables/worksheets_
doc_docx/infinitive_with_to_board_game/gerunds-and-infinitives/32322

Activity:
TASK 2: DEFINE ITS PURPOSE!
A. Split class into teams. Each team has 30 seconds to describe the purpose of the
objects on the cards.

B. Match the sentences halves 1-6 a-f to make complete sentences.


1. I go to the gym 3 times a week a. to give to her mother.
2. I went to the supermarket b. to see the Train To Busan film.
3. We went to the cinema c. to do the weekly shop.
4. I drove all night just d. to clean underneath it.
5. He lifted up the sofa e. to keep fit.
6. She bought chocolates f. to see you.
Analysis
TASK 3: INFINITIVES AT WORK
Infinitives are the “to” form of the verb. The infinitive form of “learn‖ is
“to learn.”
A.
Read the following lines from the play ―Romeo and Juliet” and underline the
infintives.

To strike him dead, I hold it not a sin.

To scorn at our solemnity this night.

To be a virtuous and well governed youth.

To smooth the rough touch with tender kiss.

B. Look for a partner and ask each other the following questions using infinitives.

1. What do you hope to accomplish in five years?

2. What are you willing to sacrifice for your family?

3. As a youth leader, what are you willing to do?

Abstraction:

FUNCTIONS OF INFINITIVES
 INFINITIVES AS NOUNS
Infinitives can be used as the subject, the complement or the object of
a sentence.
Examples: To err is human. – Subject
Maria’s dream is to finish her studies. – Complement
Monica always wanted to dance. - Object
INFINITIVES AS ADJECTIVES
Infinitives used as adjectives modify/ describe nouns.

Examples: The candidate to trust is Tony.

He has the great ability to paint.

 INFINITIVES AS ADVERBS
Infinitives used as adverbs modify/describe verbs, adjectives
and other adverbs .

Examples: My grandmother has come to stay.

The team was too slow to score.

TASK 4: TRY THIS!


Read the following lines and identify the use of the infinitives
in each sentence.
Uncle, this is a Montague, our foe; a villain, that is hither
come in
Spite to score at our solemnity this night.
I must another way, to fetch a ladder, by the which your love must climb a bird’s nest
soon when it is dark.
These times of woe afford no times to woo.
Come, is the bride ready to go to church?
Here is a friar, and slaughtered Romeo’s man, with instruments upon them fit to open
these dead men’s tombs.

TASK 5: FIT AND RIGHT


Write the infinitive in each sentence. Then beside each write ADJ if it is used as an
adjective and ADV if it is used as an adverb.
1. The choir was ready to perform.
2. He worked to get ahead in the ladder of education.
3. He gave me a book to read.
4. The passage from the Bible is hard to translate.
5. The boys are coming this weekend to play tennis
Application:

TASK 6: BIG LEAGUE


Complete the following sentences with the infinitive used as indicated
inside the parentheses.

1. Here is the lesson _____________________. ( adjective)


2. The team was ready ____________________. (adverb)
3. My friend were sorry ______________________. (adjective)
4. She promised never ______________________. (adverb)
5. I don‘t have time ________________________. (adjective)

Assessment:

TASK 7: CHECKPOINT
Circle the infinitives in the sentences below. Write the infinitive‘s
function in the sentence in the blank under the sentence.

1. His goal was to succeed.


____________________________________________________________
2. To refuse was not an option, so we agreed with their demands.
___________________________________________________________
3. My brother likes to sing.
____________________________________________________________
4. The team must score to win.
___________________________________________________________
5. The counselor has the ability to help.
___________________________________________________________
6. Her dog just wanted to play.
___________________________________________________________
7. To laugh seemed rude, but the story was funny.
___________________________________________________________
8. For the dishes tonight, your job is to dry.
___________________________________________________________
CITY SCHOOLS DIVISION OF TAYABAS
Tayabas City

LESSON EXEMPLAR
Grade 9-English

Quarter: THIRD
Theme: Connecting to the World
Sub-Theme: With Fortitude and Determination

Content Standard: Performance Standard:


The learner demonstrates understanding The learner skillfully performs in one-act
of how Anglo-American literature and play through utilizing effective verbal and
other text types serve as means of non-verbal strategies and ICT resources
connecting to the world; also how to use based on the following criteria: Focus,
ways of analysing one-act play and Voice, Delivery, and Dramatic
different forms of verbals for him/her to Conventions.
skillfully perform in a one-act play.

I. LEARNING COMPETENCY
EN9LT-IIIf-20.2: Explain the literary devices used
EN9WC-IIIf-9.5: Use literary devices and techniques to craft a play synopsis

Objectives:
1. Acquire a clear understanding on the concept of literary devices namely
apostrophe and understatement
2. Employ the use of these two literary devices in writing a play synopsis
3. Demonstrate appreciation of tasks involving explanation of literary devices
employed in writing

II. LEARNING CONTENT


Lesson: Literary Devices - Apostrophe, Metaphor, Personification,
Hyperbole and Understatement
Materials:
1. Metacards
2. Tarpapel
3. Paper and Markers
References:
1. K to 12 Curriculum Guide (May 2016) pp. 207-208
2. A Journey through Anglo-American Literature Learner‘s Material for English
p. 312
3. Online References
http://www.literarydevices.com/understatement/
http://literarydevices.net/apostrophe/
https://blog.udemy.com/metaphor-poem-examples/
http://literarydevices.net/personification/
III. LEARNING TASKS
Introduction: Figurative language is said to be linguistic miracles. Let‘s get to know
five literary devices that can transform simple statements to more emotionally
evocative ones.

Preliminary Activity:
TASK 1: SHARING
Which line/s from the play Romeo and Juliet is your favorite?
Why?

Activity:
TASK 2: ONE-ACT
Deliver the following lines taken from the play Romeo and Juliet.

"Ay, ay, a scratch; marry, ‘tis enough."

“I am no pilot; yet, wert thou as far/ As that vast shore wash’d with
the farthest sea,/ I would adventure for such merchandise.”

“Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon.”

“But soft! what light through yonder window breaks? It is the east,
and Juliet is the sun.”

“Every cat and dog/ And little mouse, every unworthy thing,/ Live
here in heaven and may look upon her.”

Analysis:
TASK 3: LOOKING CLOSELY
Given here are the definitions and examples of different literary
devices. Identify which among the lines you delivered in the
previous activity falls under each.

Apostrophe – is an address to someone who is absent and cannot hear the


speaker, or to something nonhuman that cannot understand what is said. An
apostrophe allows the speaker to think aloud, and reveals those thoughts to
the audience.

Examples:
O God! Can I not grasp
Them with a tighter clasp?
O God! can I not save
One from the pitiless wave?
~ ―A Dream within a Dream‖ -1827 Lines 19-22
―Oh, lady bright! can it be right— / This window open to the night?‖
―Oh, lady dear, hast thou no fear? / Why and what art thou dreaming here?‖
~―The Sleeper‖ – 1831 Lines 18-19, 31-32

"O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?"


―O happy dagger, /This is thy sheath. / There rust and let me die.‖
―Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon. ―
~ Romeo and Juliet

Metaphor – is a comparison of two things that are basically dissimilar in which


one is described in terms of the other.

Examples:
―She is all states, and all princes, I.‖
~ ―The Sun Rising‖
―I‘m a riddle in nine syllables,
An elephant, a ponderous house,
A melon strolling on two tendrils.‖
~ Sylvia Plath
―The Moon‘s a snowball. See the drifts
Of white that cross the sphere.‖
~ What the Snow Man Said

Personification – is a figure of speech in which an object, abstract idea, or


animal is given human characteristics.

Examples:
―The woods are getting ready to sleep—they are not yet asleep but they are
disrobing and are having all sorts of little bed-time conferences and whisperings and
good-nights.‖
~ The Green Gables Letters
―Loveliest of trees, the cherry now/ Is hung with bloom along the bough,/ And stands
about the woodland ride/ Wearing white for Eastertide.‖
~ Loveliest of Trees the Cherry Now

Hyperbole – is exaggeration for emphasis; overstatement.

Examples:
―I‘ll love you till the ocean
Is folded and hung up to dry.‖
~ As I Walked One Evening

―I had to wait in the station for ten days-an eternity.‖


~ The Heart of Darkness
Understatement – is way of speaking which minimizes the significance of
something. When using understatement, a speaker or writer often employs
restraint in describing the situation at hand and uses an expression with less
emphasis or strength than would be expected.

Examples:
"A soiled baby, with a neglected nose, cannot be conscientiously regarded as a
thing of beauty."
~ (Mark Twain)
"I have to have this operation. It isn't very serious. I have this tiny little tumor on the
brain."
~ (Holden Caulfield in The Catcher In The Rye
"Last week I saw a woman flayed, and you will hardly believe how much it altered
her person for the worse."
~ A Tale of a Tub
"The grave's a fine and private place,
But none, I think, do there embrace."
~ Andrew Marvell, "To His Coy Mistress"
"I am just going outside and may be some time."
~ Captain Lawrence Oates, Antarctic explorer,
before walking out into a blizzard to face certain
death, 1912
Abstraction

TASK 4: PRACTICE ON LITERARY DEVICES


A. Encircle the letter of your answer.
1. Choose the correct definition of apostrophe as a literary
device.
A. A punctuation mark that stands in place of omitted letters.
B. An exclamatory figure of speech when a character turns from addressing
one party to another party or inanimate object.
C. The act of omitting information necessary to the plot to keep readers guessing.

2. Which of the following quotes from Herman Melville‘s story ―Bartleby, the Scrivener‖
is an example of apostrophe?
A. Ah Bartleby! Ah Humanity!
B. I would prefer not to.
C. Nothing so aggravates an earnest person as a passive resistance.
3. Why is the following excerpt from Shakespeare‘s Romeo and Juliet an example of
apostrophe as a literary device?
JULIET: Yea, noise? Then I’ll be brief. O happy dagger! This is thy sheath; there rust,
and let me die.
B. Write an understatement on the following situations:
1. When one is sweating profusely in a sauna or traveling through
a desert at midday
2. After completing a marathon
3. After having not slept all night long
4. When cornered in battle
5. Surrounded by sharks while in a lifeboat

C. What would be your reaction in the following


situations? Write statements using hyperbole.
1. You win 100 million pesos in a lottery.
2. Your team loses to its opponent 50 to 0 in a
basketball match.
3. You lost your new iphone7.
4. You receive a bouquet of red roses and a box of chocolates.
5. You are trapped in a dark room.

D. Identify if the statements used personification or


hyperbole. Write PER for personification and HYP for
hyperbole.
1. The dog was a jack-in-the-box, trying to jump up on the
visitors.
2. The full moon guided me through the dark streets.
3. The pool was a boiling cauldron on that hot summer day.
4. "Chocolate is my ray of sunshine on a bad day," admitted Reena.
5. Cars danced across the icy road.

Application

TASK 5: YOU’RE THE BOSS


Write a short synopsis or summary of your own play or drama you
imagine writing about. Include at least three statements using any
of the three literary devices discussed.
SYNOPSIS WRITING RUBRIC

Criteria Excellent Good Below Average Ineffective


Main Idea Main idea is unclear-
Main idea is The main idea is not
Main idea is clear. not specifically stated
established. present.
in the writing.
Supporting Important details are
All important details Some critical Synopsis contains only
included but some
Details are included.
might be missing.
information is missing. some details.

Format Details are in logical Ideas are not in a


Most of the ideas are Ideas are in random
order because the logical order because
in logical order. order and not logical.
format is followed. format is not observed.
Content The synopsis contains The synopsis contains
The synopsis contains There is no use of
at least three (3) only two (2)
only one (1) statement literary devices as
statements using statements using
using literary device. required.
literary device. literary device.

Reference: www.studyzone.org/testprep/ela4/h/summaryrubric.htm

Assessment

TASK 6: CHECKPOINT
Identify the literary devices (APOSTROPHE, METAPHOR,
PERSONIFICATION, HYPERBOLE, or UNDERSTATEMENT) used in the
following passsages:

______________1. O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth,


That I am meek and gentle with these butchers!
Thou art the ruins of the noblest man
That ever lived in the tide of times."
~Shakespeare, Julius Caesar, Act 3, Scene 1

______________ 2. BENVOLIO: What, art thou hurt?


MERCUTIO: Ay, ay, a scratch, a scratch. Marry, ‘tis enough.
Where is my page?—Go, villain, fetch a surgeon.
ROMEO: Courage, man. The hurt cannot be much.
MERCUTIO: No, ‘tis not so deep as a well nor so wide as a church-
door, but ‘tis enough, ‘twill serve. Ask for me tomorrow,
and you shall find me a grave man. I am peppered, I
warrant, for this world. A plague o‘ both your houses!
Zounds, a dog, a rat, a mouse, a cat to scratch a man
to death!

_____________ 3. "Death, be not proud, though some have called thee


Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so."
~John Donne, Holy Sonnet X

_____________ 4. Hey diddle, Diddle,


The cat and the fiddle,
The cow jumped over the moon;
The little dog laughed
To see such sport,
And the dish ran away with the spoon.
~ Hey Diddle, Diddle

_____________ 5. "Hello darkness, my old friend


I've come to talk with you again."
~Paul Simon, The Sounds of Silence

_____________ 6. I‘ve got a nice place here,‖ he said, his eyes flashing about restlessly.

_____________ 7. ―I‘ll go with you and I‘ll stay with you all the time. They just let the air
in and then it‘s all perfectly natural.‖

_____________ 8. But tree, I have seen you taken and tossed,


And if you have seen me when I slept,
You have seen me when I was taken and swept
And all but lost.
~ Tree at My Window

_____________ 9. Love is a guest that comes, unbidden.

_____________ 10. It's a slow burg. I spent a couple of weeks there one day.
CITY SCHOOLS DIVISION OF TAYABAS
Tayabas City

LESSON EXEMPLAR
Grade 9-English

Quarter: THIRD
Theme: Connecting to the World
Sub-Theme: With Fortitude and Determination

Content Standard: Performance Standard:


The learner demonstrates understanding The learner skillfully performs in one-act
of how Anglo-American literature and play through utilizing effective verbal and
other text types serve as means of non-verbal strategies and ICT resources
connecting to the world; also how to use based on the following criteria: Focus,
ways of analysing one-act play and Voice, Delivery, and Dramatic
different forms of verbals for him/her to Conventions.
skillfully perform in a one-act play.

I. LEARNING COMPETENCY
EN9V-IIIf-29: Get familiar with the technical vocabulary for drama and theatre (like
stage directions)
EN9OL-IIIa-3.7: Employ varied verbal and non-verbal strategies while performing in a
one-act play

Objectives:
1. Familiarize oneself to vocabulary terminologies essential in performing a one-
act play
2. Analyze the famous scene from the play Romeo and Juliet through a comics
3. Employ appropriate verbal and non-verbal strategies upon performing an act
from the discussed literary piece
4. Express appreciation of the literary piece by demonstrating its understanding
during the major performance

II. LEARNING CONTENT


Lesson: “Romeo and Juliet” (Balcony Scene) by William Shakespeare
Materials:
1. Pen and Paper
2. Copies of the Comics
References:
1. K to 12 Curriculum Guide (May 2016) pp. 206-207
2. A Journey through Anglo-American Literature Learner‘s Material for English
pp. 305-319
3. Online References
III. LEARNING TASKS
Introduction: Whatever your age or gender, professing love to your sweetheart is a
terrifying experience. The three little words, "I love you," make your heart race, hands
sweat, and lips tremble with trepidation. If Cupid is benevolent, your dearest may
reciprocate with love. (Khurana, 2016)

Preliminary Activity:
TASK 1: SHARING
Have you experienced confessing your feelings to someone?
How about someone confessing his/her feelings to you? Share
it to the class.

Activity:
TASK 2: WORD BANK
To be discussed is one of the scenes in the world renowned piece
Romeo and Juliet which is a stage play. Get to know first words
that have something to do with theatre. Find the missing letters to
complete the word that corresponds to the given definition.
(LM, p. 318-319)

1. b __ __ __ k __ __ g

the planning and working out of the movements of actors on stage

2. __ r __ __ s

a movement from one part of the stage to another

3. __ __ s __ t __ __ n

the direction an actor is facing relative to the audience, but from the actor’s
perspective

4. g __ s __ __ r __

an expressive movement of the body or limits

5. __ __ b __ e __ u

a silent and motionless depiction of a scene created by actors, often from a


picture
TASK 3: THE PAST
In the previous lesson, the story of Romeo and Juliet was introduced to you. Salient
points like how Romeo met Juliet and how they fell in love with each other were put
into light. How much do you know Romeo and Juliet?
Complete the character map below. Put the traits that would describe Romeo and
Juliet on the boxes. (LM, p. 306)

JULIET CAPULET ROMEO MONTAGUE

Source: http://panchi178.deviantart.com/art
/Shame-the-Stars-341251421

Analysis:
TASK 4: FAMOUS SCENE
The next scene you are about to read is called the balcony scene
which is very famous. Romeo secretly enters the Capulet orchard.
Juliet comes out on her balcony alone, Romeo and Juliet then speak
of their love for each other. Read this comics version of the scene.
Source: http://grammarmancomic.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/romeostory.pdf
LM, pp. 307-308
TASK 5: FACTUAL REACOUNT
Answer the following questions in the speech bubbles based from your
understanding of the comics. (LM, p.309)

What is Juliet worried Who knows what they


about while they were are talking secretly
talking in the balcony? about in the balcony?

How does Romeo react Where does Romeo


to what Juliet said? hide while talking to
Juliet?

What does Romeo


What proof of his love
plan to do when he
does Juliet ask from
leaves Juliet?
Romeo?

Abstraction:
TASK 6: MODERN REVISION
Group yourselves into three. Rewrite the balcony scene in everyday
speech or modern dialogue. Be sure to preserve the original intent
and meaning of the balcony scene. (LM, p. 319)

Application:

TASK 7: A TWIST
Re-enact the balcony scene of Romeo and Juliet using the modern
dialogue you have written.
CREATIVE REENACTMENT RUBRIC

Exceptional Admirable Acceptable Attempted


Criteria
4pts. 3pts. 2pts. 1pt.

Understanding  Indicates a clear  Good


 Fair understanding  Presentation is off
of Topic understanding of understanding of
of topic topic
topic topic

 All members  Some members  Few members  Group does not


Cooperation contribute by contribute by contribute by work together in
playing role well playing role well playing role well playing their roles

 Shows confidence  Shows some  Unsure of


 Portrayal stalls
 Informative confidence responsibility
 Lacks information
 Entertaining;  Presents some  Somewhat
 Audience bored
Presentation engages audience information informative
 Mumbles
 Speaks loudly and  Engages audience  Engages audience
 Body language is
clearly  Can be heard intermittently
lacking;
 Appropriate use of  Some use of body  Hard to hear
inappropriate
body language language  Some movement
Source: cte.sfasu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/Skit.doc

Assessment:
TASK 8: UNDER THE SPOTLIGHT
As a major performance output, you are expected to
perform a one-act play. You will be performing the balcony
scene of Romeo and Juliet. Be guided with the script and
rubric that will be given to you.

ONE-ACT PLAY RUBRIC

Source: http://www.rcampus.com/rubricshowc.cfm?code=T538WW&sp=true
ROMEO AND JULIET SCRIPT
The Balcony Scene
William Shakespeare

Juliet: (to herself) Ay me! And but thou love me, let them find me
Romeo: (to himself) She speaks. here.
O, speak again, bright angel for thou art My life were better ended by their hate
As glorious to this night, being o‘er my That death prorogued, wanting of thy love.
head, Juliet: By whose direction found‘st thou out this
As is a winged messenger of heaven place?
Unto the white-upturned wondering eyes Romeo: By love, that first did prompt me to inquire.
Of mortals that fall back to gaze on him. He lent me counsel, and I lent him eyes.
Juliet: (to herself) O, Romeo, Romeo. Wherefore art I am no pilot; yet, wert thou as far
thou Romeo? As that vast shore washed with the farthest
Deny thy father and refuse thy name; sea,
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love, I should adventure for such merchandise.
And I‘ll no longer be a Capulet. Juliet: Dost thou love me? I know thou wilt say
Romeo: (to himself) Shall I hear more, or shall I speak ―Aye‖;
at this? And I will take thy word. Yet, if thou swear‘st,
Juliet: ‗Tis but thy name that is my enemy. Thou mayst prove false. At lovers‘ perjuries,
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague, They say Jove laughs. O gentle Romeo,
What‘s Montague? It is nor hand, nor foot, If thou dost love, pronounce it faithfully.
Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part Romeo: Lady, by yonder blessed moon I vow,
Belonging to a man. O, be some other name! That tips with silver all these fruit-tree tops ---
What‘s in a name? That which we call a rose Juliet: O, swear not by the moon, th‘ inconstant
By any other name would smell as sweet. moon,
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call‘d, That monthly changes in her circled orb,
Retain that dear perfection which he owes Lest that thy love prove likewise variable.
Without that title, Romeo, doff thy name; Romeo: What shall I swear by?
And for thy name, which is no part of thee, Juliet: Do not swear at all;
Take all myself. Or if thou wilt, swear by thy gracious self,
Romeo: (reveals himself, to Juliet) I take thee at thy Which is the god of my idolatry,
word. And I‘ll believe thee.
Call me but love, and I‘ll be new baptized; Romeo: If my heart‘s dear love ---
Henceforth I never will be Romeo. Juliet: Well, do not swear. Although I joy in thee,
Juliet: (surprised) What man art thou that, thus I have no joy of this contract tonight.
bescreen‘d in night, It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden;
So stumblest on my counsel? Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be
Romeo: By a name Ere one can say it lightens. Sweet, good
I know not how to tell thee who I am. night!
My name, dear saint, is hateful to myself, Romeo: O, wilt thou leave me unsatisfied?
Because it is an enemy to thee. Juliet: What satisfaction canst though have tonight?
Had I written it, I would tear the word. Romeo: Th‘ exchange of thy love‘s faithful vow for
Juliet: My ears have yet not drunk a hundred words mine.
Of thy tongue‘s uttering, yet I know the Juliet: I gave thee mine before thou didst request it;
sound. And yet I would it were to give again.
Art thou not Romeo, and a Montague? Romeo: Wouldst thou withdraw it? For what
Romeo: Neither, fair maid, if either thee dislike. purpose, love?
Juliet: How camest thou hither, tell me, and Juliet: But to be frank, and give it thee again.
wherefore? And yet I wish but for the thing I have.
The orchard walls are high and hard to climb, My bounty is as boundless as the sea,
And the place death, considering who thou My love as deep; the more I give to thee,
art, The more I have, for both are infinite.
If any of my kinsmen find thee here. (Hears the nurse calling.)
Romeo: With love‘s light wings did I o‘erperch these I hear some noise within. Dear love, adieu!
walls;
For stony limits cannot hold love out,
And what love can do, that dares love
attempt.
Therefore thy kinsmen are no stop to me.
Juliet: If they do see thee, they will murder thee.
Romeo: Alack, there lies more peril in thine eye
Than twenty of their swords!
Juliet: I would not for the world they saw thee here.
Romeo: I have night‘s cloak to hide me from their
eyes;
CITY SCHOOLS DIVISION OF TAYABAS
Tayabas City

LESSON EXEMPLAR
Grade 9-English

Quarter: THIRD
Theme: Making a Difference
Sub-Theme: Across Time

Content Standard: Performance Standard:


The learner demonstrates understanding The learner skillfully performs in one-act
of how Anglo-American literature and play through utilizing effective verbal and
other text types serve as means of non-verbal strategies and ICT resources
connecting to the world; also how to use based on the following criteria: Focus,
ways of analysing one-act play and Voice, Delivery, and Dramatic
different forms of verbals for him/her to Conventions.
skillfully perform in a one-act play.

I. LEARNING COMPETENCY
EN9V-IIIg-29: Get familiar with the technical vocabulary for drama and theatre
(like stage directions)
EN9WC-IIIg-9: Compose forms of literary writing

Objectives:
1. Define the different forms of literary writing to be able to distinguish a play
from other forms
2. Familiar oneself with the technical vocabulary for drama and theater
3. Demonstrate involvement in composing a script about an alternative
ending to the literary piece discussed

II. LEARNING CONTENT


Lesson: “Romeo and Juliet” (Wedding to End) by William Shakespeare
Materials:
1. Copies of the Literary Text
2. Worksheet
References:
1. K to 12 Curriculum Guide (May 2016) p. 208
2. A Journey through Anglo-American Literature Learner‘s Material for English
pp. 327-342
3. Online References

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
III. LEARNING TASKS
Introduction: People‘s lives are shaped by the circumstances of the time and
place in which they live (family and social mores, religion, power relations, etc.).
Circumstances of life and the choices we make change and mold us.

Preliminary Activity:
TASK 1: GENRE SENSITIVITY!
Match the literary genre on the left to its definition on the right.
Write your answer on the space provided.

____________

Fiction ____________
_
Biography

Informational ____________
____________
Realistic Fiction _

Nonfiction ____________

Poetry
Drama
____________
____________
Poetry
_

____________

Source: http://bryanbibb.com/2014/11/18/can-a-genre-be-errant/

TASK 2: THEATRICAL TEXT-TWIST


Arrange the letters to form a word that matches the given
meaning. Do this in your notebook. (LM, pp. 341-342)

the degree of loudness or


U E L V O M intensity of sound

the tempo of an entire


G N I P A C theatrical performance

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
a group of theatrical
E E N L S B E M artists working
together to create a
H theatrical production

the orientation of the


P N O O S I I T actor to the audience
(e.g. full front, right
profile, left profile)

the highness or lowness of


C T P I H voice

the planning and


N G I C K L O B working out of the
movements of actors
on stage

Activity:
TASK 3: FIND YOUR MATCH
Match the word in Romeo‘s column with the definition given
in Juliet‘s. Use the sentences below as your clues. (LM, p. 326)

a. an angry
disagreement
_____ 1. terrible b. a building or
_____ 2. execute chamber above or
below the ground in
_____ 3. tomb
which a dead body
_____ 4. argument c. a
is small
kept room with shelves
_____ 5. cupboard where you keep cups,
dishes, or food
d. very shocking and upsetting
e. to kill (someone) especially
as punishment for a crime

1. Juliet my dear, something terrible happened.


2. The Prince is not going to execute you.
3. I‘ll be in the tomb, with the dead bodies around me.
4. Oh, you Montagues and Capulets, what a stupid argument.
5. He goes to a cupboard and takes out a bottle

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
Analysis:
TASK 4: PIECE OF A PUZZLE
Divide the class into groups of 10. Each member of
the group will read the assigned part in Romeo and
Juliet and will take turns in explaining their part of
the story to the rest of the group.

 Student 1: Act II, Scene IV: A Secret Wedding (p. 327)


 Student 2: Act III, Scene I: More Trouble (p. 327-329)
 Student 3: Act III, Scene II: Another Message (p. 329)
 Student 4: Act III, Scene III: Bad News for Romeo (p. 329-330)
 Student 5: Act III, Scene IV: Lord Capulet‘s Plan (p. 330-332)
 Student 6: Act IV, Scene I: Father Lawrence‘s Medicine (p. 332-333)
 Student 7: Act IV, Scene II: Another Wedding (p. 333-334)
 Student 8: Act IV, Scene III: Juliet Drinks the Medicine
Act IV, Scene IV: The Capulets Find Juliet (p. 334-335)
 Student 9: Act V, Scene I: News from Verona (p. 335-336)
 Student 10: Act V, Scene II: Together Again (p. 336-337)

TASK 5: FACTUAL RECOUNT


Answer the following question from the context of the story. Do
this in your notebook. (LM, p. 338)

1. Who are Romeo and Juliet? What is going on between the


families of the two?
2. Where is Romeo exiled? Why does Romeo feel that banishment
is worse than death?
3. How does Lord Capulet react to Juliet‘s refusal? What ultimatum
does he give her?
4. Why is there such a rush to see Juliet married?

TASK 6: THINK THROUGH


Answer the following questions with your group. Write your
answers in a manila paper for your insights to be presented to
the class later. (LM, p. 338)
Group 1

 Friar Lawrence gives this advice to Romeo and Juliet: ―Love moderately;
long love doth so.‖ What is he telling the young lovers? Do you agree
with him? Should he have given them any other advice?

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
Group 2
 What could have been done to prevent this tragedy from occurring?

Group 3
 What would have happened to Romeo and Juliet if they hadn‘t died? Is
their relationship sustainable over the time? Do they have anything to
offer each other once the initial burst of passion calmed down? Would
Romeo move on from Juliet as quickly as he moved on from Rosaline?

Group 4
 In what ways do the young adopt the beliefs of the old, and in what
ways do they ignore them or fight against them?

Group 5
 Should Romeo and Juliet‘s relationship be viewed as a rebellion of the
young against the old? In other words, is this play‘s motto, ―Kids these
days,‖ or ―Mover over, Grandpa?‖

Abstraction:

TASK 7: SMALL UNDERTAKINGS


Do the following activity with your group.
(LM, p.343-344)

Group 1: News Flash


Suppose you were a reporter and your beat is
to cover a crime report. You decided to make
a news report about the Tragedy in Verona
concerning the ill-fated lovers Romeo and Juliet

Group 2: Dance of Love


Design a costume, select the music, and perform an interpretative dance about
a secret wedding. Turn in a paragraph explaining what your group is trying to
convey (How does your costume, music and choreography capture important
events and themes of the act?).

Group 3: Sing Your Heart Out


Write and perform an original song, including lyrics and music, for the wedding of
Romeo and Juliet.

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
Group 4: Paint My Love
Create a timeline highlighting the feud between the two families resulting in the
untimely death of the two young lovers.

Group 5: A Love Story Untold


Reorganize the summary of the last scene of the play, Romeo and Juliet. Write it
in a different form like a newspaper article, a novel chapter, a diary entry, a
sonnet or a letter.

Application:

TASK 8: AN ALTERNATIVE ENDING


If you will be given a chance to give Romeo and Juliet a
different ending, what would it be?
Write a script showing an alternative ending of the play.
Then, with your group, perform a role play following the script.

WRITING A SCRIPT RUBRIC


1 2 3 4
There are more
There are few There are no
The final draft has than a few
grammar, grammar,
many grammar, grammar,
Conventions capitalization, capitalization,
capitalization, capitalization,
spelling, or spelling, or
spelling, and spelling, or
punctuation errors punctuation errors
punctuation errors. punctuation errors
in the final draft. in the final draft.
in the final draft.
The story is very well
The plot is pretty
The plot is a little organized. One
Ideas and scenes well organized.
hard to follow. The idea or scene
seem to be One idea or scene
Clarity randomly
transitions are
may seem out of
follows another in a
sometimes not logical sequence
arranged. place. Clear
clear. with clear
transitions are used.
transitions.
There is little The story contains
The story contains a The story contains
evidence of many creative
few creative details creative details
creativity. The details and/or
and/or and/or descriptions
Creativity playwright does
descriptions, but that contribute to
descriptions that
not seem to have contribute to the
they distract from the reader's
used much reader's
the story. enjoyment
imagination. enjoyment.
It is usually clear
Hard to follow It is usually clear It is always clear
which character is
characters' which character is which character is
speaking. Dialogue
dialogue and speaking. Dialogue speaking. Dialogue
Dialogue is well developed,
minimal effort is put is choppy and not is well developed
but could be more
into conversations. well developed. and varied.
varied in structure.
Source: https://www.google.com.ph/#q=script+writing+rubric+high+school

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
ROMEO AND JULIET (WEDDING TO END)

A wedding was a joyous event that was celebrated by many friends and relatives. After
the ceremony, the guests followed the couple through the streets to the home of the
bride or groom. Then a wedding feast was held that lasted into the night. Notice how
different Juliet‘s wedding is from a typical ceremony of the day.

Act Two, Scene Four: A Secret Wedding


Father Lawrence's house. Father Lawrence and Romeo are talking.
Romeo: Juliet will be here very soon. I'll be very happy when we're married.
Father Lawrence: Listen, Romeo. You only loved Rosaline for a few weeks. Remember, if
you marry Juliet, you must love her, and stay with her, for the rest of
your life.
Romeo: Yes Father, I understand. I'll always love her. (Juliet enters, and kisses Romeo.)
Juliet: The Nurse told me to meet you here. She said that Father Lawrence would marry
us.
Father Lawrence: And I will. Come with me.

Act Three, Scene One: More Trouble


A busy street in Verona. Some people are walking along the street. Mercutio and
Benvolio are talking.
Benvolio: It's hot today, isn't it? I don't like this weather. People feel angry when it's so
hot. (Tybalt and some friends enter.)
Mercutio: Look! It's the Capulets – over there!
Benvolio: Don't start an argument, we don't want trouble.
Mercutio: I'm not afraid of Tybalt.
Tybalt: Where is Romeo? He's your friend, isn't he?
Mercutio: That's none of your business.
Tybalt: I'm looking for him. And I'm going to find him.
Mercutio: Are you looking for a fight?
Benvolio: Stop it, you two! (Romeo enters.)
Tybalt: There he is! Romeo! Come here! (He pulls out his sword.) You came to our house
last night, didn't you? Well, we don't want the Montagues in our house. I'm
going to teach you a lesson. Come on, get out your sword and fight!
Romeo: Tybalt, I'm not your enemy! (Laughing) The Montagues and Capulets are going
to be good friends. Something wonderful has happened.
Tybalt: What are you talking about?
Mercutio: Why won't you fight with him, Romeo? (He pulls out his sword.) Well, I'll fight.
Come on! (Mercutio and Tybalt start fighting.)
Romeo: Stop fighting! Don't you remember what Prince Escalus said? Benvolio, help me
to stop them. (Benvolio and Romeo try to stop them. Tybalt stabs Mercutio and
runs away. Mercutio falls.)
Mercutio: Why did you stand between us? I – I'm hurt!
Romeo: I'm sorry, Mercutio – I was trying to help.
Mercutio: I need a doctor. Oh, you Montagues and Capulets, what a stupid argument!
You're both wrong, to fight, and hate, and fight again like this! Ah – I'm dying!
(Mercutio dies.)
Romeo: Mercutio! He's dead! Tybalt! Come back! (He pulls out his sword angrily.) You've
killed my friend. Now I'm going to kill you! (Tybalt enters again. They fight, and
Romeo kills him. Some people who are watching start shouting.)
Benvolio: This is terrible! Romeo, run away! You'll be in trouble if the Prince finds you
here!
Romeo: Oh, no! What have I done? (He runs away.)
(Prince Escalus, Lord and Lady Montague, Lord and Lady Capulet, servants and
others enter.)
Prince Escalus: What's happened? How did these men die?
Benvolio: Tybalt killed Mercutio, sir. Mercutio was Romeo's friend. Romeo was very
angry, and he killed Tybalt.
Lady Capulet: Romeo must die! He's a murderer! He killed my nephew Tybalt!
Prince Escalus: But Tybalt was a murderer too, Lady Capulet.
Lady Capulet: No, he wasn't! That's what Benvolio says, but he's a Montague. Romeo
must die!

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
Lord Montague: Sir, our son is not a murderer. He killed Tybalt because he was angry.
Prince Escalus: Listen, all of you. I have decided not to execute Romeo. But he must
leave Verona, and he can never come back. Tell him that he must
leave immediately. If he ever comes back to Verona, he will die. Now
go home, and keep the peace.

Act Three, Scene Two: Another Message


Juliet is alone in her room.
Juliet: I'm so excited! Romeo is going to be with me tonight! We're married now, but the
only people who know are Father Lawrence and my Nurse. Here she is now. (The
Nurse enters.)
Nurse: Juliet, my dear, something terrible has happened. (She starts crying) He's dead,
he's dead.
Juliet: Who's dead? Not Romeo? Not my husband?
Nurse: No, Tybalt is dead.
Juliet: Oh, no! My cousin Tybalt! How did he die?
Nurse: There was a fight, and Romeo killed him.
Juliet: It can't be true! Romeo never fights.
Nurse: But it is true. Tybalt killed Romeo's friend Mercutio, and Romeo was very angry.
The two of them started fighting, and Romeo killed Tybalt.
Juliet: Where's Romeo now? And what's going to happen to him?
Nurse: Romeo is hiding in Father Lawrence‘s house. The Prince has told Lord Montague
that Romeo must leave Verona and never come back.
Juliet: So I'll never see him again! (She starts crying.)
Nurse: Don't cry, my dear. Listen. I'll go to Father Lawrence's house and tell Romeo to
come here secretly tonight, to say goodbye to you.
Juliet: Thank you, Nurse. You're very kind. Wait – take this ring. (She gives her a ring.)
Give it to Romeo, and tell him that I love him.

Act Three, Scene Three: Bad News for Romeo


Father Lawrence's house. Romeo is hiding. Father Lawrence enters.
Father Lawrence: Romeo – where are you? It's me, Father Lawrence. (Romeo comes
out.)
Romeo: What did Prince Escalus say? Am I going to die?
Father Lawrence: No. Killing Tybalt was wrong. But the Prince is not going to execute
you. He said that you must leave Verona immediately, and never
come back.
Romeo: This is terrible! (He starts crying.) Leaving Juliet is worse than dying.
Father Lawrence: Just listen, Romeo! You are lucky. The Prince has been kind to you.
Romeo: But I want to die! I can't live without Juliet! (There is a knock on the door.)
Father Lawrence: Hide, Romeo! If anyone finds you here, there will be trouble!
Romeo: It doesn't matter. I want to die. (The Nurse enters.)
Father Lawrence: I'm happy to see you, Nurse. Have you been with Juliet?
Nurse: Yes. I saw her a few minutes ago, crying and shaking, just like Romeo here.
Romeo: But I killed her cousin. Does she still love me?
Nurse: Yes, of course she does. (She gives Romeo Juliet's ring.) She sends you this ring.
Father Lawrence: Listen, Romeo. You can go to see Juliet tonight. But then you must
leave Verona. Later, I will tell everybody that you and Juliet are
married, and I will ask the Prince to think again. Perhaps you can
come back to Verona soon. But you have to leave Verona tonight
and go to Mantua. Do you agree to do that?
Romeo: Yes, Father. How long must I stay in Mantua?
Father Lawrence: I'm not sure. Stay there until I send you a message. Don't come back
until you hear from me. Now go and say goodbye to Juliet.

Act Three, Scene Four: Lord Capulet‘s Plan


The Capulets' house. Lord and Lady Capulet and Paris are talking.
Lord Capulet: Paris, my daughter is very unhappy. Her cousin Tybalt died this morning.
Lord Montague's son killed him.
Paris: I'm sorry to hear that. Can I talk to Juliet?
Lady Capulet: Not at this moment, Paris. She is in her room. It's very late, and she needs
to rest.

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
Lord Capulet: Listen. I've just thought of something. I want Juliet to forget about Tybalt's
death. I think that she'll be happy when she marries. I know that you love
Juliet, and that you would like to marry her. The two of you must marry as
soon as possible. What day is it today?
Paris: It's Monday night, sir.
Lord Capulet: Right. The wedding will be on Thursday.
Paris: That's wonderful.
Lord Capulet: (To his wife) Go and tell Juliet what I have decided, my dear. We must
hurry! Don't forget, Paris – the wedding will be in three days!
Paris: I won't forget, sir.

Act Three, Scene Five: Trouble for Juliet


Juliet's room. Romeo and Juliet are together.
Romeo: I'm sorry, my love, but I have to go. Look outside – it's nearly morning.
Juliet: Please don't say that. I want you to stay with me. You are my husband now. You
needn't go.
Romeo: You know that I have to go. If anyone finds me here, the Prince will execute
me. I'm going to stay in Mantua. Father Lawrence is going to talk to our
families, and to the Prince. Then I'll be back soon.
Juliet: I hope so. Romeo, my only love! (There is a knock at the door.)
Romeo: Kiss me! Goodbye, my love. (He climbs out of the window.)
Lady Capulet: (Entering) Juliet – you're already out of bed. It's very early.
Juliet: I know. I can't sleep.
Lady Capulet: You're still very unhappy about your cousin Tybalt. Don't worry, my dear.
We'll find Romeo. And when we find him, he'll die. Now listen, I have
some exciting news. Your father has said that Paris and you can marry.
And the wedding will be on Thursday. (Juliet screams.)
Juliet: I won't marry Paris. It's just not possible!
Lady Capulet: What do you mean? (Lord Capulet and the Nurse enter.)
Lord Capulet: Have you told her the news?
Lady Capulet: She says that she won't marry Paris.
Lord Capulet: What? Why not? Listen, Juliet. Paris is a good, kind man. He's an important
man, too, and a friend of the Prince's. You are a very lucky girl!
Juliet: Father, listen. I know that you're trying to help me, but I will never marry Paris. I
don't love him. I don't even know him.
Lord Capulet: That doesn't matter. You will marry him on Thursday. Do you understand?
(Lord and Lady Capulet leave.)
Juliet: This is terrible. What shall I do? They don't know that I've married Romeo!
Nurse: Listen, my dear. Romeo is in Mantua. Perhaps you'll never see him again. Your
mother and father are right, you know. Paris is a kind man, and good-looking
too. He'll be a better husband than Romeo. Marry him. Forget about Romeo.
That's the best thing to do. (She leaves.)
Juliet: I will never listen to my Nurse again. I thought that she would help me, but she
won't. I'm going to see Father Lawrence. Perhaps he can help me.

Act Four, Scene One: Father Lawrence‘s Medicine


Father Lawrence's house. Paris and Father Lawrence are talking.
Father Lawrence: What! On Thursday! That's in two days. This is very sudden!
Paris: I know. I'm very excited. I've loved Juliet for a long time, and soon we'll be
married!
Father Lawrence: But you don't know her very well. You wait, Paris. Thursday is too soon.
Paris: But her father has already decided. I'm very happy!
Juliet: (Entering) Good morning, Paris.
Paris: Hello, Juliet, my love. (Laughing) You'll soon be my wife.
Juliet: Perhaps. I've come to talk to the priest.
Paris: Are you going to tell him how much you love me?
Juliet: I've come to talk to him alone.
Father Lawrence: Can you leave us, please, Paris?
Paris: Of course, Father. Goodbye, my love. (He kisses Juliet.) We'll be married soon!
(He leaves.)
Juliet: What shall I do? (She starts crying.) I want to die.
Father Lawrence: You must marry Paris. What else can you do?

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
Juliet: Father, I'll never marry Paris. Don't you understand? I love Romeo. He is my
husband. Look, I have a knife. (She pulls out a knife.) If you tell me to marry Paris,
I'll kill myself.
Father Lawrence: Stop! Put down the knife. Listen, Juliet, I've just thought of something.
(He goes to a cupboard and takes out a bottle.)
Juliet: What's that? Is it poison? Will you kill me?
Father Lawrence: No, Juliet, it's not poison, but it's a very, very strong medicine. Anyone
who drinks this will sleep for two days.
Juliet: What do you want me to do?
Father Lawrence: I want you to drink this medicine the night before your wedding. You'll
sleep very, very deeply, and it won't be possible to wake you up. You
will be cold and still. Everyone will think that you are dead.
Juliet: What'll happen then?
Father Lawrence: They will put your body in your family's tomb, next to your cousin
Tybalt. Later, you'll wake up. (Juliet screams.) Don't worry, I'll send a
message to Romeo in Mantua and tell him to come back to Verona
when it's dark, I'll tell him to go to the tomb and open it at night.
Then the two of you can run away together to Mantua. Will you do
it? It's very dangerous, but if you don't do this, you have to marry
Paris.
Juliet: Yes, Father, I'll do it. I'll do anything to be with Romeo. Thank you, Father. (Juliet
takes the bottle and leaves.)
Father Lawrence: Father John! Father John! (Father John enters. Father Lawrence
quickly writes a message and gives it to him.) Take this message to
Romeo in Mantua. It's very, very important.

Act Four, Scene Two: Another Wedding


The Capulets' house. Lord and Lady Capulet, the Nurse and servants are all busy.
Lord Capulet: (To a servant) Go and ask all our friends to come to the wedding. (To
another servant) Go and find the best cooks in Verona. This will be a very special
wedding. (To the Nurse) Where's Juliet?
Nurse: She's with the priest, sir. She'll be back soon. Look, here she is now. She look very
happy.
Juliet: (Entering) I'm sorry, father.
Lord Capulet: What?
Juliet: You told me to marry Paris, and you were right. I'm not going to cry any more. He
is the right man for me. I'm sorry that I didn't agree at first.
Lord Capulet: This is wonderful news! Oh, I'm so happy! Listen, everybody! The wedding
will be tomorrow morning. Go and tell Paris.
Lady Capulet: Tomorrow? But tomorrow is Wednesday. You said that the wedding
would be on Thursday. We won't be ready tomorrow!
Lord Capulet: That doesn't matter. Juliet and Paris must marry as soon as possible.
Hurry,hurry! Nobody will sleep tonight – we're all going to be too busy.
Nurse – go and help Juliet with her wedding-dress! Oh, I'm so happy!

Four, Scene Three: Juliet Drinks the Medicine


Juliet's room. Juliet is wearing her wedding-dress. The Nurse and Lady Capulet are with
her.
Nurse: You look beautiful, my dear.
Lady Capulet: You must go to bed now, Juliet. It's very late, and you need to rest. Good
night. (The Nurse and Lady Capulet leave.)
Juliet: They think that I'm going to marry Paris tomorrow, but they're wrong, (She takes
out Father Lawrence's bottle.) When I drink this, I'll fall asleep. They'll think I'm
dead. Oh, I'm so afraid! I won't wake up for two days. When I wake up, I'll be in
the tomb, with dead bodies around me. But I must do it. Romeo will come and
find me, and we'll be together again! (She drinks the medicine and lies down on
her bed.)

Act Four, Scene Four: The Capulets Find Juliet


The Capulets' house. It is early in the morning, and Lord and Lady Capulet, the Nurse,
servants and cooks are all moving around busily.
Lady Capulet: We need more food! And more tables and chairs!

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
Lord Capulet: Bring those flowers over here! Hurry up, there isn't much time left!
Nurse: Why don't you go to bed, sir? It's very late.
Lord Capulet: I can't sleep – I'm too excited! My daughter is going to marry Paris in the
morning! After the wedding, we're going to have a party. It'll be the best
party I've ever had!
Lady Capulet: Paris will be here soon. Nurse – go and wake Juliet up. (The Nurse goes
out.)
Lord Capulet: I can hear music. Paris is coming, with his musicians. (The musicians play
outside.)
Nurse: Help! Help! (Some servants run to help her.)
Lady Capulet: What's the matter? (The Nurse and servants come back, carrying Juliet.
They are crying.)
Nurse: She is dead! (Everyone stops moving.)
Lady Capulet: Juliet! My only child! (Holding Juliet) Please, wake up! Oh, she's cold!
She's dead!
Lord Capulet: She was the sweetest child in the world. She was only thirteen, and now
she's dead. (Father Lawrence, Paris and the musicians enter. The
musicians are still playing.)
Paris: I've come here to take Juliet to church! (They see Juliet's body. The musicians stop
playing.)
Lady Capulet: She was our only child. Now our lives are empty. We will never be happy
again.
Paris: Juliet – dead? This is the worst day of my life.
Father Lawrence: Carry her to the church. We will put her in your family's tomb, next to
her cousin. Put flowers on her body. (They put flowers on her body
and carry her out.)

Act Five, Scene One: News from Verona


Romeo is walking along a street in Mantua. There are some shops in the street.
Romeo: Oh, I'm so lonely without Juliet I want to go back to Verona, but I can't go back
yet. I must wait until Father Lawrence sends a message. I'll hear some news
soon, I hope. (One of Lord Montague's servants enters.) Did Father Lawrence
send you?
Servant: No, but I've got some news. It's bad news, I'm afraid. Juliet is dead. I saw them
put her body in the Capulets' tomb yesterday.
Romeo: What! I must go back, I must find out what's happened.
Servant: Wait, my lord. Don't go back yet. Wait until Father Lawrence sends some news.
Romeo: No! I'm going to Verona now. Leave me alone. (The servant leaves) If Juliet is
dead, I want to die too. I'm going to see Juliet once more, and then I'm going
to die. I need some poison. Where can I find some poison? I remember seeing
a shop near here. Where was it? Here it is. (He stops outside a shop.) You! You
sell medicines, don't you?
Shopkeeper: Yes, sir.
Romeo: I want some poison. It must be strong. Do you understand?
Shopkeeper: Sir, I sell medicines to help people, not poison to kill them.
Romeo: Here. (He takes some gold from his pocket.) I will give you as much gold as you
want. You look poor and hungry.
Shopkeeper: Yes, sir, I am. (He goes to a cupboard and takes out a bottle.) I have some
poison. It is very dangerous. Anyone who drinks this will die immediately.
But I can't sell it to you, I'll be in trouble.
Romeo: Don't worry. I won't tell anyone that it came from your shop. (He takes some
more gold from his pocket.) Here, have all my gold. I don't need it. (The
shopkeeper gives him the bottle, and Romeo leaves.)
Father John: (Entering) Where's Romeo? I've got a message for him. It's from Father
Lawrence. He said that the message was very important. (Running up
and down the street) Romeo! Romeo! Where are you? Romeo! Oh, no!
He's not here!

Act Five, Scene Two: Together Again


A garden outside a church. It is late at night. Paris is standing near the Capulets' tomb. It
is a very large tomb with a big, heavy door.

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
Paris: Oh, Juliet! I loved you more than anyone else in the world. I wanted you to be my
wife, but now you're dead. (Putting flowers on the tomb) I'm going to come to
your tomb every night. What's that noise? Someone's coming! (He hides. Romeo
enters.)
Romeo: Juliet – I must see your sweet face again! (Paris comes out. Romeo opens the
door of the tomb.)
Paris: Stop! You're Romeo, aren't you? You're the one of the Montagues. What are you
doing to Juliet's tomb?
Romeo: Who are you? Leave me alone! (The two men fight, and Romeo kills Paris.
(Romeo goes into the tomb, and takes the bottle of the poison out of his
pocket.) Juliet, my love, my wife! You are dead, but you are still beautiful. This
will be our last kiss. (He kisses her, then drinks the poison.) So with a kiss, he dies.
(He dies.)
Father Lawrence: (Entering) Juliet will wake up very soon. Where's Romeo! Father John
took a message to him, and the message told him to meet me here.
Romeo! (He goes to the tomb.) The door's open! What's happened?
Juliet: (Waking up) Father Lawrence! It's good to see you. Where's Romeo?
Father Lawrence: Juliet – something terrible has happened. Romeo is lying next to you,
but he's dead! Quickly – get out of the tomb, and come with me. If
anyone finds us here, there will be trouble!
Juliet: No, Father, I want to be with Romeo. (Father Lawrence runs away.) Romeo, my
love, what's happened? (She sees the bottle of poison.) He's killed himself! Well,
I'm going to die too. I can't live without him. Romeo, perhaps there's poison on
your lips. (She kisses him.) I'm still alive, but I want to die. I'm not afraid of death.
(She takes out a knife, stabs herself and dies. Some people enter.)
People: (Shouting) What's happened? Look, here's Paris – he's dead! And Romeo's
dead, too! Someone's opened the tomb! Find the Prince! Find the Capulets
and the Montagues! (Prince Escalus, the Capulets, Montagues and servants
enter.)
Prince Escalus: Dead! Romeo and Juliet?(Some more people enter, with Father
Lawrence.) Father Lawrence, do you know anything about this?
Father Lawrence: Just a few days ago, Romeo married Juliet. (Everyone shouts in
surprise, and Lady Capulet starts crying.) I married them secretly,
because the Capulets and Montagues are enemies. Juliet didn't
want to marry Paris, so I told her to take some special medicine. She
wasn't dead, she was asleep. I wanted to send a message to
Romeo in Mantua, but he didn't get the message. And they have
both killed themselves.
Prince Escalus: Lord Capulet, Lord Montague – come here. (They stand in front of the
Prince.)This has happened because you are enemies. Romeo, Juliet,
Paris, Mercutio and Tybalt are all dead.
Lord Capulet: Sir, our arguments have finished. We're friends now, and we will never
fight again. (They shake hands unhappily.)
Lord Montague: We'll build a statue of Romeo and Juliet. It will be made of gold. No
one will ever forget them.
Prince Escalus: Perhaps Verona will be peaceful now. (He looks up at the sky.) There is
no sun this morning. Go home now, all of you, and remember this
unhappy story of Juliet and her Romeo.

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
CITY SCHOOLS DIVISION OF TAYABAS
Tayabas City

LESSON EXEMPLAR
Grade 9-English

Quarter: THIRD
Theme: Connecting to the World
Sub-Theme: Despite Differences in Social Class

Content Standard: Performance Standard:


The learner demonstrates understanding The learner skillfully performs in a one-act
of how Anglo-American literature and play through utilizing effective verbal and
other text types serve as means of non-verbal strategies and ICT resources
connecting to the world; also how to use based on the following criteria: Focus,
ways of analyzing one-act play and Voice, Delivery, and Dramatic
different forms of verbals for him/her to Conventions.
skillfully perform in a one-act play.

I. LEARNING COMPETENCY
EN9RC-IIIf-20: Analyze a one-act play
EN9V-IIIg-29: Get familiar with technical vocabulary for drama and theatre (like
stage directions)

Objectives:
1. Familiarize oneself with the elements and definition of a one-act play
2. Write a character sketch by following the given content guide
3. Analyze the one-act play as a means of valuing the importance of being
true to oneself and to others

II. LEARNING CONTENT


Lesson: “While the Auto Waits” by O. Henry
Materials:
1. Copies of the Literary Text
2. Photographs of Local Personalities
References:
1. K to 12 Curriculum Guide (May 2016) p. 207
2. A Journey through Anglo-American Literature Learner‘s Material for English
pp. 348-370
3. Online References

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
III. LEARNING TASKS
Introduction: We can be anything we want to be, but we can't be anyone we
want to be. You have no choice but to be yourself. Rather, you have no other
wise choice than to be yourself. Pretending to be someone you‘re not will cause
you to lose the person you really are, which may cause unhappiness – and
eventually cause you to fail – crash and burn.

Preliminary Activity:
TASK 1: MEANING MENACE
A. Arrange the jumbled words that will lead you to arrive at the definition of a
one-act play.

1. tac 2. pyla
A one-act play is a play
with only one
3. lementes ___________. An act is a
part of a _________
defined by ____________
such as rising action,
______________, and
_______________.
4. maclix 5. sorelution

Source: http://www.philstar.com/arts-and-culture/2014/06/09/1332050/peta-re-stages-rock-aegis

Clues:
1. A division or unit of a drama
2. A dramatic performance
3. The simplest or essential parts
4. The most exciting and important part of a play
. part of the story‘s plot line in which the problem
5. The
of the story is resolved

B. Guess the words hidden in the constellation of letters. Use the description as a
clue.

G
T G T
A
E N
S S E
I
T

1. _________________________ 2. ________________________

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
A R D A G
S
I U
T C C E L

O
A H R E

3. _________________________ 4. ________________________

Clues:
1. Place where the story happened
2. Platform on which the actors perform
3. People involved in the story
4. Words/Lines the characters say in a story, movie, play,
etc.

Activity:

TASK 2: THE GREAT PRETENDERS


Have you ever been tempted to pretend that you were someone else?
In this activity, impersonate the following local personalities.

Pres. Rodrigo Duterte


Vice Ganda

PNP Dir. Gen “Bato” Dela Rosa Ms. Universe Pia Wurtzbach
Sources:
http://www.getrealphilippines.com/blog/2016/02/vice-gandas-vulgar-behavior-damages-the-image-of-the-
philippines-gay-community/
http://pinoynewsonline.info/mayor-rodrigo-duterte-last-jokes-before-becoming-the-president-of-the-philippines/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ronald_dela_Rosa
http://www.philstar.com/nation/2016/01/15/1542543/list-routes-affected-pia-wurtzbachs-homecoming-parade

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
 How does it feel to pretend that you were someone else?
 Would you rather be the person you impersonated or the person that you are
now?

Analysis:
TASK 3: READING CORNER
Read the copy of ―While the Auto Waits‖ by O. Henry then
answer the questions below on pages 352 to 358 of your
module.

1. Who met at the park? Describe how the characters reacted on their
first meeting.
2. What do you think are the intentions of the characters for not
revealing their true status in life?
3. Would you consider the situations of the characters a ―white lie?‖ Why
or why not?
4. What does the last scene of the story tell us about the young man?
5. If you were the author, how would you end the play?

TASK 4: PLAY IN PROCESS


Group 1: Story Grammar
Complete the story grammar below by writing the details about
the play, While the Auto Waits.

While the Auto Waits

Characters Plot Setting Conflict

Who Event 1: __________ Time (When) 1. ______________


a. _____________ __________________ ________________ 2. ______________
b. _____________ Event 2: __________ ________________ 3. ______________
c. _____________ __________________ Place (Where) 4. ______________
________________
_______________

Group 2: Character Analysis

Fill out the character analysis sketch to give characterization to the characters of
the play, While the Auto Waits.

Part of the play


Trait Evidence where it was
revealed

Character 1

Character 2

Character 3

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
Group 3: Plot Diagram

The plot diagram shows how the main events in the play are organized into
a plot.

 Introduction or Exposition: explains the situation with which the story


begins
 Rising Action or Involution: complication is presented
 Climax: highest point of interest, usually a question is raised
 Falling Action or Resolution: solutions to the problem are presented
 Conclusion: situation with which the story ends.

 Come up with a plot diagram of the play While the Auto Waits.

____________________
____________________ ____________________
____________________

____________________ ____________________
____________________ ____________________

____________________ ____________________
____________________ ____________________

Abstraction:
TASK 5: WRITING YOUR OWN
A one-act play usually has a small number of characters who
are a part of the story. Use what you have learned in this
lesson and draw up a cast of characters for a show that you
watch regularly. Here are the steps:

Identify the show and write the cast of characters. List the characters in
their approximate order of importance. List only the characters that
appear regularly.

For each character on the cast list, write no more than two sentences
describing him or her. Be sure to mention the character‘s most striking
characteristics – both good and bad.

Exchange your cast list with a classmate who watches the same show.
Ask if your classmate agrees with your choice of characters and their
descriptions. If not, work together to decide how to improve your list.

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
Application:
TASK 6: WRITING A CHARACTER SKETCH
Can you draw your friend in words? Write a character sketch for
someone you know. It could be a friend, family member, or
anybody you know well. Do this in your notebook. Here‘s a list of
things to include in your character sketch.
 Opening – Introduce the topic (your friend).
 Explain how you met.
 Give a physical description – appearance, clothes, voice, habits,
mannerisms, etc.
 Personality trait #1, and supporting evidence
 Personality trait #2, and supporting evidence
 Personality trait #3, and supporting evidence
 Closing comment – Try to reconnect to your friend.

CHARACTER SKETCH WRITING RUBRIC


Needs Fair Good Very
Criteria Work 2pts. 3pts. Good
1pt. 4pts.
Includes basic facts about the character‘s
background and a description of his/her
physical appearance and personality
Includes a description of the character‘s
thoughts, feelings and actions
Vocabulary (e.g. range of vocabulary, inclusion
of specific details)
Grammar (e.g. use of appropriate verb tense,
subject-verb agreement)
Mechanics (e.g. spelling, capitalization,
punctuation)
Source: http://www.edb.gov.hk/attachment/en/curriculum-development/resource-support/net/
assessment%20form%202.2-%20character%20sketch%20rubric%20(peer%20assessment).pdf

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
WHILE THE AUTO WAITS
by O. Henry
adapted for the stage by Walter Wykes

CHARACTERS
GIRL
YOUNG MAN
WAITRESS
CHAUFFEUR

TIME
1920s

[Twilight. The quiet corner of a city park. A GIRL in gray sits alone on a bench, reading
her book. A large-meshed veil hangs over her face, which nevertheless shines through
with a calm and unconscious beauty. When she turns a page, the book slips from her
hand, and a YOUNG MAN, who has been hovering nearby, pounces upon it. He
returns it to her with a gallant and hopeful air.]

GIRL: Oh, thank you.

YOUNG MAN: Nice weather we‘re having.

GIRL: Yes.

[Pause.]

YOUNG MAN: Well …

GIRL: You may sit down, if you like.

YOUNG MAN: [Eagerly.] Are you sure? I don‘t want to interrupt your reading.

GIRL: Really, sit. I would like very much to have you do so. The light is too bad for
reading. I would prefer to talk.

YOUNG MAN: Well, if you insist. [He slides hopefully onto the seat next to her.] You know,
you‘ve got to be the stunningest girl I‘ve ever seen. Honest. I had my eye on you since
yesterday.

GIRL: Yesterday?

YOUNG MAN: Didn't know somebody was bowled over by those pretty lamps of yours,
did you, honeysuckle?

GIRL: Whoever you are, you must remember that I am a lady. I will excuse the remark
you have just made because the mistake was, doubtless, not an unnatural one—in your
circle. I asked you to sit down; if the invitation must constitute me your honeysuckle,
consider it withdrawn.

YOUNG MAN: Sorry. I‘m sorry. I didn‘t mean to offend you. I just thought … well, I
mean, there are girls in parks, you know—that is, of course, you don't know, but—

GIRL: Abandon the subject, if you please. Of course I know.

YOUNG MAN: Right.

GIRL: Now, tell me about these people passing and crowding, each way, along these
paths. Where are they going? Why do they hurry so? Are they happy?

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
YOUNG MAN: It is interesting to watch them—isn‘t it? The wonderful drama of life.
Some are going to supper and some to—er—other places. One can‘t help but wonder
what their histories are.

GIRL: Yes! How fascinating they seem to me—rushing about with their petty little
dreams and their common worries! I come here to sit because here, only, can I be
near the great, common, throbbing heart of humanity. My part in life is cast where its
beating is never felt. Can you surmise why I spoke to you, Mr.—?

YOUNG MAN: Parkenstacker. And your name…?

[He waits, eager and hopeful, but she only holds up a slender finger and smiles slightly.]

GIRL: No, you would recognize it immediately. It is simply impossible to keep one's
name out of the papers. Or even one's portrait. This veil and this hat—my maid‘s, of
course—are my only protection. They furnish me with an incog. You should have seen
the chauffeur staring when he thought I did not see. Candidly, there are five or six
names that belong in the holy of holies, and mine, by the accident of birth, is one of
them. I spoke to you, Mr. Stackenpot—

YOUNG MAN: Parkenstacker.

GIRL: —Mr. Parkenstacker, because I wanted to talk, for once, with a natural man—a
real man—one unspoiled by the despicable gloss of wealth and supposed social
superiority. Oh! You have no idea how weary I am of it—money, money, money! And
of the men who surround me, dancing like little marionettes all cut from the same
pattern. I am sick of pleasure, of jewels, of travel, of society, of luxuries of all kinds!

YOUNG MAN: I always had the idea that money must be a pretty good thing.

GIRL: A competence is to be desired, certainly. But when you have so many millions
that—! [She concludes the sentence with a gesture of despair.] It is the monotony of it
that palls. Drives, dinners, theatres, balls, suppers, balls, dinners, more balls, followed of
course by dinners and suppers, with the gilding of superfluous wealth over it all.
Sometimes the very tinkle of the ice in my champagne glass nearly drives me mad.

YOUNG MAN: You know … I‘ve always liked to read up on the habits and customs of
the wealthy class. I consider myself a bit of a connoisseur on the subject. But I like to
have my information accurate. Now, I had formed the opinion that champagne is
cooled in the bottle and not by placing ice in the glass.

[The GIRL gives a musical laugh of genuine amusement.]

GIRL: You must understand that we of the non-useful class depend for our amusement
upon departure from precedent. Just now it is a fad to put ice in champagne. The
idea was originated by a visiting Prince of Tartary while dining at the Waldorf. It will
soon give way to some other whim. Just as, at a dinner party this week on Madison
Avenue, a green kid glove was laid by the plate of each guest to be put on and used
while eating olives.

YOUNG MAN: [Humbly.] I see.

GIRL: These special diversions of the inner circle do not become familiar to the common
public, of course.

YOUNG MAN: Of course. It‘s all quite fascinating. I‘ve always wanted to participate in,
or at least witness first hand, the rituals of the elite.

GIRL: We are drawn to that which we do not understand.

YOUNG MAN: I guess that‘s true.

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
GIRL: For my part, I have always thought that if I should ever love a man it would be one
of lowly station. One who is a worker and not a drone. But, doubtless, the claims of
caste and wealth will prove stronger than my inclination. Just now I am besieged by
two suitors. One is Grand Duke of a German principality. I think he has, or has had, a
wife, somewhere, driven mad by his intemperance and cruelty. The other is an English
Marquis, so cold and mercenary that I prefer even the diabolical nature of the Duke.
What is it that impels me to tell you these things, Mr. Packenwacker?

YOUNG MAN: Parkenstacker.

GIRL: Of course.

YOUNG MAN: I don‘t know why you should bare your soul to a common man like me,
but you can‘t know how much I appreciate your confidences.

[The girl contemplates him with the calm, impersonal regard that befits the difference in
their stations.]

GIRL: What is your line of business, if you don‘t mind my asking?

YOUNG MAN: A very humble one. But I hope to rise in the world someday.

GIRL: You have aspirations?

YOUNG MAN: Oh, yes. There‘s so much I want to do.

GIRL: I admire your enthusiasm. I, myself, can find very little to be enthused about,
burdened, as I am, by the constant pleasures and diversions of my class.

YOUNG MAN: Did you really mean it, before, when you said you could love a man of
lowly station?

GIRL: Indeed I did. But I said ―might.‖

YOUNG MAN: Why only ―might?‖

GIRL: Well, there is the Grand Duke and the Marquis to think of, you know.

YOUNG MAN: But you‘ve said yourself—they‘re so cold.

GIRL: I am sure you understand when I say there are certain expectations of a young
lady in my position. It would be such a disappointment to certain members of my
family if I were to marry a commoner as we like to call them. You simply cannot
imagine the scandal it would cause. All the magazines would remark upon it. I might
even be cut off from the family fortune. And yet … no calling could be too humble
were the man I loved all that I wish him to be.

YOUNG MAN: I work in a restaurant.

[The girl shrinks slightly.]

GIRL: Not as a waiter? Labor is noble, but personal attendance, you know—valets
and—

YOUNG MAN: Not a waiter. I‘m a cashier in … in that restaurant over there.

GIRL: [With a strange, suspicious look.] That … that one there? [He nods.] That one?

YOUNG MAN: Yes.

GIRL: [Confused.] Are you sure?

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
YOUNG MAN: Quite sure.

GIRL: But—

[Suddenly the GIRL consults a tiny watch set in a bracelet of rich design upon her wrist.
She rises with a start.]

GIRL: Oh!

YOUNG MAN: What is it? What‘s wrong?

GIRL: I … I am late for an important engagement.

YOUNG MAN: An engagement?

GIRL: Yes!

YOUNG MAN: Some sort of ball or—

GIRL: Yes, yes!

YOUNG MAN: Will I see you again?

GIRL: I do not know. Perhaps—but the whim may not seize me again. I must go quickly
now. There is a dinner, and a box at the play—and, oh! The same old round! Perhaps
you noticed an automobile at the upper corner of the park as you came. One with a
white body.

YOUNG MAN: [Knitting his brow strangely.] And red running gear?

GIRL: Yes. I always come in that. Pierre waits for me there. He supposes me to be
shopping in the department store across the square. Conceive of the bondage of the
life wherein we must deceive even our chauffeurs. Good-night.

YOUNG MAN: Wait! It‘s getting dark, and the park is full of questionable characters.
Can‘t I walk you to your—

GIRL: [Quickly.] No! I mean … no. If you have the slightest regard for my wishes, you will
remain on this bench for ten minutes after I have left. I do not mean to question your
intentions, but you are probably aware that autos generally bear the monogram of
their owner. Again, good-night.

[Suddenly a WAITRESS approaches, wearing a soiled, dirty uniform—evidently just


coming off her shift.]

WAITRESS: Mary-Jane! Mary-Jane Parker! What on earth are you doing out here?!
Don‘t you know what time it is?!

GIRL: [A little flustered.] To whom are you speaking, Madame?

WAITRESS: To whom am I … to you! Who do you think, you ninny?!

GIRL: Then I‘m sure I don‘t know what you‘re talking about.

WAITRESS: You‘re shift started fifteen minutes ago! Mr. Witherspoon‘s in a rage! This is
the third time this month you‘ve been late! You‘d better get yourself over there and
into uniform before he cuts you loose for good!

GIRL: I—

WAITRESS: Go on, now! I know you can‘t afford to miss a paycheck!

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
GIRL: [Attempting to maintain her dignity.] You must have me confused with—with
someone else.

WAITRESS: Confused with—why, Mary-Jane Parker, we‘ve known each other for three
years! We swap shifts! Have you been drinking?! Why are you wearing that ridiculous
hat?!

GIRL: [To the YOUNG MAN.] I … I‘m sorry, Mr. Porkenblogger—

YOUNG MAN: Parkenstacker.

GIRL: Parkenstacker.

WAITRESS: Parkenstacker?

YOUNG MAN: Yes, Parkenstacker.

WAITRESS: As in THE Parkenstackers?! From the society pages?!

GIRL: The society pages?

YOUNG MAN: If only I were so fortunate.

GIRL: You … you must excuse me. My chauffeur is waiting.

WAITRESS: Chauffeur?! What kind of crazy airs are you putting on?! You‘ve never had
a chauffeur in your life! You don‘t even own an automobile!

GIRL: I do so!

WAITRESS: Since when?!

GIRL: Since … Oh, get away from me! I don‘t know you!

WAITRESS: Don‘t know me?! You have been drinking! I‘m going to tell your mother!

[The GIRL rushes off, followed closely by the WAITRESS. The YOUNG MAN picks up her
book where she has dropped it.]

YOUNG MAN: Wait! You forgot your—

[But they are gone. After a few moments, a CHAUFFEUR approaches cautiously.]

CHAUFFEUR: Begging your pardon, sir.

YOUNG MAN: Yes, Henri?

CHAUFFEUR: I don‘t mean to intrude, but your dinner reservation—shall I cancel or—

YOUNG MAN: No … I‘m coming.

CHAUFFEUR: Very good, sir. The auto is waiting.

[The CHAUFFEUR exits and leaves the YOUNG MAN standing alone for a moment as the
lights fade.]

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
CITY SCHOOLS DIVISION OF TAYABAS
Tayabas City

LESSON EXEMPLAR
Grade 9-English

Quarter: THIRD
Theme: Connecting to the World
Sub-Theme: Despite Differences in Social Class

Content Standard: Performance Standard:


The learner demonstrates understanding The learner skilfully performs in one-act
of how Anglo-American literature and play through utilizing effective verbal
other text types serve as a means of and non-verbal strategies and ICT
connecting to the world; also how to use resources based on the following
ways of analysing one-act play and criteria: Focus, Voice, Delivery, and
different forms of verbals for him/her to Dramatic Conventions.
skilfully perform in one-act play.

I. LEARNING COMPETENCY
EN9G-IIIg-21: Use verbals

Objectives:
1. Give the meaning of participle
2. Identify the participle and the word it modifies in given sentences
3. Use participle in creating sentences depicting pictures presented to them

II. LEARNING CONTENT


Lesson: Participle
Materials:
1. Pictures
2. Worksheets
References:
1. K to 12 Curriculum Guide (May 2016) p. 208
2. A Journey through Anglo-American Literature Learner‘s Material for English
pp. 363-364
3. Online References

III. LEARNING TASKS


Introduction: How do you describe your family, friends, things, food, and places
you like?

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
Preliminary Activity:
TASK 1: DESCRIBING WORDS INVENTORY
Use words to describe the following pictures. List down as
many as you can.

Sources:
http://www.dfordog.co.nz/Training+Articles/Scared+dog++Reassure+or+Ignore.html
http://www.ayurvedicherbalcure.com/blog/useful-home-remedies-for-ankle-swelling-quickest-ways-to-get-rid-of-it
http://wallpaperfolder.com/wallpapers/falling+star
https://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-photography-clown-face-illustration-happy-image31030937

Now, see if any in your list match the words below.


To describe the dog: scared To describe the ankle: swollen
To describe the star: falling To describe the clown: juggling
What have you noticed in these describing words?

Activity:
TASK 2: ASSIGNING DESCRIPTIONS
Choose the appropriate words in box B to describe the words in box A.

1. dog 6. gift
2. child 7. sun
3. pencils 8. crowd delayed relaxing

4. massage 9. arrival polluted crying

5. manners 10. river coloring irritating


rising howling
shouting unexpected

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
Analysis:
TASK 3: LOOKING CLOSELY
Provided below is the definition of a verbal called participle. Analyse the set of
given sentences below.

The participle is a verb used as an adjective.


A participle may make use of the past participle of the
verb or its present participle (-ing form). The one-word
participle comes before the noun it modifies. (LM, p.364)

Set A Set B
1. The defeated team left the field. 1. The LPNHS team defeated the other
2. The senator‘s convincing speech school.
amazes the audience. 2. The girl is convincing her parents to
3. Her broken leg was put in a cast. let her attend the ball.
4. She argued with the learned professor. 3. They had broken the rules.
5. The shining star is a sign for Megan to 4. I learned a lot from my speech class.
change. 5. The boy is shining his father‘s shoes.

Abstraction:
TASK 4: FIRMING UP
Based from the activities you did, what is the
definition of participle? How do you form the
participle? What is the function of participle? How
does it differ from a gerund? a verb?

Application:
TASK 5: EXERCISES ON PARTICIPLE

A. Encircle the participle and underline the word it


modifies.
1. Laura returned the borrowed book this morning.
2. In David‘s dream, he rode on a flying carpet.
3. The dismayed crowd threw tomatoes on the performer.
4. The detective had a puzzled expression on his face.
5. Can you repair the broken vase.
6. My favourite dessert is baked apples.
7. The dry cleaner had a pressing appointment.
8. Keith is a leading hitter in our team.
9. An amused smile played across her face.
10. Mark auditioned for the casting director.

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
B. On each line on the right, write whether the underlined word is a verb or
participle.
1. The plane has been delayed by the weather. ______________
2. The delayed game will be played next week. _____________
3. A growing child needs nutritious foods. __________
4. Queen Ann‘s lace was growing by the roadside. _________
5. You will find the information on the following pages. ________
6. Someone has been following me for the last block. _________
7. Some spots are becoming color. ________
8. That dress is a very becoming color. ____________
9. This restaurant has interesting but limited menu. __________
10. My parents have limited nights out to weekends. __________

Assessment:
TASK 6: CHECKPOINT
A. Encircle the participle and underline the word it modifies.

1. Have you had an interesting day?


2. It was an embarrassing situation for us.
3. Hey, I have a fascinating idea regarding our upcoming reunion.
4. What a shocking thought!
5. It is a tiring job.
6. He came up with a disappointing remark.
7. Malou submitted a nicely written article.
8. My little sister got a newly painted room.
9. I have never seen such a boring film.
10. What exactly is a liberated woman?

B. Give the appropriate participle for the given pictures then use the participle
and the word it modifies in your own sentence. Use the table provided.

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
Sources:
https://www.shutterstock.com/search/melting+candle
http://www.pixelstalk.net/sun-and-clouds-wallpaper/
http://damagemax.com/sell-damaged-cars-rhode-island
https://www.shutterstock.com/search/rotten+tomato
http://dublinmortgageblog.com/mischief/2012/02/03/the-parrot-and-why-he-has-returned/parrots-mating/

Participle Word it Modifies


1.
Sentence:
2.
Sentence:
3.
Sentence:
4.
Sentence:
5.
Sentence:

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
CITY SCHOOLS DIVISION OF TAYABAS
Tayabas City

LESSON EXEMPLAR
Grade 9-English

Quarter: THIRD
Theme: Connecting to the World
Sub-Theme: Despite Racial Differences

Content Standard: Performance Standard:


The learner demonstrates understanding The learner skillfully performs in one-act
of how Anglo-American literature and play through utilizing effective verbal and
other text types serve as means of non-verbal strategies and ICT resources
connecting to the world; also how to use based on the following criteria: Focus,
ways of analyzing one-act play and Voice, Delivery, and Dramatic
different forms of verbals for him/her to Conventions.
skillfully perform in a one-act play.

I. LEARNING COMPETENCY
EN9LT-IIIh-16: Analyze literature as a means of connecting to the world
EN9V-IIIh-29: Get familiar with the technical vocabulary for drama and theatre
(like stage directions)

Objectives:
1. Identify technical vocabulary for drama and theater
2. Analyze literature as a means of finding usual situations at present in
comparison to the events depicted in the play
3. Write a dialogue for a given situation
4. Show active participation in group tasks requiring analysis of the play by
part and performing a creative rendition

II. LEARNING CONTENT


Lesson: “Driving Miss Daisy” by Alfred Uhry
Materials:
1. Copies of the Literary Text
2. Handouts/Worksheets
References:
1. K to 12 Curriculum Guide (May 2016) p. 206
2. A Journey through Anglo-American Literature Learner‘s Material for English
pp. 372-400
3. Teacher‘s Guide p. 2-7
4. Learning Package (Second Quarter) pp. 1-6
5. Online References

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
III. LEARNING TASKS
Introduction: Prejudice is so easy to embrace when it‘s seen at a distance, and
nearly impossible to sustain when viewed up close.

Preliminary Activity:

TASK 1: CHECKPOINT
How much do you know about drama and theater lingo?
Complete the puzzle by filling in the boxes with the letter of the
words defined below the puzzle. (LM, p.373)

1 2

4 5

Across
1. The actions of a play printed in the script by the publisher
6. The stage representation of an action or a story
7. The conversation between actors on stage
7. A theatrical work that is intentionally humorous

Down

1. The distinctive and unique manner in which a writer arranges words to


achieve particular effects
2. A play that demonstrates a character‘s fall from grace, power, position, or
moral standing through his/her own actions
3. A main type of literary form
8. Printed words, including dialogue and the stage direction for a script

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
Activity:

TASK 2: MEET NEW WORDS


There are eight hidden words in the puzzle below. Use the
descriptions as clues to figure out the words which you will find
in the play you are about to read. Some letters are given as
clues. (LM, p.372)

1. I am another word for ―storeroom.‖ P T

2. I am ―a hand tool.‖ T R W

3. I am the opposite of ―generous.‖ S I G Y

4. I mean ―gravestone.‖ T O B T E

5. I mean ―annoy.‖ P S R U R

6. I am ―employed to
C H A F F R
drive a private car.‖

A X C B
7. I am a ―car for hire.‖

8. I mean ―rude and disrespectful.‖ A S Y

TASK 3: LOOK WHO’S TALKING


What is your idea of friendship? How do you choose your
friends? Work with a classmate and discuss the meaning of
the following quote.

A friend in need is a friend in deed.

Analysis:
TASK 4: READING CORNER
Read your copy of ―Driving Miss Daisy‖ by Alfred Uhry on pages
375 to 390 of your module then answer the following questions:

1. Who is Daisy? How old is she?


2. What event led her to have a personal driver?
3. Who is Hoke? What did you observe about his personality and the manner of
his speaking?
4. At the end of the play, what did Miss Daisy discover about Hoke? How did
she react to that?

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
5. What kind of relationship would they have if Miss Daisy continued to be
impolite to Hoke?
6. Explain how important education is to man. As a student, what can you do in
order to help or assist people like Hoke?

TASK 5: DELVING DEEPER


What can you say about the play, Driving Miss Daisy? Read the
following passages from the play and then answer the questions that
follow to help you deepen your understanding. (LM, pp. 396-397)

Daisy: I don’t need you. I don’t want you. And I don’t like you saying
I’m rich.
Hoke: I won’t say it, then.
Daisy: Is that what you and Idella talk about in the kitchen? Oh, I
hate this! I hate being discussed behind my back in my own house!
I was born on Forsyth Street and, believe me; I knew the value of
penny. My brother Manny brought home a white cat one day and
Papa said we couldn’t keep it because we couldn’t afford to feed it.
My sisters saved up money so I could go to school and be a
teacher. We didn’t have anything!
Hoke: Yassum, but look like you doin’ all right now.
Daisy: And I’ve ridden the trolley with groceries plenty of times!

 How did Daisy describe the economic conditions in which she grew up?
 Did Daisy‘s upbringing help explain her attitude toward Hoke and the
idea of having a chauffeur?

Hoke: You is rich, Miz Daisy!


Daisy: No I’m not! And nobody can ever say I put on airs. On
Forsyth Street we only had meat once a week. We made a meal off
grits and gravy, I taught the fifth grade at the Crew Street School! I
did without plenty of times. I can tell you.
Hoke: And now you doin’ with. What so terrible in that?
Daisy: You! Why do I talk to you? You don’t understand me.
Hoke: Nome, I don’t. I truly don’t. Cause if I ever was to get ahold of
what you got I be shakin’ it around for everybody in the world to
see.
Daisy:That’s vulgar. Don’t talk to me! (Hoke mutters something
under his breath) What? What did you say? I heard that!
Hoke: Miz Daisy, you need a chauffeur and Lawd know, I need a
job. Let’s jes leave it at dat.

 How did Daisy describe the economic conditions in which she grew up?
 Did Daisy‘s upbringing help explain her attitude toward Hoke and the
idea of having a chauffeur?

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
Daisy: It was mine. I bought it and I put it there and he went into
my pantry and took it and he never said a word. I leave him
plenty of food every day and I always tell him exactly what it is.
They are like having little children in the house. They want
something so they just take it. Not a smidgin of manners. No
conscience. He’ll never admit this. (Hoke enters in an overcoat.)
Hoke: Mornin, Miz Daisy. I b’leve it fixin’ to clear up. S’cuse me, I
didn’t know you was here Mist’ Werthan.
Boolie: Hoke, I think we have to talk.
Hoke: Jes’ a minute. Lemme put my coat away. I be right back.
(He pulls a brown paper bag out of his overcoat.) Oh., Miz Daisy.
Yestiddy when you out with yo sister I ate a can o’your salmon. I
know you say eat the leff over pork chops, but they stiff. Here, I
done buy you another can. You want me to put it in the pantry fo’
you?
Daisy: Yes. Thank you, Hoke.
Hoke: I’ll be right with you Mist’Wertham. (Hoke exits. Daisy looks
at the empty can in her hand.)
Daisy: (trying for dignity) I’ve got to get dressed now. Goodbye,
son. (She pecks his Vucheek and exits.)

 How did Daisy describe Hoke‘s honesty?


 Describe Daisy by the time Hoke exits. What does she feel about herself
after realizing her wrong judgment of others?

Abstraction:
TASK 6: MULTIMEDIA MEISTER
With your group, perform the following tasks by using
different multi-media resources. (LM, p. 398)

Group 1 Group 2
Choose a scene or excerpt Write an open letter to Hoke
from Driving Miss Daisy and persuading him to study even if
perform it in a radio play. he is already old.

Group 3 Group 4
Draw a picture showing the Compose a song depicting the
most interesting scene of the theme of the play.
play.

Application:
TASK 7: JUST THE TWO OF YOU
One of the most enjoyable elements in Driving Miss Daisy is the naturalness of the
dialogue. The playwright uses familiar patterns of speech (Anything over seven
dollars is robbery. Highway robbery) and references to real-life places (the

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
grocery store). Reading or hearing this dialogue makes the situation authentic
and believable. (LM, pp. 398-400)

 With a partner, develop a two or three-minute


conversation that you might hear in the cafeteria. Make
the conversation real and believable. Then present the
dialogue in the class.

WRITING A DIALOGUE RUBRIC


1 2 3 4
There are more
The final draft There are few There are no
than a few
has many grammar, grammar,
grammar,
grammar, capitalization, capitalization,
Conventions capitalization,
capitalization, spelling, or spelling, or
spelling, or
spelling, and punctuation punctuation
punctuation
punctuation errors in the final errors in the final
errors in the final
errors. draft. draft.
draft.
The story is very
The plot is pretty
well organized.
The plot is a little well organized.
Ideas and scenes One idea or
hard to follow. One idea or
seem to be scene follows
Clarity randomly
The transitions scene may seem
another in a
are sometimes out of place.
arranged. logical sequence
not clear. Clear transitions
with clear
are used.
transitions.
The story The story
There is little The story
contains contains many
evidence of contains a few
creative details creative details
creativity. The creative details
and/or and/or
Creativity playwright does and/or
descriptions that descriptions that
not seem to descriptions, but
contribute to the contribute to the
have used much they distract from
reader's reader's
imagination. the story.
enjoyment enjoyment.
It is usually clear
Hard to follow It is usually clear which character It is always clear
characters' which character is speaking. which character
dialogue and is speaking. Dialogue is well is speaking.
Dialogue minimal effort is Dialogue is developed, but Dialogue is well
put into choppy and not could be more developed and
conversations. well developed. varied in varied.
structure.

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
DRIVING MISS DAISY
In the dark we hear a car ignition turn on, and then a horrible crash. Bangs and booms and
wood splintering. When the noise is very loud, it stops suddenly and the lights come up on Daisy
Werthan‘s living room,or a portion thereof. Daisy, age 72, is wearing a summer dress and high
heeled shoes. Her hair, her clothes, her walk, everything about her suggests bristle and feist1 and
high energy. She appears to be in excellent health. Her son, Boolie Werthan, 40, is a
businessman, Junior Chamber of Commerce style. He has a strong, capable air. The Werthans
are Jewish, but they have strong Atlanta accents.
DAISY: No!
BOOLIE: Mama!
DAISY: No!
BOOLIE: Mama!
DAISY: I said no, Boolie, and that‘s the end of it.
BOOLIE: It‘s a miracle you‘re not laying in Enory Hopital – or decked out at the funeral home.
Look at you! You didn‘t even break your glasses.
DAISY: It was the car‘s fault.
BOOLIE: Mama, the car didn‘t just back over the driveway and land on the Pollard‘s garage all
by itself. You had it in the wrong gear.
DAISY: I did not!
BOOLIE: You put it in reverse instead of drive. The police report shows that.
DAISY: You should have let me keep my La Salle.
BOOLIE: Your La Salle was eight years old.
DAISY: I don‘t care. It never would have behaved this way. And you know it.
BOOLIE: Mama, cars, don‘t behave. They are behaved upon. The fact is you, all by yourself,
demolished that Packard.
DAISY: Think what you want. I know the truth.
BOOLIE: The truth is you shouldn‘t be allowed to drive a car any more.
DAISY: No.
BOOLIE: Mama, we are just going to have to hire somebody to drive you.
DAISY: No, we are not. This is my business.
BOOLIE: Your insurance policy is written so that they are going to have to give you a brand new
car.
DAISY: Not another Packard. I hope.
BOOLIE: Lord Almighty! Don‘t you see what I‘m saying?
DAISY: Quit talking so ugly to your mother.
BOOLIE: Mama, you are seventy–two years old and you just cost the insurance company twenty-
seven hundred dollars. You are a terrible risk. Nobody is going to issue you a policy after
this.
DAISY: You‘re just saying that to be hateful.
BOOLIE: O.k. Yes. Yes I am. I‘m making it all up. Every insurance company in America is lined up
in the driveway waving their fountain pens and falling all over themselves to get you to
sign on. Everybody wants Daisy Werthan, the only woman in the history of driving to
demolish a three week old Packard, a two car garage and a free standing tool shed in
one fell swoop!
DAISY: You talk so foolish sometimes, Boolie.
BOOLIE: And even if you could get a policy somewhere, it wouldn‘t be safe. I‘d worry all the
time. Look at how many of your friends have men to drive them. Miss Ida Jacobs, Miss
Ethel Hess, Aunt Nonie–
DAISY: They‘re all rich.
BOOLIE: Daddy left you plenty enough for this. I‘ll do the interviewing at the plant. Oscar in the
freight elevator knows every colored man in Atlanta worth talking about. I‘m sure in two
weeks time I can find you somebody perfectly–
DAISY: No!
BOOLIE: You won‘t even have to do anything, Mama. I told you. I‘ll do all the interviewing, all the
reference checking, all the–
DAISY: No. Now stop running your mouth! I am seventy-two years old as you gallantly reminded
me and I am a widow, but unless they rewrote the Constitution and didn‘t tell me, I still
have rights. And one of my rights is the right to invite who I want–not who you want–into
my house. You do accept the fact that this is my house? What I do not want–and
absolutely will not have is some– (She gropes for a bad enough word.) some chauffeur
sitting in my kitchen, gobbling my food, running up my phone bill. Oh, I hate all that in
my house!
BOOLIE: You have Idella.
DAISY: Idella is different. She‘s been coming to me three times a week since you were in the
eighth grade and we know how to stay out of each other‘s way. And even so there are
nicks and chips in most of my wedding china and I‘ve seen her throw silver forks in the
garbage more than once.
BOOLIE: Do you think Idella has a vendetta 2 against your silverware?

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
DAISY: Stop being sassy. You know what I mean. I was brought up to do myself. On Forsyth Street
we couldn‘t afford them and we did for ourselves. That‘s still the best way, if you ask me.
BOOLIE: Them! You sound like Governor Talmadge.
DAISY: Why, Boolie! What a thing to say! I‘m not prejudiced! Aren‘t you ashamed?
BOOLIE: I‘ve got to go home. Florine‘ll be having a fit.
DAISY: Y‘all must have plans tonight.
BOOLIE: Going to the Ansleys for a dinner party.
DAISY: I see.
BOOLIE: You see what?
DAISY: The Ansleys. I‘m sure Florine bought another new dress. This is her idea of heaven on
earth, isn‘t it?
BOOLIE: What?
DAISY: Socializing with Episcopalians.
BOOLIE: You‘re a doodle, Mama. I guess Aunt Nonie can run you anywhere you need to go for
the time being.
DAISY: I‘ll be fine.
BOOLIE: I‘ll stop by tomorrow evening.
DAISY: How do you know I‘ll be here? I‘m certainly not dependent on you for company.
BOOLIE: Fine. I‘ll call first. And I still intend to interview colored men.
DAISY: No!
BOOLIE: Mama!
DAISY: (singing to end discussion)
After the ball is over
After the break of morn
After the dancers leaving
After the stars are gone
Many a heart is aching
If you could read them all –
(Lights fade on her as she sings and come up on Bollie at his desk at the Werthan Company. He
sits at a desk piled with papers, and speaks into an intercom.)
BOOLIE: Ok, Miss McClatchey. Send him on in. (He continues working at his desk. Hoke Coleburn
enters, a black man of about 60, dressed in a somewhat shiny suit and carrying a
fedora, a man clearly down on his luck but anxious to keep up appearances.) Yes,
Hoke, isn‘t it?
HOKE: Yassuh. Hoke Coleburn.
BOOLIE: Have a seat there. I‘ve got to sign these letters. I don‘t want Miss McClatchey fussing at
me.
HOKE: Keep right on with it. I got all the time in the worl‘.
BOOLIE: I see. How long you been out of work?
HOKE: Since back befo‘ las November.
BOOLIE: Long time.
HOKE: Well, Mist‘ Werthan, you try bein‘ me and looking for work. They hirin‘ young if they hirin‘
colored, an‘ they ain‘ even hirin‘ much young, seems like. (Boolie is involved with his
paperwork.) Mist‘ Werthan? Y‘all people Jewish, ain‘ you?
BOOLIE: Yes we are. Why do you ask?
HOKE: I‘d druther drive for Jews. People always talkin‘ bout they stingy and they cheap, but
don‘ say none of that ‗roun‘ me.
BOOLIE: Good to know you feel that way. Now, tell me where you worked before.
HOKE: Yassuh. That‘s what I‘m getting at. One time I workin‘ for this woman over near Little Five
Points. What was that woman‘s name? I forget. Anyway, she president of the Ladies
Auxiliary over yonder to the Ponce De Leon Baptist Church and seem like she always
bringing up God and Jesus and do unto others. You know what I‘m talkin ‗bout?
BOOLIE: I‘m not sure. Go on.
HOKE: Well, one day, Mist‘ Werthan, one day that woman say to me, she say ―Hoke, come on
back in the back wid me. I got something for you.‖ And we go on back yonder and,
Lawd have mercy, she have all these old shirts and collars be on the bed, yellow, you
know, and nasty like they been stuck off in a chiffarobe and forgot about. Thass‘ right.
And she say ―Ain‘ they nice? They b‘long to my daddy befo he pass and we fixin‘ to sell
‗em to you for twenty five cent apiece.
BOOLIE: What was her name?
HOKE: Thass‘ what I‘m thinkin‘. What WAS that woman‘s name? Anyway, as I was goin‘ on to
say, any fool see the whole bunch of them collars and shirts together ain‘ worth a nickel!
Them‘s the people das callin‘ Jews cheap! So I say ―Yassum, I think about it‖ and I get
me another job fas‘ as I can.
BOOLIE: Where was that?
HOKE: Mist‘ Harold Stone, Jewish gentlemen jes like you. Judge, live over yonder on Lullwater
Road.
BOOLIE: I knew Judge Stone.

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
HOKE: You doan‘ say! He done give me this suit when he finish wid it. An‘ this necktie too.
BOOLIE: You drove for Judge Stone?
HOKE: Seven years to the day nearabout. An‘ I be there still if he din‘ die, and Miz Stone decide
to close up the house and move to her people in Savannah. And she say ―Come on
down to Savannah wid‘ me, Hoke.‖ Cause my wife dead by then and I say ― No thank
you.‖ I didn‘t want to leave my grandbabies and I don‘ get along with that Geechee
trash they got down there.
BOOLIE: Judge Stone was a friend of my father‘s.
HOKE: You doan‘ mean! Oscar say you need a driver for yo‘ family. What I be doin‘? Runnin‘ yo
children to school and yo‘ wife to the beauty parlor and like dat?
BOOLIE: I don‘t have any children. But tell me–
HOKE: Thass‘ a shame! My daughter bes ‗ thing ever happen to me. But you young yet. I
wouldn‘t worry none.
BOOLIE: I won‘t. Thank you. Did you have a job after Judge Stone?
HOKE: I drove a milk truck for the Avondale Dairy thru the whole war–the one jes‘ was.
BOOLIE: Hoke, what I am looking for is somebody to drive my mother around.
HOKE: Excuse me for askin‘, but how come she ain‘ hire fo‘ herself?
BOOLIE: Well, it‘s a delicate situation.
HOKE: Mmmm Hmm. She done gone ‗roun‘ the bend a little? That‘ll happen when they get on.
BOOLIE: Oh no. Nothing like that. She‘s all there. Too much there is the problem. It just isn‘t safe
for her to drive any more. She knows it, but she won‘t admit it. I‘ll be frank with you. I‘m a
little desperate.
HOKE: I know what you mean ‗bout dat. Once I was outta work my wife said to me ―Oooooh,
Hoke, you ain‘ gon get noun nother job.‖ And I say ―What you talkin‘ bout, woman?‖
And the very next week I go to work for that woman in Little Five Points. Cahill! Ms.
Frances Cahill. And then I go to Judge Stone and they the reason I happy to hear you
Jews.
BOOLIE: Hoke, I want you to understand, my mother is a little high-strung. She doesn‘t want
anybody driving her. But the fact is you‘d be working for me, She can say anything she
likes but she can‘t fire for you. You understand?
HOKE: Sho‘I do. Don‘t worry none about it. I hold on no matter what way she run me. When I
nothin‘ but a little boy down there on the farm above Macon, I use to wrastle hogs to
the ground at killin‘ time, and ain‘ no hog get away from me yet.
BOOLIE: How does twenty dollars a week sound?
HOKE: Soun‘ like you got yo‘ Mama a chauffeur. (Lights fade on them and come up on Daisy
who enters her living room with the morning paper. She reads with interest. Hoke enters
the living room. He carries a chauffeur’s cap instead of his hat. Daisy’s concentration on
the paper becomes fierce when she senses Hoke’s presence.) Mornin‘, Miz Daisy.
DAISY: Good morning.
HOKE: Right cool in the night, wadn‘t it?
DAISY: I wouldn‘t know. I was asleep.
HOKE: Yassum. What yo plans today?
DAISY: That‘s my business.
HOKE: You right about dat. Idella say we runnin‘ outa coffee and Dutch Cleanser.
DAISY: We?
HOKE: She say we low on silver polish too.
DAISY: Thank you. I will go to the Piggly Wiggly on the trolley this afternoon.
HOKE: Now, Miz daisy, how come you doan‘ let me carry you?
DAISY: No thank you.
HOKE: Aint dat what Mist‘ Werthan hire me for?
DAISY: That‘s his problem.
HOKE: All right den. I find something to do. I tend yo zinnias.
DAISY: Leave my flower bed alone.
HOKE: Yassum. You got a nice place back beyond the garage ain‘ doin‘ nothin‘ but sittin‘ there.
I could put you in some butterbeans and some tomatoes and even some Irish potatoes
could we get some ones with good eyes.
DAISY: If I want a vegetable garden. I‘ll plant it for myself.
HOKE: Well, I go out and set in the kitchen, then, like I been doin‘ all week.
DAISY: Don‘t talk to Idella. She has work to do.
HOKE: Nome, I jes sit there till five o‘clock.
DAISY: That‘s your affair.
HOKE: Seem a shame, do. That fine Oldsmobile settin out there in the garage. Ain‘t move a inch
from when Mist‘ Werthan rode it over here from Mitchell Motors. Only got nineteen miles
on it. Seem like that insurance company give you a whole new car for nothin‘.
DAISY: That‘s your opinion.
HOKE: Yassum. And my other opinion is a fine rich Jewish lady like you doan b‘long draggin‘ up
the steps of no bus, luggin‘ no grocery store bags. I come along and carry them fo‘ you.
DAISY: I don‘t need you. I don‘t want you. And I don‘t like you saying I‘m rich.

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
HOKE: I won‘t say it, then.
DAISY: Is that what you and Idella talk about in the kitchen? Oh, I hate this! I hate being
discussed behind my back in my own house! I was born on Forsyth Street and, believe
me, I knew the value of penny. My brother Manny brought home a white cat one day
and Papa said we couldn‘t keep it because we couldn‘t afford to feed it. My sisters
saved up money so I
could go to school and be a teacher. We didn‘t have anything!
HOKE: Yassum, but look like you doin‘ all right now.
DAISY: And I‘ve ridden the trolley with groceries plenty of times!
HOKE: Yassum, but I feel bad takin‘ Mist‘ Werthan‘s money for doin‘ nothin‘. You understand?
(She cut him off in the speech.)
DAISY: How much does he pay you?
HOKE: That between me and him, Miz Daisy.
DAISY: Anything over seven dollars a week is robbery. Highway robbery!
HOKE: Specially when I doan do nothin‘ but sit on a stool in the kitchen all day long. Tell you
what, while you goin on the trolley to the Piggly Wiggly, I hose down yo‘ front steps.
(Daisy is putting on her hat.)
DAISY: All right.
HOKE: All right I hose yo steps?
DAISY: All right the Piggly Wiggly. And then home. Nowhere else.
HOKE: Yassum.
DAISY: Wait. You don‘t know how to run the Oldsmobile!
HOKE: Miz Daisy, a gear shift like a third arm to me. Anyway, thissun automatic. Any fool can run
it.
DAISY: Any fool but me, apparently.
HOKE: Ain‘ no need to be so hard on yoseff now. You cain‘ drive but you probably do alota
things I cain‘ do. It all work out.
DAISY: (calling offstage) I‘m gone to the market, Idella.
HOKE: (also calling) And I right behind her! (Hoke puts on his cap and helps Daisy into the car.
He sits at the wheel and backs the car down the driveway. Daisy, in the rear, is in full
bristle.) I love a new car smell. Doan‘ you? ( Daisy slides over to the other side of the
seat.)
DAISY: I‘m nobody‘s fool, Hoke.
HOKE: Nome.
DAISY: I can see the speedometer as well as you can.
HOKE: I see dat.
DAISY: My husband taught me how to run a car.
HOKE: Yassum.
DAISY: I still remember everything he said. So don‘t you even think for a second that you can–
Wait! You‘re speeding! I see it!
HOKE: We ain goin‘ but nineteen miles an hour.
DAISY: I like to go under the speed limit.
HOKE: Speed limit thirty five here.
DAISY: The slower you go, the more you save on gas. My husband told me that.
HOKE: We barely movin‘. Might as well walk to the Piggly Wiggly.
DAISY: Is this your car?
HOKE: Nome.
DAISY: Do you pay for the gas?
HOKE: Nome.
DAISY: All right then. My fine son my think I‘m losing my abilities, but I am still in control of what
goes on in my car. Where are you going?
HOKE: To the grocery store.
DAISY: Then why didn‘t you turn on Highland Avenue?
HOKE: Piggly Wiggly ain‘ on Highland Avenue. It on Euclid down there near–
DAISY: I know where it is and I want to go to it the way I always go. On Highland Avenue.
HOKE: That three blocks out of the way, Miz Daisy.
DAISY: Go back! Go back this minute!
HOKE: We in the wrong lane! I cain‘ jes–
DAISY: Go back I said! If you don‘t, I‘ll get out of this car and walk!
HOKE: We movin‘! You cain‘ open the do‘!
DAISY: This is wrong! Where are you taking me?
HOKE: The sto‘.
DAISY: This is wrong. You have to go back to Highland Avenue!
HOKE: Mmmm Hmmmm.
DAISY: I‘ve been driving to the Piggly Wiggly since the day they put it up and opened it for
business. This isn‘t the way! Go back! Go back this minute!
HOKE: Yonder the Piggly Wiggly.
DAISY: Get ready to turn now.

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
HOKE: Yassum
DAISY: Look out! There‘s a little boy behind that shopping cart!
HOKE: I see dat.
DAISY: Pull in next to the blue car.
HOKE: We closer to the do‘ right here.
DAISY: Next to the blue car! I don‘t park in the sun! It fades the upholstery.
HOKE: Yassum. (He pulls in, and gets out as Daisy springs out of the
back seat.)
DAISY: Wait a minute. Give me the car keys.
HOKE: Yassum.
DAISY: Stay right here by the car. And you don‘t have to tell everybody my business.
HOKE: Nome. Don‘ forget the Dutch Cleanser now. (She fixes him with a look meant to kill and
exits. Hoke waits by the car for a minute, then hurries to the phone booth at the corner.)
Hello? Miz McClatchey? Hoke Coleburn here. Can I speak to him? (pause) Mornin sir,
Mist‘ Werthan. Guess where I‘m at? I‘m at dishere phone booth on Euclid Avenue right
next to
the Piggly Wiggly. I jes drove yo‘ Mama to the market. (pause) She flap a little on the way. But
she all right. She in the store. Uh oh, Miz Daisy look out the store window and doan‘ see
me, she liable to throw a fit right there by the checkout. (pause) Yassuh, only took six
days. Same time it take the Lawd to make the worl‘. (Lights out on him. We hear a choir
singing.)
CHOIR.
May the words of my mouth
And the meditations of my heart
Be acceptable in Thy sight, O Lord
My strength and my redeemer, Amen.
(Light up on Hoke waiting by the car, looking at a newspaper. Daisy enters in a different
hat and a fur piece.)
HOKE: How yo‘ Temple this mornin‘, Miz Daisy?
DAISY: Why are you here?
HOKE: I bring you to de Temple like you tell me. (He is helping her into the car.)
DAISY: I can get myself in. Just go. (She makes a tight little social smile and a wave out the
window.) Hurry up out of here! (Hoke starts up the car.)
HOKE: Yassum.
DAISY: I didn‘t say speed. I said get me away from here.
HOKE: Somethin‘ wrong back yonder?
DAISY: No.
HOKE: Somethin‘ I done?
DAISY: No. (a beat) Yes.
HOKE: I ain‘ done nothin‘!
DAISY: You had the car right in front of the front door of the Temple! Like I was Queen of
Romania! Everybody saw you! Didn‘t I tell you to wait for me in the back?
HOKE: I jes trying‘ to be nice. They two other chauffeurs right behind me.
DAISY: You made me look like a fool. A g.d. fool!
HOKE: Lawd knows you ain‘ no fool, Miz Daisy.
DAISY: Slow down. Miriam and Beulah and them, I could see what they were thinking when we
came out of services.
HOKE: What that?
DAISY: That I‘m trying to pretend I‘m rich.
HOKE: You is rich, Miz Daisy!
DAISY: No I‘m not! And nobody can ever say I put on airs. On Forsyth Street we only had meat
once a week. We made a meal off of grits and gravy, I taught the fifth grade at the
Crew Street School! I did without plenty of times. I can tell you.
HOKE: And now you doin‘ with. What so terrible in that?
DAISY: You! Why do I talk to you? You don‘t understand me.
HOKE: Nome, I don‘t. I truly don‘t. Cause if I ever was to get ahold of what you got I be shakin it
around for everybody in the world to see.
DAISY: That‘s vulgar3. Don‘t talk to me! (Hoke mutters something under his breath,) What? What
did you say? I heard that!
HOKE: Miz Daisy, you need a chauffeur and Lawd know, I need a job. Let‘s jes leave it at dat.
(Light out on them and up on Boolie, in his shirtsleeves. He has a phone to his ear.)
BOOLIE: Good morning, Mama. What‘s the matter? (pause) What? Mama, you‘re talking so fast
I… What? All right. All right. I‘ll come by on my way to work. I‘ll be there as soon as I can.
(Light out on him and up on Daisy, pacing around her house in a winter bathrobe.
Boolie enters in a topcoat and scarf.) I didn‘t expect to find you in one piece.
DAISY: I wanted you to be here when he comes. I wanted you to hear it for yourself.
BOOLIE: Hear what? What‘s going on?
DAISY: He‘s stealing from me!

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
BOOLIE: Hoke? Are you sure?
DAISY: I don‘t make empty accusations. I have proof!
BOOLIE: What proof?
DAISY: This! (She triumphantly pulls an empty can of salmon out of her robe pocket.) I caught
him red handed! I found this hidden in the garbage pail under some coffee grounds.
BOOLIE: You mean he stole a can of salmon?
DAISY: Here it is! Oh I knew. I knew something was funny. They all take things, you know. So I
counted.
BOOLIE: You counted?
DAISY: The silverware first and the linen dinner napkins and then I went into the pantry. I turned
on the light and the first thing that caught my eye was a hole behind the corned beef.
And I knew right away. There were only eight cans of salmon. I had nine. Three for a
dollar on sale.
BOOLIE: Very clever, Mama. You made me miss my breakfast and be late for a meeting at the
bank for a thirty-three cent can of salmon. (He jams his hand in his pocket and pulls out
some bills.) Here! You want thirty-three cents? Here‘s a dollar! Here‘s ten dollars! Buy a
pantry full of salmon!
DAISY: Why, Boolie! The idea! Waving money at me like I don‘t know what! I don‘t want the
money. I want my things!
BOOLIE: One can of salmon?
DAISY: It was mine. I bought it and I put it there and he went into my pantry and took it and he
never said a word. I leave him plenty of food everyday and I always tell him exactly
what it is. They are like having little children in the house. They want something so they
just take it. Not a smidgin of manners. No conscience. He‘ll never admit this. ―Nome,‖
he‘ll say, ―I doan know nothin‘ bout that.‖ And I don‘t like it! I don‘t like living this way! I
have no privacy.
BOOLIE: Mama!
DAISY: Go ahead. Defend him. You always do.
BOOLIE: All right. I give up. You want to drive yourself again, you just go ahead and arrange it
with the insurance company. Take your blessedtrolley. Buy yourself a taxicab. Anything
you want. Just leave me out of it.
DAISY: Boolie… (Hoke enters in an overcoat)
HOKE: Mornin, Miz daisy. I b‘leve it fixin‘ to clear up. S‘cuse me, I didn‘t know you was here Mist‘
Werthan.
BOOLIE: Hoke, I think we have to have a talk.
HOKE: Jes‘ a minute. Lemme put my coat away. I be right back. (He pulls a brown paper bag
out of his overcoat.) Oh., Miz Daisy. Yestiddy when you out with yo sister I ate a can
o‘your salmon. I know you say eat the leff over pork chops, but they stiff. Here, I done
buy you another can. You want me to put it in the pantry fo‘ you?
DAISY: Yes. Thank you, Hoke.
HOKE: I‘ll be right wit you Mist‘ Wertham. (Hoke exits. Daisy looks at the empty can in her hand.)
DAISY: (trying for dignity) I‘ve got to get dressed now. Goodbye, son. (She pecks his cheek and
exits. Lights out on him. We hear sounds of birds twittering. Lights come up brightly–hot
sun. Daisy, in light dress, is kneeling, a trowel in her hand, working by a gravestone.
Hoke, jacket in hand,
sleeves rolled up, stands nearby.)
HOKE: I jess thinkin‘, Miz Daisy. We bin out heah to the cemetery three times dis mont already
and ain‘ even the twentieth yet.
DAISY: It‘s good to come in nice weather.
HOKE: Yassum. Mist‘ Sig‘s grave mighty well tended. I b‘leve you the best widow in the state of
Georgia.
DAISY: Boolie‘s always pestering me to let the staff out here tend to this plot. Perpetual care they
call it.
HOKE: Doan‘ you do it. It right to have somebody from the family lookin‘ after you.
DAISY: I‘ll certainly never have that. Boolie will have me in perpetual care before I‘m cold.
HOKE: Come on now, Miz Daisy.
DAISY: Hoke, run back to the car and get that pot of azaleas for me and set it on Leo Bauer‘s
grave.
HOKE: Miz Rose Bauer‘s husband?
DAISY: That‘s right. She asked me to bring it out here for her. She‘s not very good about coming.
And I believe today would‘ve been Leo‘s birthday.
HOKE: Yassum. Where the grave at?
DAISY: I‘m not exactly sure. But I know it‘s over that way on the other side of the weeping cherry.
You‘ll see the headstone. Bauer.
HOKE: Yassum.
DAISY: What‘s the matter?
HOKE: Nothin‘ the matter. (He exits. She works with her trowel. In a moment Hoke returns with
flowers.) Miz Daisy…

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
DAISY: I told you it‘s over on the other side of the weeping cherry. It says Bauer on the
headstone.
HOKE: How‘d that look?
DAISY: What are you talking about?
HOKE: (deeply embarrassed) I‘m talkin‘ bout I cain‘ read.
DAISY: What?
HOKE: I cain‘ read.
DAISY: That‘s ridiculous. Anybody can read.
HOKE: Nome. Not me.
DAISY: Then how come I see you looking at the paper all the time?
HOKE: That‘s it. Jes lookin‘. I dope out what‘s happening from the pictures.
DAISY: You know your letters, don‘t you?
HOKE: My ABC‘s? Yassum, pretty good. I jes‘ cain‘ read.
DAISY: Stop saying that. It‘s making me mad. If you know your letters then you can read. You just
don‘t know you can read. I taught some of the stupidest children God ever put on the
face of this earth and all of them could read enough to find a name on a tombstone.
The name is Bauer, Buh buh buh buh Bauer. What does that buh letter sound like?
HOKE: Sound like a B.
DAISY: Of course. Buh Bauer. Er er er er er. BauER. That‘s the last part. What letter sounds like er?
HOKE: R?
DAISY: So the first letter is a–
HOKE: B.
DAISY: And the last letter is an–
HOKE: R.
DAISY: B-R.B-R.B-R.Brr. Brr. Brr. It even sounds like Bauer, doesn‘t it?
HOKE: Sho‘do Miz Daisy. Thass it?
DAISY: That‘s it. Now go over there like I told you in the first place and look for a headstone with
a B at the beginning and an R the end and that will be Bauer.
HOKE: We ain‘ gon‘ worry ‗bout what come n‘ the middle?
DAISY: Not right now. This will be enough for you to find it. Go on now.
HOKE: Yassum.
DAISY: And don‘t come back here telling me you can‘t do it. You can.
HOKE: Miz Daisy…
DAISY: What now?
HOKE: I ‗preciate this, Miz Daisy.
DAISY: Don‘t be ridiculous! I didn‘t do anything. Now would you please hurry up? I‘m burning up
out here.
________________________________________________________________
Source: Best Plays Middle Level by Thomas, Brandon, Susan Glaspell
Contemporary Publishing Group Incorporated, 1998

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
CITY SCHOOLS DIVISION OF TAYABAS
Tayabas City

LESSON EXEMPLAR
Grade 9-English

Quarter: THIRD
Theme: Connecting to the World
Sub-Theme: Despite Racial Differences

Content Standard: Performance Standard:


The learner demonstrates understanding The learner skillfully performs in one-act
of how Anglo-American literature and play through utilizing effective verbal
other text types serve as means of and non-verbal strategies and ICT
connecting to the world; also how to use resources based on the following criteria:
ways of analyzing one-act play and Focus, Voice, Delivery, and Dramatic
different forms of verbals for him/her to Conventions.
skillfully perform in a one-act play.

I. LEARNING COMPETENCY
EN9LT-IIIh-2.11: Determine tone, mood, technique, and purpose of the author

Objectives:
1. Define tone, mood, technique, and purpose of the author
2. Identify the tone, mood, technique, and purpose of the author in writing
the literary piece discussed
3. Exhibit cooperation in performing group tasks

II. LEARNING CONTENT


Lesson: Tone, Mood, Technique, and Purpose of Author
Materials:
1. Tarpapel
2. Paper and Pen
References:
1. K to 12 Curriculum Guide (May 2016) p. 208
2. A Journey through Anglo-American Literature Learner‘s Material for English
pp. 392
3. Teacher‘s Guide
4. Online References

III. LEARNING TASKS


Introduction: Have you ever wondered how powerful words are? Only the unwise
disregard what words can do. Words changed the lives of men, the social order
and the course of histories of nations. Words found in the newspapers and

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
magazines, on billboards and even in the Internet may influence or persuade
you to take some kind of action.

Preliminary Activity:

TASK 1: LIKE METER


Did you like the play "Driving Miss Daisy?"
Rate from 1 to 10 how much you liked it, 10 being the highest.

Activity:
TASK 2: REVISITING THE TEXT
Form groups of four (4). Choose dialogues or lines from the play
―Driving Ms. Daisy‖ that show the following:

Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 Group 4

Mood of the Tone of the Technique of the Purpose of the


Writer Writer Writer Writer

Analysis:
TASK 3: REPORTERS’ BLOCK
Each group will assign a leader to report the result of the
activity given to them. Read the following tips to calm
down and gear up for a super performance.
1. Practice what you've written.
2. Once you stand, take a moment to gather your thoughts or relax. Don't be
afraid to give yourself a silent pause before you begin. Look through your
paper for a moment. If your heart is beating hard, this will give it an
opportunity to calm. If you do this right, it actually looks very professional. If
you start to speak and your voice is shaky, take a pause. Clear your throat.
Take a few relaxing breaths and start again.
3. Focus on someone in the back of the room. This has a calming effect on
some speakers. It feels weird, but it doesn't look weird.
4. If there is a microphone, talk to it. Many speakers concentrate on the
microphone and pretend it's the only person in the room. This works well.
5. Take the stage. Pretend you're a professional on TV. This gives confidence.
6. Prepare an "I don't know" answer if people will be asking questions. Don't be
afraid to say you don't know. You can say something like, "That is a great
question. I'll look into that."
7. Prepare a good ending line. Avoid an awkward moment at the end. Don't
back away, mumbling "Well, I guess that's all."

Source: http://homeworktips.about.com/od/paperassignments/ht/oralreport.htm

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
Abstraction:

TASK 4: WRAPPING UP
Match column A with column B to define the key concepts covered
in this lesson.

A B
1. The overall feeling of the piece, or passage a. tone
2. The literary devices, or methods the creator of a b. mood
narrative uses to convey what they want — in other c. purpose
words, a strategy used in the making of a narrative d. technique
to relay information to the audience and,
particularly, to "develop" the narrative, usually in
order to make it more complete, complicated, or
interesting
3. The effect the writer wants to create, the work can
be formal or informal, sober or whimsical (unusual or
creative), assertive or pleading, straightforward or sly
(clever)
4. To enlighten the readers to make or to take action or
to be active or to be operative

Application:
TASK 5: PRACTICE
Read and answer the questions carefully. Encircle the letter of the
correct answer.

1. Read the following poem, "A Birthday" by Christina Rossetti. What mood do
the details of the poem convey?

My heart is like a singing bird My heart is like a rainbow shell


Whose nest is a weathered shoot; That paddles in a peaceful sea;
My heart is like an apple-tree My heart is gladder than all these
Whose boughs are bent with thick-set fruit; Because my love comes to me.
A. Sorrow B. Happiness C. Excitement D. Nervousness

2. Which tone is represented in the following passage?


Wow! With a top speed of one hundred fifty miles per hour, that car can
almost fly!
A. Calm B. Annoyed C. Scary D. Excited

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
3. Which tone is represented in the following passage?
She delicately placed the cooing baby on a soft, freshly cleaned blanket.
A. Calm B. Annoyed C. Scary D. Excited

4. The story of a young man who learns to resist the influences of drugs and
gangs _______________.
A. Entertain B. Inform C. Persuade D. Argue

5. What is the purpose of the author in the following statements?


Everyone should visit Spain, at least once in their life, because it is an
incredibly beautiful place. It has breath-taking scenery, enjoyable music and
mouth-watering food.
A. Entertain B. Inform C. Persuade D. Argue

Assessment:

TASK 6: WHAT’S ON YOUR MIND?


Read the following quotes. What does it convey?

1. ―Thousands of candles can be lighted from a single candle, and the life of the
candle will not be shortened. Happiness never decreases by being shared.‖
- Buddha
2. ―If you want happiness for an hour — take a nap.‘
If you want happiness for a day — go fishing.
If you want happiness for a year — inherit a fortune.
If you want happiness for a lifetime — help someone else.‖
- Chinese Proverb

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
CITY SCHOOLS DIVISION OF TAYABAS
Tayabas City

LESSON EXEMPLAR
Grade 9-English

Quarter: THIRD
Theme: Connecting to the World
Sub-Theme: Transcending Differences

Content Standard: Performance Standard:


The learner demonstrates understanding The learner skilfully performs in one-act
of how Anglo-American literature and play through utilizing effective verbal
other text types serve as a means of and non-verbal strategies and ICT
connecting to the world; also how to use resources based on the following
ways of analysing one-act play and criteria: Focus, Voice, Delivery, and
different forms of verbals for him/her to Dramatic Conventions.
skilfully perform in one-act play.

I. LEARNING COMPETENCY
EN9LT-IIIi-3: Explain how a selection may be influenced by culture, history,
environment, or other factors
EN9WC-IIIi-9: Compose forms of literary writing

Objectives:
1. Sequence the events of the story and explain how the selection is
influenced by various factors
2. Perform small group dynamics leading to in-depth analysis of the play
3. Appreciate the significance of equality among men as pointed out in the
theme of the literary piece
4. Compose a play synopsis by following the steps in constructing one

II. LEARNING CONTENT


Lesson: Driving Miss Daisy ( Part II ) by Alfred Uhry
Materials:
1. Film Clips of Viewing Inputs
2. Pictures
References:
1. K to 12 Curriculum Guide (May 2016) pp. 208-209
2. A Journey through Anglo-American Literature Learner‘s Material for English
pp. 402-409
3. Teacher‘s Guide
4. Online References

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
III. LEARNING TASKS
Introduction: Ponder in this thought:

Source: http://www.elephantjournal.com/2013/12/ the-poem-


that-got-nelson-mandela-through-27-years-in-prison/

Preliminary Activity:

TASK 1: ALL EARS


Students listen as the teacher reads a text about Nelson
Mandela.
Source: http://www.thedailystar.net/news/mandela-icon-of-peace

Activity:

TASK 2: SMALL GROUP DYNAMICS


Form four groups and perform the given tasks.
(LM, pp. 403-405)

Group 1

 Give your insights regarding the


suffering of people who attempted to
live as human beings.

Source: https://i.ytimg.com/vi/C00mK6aUaq8/hqdefault.jpg
Group 2

 Cite situations that prove the


relevance and worth of this
quote.

Source: http://www.funshifter.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/Nelson-Mandela-Education-
Quotes-Wallpaper.jpg

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
Group 3

 Apartheid is a policy or system of


segregation or discrimination on grounds
of race. Analyze the editorial cartoon.

Source: https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images
/874801278/29269_1452411875881_1400813952
_31251533_7624529_n.jpg

Group 4

No Bullying
 Have you experienced
Anything in life that we don‘t accept being bullied in school,
Will simply make trouble for us until
we make peace with it. at home, or in
-Shakti Gawain

your
TASK 3: LEVEL UP
community?
A. With a partner, read and give your reaction Share
to this your
quotation. stories.
Prejudice is a burden that confuses the past,
Threatens the future and renders the present inaccessible.
-Maya Angelou

1. What idea flashes to your mind as you read the quotation?


2. Who do you think of as you read this quotation? Why?

B. Look closely at the picture.

Source: https://www.google.com.ph/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc
=s&source=images&cd=&ved=&url=http%3A%2F%2Fchica

1. What are you reminded of by the illustration?


2. What message does this illustration convey?

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
3. What could be the social problem depicted in the picture?
4. What is your idea of racism?
5. Where do racism and discrimination take place the most?

Analysis:
TASK 4: READING CORNER
Read Driving Miss Daisy (Part II) by Alfred Uhry on pages 405 to408 of
your module. (LM, pp. 408-409)

TASK 5: COMPREHENSION CHECK


A. Sequencing Events
Arrange the following events accordingly. Use numbers 1-12.
_____ When Daisy found out that Hoke was illiterate, she taught him
how to read.
_____ Daisy told Hoke that he was her best friend.
_____ Boolie hired a driver –Hoke Coleburn, an uneducated African-American.
_____ Daisy was on her way to the temple, but there was a bad traffic jam.
_____ Daisy refused to let Hoke drive her anywhere.
_____ As Miss Daisy and Hoke spent time together, she gained an appreciation to
his many skills and the two became friends.
_____ Hoke told Daisy that the temple had been bombed.
_____ As Daisy get older, she began to lose her reason.
_____ Daisy accused of Hoke stealing a can of salmon from her pantry.
_____ Daisy showed signed of dementia.
_____ Boolie arranged for Miss Daisy to enter a nursing home.
_____ Hoke and Boolie visited her on Thanksgiving.

B. Establishing Links
1. What is the play about?
2. How did the writer present a moving description of the characters? Cite
parts of the play that could prove this,
3. What interesting details did the writer share in the play?
Interesting Details

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
Application:
TASK 6: PONDER ON
On your notebook, answer the following questions.
1. What is the implication of the lesson in your life?
2. How will it make you a better person?

Assessment:

TASK 7: DRIVING MS. DAISY, THE MOVIE

To give you a clearer picture of the play ―Driving Ms. Daisy‖,


watch the film adaptation directed by Bruce Beresford with
Morgan Freeman, Jessic Tandy, Dan Aykroyd, and Patti
LuPone. This will further help you in composing your plot
synopsis. (LM, p. 418)

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJb1pu6QCWU

TASK 8: COMPOSING A PLOT SYNOPSIS


In this task, you will use what you have learned in the lesson to
compose a play synopsis of Driving Ms. Daisy. Composing a play
synopsis is essential as it will demonstrate your understanding of
the play. Below are the steps in crafting one. (LM, p. 418)
1. Start with a hook.

2. Introduce the characters.

3. Construct the body of your synopsis.

4. Use three or four paragraphs to write the crisis


resolution.

5. Rewrite.

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
PLOT SYNOPSIS RUBRIC

Criteria Excellent Good Below Average Ineffective


4pts. 3pts. 2pts. 1pt.
Main Idea Main idea is unclear-
Main idea is clear and Main idea is The main idea is not
not specifically stated
well-established. established. present.
in the writing.
Supporting Important details are Some critical
All important details Synopsis contains only
included but some are information are
Details are included.
not clearly stated. missing.
some details.

Format Details are in logical Ideas are not in a


Most of the ideas are Ideas are in random
order because the logical order because
in logical order. order and not logical.
format is followed. format is not observed.
Content Clear understanding Adequate Basic understanding of Little or no
of information in the understanding is information in text is understanding is
text is demonstrated. demonstrated. demonstrated. demonstrated.

Source: www.studyzone.org/testprep/ela4/h/summaryrubric.htm

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
DRIVING MISS DAISY
by Alfred Uhry (Part II)

Plot Synopsis
The play spans a period of twenty-five years in an unbroken series of segments.
At the beginning of the play, Daisy Werthan, a seventy-two-year-old, southern Jewish
widow, has just crashed her brand new car while backing it out of the garage. After the
accident, her son Boolie insists that she is not capable of driving. Over her protests, he
hires a driver — Hoke Coleburn, an uneducated African American who is sixty. At first,
Daisy wants nothing to do with Hoke. She is afraid of giving herself the airs of a rich
person, even though Boolie is paying Hoke's salary. She strongly values her
independence, so she also resents having someone around her house.
For the first week or so of Hoke's employment, Daisy refuses to let him drive her
anywhere. He spends his time sitting in the kitchen. One day, however, he points out
that a lady such as herself should not be taking the bus. He also points out that he is
taking her son's money for doing nothing. Daisy responds by reminding Hoke that she
does not come from a wealthy background, but she relents and allows him to drive her
to the rocery store. She insists on maintaining control, however, elling him where to turn
and how fast to drive. On nother outing, she gets upset when he parks in front of the
temple to pick er up, afraid that people will thinking she is giving herself airs.
One morning Boolie comes over after Daisy calls him up, extremely upset. She
has discovered that Hoke is stealing from her—a can of salmon. She wants Boolie to fire
Hoke right away. Her words also show her prejudice against African Americans. Boolie,
at last, gives up. When Hoke arrives, Boolie calls him aside for a talk. First, however, Hoke
wants to give something to Daisy—a can of salmon to replace the one he ate the day
before. Daisy, trying to regain her dignity, says goodbye to Boolie. Hoke continues to
drive for Daisy. She also teaches him to read and write. When she gets a new car, he
buys her old one from the dealer.
When Daisy is in her eighties, she makes a trip by car to Alabama for a family
birthday party. She is upset that Boolie will not accompany her, but he and his wife are
going to New York and already have theater tickets. On the trip, Daisy learns that this is
Hoke's first time leaving Georgia. Suddenly, Daisy realizes that Hoke has taken a wrong
turn. She gets frantic and wishes aloud that she had taken the train instead. The day is
very long. It is after nightfall that they near Mobile. Hoke wants to stop to urinate, but
Daisy forbids him from doing so as they are already late. At first Hoke obeys her, but
then he pulls over to the side of the road. Daisy exclaims at his impertinence, but Hoke
does not back down.
Hoke is exceedingly loyal to Daisy, but not so loyal that he does not use another
job offer as leverage to get a pay raise. He tells Boolie how much he enjoys being
fought over. One winter morning, there is an ice storm. The power has gone out and the
roads are frozen over. On the telephone, Boolie tells Daisy he will be over as soon as the

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.
roads are clear. Right away, however, Hoke comes in. He has experience driving on icy
roads from his days as a deliveryman. When Boolie calls back, Daisy tells him not to
worry about coming over because Hoke is with her.
In the next segment, Daisy is on her way to temple, but there is a bad traffic jam.
Hoke tells her that the temple has been bombed. Daisy is shocked and distressed. She
says the temple is Reformed and can't understand why it was bombed. Hoke tells his
own story of seeing his friend's father hanging from a tree, when he was just a boy.
Daisy doesn't see why Hoke tells the story—it has nothing to do with the temple—and
she doesn't even believe that Hoke got the truth. She refuses to see Hoke's linkage of
prejudice against Jews and African Americans. Though she is quite upset by what has
happened, she tries to deny it.
Another ten years or so has passed. Daisy and Boolie get into an argument
about a Jewish organization's banquet for Martin Luther King, Jr. Daisy assumes Boolie
will go with her, but he doesn't want to. He says it will hurt his business. Daisy plans on
going, nonetheless. Hoke drives her to the dinner. At the last minute, she offhandedly
invites Hoke to the dinner, but he refuses because she didn't ask him beforehand, like
she would anyone else.

As Daisy gets older, she begins to lose her reason. One day Hoke must call Boolie
because Daisy is having a delusion. She thinks she is a schoolteacher and she is upset
because she can't find her students' papers. Before Boolie's arrival, she has a moment of
clarity, and she tells Hoke that he is her best friend.

In the play's final segment, Daisy is ninety-seven and Hoke is eighty-five. Hoke no
longer drives; instead, he relies on his granddaughter to get around. Boolie is about to
sell Daisy's house—she has been living in a nursing home for two years. Hoke and Boolie
go to visit her on Thanksgiving. She doesn't say much to either of them, but when Boolie
starts talking she asks him to leave, reminding him that Hoke came to see her. She tries
to pick up her fork and eat her pie. Hoke takes the plate and the fork from her and
feeds her a small bite of pie.

We are an emerging division where excellence is a habit and allegiance for quality is a pledge.