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AGENDA 2010-11-08

Ref: PCD 7/A-2.9 e-mail: pcd@bis.org.in

Subject: Ninth Meeting of Solid Mineral Fuel Sectional Committee, PCD 7


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To Chairman and all Members of:

1. Solid Mineral Fuels Sectional Committee, PCD 7;


2. Coal preparation: Terminology and performance Subcommittee, PCD 7:1;
3. Coke Subcommittee, PCD 7:2;
4. Sampling Subcommittee, PCD 7:3 and
5. Methods of analysis Subcommittee, PCD 7:4

Dear Sir(s)/Madam(s),

In continuation of our letter of even number dated 18th October 2010, enclosed please find a copy
of the Agenda for ninth meeting of Solid Mineral Fuels Sectional Committee, PCD 7 along with
its subcommittees scheduled to be held at 1030h on Tuesday, 30 November 2010 at Dr. Lal C.
Verman Conference Hall, Bureau of Indian Standards, Manak Bhavan, 9 Bahadur Shah
Zafar Marg, New Delhi – 110 002.

Prior to this meeting, meetings of all Subcommittees of PCD 7 shall be held on Monday, 29
November 2010 at 1100h at the same venue.

Kindly keep these dates free from your other engagements and make it convenient to attend the
meeting of which you are a member and participate in the deliberations.

You are once again requested to kindly update the nominations from your organization, if not already
done for better communications. Kindly provide E-mail, Fax, Phone etc.

We would appreciate a line in confirmation indicating your participation, preferably by e-mail.

Thanking you,
Yours faithfully,

Nisha Bura
Scientist ‘B’
Member Secretary, PCD 7
Encl: as above
NB: Kindly bring your copy of the AGENDA and other important documents for discussion. Kindly
note, it may not be possible for BIS Directorate General to supply additional copies of the Agenda during
the meeting.
AGENDA
BUREAU OF INDIAN STANDARDS
_____________________________________________________________________________
_

Coal preparation: Terminology and performance PCD 7:1 1st Meeting


Subcommittee

Coke Subcommittee PCD 7:2 1st Meeting

Sampling Subcommittee PCD 7:3 1st Meeting

Methods of analysis Subcommittee PCD 7:4 1st Meeting

Monday, 1100 h, 29 November 2010,


Dr. Lal C. Verman Conference Hall,
Bureau of Indian Standards, Manak Bhavan,
9 Bahadur Shah Zafar Marg,
New Delhi – 110 002.
_____________________________________________________________________________
_

Solid Mineral Fuels Sectional Committee PCD 7 9th Meeting

Tuesday, 1030 h, 30 November 2010,


Dr. Lal C. Verman Conference Hall,
Bureau of Indian Standards, Manak Bhavan,
9 Bahadur Shah Zafar Marg,
New Delhi – 110 002.
_____________________________________________________________________________
_

CHAIRMAN: Dr Amalendu Sinha MEMBER-SECRETARY: Nisha Bura

Item 0 OPENING OF THE MEETING

0.1 Welcome by Chairman and Opening Remarks

Item 1 CONFIRMATION OF THE MINUTES OF THE PREVIOUS MEETING

1.1 The Minutes of the 8th meeting of Solid Mineral Fuels Sectional Committee, PCD 7 held on
15 March 2007 were circulated vide letter No PCD 7/A-2.8 dated 2007-04-27. Comments
received from members are given in Annex I, page____.

The Committee may confirm the Minutes as circulated.


Item 2 THE PRESENT TITLE, SCOPE AND COMPOSITION OF SOLID MINERAL
FUELS SECTIONAL COMMITTEE, PCD 7 AND ITS SUBCOMMITTEES

2.1 In accordance with the BIS bye-laws, the composition of the Solid Mineral Fuels
Sectional Committee, PCD 7 was reviewed by the Petroleum, Coal and Related Products
Division Council in its 13th meeting held on 02 August 2010at BIS HQs, New Delhi.

The present title, scope and the composition of the Solid Mineral Fuels Sectional
Committee, PCD 7 and its Subcommittees are given in Annex II, page ______.

2.2 At the last meeting, new structure of subcommittees was constituted. Recently fresh
nominations have been sought from PCD7 and its Subcommittees. The organizations,
which are yet to send their fresh/revised nominations on PCD 7 and its subcommittees,
are requested to provide the updated information at the earliest for our computerized
record and reference. E-mail addresses of representatives may also be provided for faster
communication.

2.3 Dr. Hazra, Convener (PCD 7:2) has retired from CIMFR on 28th February 2009.

2.4 Request has been received from Dr. H. K. Mishra, CMPDIL to constitute a new
subcommittee on Coal Petrography.

2.5 The following Requests have been received for Representation on the Sectional
Committee/Sub-Committees:

Sl. Name of Organisation Sectional Committee/Sub-Committees


No. (Annex III, page____)
1 Indian Metals & Ferro Alloys Ltd., IMFA Solid Mineral Fuels Sectional Committee,
. building, Therubali-765018, PCD 7
Dist: Rayagada, Orissa, India
2 Neyveli Lignite Corporation Ltd., P.O. Classification and Codification of Indian
. Neyveli, Cddalore Dist, Tamil Nadu Coals and Lignites, PCD7/WG1

3 Eastman Crusher Company Ltd., 4A, Sampling Subcommittee, PCD 7:3


. Council House Street, Kolkata – 700001.

4 ELICO Ltd., B-90, A.P.I.E. Sanathnagar, Solid Mineral Fuels Sectional Committee,
. Hyderabad-500018 PCD 7

The Committee may consider.

Item 3 ACTIVITIES OF PCD 7 AND ITS SUBCOMMITTEES


3.1 The present state of activities in the form of published standards under PCD 7 and its
Subcommittees are given in Annex IV, page ______.

The Committee may like to review.

3.2 Review/ Reaffirmation of Pre-2006 Standards

As per BIS Rules 1987, all Indian Standards shall be reviewed once in five years after
their publication/reaffirmation with the following guidelines:

i) The standards may be reaffirmed in the present form;


ii) The standards may be reaffirmed with minor changes by issuing an amendment;
iii) May be reaffirmed with simultaneously taking up the revision; or
iv) The standards may be withdrawn.

The review of Indian Standards may involve the following steps wherever applicable:

a) Examination with regard to the base standards;


b) Comparison with standards issued by other National Standards Bodies;
c) Taking account of technological changes;
d) Analysis of comments from users/others;
e) Discussions with Industry/Associations etc.;
f) Feedback from industry including certification;
g) Visit to industry / arranging laboratory testing.

The Indian Standards, which fall in the above category, are given in Annex V, page
______.

Through our letter dated 18th October 2010, members / experts were requested to review
the standards given in Annex V, page ______, taking into account the information given
in other overseas standards, if any, and latest technological developments that might have
taken place in this interim period since their publication with a view to update the same
and make their implementation more effective. No comments have been received.

The Committee may consider and decide about revision/amendments/reaffirmation of


these standards.

3.3 PENDING WORK BEFORE THE COMMITTEE

3.3.1 IS 436(Pt I/Sec 1):1964 Methods for sampling of coal and coke: Part I Sampling of
coal: Section 1 Manual sampling (first revision)

IS 436(Part 1/Sec 1):1964 was reaffirmed in the 8th meeting of PCD 7 and the
Committee requested Shri Sunil Nath, Convener of PCD 7:3, to review ISO 18283:2006
Hard coal and coke – Manual sampling and furnish comments whether it is possible to
adopt it under dual numbering of IS 436 (Pt I/Sec 1):1964. The copy of International
Standard was handed over to him during the meeting. Reply from Shri Sunil Nath is
awaited.
However, in the meantime, comments from Senior Chief Chemist, MPPGCL, Sarni on IS
436 (Pt I /Sec 1):1964 have been received which are reproduced below:
“It is very difficult to adopt the above standard for collection and preparation of coal
samples from coal rakes and trucks as the power station has been receiving/handling
approximately 20,000 M.T. of coal on daily basis. During the early sixties the procedure
prescribed in this Indian Standard was quite practical, when the number of thermal
stations was limited and coal consumption and movement of coal rake was minimum.
Looking at the present conditions, when the quantity of coal has increased and the time
duration of unloading the rakes is reduced to 7 hours by the railways. Also, now a days
multiple grades of coal are being received by different modes of transportations such as
rail, belt & road. Hence the Indian Standard may be reviewed so that the representative
samples of consignments/stocks could be made without any dispute between the buyer
and supplier.”

In the mean time, ISO 18283 has been closed by ISO/TC 27 for review and also a
corrigendum to this standard has been published as ISO 18283:2006/Cor 1:2009.

The Committee may consider adoption of this International Standard provided, the
practices followed in our country are compatible with this International Standard.

3.3.2
• IS 436(Pt I/Sec 2):1976 Methods for sampling of coal and coke: Part I Sampling of
coal: Section 2 Mechanical sampling
• IS 436(Pt II):1965 Methods for sampling of coal and coke: Part II Sampling
of coke(first revision)

Printing of 8 finalized documents PCD 7(2001)C/ISO 13909-1:2001 to Doc: PCD


7(2008)C/ISO 13909-8:2001 under dual numbering system on mechanical sampling was
withheld by the Committee since ISO/TC 27 had already started their revision and in the
last meeting of PCD 7, Shri Sunil Nath, Convener (PCD 7:3) was requested by the
committee to review the above International Standards covering sampling of the coal and
coke whether these can be printed as Indian Standards under dual numbering system. His
comments are still awaited.

However, comments received from A. K. Dey, CMPDIL on ISO 13909-3:2001 are given
under Annex VI, page____ .

In the mean time these International Standards have been confirmed by ISO. The
committee may now consider printing of these finalized documents under dual
numbering system.

3.3.3 IS 437:1979 Size analysis of coal and coke for marketing (third revision) and

In the 7th meeting, the Committee discussed IS 437:1979 and decided to prepare its draft
revision in the light of International Standard ISO 728: 1995 ‘Coke (nominal top size
greater than 20 mm)-Size analysis by Sieving’.
In the last meeting, the Committee requested Dr Sreenivasarao to furnish his comments
on the printed standard in writing to BIS which were to be sent to the Dr S.K. Hazra,
Convener PCD7:2 for his study and suitable modification/revision of IS 437. Comments
from Dr Sreenivasarao are still awaited. On scrutiny of published International Standards
it is found that the following four standards have been published by ISO/TC 27 on the
above subject:

1. ISO 728:1995 Coke (nominal top size greater than 20 mm) -- Size analysis by sieving
2. ISO 1953:1994 Hard coal -- Size analysis by sieving
3. ISO 2325:1986 Coke -- Size analysis (Nominal top size 20 mm or less)
4. ISO 14180:1998 Solid mineral fuels -- Guidance on the sampling of coal seams

However the Foreword of IS 437:1979 refers only to ISO 1953 having taken assistance
during formulation of this Indian Standard.

In the view of above the committee may like to align IS 437 with the latest ISO 1953 or
may like to base the draft revision on all above ISO Standards as deemed fit.

The Committee may consider.

3.3.4 IS 439:1989 Industrial Coke - Specification (third revision)

Because of shortening of 8th meeting by one day, IS 439:1989 could not be discussed in
the meeting. The Committee may now discuss the standard in light of the Table of
requirements prepared by Dr. Sarkar, comments received from A. K. Paul, CMD, BCCL
and from Shri H. C. Chakrabarti, Retired GM, Coal India Ltd. given under Annex VII,
page____of the Agenda so that draft revision can be prepared afresh.

The Committee may consider.

3.3.5 IS 1350(Part 5): 1975 Methods of test for coal and coke Part 5: Special impurities
(first revision)

In the last meeting, the Committee requested Shri T.B. Das, Convener (PCD 7:4), to
review IS 1350(Part 5) in the light of ISO/FDIS 8983 Solid Mineral Fuels –
Determination of nine trace elements – Acid digestion and flame atomic absorption
method and furnish his comments as to whether this can be adopted as Indian Standard
under dual numbering system. Alternately, a revision of IS 1350 (Part 5) may be taken up
if adoption of International document does not serve the complete purpose. Reply from
Shri T.B. Das is awaited.

In the meantime, apparently, “ ISO/FDIS 8983 Solid Mineral Fuels – Determination of


nine trace elements – Acid digestion and flame atomic absorption method” has been
dropped by ISO/TC 27 as there is no mention of this standard on ISO site and a new
International Standard, ISO 23380:2008 ‘Selection of methods for the determination of
trace elements in coal’ has been published by ISO/TC 27.The Committee may consider
the relevance of ISO 23380:2008 vis-a-vis IS 1350 (Part 5) for updation of this Indian
Standard.

The Committee may consider.

3.3.6 IS 1353:1993 Methods of Test for Coal Carbonization – Caking Index, Swelling
Number and (LT) Grey-King Assay (first revision)

This Indian Standard covers three methods of test for coal carbonization, namely
agglutinating or caking index, swelling number and low temperature (LT) Gray King
assay.
a) Sand method
b) Crucible Swelling Number test
c) Gray-King Assay (LT) Coke Type.
While the sand method of determining stickiness or agglutinating power is being used in
India, the other two alternative methods listed at sl. no. b) and c) have International
acceptance. The two methods based on following ISO specifications were finalized by
the Committee for printing at its last meeting.

i) ISO 501:2003 Coal – Hard Coal- Determination of the crucible swelling number
[Doc: PCD 7(1967)]
ii) ISO 502:1982 Coal – Coal-Determination of caking power – Gray-King coke test
[Doc: PCD 7(1968)]

However, ISO 501:2003 has already been taken up for revision by ISO/TC27, therefore,
the Committee may like to consider whether only sl. No. ii) be printed at this moment or
all the methods be published simultaneously. It may also be noted that IS 1353:1993 was
to be revised to cover only sand method and the new title of the standard agreed was
Methods of Test for Coal Carbonization – Caking Index - Sand Method. Shri T.B.
Das, Convener (PCD 7:4) was requested to prepare the proposed draft for IS 1353
covering remaining ‘Sand method’ as well as ‘Roga index method’ and submit the same
to BIS for circulation to the Committee members in two month’s time. The draft revision
from Shri T.B. Das is still awaited.

The Committee may consider.

3.3.7 IS 3746:1984 Graphical symbols for coal preparation plant (first revision)

In the last meeting, after detailed discussions, it was agreed that Dr D.D Haldar, CIMFR
would prepare revised draft document for IS 3746 consulting ISO 561:1989 and
comments of Shri Biswas as given in Annex VIII, page____.

The draft revision of IS 3746:1984 has not been prepared by Dr D.D Haldar as he
mentioned in his reply to BIS that the above document is very big and needs to be
discussed in the Coal preparation: Terminology and performance Subcommittee, PCD
7:1 for taking suitable decision.

The Committee may consider.

3.3.8 IS 4311:1967 vis-à-vis ISO 602:1983 Method for the determination of mineral
matter in coal

In the last meeting, the Committee after detailed discussions, agreed with the suggestions
of M/s Neyveli Lignite Corporation to publish IS 4311 / ISO 602:1983 under dual
numbering procedure.

However, from recording of the minutes, it is not clear whether the wide circulation of
the document has been waived off or it has to be first circulated for seeking views of the
experts.

The Committee may consider.

3.3.9 IS 4433:1979 vis-à-vis ISO 5074: 1994 Method for determination of hardgrove
grindability index of coal (first revision)

In the last meeting, the Committee NOTED that ISO 5074:1994 is currently under
revision, hence, may not be considered for adoption till the revised version is available.
However as per latest status of ISO/TC 27, this International Standard has been
confirmed by ISO and ISO 5074:1994 version is valid.

Comments received from BHEL, Trichy in the last meeting, state that to avoid
complicity, ISO 5074:1994 Hard Coal – Determination of Hard Grove Grindability Index
may be accepted as Indian Standard adding the following portion after 9.1 of ISO
5074:1994(E) “Alternatively for quick reference, the HGI can be calculated from the
formula HGI=13 + 6.93M, where M = mass of that sample passing through 75 micron
sieve after grinding. In practice M is obtained by deducing from 50gm the mass of
ground sample retained on 75 micron sieve.”

It may be noted that in case we have to adopt International Standard, no technical


changes can be carried out. If the comments received are to be accommodated in Indian
Standard then a draft revision shall be required to be prepared on the basis of this
International Standard and not as dual numbering standard.

The Committee may consider.

3.3.10 IS 9949:1986 vis-a-vis ISO 12900:1997 Methods of test for abrasive properties of
coal and associated minerals (first revision)

In the last meeting, the Committee after detailed discussions, agreed to publish IS 9949 /
ISO 12900:1997 under dual numbering procedure.
However, from recording of the minutes, it is not clear whether the wide circulation of
the document has been waived off or it has to be first circulated for seeking views of the
experts. In the meantime, ISO/TC 27/ SC 5 has taken this International Standard under
periodical review.

The Committee may consider.

3.3.11 IS 13810:1993 Code of practice for float and sink analysis of coal

In the last meeting, the Committee requested Dr Haldar to review IS 13810 in the light of
International Standards namely:
i) ISO 923:2000 Coal cleaning tests – Expression and presentation of results and
ii) ISO 7936:1992 Hard coal – Determination of float and sink characteristics –
General directions for apparatus and procedures
and forward the revised document to BIS for issue into wide circulation.

Draft revision is still awaited. The Committee may consider.

3.4 New Work Proposals Pending in Preliminary Stages

3.4.1 Doc: PCD7 (2547)P Methods of test for the Determination of Crossing Point and
Ignition Temperature of Coal

In the last meeting, Dr A. Sarkar, Scientist, CFRI, Dhanbad had submitted the working
draft on the subject which was to be circulated as proposed draft. BIS could not find the
P- Draft prepared by Dr A. Sarkar from the records instead an older P-Draft on same
subject by Shri S.C. Banerjee is available. All efforts to contact Dr Sarkar have failed.
The document available with BIS on subject is enclosed in Annex IX, page____.

The Committee may consider.

3.4.2 Doc:PCD7(2548)P Coking Coal (Non-Indigenous) – Specification

The Panel for finalization of Doc: PCD 7(2275) in its meeting held on 15-03- 2007
decided to bring out Classification System for Imported Coke separately. As per this
decision a draft document was received from Dr. Sreenivasarao which is enclosed in
Annex X, page____. On examination of the above document it was observed that it is a
product standard for imported coke.

A written request from Dr T.K. Roy, Director (Revenue Laboratories), Central Board of
Excise & Customs for the formulation of Indian Standard for imported coking coal has
also been received.

However, CIL, BCCL and Shri H. C. Chakrabarti (Individual capacity) have suggested
that there is no need to have a separate standard for imported coal since the basic
parameters remain the same for any coal.
The Committee may re-consider the new subjects above.

Item 4 COMMENTS ON PRINTED STANDARD

4.1 The comments received from Dr S. Santhanam, Nayveli Lignite Corporation Ltd, Nayveli
on the following printed Indian Standard are given below:

i) IS 9127(Part 2):2002/ ISO 7404-2:1985 Methods for petrographic analysis of coal


Part II Method of preparing coal samples

ii) IS 9127(Part 3):2002/ ISO 7404-3:1994 Methods for petrographic analysis of


bituminous coal and anthracite Part III Method of determining maceral group
composition (first revision)

iii) IS 9127(Part 5):2004/ ISO 7404-5:1994 Methods for petrographic analysis of


coal and anthracite: Part V Method of determining microscopically the reflectance
of vitrinite (first revision)

ISO 7404-2, ISO 7404-3 and ISO 7404-5 have been revised by ISO and their 2009
version is already published. The above Indian Standards printed under dual numbering
of these ISO standards may also be revised for updation.

The Committee may consider.

4.2 IS 12770:1989 Coal for cement manufacture – Specification

The following comments have been received from Shri A.K. Prasad, M/s. Amisha Fincap
Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi:

“IS 12770:1989 for cement plants is very old and it needs revision because now
Anthracite, Semi-anthracite, Pet-coke with low Volatile Matter (VM) like 6-9% is being
blended with non coking coal of VM 24-30%. The average VM of the blended coal is
not 24% as mentioned in above Indian Standard. Also cement plants have undertaken lots
of modification in their technology, due to which the plants are running with efficiency
using coal of much lower VM. Hence there is need for revision of IS 12770:1989.”

The Committee may consider.

4.3 IS 1350(Part 4/Sec 1) Methods of test for coal and coke: Part IV Ultimate analysis
Section 1 - Determination of carbon and hydrogen (first revision)

In this standard following three methods of determination of carbon and hydrogen have
been prescribed:

i) Modified Fentons Method developed at the CIMFR, Dhanbad.


ii) Liebig Method
iii) High-temperature combustion Method
Liebig Method and High-Temperature Combustion Method are based on the following
publications issued by the International Organization for Standardization respectively:

i) ISO 625: Determination coke by the Liebig method


ii) ISO 609: Determination of carbon and hydrogen in coal and coke by the high-
temperature combustion method

IS 15441:2004/ISO 625:1996 Solid Mineral Fuels - Determination of Carbon and


Hydrogen - Liebig Method has already been published by this Committee, thus an
Amendment to IS 1350(Part 4/Sec 1) may be issued for deletion of Liebig Method.

Besides, International Standard ISO 609 Determination of carbon and hydrogen in coal
and coke by the high-temperature combustion method may be considered by the
Committee for reviewing the existing IS 1350(Part 4/Sec 1) and also the utility of method
at Sl.No. i) above.

The Committee may consider.

Item 5 RECONSIDERATION OF FINALIZED DOCUMENTS

5.1 Doc:PCD 7(2275) Classification and Codification of Indian coals, lignites and
Pseudo/semi-anthracite (third revision of IS 770:1977)

Revision of IS 770 is pending since last several years. At the 7th meeting, Committee had
considered the draft revision in the light of several comments received on this document
and constituted a small Panel under the leadership of Dr (Mrs.) Nandita Chaudhury, the
then CFRI, co-opting Dr T.A. Sreenivasarao of Customs Department, Vishakhapatnam
besides 6 other members to discuss and resolve all the comments received. Dr Chaudhury
conducted a meeting at CFRI along with CMPDI representative and prepared a second
draft revision on the subject which was again circulated to this Panel members for their
study and comments. Somehow, the comments received from the Customs Department
were not resolved even in this draft revision prepared, therefore, a large number of
comments were again received on the said document.

Decision of the Committee on this subject at the 8th meeting is reproduced in Annex XI,
page____. Brief history of the subject and observations received from the Customs are
given in same Annex.

The Committee may consider.

Item 6 RECONSIDERATION OF DOCUMENTS NOT FINALIZED EARLIER

6.1 IS 1354:1992 Methods of test for coke special test (second revision)

In the sixth meeting, Committee had finalized ISO 616:1995 for printing under dual
numbering of IS 1354:1992. However, in the last meeting after detailed deliberations, the
adoption of this ISO Standard was deferred and the Committee requested Dr Hazra of
CIMFR to prepare the draft revision of IS 1354 in three months time, taking assistance
from ISO 616:1995 in case the adoption of International Standard as such was not
feasible. Draft revision from Dr Hazra, CIMFR is still awaited.
The committee may note that the Foreword of IS 1354:1992 refers to ISO 556:1980, ISO
616:1977 and ISO 1014:1985 for taking assistance during formulation of this Indian
Standard.

The Committee may like to reconsider the revision.

6.2 IS 5062 (Part 1):1969 Methods of test for brown coals and lignites: Part 1
Determination of moisture content by the direct volumetric method

In the sixth meeting, Committee had finalized printing of IS 5062 (Part 1)/ISO 1015:1992
under dual numbering. However ISO/TC 27 has withdrawn this International Standard,
therefore in the last meeting, it was agreed that adoption of this International Standard as
Indian Standard is not possible. Shri T.B. Das, however, was assigned to review IS 5062
(Part 1) to upgrade the present standard on determination of moisture content using direct
volumetric method. . Draft revision from Shri T. B. Das is still awaited.

The Committee may consider.

6.3 IS 1350(Pt 3):1969 – Methods of test for coal and coke: Part III Determination of
Sulphur (first revision); and Doc: PCD 7(1843)C/ ISO 157:1996 - Hard coal -
Determination of forms of sulphur

IS 1350(Pt 3):1969 covers the methods of test for coal and coke relating to the
determination of total Sulphur and forms of Sulphur both. The Foreword of this Indian
Standard refers to ISO 157 and ISO 334 having taken assistance during formulation of
this Indian Standard.

IS 15438:2004/ISO157:1996 Coal - Determination of forms of Sulphur is a published


standard, therefore an amendment may now be considered by the Committee to IS
1350(Pt 3):1969 for deletion of determination of forms of Sulphur and further revision
of this Indian Standard may be considered for determination of sulphur in the light of
latest ISO334.

The Committee may consider.

Item 7 DRAFT STANDARD FOR WIDE CIRCULATION

7.1 Doc: PCD7(2462)P Low Ash Metallurgical Coke - Specification was circulated vide letter
No. PCD 7/T dated 25-06-2009. The comments received from Shri A.K. Paul, BCCL,
Dhanbad are ‘Since Low Ash Metallurgical Coke is covered in IS 439:1989 Industrial
coke – Specification (third revision), no separate standard is required’. Similar comments
have earlier been received from Sh Chakrabarty.

The committee may like to consider.

Item 8 NEW WORK PROPOSALS


8.1 Neyveli Lignite Corporation Limited which is engaged in lignite mining and utilization
of lignite has proposed the following as new subjects for standard formulation:

i) Methods of test for Determination of various properties of lignites such as sample


collection, sample preparation, bulk density, in-situ moisture, proximate analysis, carbon,
hydrogen, nitrogen and Sulphur determination, forms of Sulphur, chemical composition
of ash, hard grove index, trace elements, TCLP for leaching studies of lignite residues
like fly ash, bottom ash, slag, petrographic technique and maceral studies etc.

ii) Methods of Test for Humic Acid Extracted from Lignite.

iii) Methods of Test for evaluation of rate of disintegration, crossing point and
ignition point of lignite.

iv) Methods of Test for determination of marcasite (FeS2) as sporadic impurity in lignite.

8.2 Declaration of separate grade for middlings as new subject for standard formulation is
proposed by Amisha Fincap Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.

“Middlings of 17% ash and non-coking coal of 17% give different useful heat value.
Therefore, unless experiments are carried out on samples of middlings, the formula for
deciding UHV of coal can not be applied for middling, even for commercial purpose.
The middlings always give higher heat value as compared to any non-coking coal of
same IM and ash%. Also middlings carry about 10-12% misplaced clean-coal due to poor
equipments of the washing vessels”.

Item 9 BIS CERTIFICATION SCHEMES

9.1 Product Certification

The Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) Certification Marks Scheme consists of a series of
activities aimed at ensuring the quality of the products under Certification at the various
stages at the manufacturer’s premises and providing a third party certification. The
presence of the BIS Standard Mark on a product indicates that it has been produced and
inspected in accordance with an approved Scheme of Testing and Inspection which
incorporates means to ascertain conformance of products with requirements stipulated in
the relevant Indian standards. BIS organizes frequent surveillance activities to maintain a
check on the quality of goods certified on a continued basis.

9.1.1 Out of 34 product specifications formulated by Plastics Containers Sectional Committees,


PCD 21, 2 standards are covered under the BIS Certification Marks Scheme having a
total of 25 licenses issued to related items. The main object of BIS Certification Marks
Scheme is to assist the manufacturers in evolving and maintaining in-house quality
control system so that conformity of the end product to the relevant Indian Standard is
ensured on a sustained basis.

The Committee may note.


9.2 System Certification

9.2.1 Quality Systems Certification

9.2.2 Environment Management System Certification

9.2.3 HACCP Certification

9.2.4 Occupational Health and Safety Management System (OHSMS) Certification

9.3 Hallmarks for Gold Jewelry

9.4 BIS Certification Schemes for Foreign manufacturers and Indian Importers

The Committee may note.

Item 10 RAJIV GANDHI NATIONAL QUALITY AWARD

Rajiv Gandhi National Quality Awards was instituted by Bureau of Indian Standards,
with the approval of Government of India in 1991, with a view to encourage Indian
companies to strive for excellence and giving special recognition to those who are
considered to be the leaders of quality movement in India. The Award is intended to
generate interest and involvement of Indian industry in quality programmes, drive our
products and services to higher levels of quality, and equip them to meet the challenges
of domestic and international markets. This award is an annual feature. It has been
designed in line with similar awards in other developed countries like Malcolm Baldridge
Quality Award in USA, Deming Prize in Japan and European Quality Award. The
assessment criteria for these awards are based on TQM and are at par with the criteria for
other similar overseas awards. Application form and the brochure for this award is
available at BIS web-site: http://www.bis.org.in

The Committee may note.

Item 11 WTO – TBT ENQUIRY POINT

11.1 World Trade Organization (WTO) is the international organization dealing with global
rules of trade between nations. The Technical Barrier to Trade Agreement (TBT) tries to
ensure that Regulations, Standards, Conformity Assessment Procedures do not create
unnecessary obstacles to trade. Manufacturers and exporters of each country need to
know about the latest standards and technical regulations in their prospective markets.
To help ensure that this information is made available conveniently, all WTO member
Governments are required to establish National Enquiry Point. India is a signatory to the
WTO TBT Agreement. Under this Agreement, India has to fulfill certain obligations
such as establishing an enquiry point and transparency of its standards and its regulations.
BIS functions as the enquiry point as nominated by Ministry of Commerce, the dealing
Ministry with WTO.
11.2 As the WTO TBT Enquiry Point, BIS answers all the reasonable enquiries pertaining to
Technical Regulation, Standards and Conformity Assessments procedures addressed to it
from the Enquiry Points of other countries. It also serves as the information centre within
the country. Additionally, BIS also disseminates the TBT Notifications of other member
bodies to the National Stakeholders.

11.3 The awareness regarding TBT notifications is lacking among various stakeholders in
India and as a result India is not sending its comments on draft notifications by other
countries, which may be of trade interest to India. As signatory of WTO-TBT
Agreement, there is a greater need for us to be aware of the TBT notifications issued by
different countries in order to protect our interest.

11.4 BIS has outsourced the activity of WTO-TBT Inquiry Point Services. The outsourced
agency, CERPA (Centre for Research Planning and Action) disseminates the TBT
Notifications of other countries to the Indian Stakeholders with a view to seek their
comments and taking up the same at appropriate forum. The stakeholders are expected to
examine the notifications on the following aspects:

a) Are the notifications in accordance with International Standards?


b) Are they stricter than the International Standards?
c) Are they stricter than the International Standards necessary to meet the legitimate
objective of Protection of human health or safety; Animal or plant life or health and
Environment Protection

11.5 The BIS Technical Committees have also been identified as stakeholders for the TBT
Notifications and relevant notifications are being disseminated to them. The Committee
Members should examine the TBT Notifications with a view to protect Indian trade
interest.

11.6 The E-mail address of CERPA and BIS Enquiry Point are as follows:

CERPA: wtoenquiry@bis.org.in BIS: info@bis.org.in BIS Website:www.bis.org.in

The Committee may note.

Item 12 NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR TRAINING IN STANDARDIZATION (NITS)

Item 13 BIS CATALOGUE ON WEBSITE

The electronic catalogue of BIS is available on BIS Website. www.bis.org.in.

Item 14 E-SALE OF INDIAN STANDARDS

Bureau has recently started on-line sale of Indian Standards. Soft copies can be from BIS
Sales Portal http://www.standardsbis.in. Printed copy can also be procured by making
payment on-line on BIS e-sale portal www.standardsbis.in.

Item 15 RECOMMENDATION OF THE PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT ADVISORY


COMMITTEE OF BUREAU OF INDIAN STANDARDS
The planning and Development Advisory Committee (PDCA) of Bureau of Indian
Standards in its 12th meeting decided as follows:

a) Technical Committee should be sensitized for Eco requirements and Standards should be
formulated considering the environmental aspects.
b) The Committee felt that BIS should be proactively involved so as to have greater impact
in International. For this purpose, the key areas are to be identified for formulating
standards for new products.

Item 16 TRANSLATIONS OF INDIAN STANDARDS FROM ENGLISH TO HINDI

It has been recently agreed to outsource translation of Indian Standards in Hindi in order
to help consumer get standards in Hindi/Bilingual. BIS would pay Rs. 250 per page of
A4 Size (approx. 850 words) of translated typed text of Indian Standard of direct
consumer interest. The work can be allotted once a trial translated page is submitted for
approval.

Item 17 DATE AND PLACE FOR THE NEXT MEETING

The Committee may decide about the date and venue for the next meeting.

Item 18 ANY OTHER BUSINESS


ANNEX I
(Item 1.1)

COMMENTS ON PROCEEDINGS FROM VARIOUS MEMBERS

1. Shri H. C. Chakrabarti, Retired GM, Coal India Ltd.

i) There is no need to prepare a different standard for Low Ash Metallurgical Coke because
this aspect has already been covered in IS 439:1989 Industrial coke – Specification. Any
body can produce any type of low ash metallurgical coke based on the input of low ash coals
depending on the need and for each type, general standards can not be formulated. However,
coke up to 18% ash content may be declared as low ash metallurgical coke if necessary.

ii) Regarding Coking Coal he has opined that the high volatile caking coals with high CSN and
high LTGK and also ddpm over 1000 are also imported at a lower price for blending with
L.V. coking coals to produce better coke. The high volatile plastic coals for import duty
purpose should be considered as coking coals because these coals are used in blend for hard
coke making. Customs duty, however on the import of such coals may be liberalized in
specific usage other than hard coke making. In the case of import of non caking coal there
should not be any problem. In the case of import of low ash metallurgical coke there are
Government tariffs. So far duties are concerned, even high Sulphur content and high
Phosphorus content in coke do not stand in the way for iron marking. Thus no tax relief
should be allowed.

NOTE: BIS has not role on tax tariff of customs or excise, hence his comments on tax relief
should be addressed to the right person.

iii) His comments on IS 439:1989 ‘Industrial coke – Specification’ are covered under item 3.3.4.

2. Dr. S. Santhanam, Dy. GM, Neyveli Lignite Corporation Ltd., Neyveli ,Tamil Nadu

In the Annex III (p-20) of Minutes of 8th Meeting of PCD 7, the distribution of the following
Indian Standards under Coke Subcommittee, PCD 7:2 maybe examined:
Sl No. IS No./Doc:No. Title Reaffirmed
last
9 5062(Pt 3):1969 Methods of test for brown coals and lignites: Part III
Determination of the yields of tar, water, gas and coke
by low temperature distillation
10 5062(Pt Methods of test for brown coals and lignites: Part IV Mar 07
4):2004 /ISO Determination of the yield of benzene - soluble
975: 2000 extract
11 5062(Pt Methods of test for brown coals and lignites: Part V Mar 07
5):2004 /ISO Determination of acetone - soluble material (resinous
1017:1985 substances) in the benzene extract from brown coals
and lignites

NOTE: The above three Indian Standards may rightly be placed under Methods of analysis
Subcommittee, PCD 7:4.
ANNEX II
(Item 2.1)

TITLE, SCOPE AND COMPOSITION OF PCD 7

TITLE: SOLID MINERAL FUELS SECTIONAL COMMITTEE, PCD 7

SCOPE
a) To formulate Indian Standards for terminology; methods of sampling and test; codes of
practice; classification by size and type; petrographic analysis; and specification for solid mineral
fuels; and
b) To co-ordinate with the work of ISO/TC 27 - Solid Mineral fuels
LIAISON
a) ISO/TC27 Solid Mineral Fuels
b) Sponge Iron Sectional Committee, MTD 30
c) Foundry Sectional Committee, MTD 14

COMPOSITION OF PCD 7 & ITS SUBCOMMITTEES

SOLID MINERAL FUELS SECTIONAL COMMITTEE, PCD 7

Sl. Name of the Representatives


No. Name of the organization Principal Representative Alternate Representative
(1) (2) (3) (4)
1. Central Institute For Mining and Dr Amalendu Sinha Dr N.S. Das
Fuel Research (CIMFR), Dhanbad (CHAIRMAN)
2. Coal Controller, Kolkata Shri A.N.Sahay Shri N.P. Srivastava
3. Geological Survey of India (GSI), Shri R.K. Datta Shri Goutam Mukherjee
Kolkata
4. National Test House, Kolkata Shri A.S. Bansood Shri Manas Chakraborty
5. Coal India Limited (CIL), Kolkata Shri Amitabha Ray, GM Shri A. K. Sen, Dy. CE
(QC) (E&M)
6. Nayveli Lignite Corporation Ltd, Dr S.Santhanam Shri V. Manoharan
Nayveli chiefcarad@nlcindia.com chiefcarad@nlcindia.com
7. Tata Steel Ltd., Jamshedpur Shri B.K. Singh Shri H.N. Prasad
8. Railway Board, (Ministry of Chief Mining Adviser Shri D.K. Singh
Railways)
9. Central Mine Planning & Design Shri D. Kumar Shri A.K. Sinha
Institute Ltd (CMPDI), Ranchi
10. Steel Authority of India Ltd. Shri R. P. Singh Shri S. Prasad
(SAIL), New Delhi
11. Bharat Coking Coal Ltd (BCCL), Shri C. K. Basu,
Dhanbad HOD (QC)
12. Central Electricity Authority Shri N.K. Nair Shri S.K. Thakur
(CEA), New Delhi
13. Central Mining Research Institute Dr. S.C. Banerjee
(CMRI), Dhanbad

14. Bharat Heavy Electrical Ltd. (BHEL), Shri G. Viswanathan Shri K. Sivaramakrishnan
Tiruchirapalli visu@bheltry.co.in ksrk@bheltry.co.in
15. The Singareni Collieries Co. Ltd., Shri D.S. Sastry Shri B. Prasada Rao
Kothagudem, (A.P.)
16. Research & Develop Centre for Iron Shri N.K. Ghosh Shri A.K.Gupta
and Steel (R&DCIS), SAIL, Ranchi
17. Ministry of Mines and Minerals, Shri M.K. Thapar
Department of Coal, New Delhi
18. National Council for Cement & Shri A. Pahuja Shri Y.P. Sethi
Building Materials, New Delhi
19. Tata Energy Research Institute Shri S.K. Chand Smt. Arpita Khanna
(TERI), New Delhi
20. Ministry of Industry, Department Shri Mahender Kumar Shri R.K. Sharma
of Industrial Policy & Promotion
Tariff Commission, New Delhi
21. The Fertilizer Association of India Shri H.S. Mann Shri J. Mohali
(FAI), New Delhi
22. Development Consultants Ltd., Shri T.K.Das Shri S.K.Dey
Kolkata
23. Videocon Power Limited Shri S.K. Grover
24. NTPC, New Delhi Shri B.P. Singh
25. Cement Manufacturer’s Association Shri M.C. Gupta Shri S.M. Sharma
(CMA), New Delhi
26. Durgapur Projects Ltd. (DPL), Dr H.S. Sarkar
Durgapur, (Distt. Burdwan)
27. Individual Capacity Dr Kalyan Sen

COAL PREPARATION SUB-COMMITTEE PCD7:1

Sl. Name of the organization Name of the Representatives


No.
(1) (2) (3)
1. Central Institute For Mining and Dr D.D. Haldar (CONVENER)
Fuel Research (CIMFR), Dhanbad
2. Indian School of Mines (ISM), Dhanbad Dr T. Sharma, HOD, Fuel and
Mineral Engg., Dr Sumantra
Bhattacharya
3. Central Mine Planning & Design Institute Ltd Shri A. Roychoudhury
(CMPDI), Kanke Road, Gondwana Place, Ranchi GM (CMP)
4. Bharat Coking Coal Limited (BCCL), Koyla Bhavan, Shri C.K. Basu, HOD(QC)
Dhanbad (Coal India Limited)
5. Central Coalfield Limited (CCL), Darbhanga House, Shri S. Bhattacharya, Dy. GM
Ranchi (CP)

6. NTPC Ltd, NTPC Bhawan, Core-7, SCOPE Complex- Shri Arun Kapoor
7, Institutional Area, Lodhi Road, New Delhi – 110003 Sr. Manager (Coal Mining &
Washeries)

7. McNally Bharat Engg. Company Limited, Shri A. Seth, Vice President


4, Mangoe Lane, (5th and 7th floor), Kolkata – 700 001
8. Raw Materials and Coke Making, R & D, Tata Steel, Dr P.K. Banerjee
Jamshedpur -831 001 pkbanerjee@tatasteel.com;
pk_banj@yahoo.com
9. IISCO Steel Plant Burnpur, Dist.- Burdwan, West Shri Shiva Prasad
Bengal-713325 Dy. GM(CPP), ISP, Chasnalla
10. Jindal Steel and Power Limited, 12, Bikaji Cama Place, Shri Desouza
New Delhi – 110 066
11. Orissa Sponge Iron Limited, P.O. Palas Panga, Dist Awaited
Kheonjor, Pin – 758 031

COKE SUBCOMMITTEE, PCD 7:2

Sl. Name of the Representatives


No. Name of the organization Principal Principal
Representative Representative
(1) (2) (3) (3)
1. Central Institute For Mining and Fuel Dr. S.K. Hazra (CONVENER)
Research (CIMFR), Dhanbad
2. Central Mine Planning Design Institute Mr. Sunil Nath, GM
Ltd. (CMPDI), Gondwana Place Kanke (C&T)
Road, Ranchi
3. Durgapur Projects Ltd. (DPL), Durgapur Shri A. Chakraborty,
GM (Coke Oven)
4. Coal India Ltd. (CIL), Kolkata Shri D. Kumar Shri A. K. Sinha
5. R&D Division, Tata Iron & Steel Co. Ltd., Shri M. N. Poddar Shri Sabir Ali
Jamshedpur
6. Research & Develop Centre for Iron and Dr. T. K. Das Shri D. G. Naolakha
Steel (R&DCIS), SAIL, Ranchi
7. Bharat Coking Coal Ltd. (BCCL), Shri C.K. Basu,
Koyla Nagar, Koyla Bhawan, HOD(QC)
Dhanbad (Jharkhand)
8. Deptt. of Coal, Govt. of India, New Delhi Awaited Awaited
9. Jindal Steel and Power Ltd. Raigarh Awaited Awaited
10. Central Excise & Customs Laboratory, Awaited Awaited
Vadodara 390023
SAMPLING SUBCOMMITTEE, PCD 7:3

Sl. Name of the Representatives


No. Name of the organization Principal Representative Principal Representative
(1) (2) (3) (3)
1. Central Mine Planning Design Shri Sunil Nath (CONVENER)
Institute Ltd. (CMPDI), HQ,
Gondwana Place,
Kanke Road,
Ranchi - 834008
2. Central Institute For Mining and Smt. N. Choudhury Shri A. Bhattacharya
Fuel Research (CIMFR), Dhanbad –
828 108
3. Coal India Ltd. (CIL), Shri D. K. Biswas Shri C. P. Sinha
10 Netaji Subhash Road,
Kolkata – 700 001
4. Tata Steel Ltd, Jamshedpur - 831001 Shri A. K. Prasad
5. Singareni Collieries Co Ltd, Shri J. Nagaiah, AGM Shri Y. Gangadhara Roa,
Kothagudem Collieries, Khammam (QM), Dy GM (AS), Shri G.
District, Andrapradesh-507101 S.N. Murthy, Supdt (AS)
6. Coal Controller Organization, Shri N. P. Srivastava Shri R. P. Singh
Council House Street,
Kolkata - 700001
7. Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd. Shri K. Nandakumar Shri K. Sivaraman
(BHEL), BHEL House, Siri Fort,
New Delhi 110049
8. Cement Mfrs’ Assofication (CMA), Awaited Awaited
2147-47, Vishu Kiran, Gurudwar
Road, Karol Bag,
New Delhi - 110005
9. Research & Develop Centre for Iron Shri N. K. Ghosh Shri T. K. Das
and Steel (R&DCIS), SAIL, Ranchi
10. Geological Survey of India, Awaited Awaited
Karunamayee, Salt Lake,
Kolkata - 700091
11. Indian Statistical Institute, 203 Awaited Awaited
Barrachpore, Trunk Road,
Kolkata – 700108
12. National Metallurgical Laboratory, Awaited Awaited
Jamshedpur – 831 007
13. Neyveli Lignite Corpn Ltd, Block 1, Shri M. Chinnamani Shri K. C.
Neyveli, chiefcarad@nlcindia.com Radhakrishnam
Tamilnadu – 607807 chiefcarad@nlcindia.com
14. NTPC Ltd, Core 7, Scope Complex, Awaited Awaited
7 Institutional Area, Lodi Road,
New Delhi 110003
15. Central Electricity Authority (CEA), Awaited Awaited
Sewa Bhavan, R.K. Puram,
New Delhi 110066

METHODS OF ANALYSIS SUBCOMMITTEE, PCD 7:4

Sl. Name of the organization Name of the Representatives


No. Principal Representative Alternate Representative
(1) (2) (3) (4)
1. Central Institute For Mining and Fuel Shri T.B. Das (CONVENER)
Research (CIMFR), Dhanbad
2. Research & Develop Centre for Iron Dr. T. K. Das Shri D. G. Naolakhe
and Steel (R&DCIS), SAIL, Ranchi.
3. Coal India Ltd. (CIL), Kolkata Dr. P. K. De Shri R. V. Erady
4. Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd. Shri G. Viswanathan Shri K.
(BHEL), Tiruchirapalli Sivaramakrishnan
5. Central Mine Planning and Design Shri T. K. Sinha Shri A. K. Sinha
Institute Ltd.(CMPDI), Ranchi
6. Singareni Collieries Company Ltd., Awaited Awaited
Kothagudam (A.P.)
7. Nayveli Lignite Corporation Ltd. Shri S. Venkataraman Shri K. Adinarayanan
Nayveli chiefcarad@nlcindia.com chiefcarad@nlcindia.com
8. National Test House, Kolkata Shri A. S. Bansood Shri Manas Chakraborty
9. Geological Survey of India (GSI), Dr. R. K. Dutta Shri S. K.
Kolkata Mukhopadhyay
10. National Council for Cement and Awaited Awaited
Building Materials, Ballabgarh
11. NTPC Ltd., ( R&D) Noida Awaited Awaited
12. Birbal Sahani Institute of Dr. B. D. Singh Dr. (Mrs) Alpana Singh
Palaeobotany, Lucknow
13. Banaras Hindu University, Banaras Awaited Awaited
(U.P.)
ANNEX III
(Item 2.5)

1. Representation by Indian Metals & Ferro Alloys Ltd, Orissa

We have the pleasure of informing you that we are member of the Ferro Alloys, Sectional
Committee, MTD 5 of BIS. We actively participate in this Sectional Committee meetings as
well as, are involved in developing various methods for chemical analysis of Ferro alloys and
revision of various BIS Standards pertaining to Ferro Alloys required thereof.

We are a regular importer of coal and coke in large quantity every year, and therefore, we are
interested to participate in your Solid Mineral Fuels Sectional Committee, PCD 7.

We, therefore, request to give us your kind consent for becoming a member of this Sectional
Committee (PCD 7) and inform us the formalities required for the same.

2. Representation by Neyveli Lignite Corporation Ltd, Centre for Applied Research and
Development (CARD), Neyveli

Centre for Applied Research and Development (CARD) is an in-house R&D Centre of Neyveli
Lignite Corporation Ltd., Neyveli. It is engaged in various research activities apart from testing
of various materials. Members from CARD/NLC participate in BIS committees Bitumen, Tar
and Their Products, PCD 6 and Solid Mineral Fuels, PCD 7 for discussions.

In view of above, we request you to kindly consider our requests for representation on
Classification and Codification of Indian Coals and Lignites, PCD7/WG1.

3. Representation by Eastman Crusher Company (P) Ltd., Kolkata

For last two decades, we are catering the needs of sampling equipment for core industries like
thermal power plant, cement, coal and steel plant etc. involving bulk material handling like coal,
lime stone and Iron ores. Our market share in the field of sampling system is quite substantial in
the back drop of Indian scenario and we enjoy much confidence of our clients.

Our organization, playing its role in the field of sampling of bulk material handling, is keenly
interest to get involved in organizing the sampling standard particularly for coal handling system.
As such, we are interested to get membership in the sub-section for mechanical sampling.
We request your goodself to give due attention regarding the participation so that a
representative of our company can be enrolled as a member, thereby our experiences and views
can get due weightage in BIS.

4. Representation by ELICO Limited, Hyderabad

ELICO started its venture in year 1960 with design, development and manufacturing of
Analytical instruments like pH meters for the first time in India and kept on adding several firsts
in the areas of Spectrophotometry, Electrochemistry, Flame Photometry, Water Quality Analysis
etc.

To keep pace with technology the company established its own R&D Wing since 1973 inception,
which is recognized by the Department of Science &Industry Research (DSIR), Govt. of India.
ELICO is the first Analytical Instrumentation Company in India to be certified for ISO 9001,
ISO 14001 and ISO 27001 standards.

ELICO to provide high end analytical instruments combined with service and support to suit
customer requirements. We strongly believe in the importance of forming partnerships and
working together towards our common goal with employees, customers, partners, stakeholders
and suppliers participation.

Coal based power has become a key element of India’s energy sector. As the country’s energy
and power needs continue to grow, the role will remain undiminished for coal at least the next
few decades while we are in search of understanding the “standards and methods of test for coal
and coke”. We can contribute our domain knowledge developed over 5 decades related to
indigenous laboratory instruments and explore possibilities to address the tasks related to
indigenous technology development of coal analysis instruments that needs through
understanding on the standards and test methods.

In view of accomplishing these goals, we request you to kindly consider our requests for
representation on the PCD 7 Sectional Committee on Coal and Coke.
ANNEX IV
(Item 3.1)

ACTIVITIES OF SOLID MINERAL FUELS SECTIONAL COMMITTEE, PCD7

Solid Mineral Fuels Sectional Committee, PCD7


Sl IS No./ Doc:No. Title Reaffirmed
No. last
1. 770:1977 Classification and codification of Indian coals and lignitesMar 07
(second revision) (superseding 5018:1968)
2. 3810(Pt 2):2003/ Solid mineral fuels – Vocabulary Part 2 – Terms relating
ISO 1213-2: 1992 to sampling, testing and analysis (first Revision)
3. 12770:1989 Coal for cement manufacture Apr 05
Coal preparation: Terminology and performance Subcommittee, PCD 7:1
4 3746:1984 Graphical symbols for coal preparation plant Apr 05
. (first revision)
2
5 3810(Pt 1): 2002 Solid mineral fuels – Vocabulary Part 1 – Terms relating
. to coal preparation (second revision)
3
6 5209:2002 /ISO Coal preparation plant – Principles and conventions for Apr 05
. 924:1989 flow sheets (first revision)
4
7 13810:1993 Code of practice float and sink analysis of coal Apr 05
.
5
Coke Subcommittee, PCD 7:2
8 437:1979 Size analysis of coal and coke for marketing (third Mar 07
. revision)
6
9 439:1989 Industrial coke – Specification (third revision) Apr 05
.

1 1354:1992 Methods of test for coke-special test (second revision) Apr 05


0
.
1 3810(Pt 3): 1977 Glossary of terms relating to solid mineral fuels : Part III Apr 05
1 Terms relating to coke
.
7
1 4023:1991 Methods for the determination of reactivity of coke
2 (first revision)
.
8
1 4286:1976 Specification for Domestic coke (first revision) Apr 05
3
.

1 5062(Pt 3):1969 Methods of test for brown coals and lignites: Part III Apr 05
4 Determination of the yields of tar, water, gas and coke by
. low temperature distillation
9
1 5062(Pt 4):2004 Methods of test for brown coals and lignites: Part IV
5 /ISO 975: 2000 Determination of the yield of benzene - soluble extract
. extract - Semi automatic method (first revision)

1 5062(Pt 5):2004 Methods of test for brown coals and lignites: Part 5
6 /ISO 1017:1985 Determination of acetone-soluble material (resinous
. substances) in the toluene- soluble extract (first revision)

1 7190(Pt 1):2004 Coke – Methods of test Part 1Determination of bulk


7 /ISO 567: 1995 density in small container (first revision)
.
1
1 7190(Pt 2):2004 Coke – Methods of test Part 2Determination of bulk
8 /ISO 1013: 1995 density in large container (first revision)
.
1
1 7929:1975 Methods for determination of electrical resistivity of Apr 05
9 chemical coke
.
1

Sampling Subcommittee, PCD 7:3


2 436(Pt I/Sec 1): Methods for sampling of coal and coke: Part I Sampling Mar 07
0 1964 of coal Section1:Manual sampling (first revision)
.
1
2 436(Pt I/Sec 2): Methods for sampling of coal and coke: Part I Sampling of Apr 05
1 1976 coal Section 2: Mechanical sampling
.
1
2 436(Pt 2): 1965 Methods for sampling of coal and coke: Part II Sampling Apr 05
2 of coke (first revision)
2
2 6345:1996 Methods of sampling of coal for float and sink analysis Mar 07
3 (first revision)
.
2
Methods of analysis Subcommittee, PCD 7:4
2 1350(Pt 1):1984 Methods of test for coal and coke: Part 1 Proximate Mar 07
4 analysis (second revision)
.

2 1350(Pt 2):1970 Methods of test for coal and coke Part II Determination of Apr 05
5 calorific value (first revision)
.

2 1350(Pt 3):1969 Methods of test for coal and coke Part III Determination Apr 05
6 of sulphur (first revision)
.

2 1350(Pt 4/Sec 1): Methods of test for coal and coke Part IV Ultimate Apr 05
7 1974 analysis, Section I Determination of carbon and hydrogen
. (first revision) [Superseding IS 1351:1959]

2 1350(Pt 4/Sec 2): Methods of test for coal and coke Part IV Ultimate Apr 05
8 1975 analysis Section 2 - Determination of nitrogen
. (first revision)

2 1350(Pt 5):1979 Methods of test for coal and coke Part V Special Mar 07
9 impurities (first revision)
.

3 1353:1993 Methods of test for coal carbonization – Caking index, Apr 05


0 swelling number and (LT)Grey-King assay (first revision)
.

3 1355:1984 Methods of determination of the chemical composition of Mar 07


1 ash of coal and coke (first revision)
.

3 4311:1967 Method for the determination of mineral matter in coal Apr 05


2
.

3 4433:1979 Method for determination of hard grove grindability Apr 05


3 index of coal (first revision)
.

3 5062(Pt 1):1969 Methods of test for brown coals and lignites: Part I Apr 05
4 Determination of moisture content by the direct
volumetric method
3 5062(Pt 2):1969 Methods of test for brown coals and lignites : Part II Apr 05
5 Determination of ash
.

3 9127(Pt 1):1992 Methods for petrographic analysis of coal: Part 1 Feb 03


6 | ISO 7404-1:1994 Definition of terms relating to petrographic analysis of
. coal (first revision)

3 9127(Pt 2):2002 Methods for petrographic analysis of coal: Part 2 Method


7 /ISO 7404-2: 1985 of preparing coal samples
.

3 9127(Pt 3):2002 Methods for the petrographic analysis of bituminous coal


8 /ISO 7404-3: 1994 and anthracite Part 3 Method of determining maceral
. group composition (first revision)

3 9127(Pt 4):2001 Methods for petrographic analysis of coal: Part 4 Method


9 /ISO 7404-4: 1988 of determining microlithotype, carbominerite and minerite
. composition

4 9127(Pt 5):2004 Methods for the petrographic analysis of coal and


0 /ISO 7404-5: 1994 anthracite: Part 5 Method of determining microscopically
. the reflectance of vitrinite (first revision)

4 9949:1986 Method of test for abrasive properties of coal and Apr 05


1 associated minerals (first revision)
.

4 12891:1990 Method of determination of fusibility of ash of coal, coke Apr 05


2 and lignite
.

4 15438:2004 Hard coal – Determination of forms of sulphur


3 / ISO 157: 1996
.

4 15807(Part 1):2008 Methods of petrographic analysis of lignite Part 1


4 Definition of terms relating to petrographic analysis of
. lignite
ANNEX V
(Item 3.2)

LIST OF INDIAN STANDARDS FOR REVIEW/ REAFFIRMATION


Sl. IS No. Title Affirmatio Amend
No. n date ment
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
1. IS 436 (Part 1 Methods for sampling of coal and coke: Part I April 2005
/Sec 2):1976 Sampling of Coal/Section 2: Mechanical sampling UR
2. IS 436(Part Methods of sampling of coal and coke Part II: April 2005
2):1965 Sampling of coke (first revision) UR
3. IS 439:1989 Industrial coke (third revision) April 2005
UR
4. IS 1350 Methods of test for coal and coke: Part II April 2005 1
(Part2):1970 Determination of calorific value (first revision)
5. IS 1350 Methods of test for coal and coke: Part III April 2005 1
(Part 3):1969 Determination of sulphur (first revision)
6. IS 1350 Methods of test for coal and coke: Part IV Ultimate April 2005
(Part 4/Sec analysis Section 1 - Determination of carbon and
1):1974 hydrogen (first revision)
7. IS 1350 Methods of test for coal and coke: Part IV Ultimate April 2005 2
(Part 4/ Sec 2) analysis Section 2 - Determination of nitrogen (first
:1975 revision)
8. IS 1353:1993 Methods of test for coal carbonization - caking April 2005
index, swelling number and (LT)grey King assay UR
(first revision)
9. IS 1354:1992 Methods of test for coke special test April 2005
(second revision) UR
10 IS 3746:1984 Graphical symbols for coal Preparation plant April 2005
. (first revision) UR

11 IS 3810 Solid mineral fuels - Vocabulary Part 1 - Terms


. (Part 1):2002 relating to coal preparation (second revision)

12 IS 3810 Solid Mineral Fuel - Vocabulary Part 2 Terms


. (Part 2):2003 relating to Sample Testing and Analysis (first
/ISO 1213-2:1992 revision)
13 IS 3810 Glossary of terms relating to solid mineral fuels; April 2005
. (Part 3):1977 Part III Coke

14 IS 4286:1976 Specification for Domestic coke (first revision) April 2005


.

15 IS 4311:1967 Method for the determination of mineral matter in April 2005


. coal UR

16 IS 4433:1979 Method for the determination of the hardgrove April 2005


. grindability index of coal (first revision) UR

17 IS 5062 Methods of test for brown coals and lignites : Part 1 April 2005
. (Part 1):1969 Determination of moisture content by the direct UR
volumetric method
18 IS 5062 Methods of test for brown coals and lignites: Part II April 2005
. (Part 2):1969 Determination of ash

19 IS 5062 Methods of test for brown coals and lignites: Part III
. (Part 3):1969 Determination of the yields of tar, water, gas and
coke by low temperature distillation
20 IS 5062 Methods of test for brown coals and lignites: Part IV
. (Part 4):2004 Determination of yield of benzene-soluble extract -
Note: UR - UNDER REVISION

ANNEX VI
(Item 3.3.2)

ISO 13909-3:2001 Hard Coal and Coke – Mechanical Sampling – Part 3: Coal – Sampling from
stationary lots

Sl. No. Clause/Sub-clause/Para No. COMMENTS/SUGGESTIONS


COMMENTED
1 2 3
1. 7.0 Sampling Equipment:

In coal Industry, at many places It should be possible also to take


coal is loaded in the railway mechanical auger/tube in incline
siding through pay loader. In position in view of electric traction
these railway sidings, there is no on the railway siding.
arrangement for mechanical
sampling

Now, it is being made mandatory Auger/similar tube may also include


to collect samples mechanically. cutter-head at the tip so that initial
sample itself is crushed and elevated
One way is to collect sample by auger or sucked-in (by pneumatic
through mechanical auger/or by arrangement). This is to avoid
Pneumatic Suction System. jamming of large lumps inside the
tube.

In case of pneumatic suction, This also requires that mass of


coal needs to be crushed at the primary increment is reduced and is
initial stage itself. compensated by sampling from more
wagons/all the wagons (typically
However, there are two problems Indian Railway have a rake size of 58
i.e. wagons x 58 tonnes)
1. Unlike produces of other
countries, coal India, who is the These points need to be considered
largest coal producer, generally by the experts committee while
sells coal in two size ranges finalizing the standard.
(i) 0-200 mm (this may have
some 10% of lumps up to 250
mm) and (ii) 0-100 mm.

2. Presence of electric overhead


traction on the railway line.
ANNEX VII
(Item 3.3.4)

1. TABLE OF REQUIREMENTS PREPARED BY DR. SARKAR

Grade Ash Moisture VM Total Phosphate Porosity Cold Hot


on % of +25mm % Sulphur %db Strength Strength Size
adb % adb adb %db
M40 M10 CRI CSR
Max Max Max Max Max Min Max Min Max
1 13 5 1.0 0.6 0.06 40-44 86 8 23 64 The Material shal
size range betw
2 18 5 1.5 0.6 0.10 40-44 82 9 25 60 25mm with 15%
for oversize (+80
3 24 5 1.5 0.6 0.20 40-44 78 12 28 52 & 10% for under
(-25mm)
1 15 5 1.5 0.6 0.10 38-44 Shatter Size of the coke
90 96 agreed between
2 20 5 2.0 0.6 0.15 38-44 85 95 and consumer

3 25 5 2.0 0.6 0.20 38-44 80 94

4 30 5 2.0 0.7 0.20 38-44 75 92


1 13 5 1.0 0.5 0.06 38-44 -do-

2 18 5 1.5 0.6 0.10 38-44

3 20 5 2.0 0.7 0.10 38-44

4 24 5 2.0 0.7 0.15 38-44


1 18 6 3.0 0.7 0.20 40 min -do-

2 22 6 3.0 0.7 0.20 40 min

3 25 6 3.0 0.7 0.20 40 min

2. COMMENTS RECEIVED FROM SHRI H. C. CHAKRABARTI, RETIRED GM,


COAL INDIA LTD

Grade Ash Moisture VM Total Phosphate Porosity Coal Hot strength


% of +25m % sulphur % db Strength
Adb m% adb adb % db
M40 M10 CRI CSR
Max Max Max Max Max Max Min Max Max Min
1 15 5 1.0 0.75 0.10 40-44 86 8 23
2 20 5 1.5 0.75 0.15 40-44 82 9 to

3 25 5 1.5 0.75 0.20 40-44 78 12 28


for all
grades
1 20 5 1.5 0.75 0.15 38-44 Shatter M 40 M10 CRI Size
90 96 85 9 below 25 shall
2 25 5 2.0 0.75 0.20 38-44 85 95 80 10 for all betw
grades and c
3 30 5 2.0 0.75 0.20 38-44 80 94 80 12
1 15 7 5 0.6 0.03 Over 40 Shatter CRI
for all +25 +13
2 20 7 5 0.6 0.05 grades Over Over Over 32 for all grades
85 95
3 24 7 5 0.6 0.10 for all grades
GAS COKE Specifications not required

3. COMMENTS RECEIVED FROM A. K. PAUL, CMD, BCCL

Grade Ash Moisture VM Total Phosphate Porosity Coal Hot strength


% of +25 % sulphur % db Strength
Adb min% adb % db
adb
M40 M10 CRI CSR
Max Max Max Max Max Max Min Max Max Min
1 15 5 1.0 0.75 0.10 40-44 86 8 23 64 The mate
the size r
2 20 5 1.5 0.75 0.15 40-44 82 9 to to 80 to 25 m
tolerance
3 20 5 1.5 0.75 0.20 40-44 78 12 28 55 (+80mm)
for all for all for under
1 20 5 1.5 0.75 0.15 38-44 Shatter M 40 M10 CRI Size of th
90 96 85 9 below as agreed
2 25 5 2.0 0.75 0.20 38-44 85 95 80 10 25 for producer
all Less reac
3 30 5 2.0 0.75 0.20 38-44 80 94 80 12 grades preferred

1 15 7 5 0.6 0.03 Over 40 Shatter CRI


for all +25 +13
2 20 7 5 0.6 0.05 grades Over Over Over 32 for all grade Reactive
85 95 since coke will be preferred
3 24 7 5 0.6 0.10 for all grades reactive. strength
ANNEX VIII
(Item 3.3.7)
COMMENTS FROM DR. BISWAS of COAL INDIA LIMITED ON IS 3746:1984
GRAPHICAL SYMBOLS

Sl. Item Indian ISO Comments Recommendations


No. Standard Standard
Sl. No. Sl. No.
1 Fan 10 34 ISO symbol different from ISO Symbol may be
BIS. adopted.
2 Feeders 12(a to f) 14 In ISO, symbol for only BIS Symbol may be
one type of feeder is given adopted.
and that too is different
from BIS.
3 Screens 13(b) 24(b) Symbol same. In 13(b), to be written as
‘Two under-product
screen/depulping and
rinsing screen”.
4 Sieve bend/arc 13(c) 28 ISO symbol different from ISO Symbol may be
screen curved BIS. adopted.
sieve
5 Fixed screen 13(d) 29 ISO symbol different from ISO Symbol may be
grizzly BIS. adopted.
6 Double deck 13(e) 25 Two under-product screen ISO Symbol may be
screen not given in BIS. adopted for two-under
product screen.
7 Water spray 15 30 ISO Symbol different ISO Symbol may be
from BIS. adopted.
8 Cyclone 19 42 ISO Symbol different ISO Symbol may be
separator (water from BIS. adopted.
only)
9 Heavy medium 26 41 ISO Symbol different ISO Symbol may be
cyclone washer/ from BIS. In BIS only two adopted for two/three
cyclone product cyclone given. product cyclone.
separator(dense
medium)
10 Rotary Breaker 22 17 ISO Symbol different ISO Symbol may be
from BIS. adopted.
11 Jig washer 23 37 Symbol same “a) Two products b)
Three Product” to be
written in BIS.
12 Dry cleaner 24 36 Symbol same “a) Two product b) Three
product” to be written in
BIS.
13 Dense medium 25 40 Symbol same “a) Two product b) Three
separator product” to be written in
BIS.

14 Trough washer 27 39 ISO Symbol different ISO Symbol may be


from BIS. adopted.
15 Concentrating 28 38 ISO Symbol different ISO Symbol may be
table from BIS. adopted.
16 Froth flotation 29 51 Symbol same “a) Two product b) Three
cells product” to be written in
BIS.
17 Magnetic 31 63 ISO Symbol different ISO Symbol may be
separator, from BIS. adopted.
medium
18 Magnetic 32 64 ISO Symbol different ISO Symbol may be
separator, tramp from BIS. adopted.
iron
19 Centrifuge 34 55/56/57 In BIS only one symbol is ISO Symbol may be
given whereas in ISO adopted.
different symbols are
given for different kinds
of centrifuges.
20 Suction 35 52(a) Symbols are same but Both names may be
(vacuum) named differently. given.
filter/drum filter
(vacuum)
21 Liquid reagent 12(d) 67 ISO symbol different from ISO symbol may be
feeder BIS. adopted.
22 Dewatering 37 27 ISO symbol different from ISO symbol may be
screen BIS. adopted.
23 Spitzcasten 38 46 ISO symbol different from ISO symbol may be
BIS. adopted.
24 Conical setting 40 48 ISO symbol different from ISO symbol may be
tank/ setting BIS. adopted.
cone
25 Mixing tank 43 60 ISO symbol different from ISO symbol may be
BIS. adopted.
26 Dust aspiration 46 19 ISO symbol different from ISO symbol may be
point BIS. adopted.
27 Crusher, large 48 - Not given in ISO BIS symbol may be
material adopted.
28 Crusher, 49 21 Symbol same in ISO for ISO symbol may be
medium crusher adopted.
material
29 Crusher, fine 50 22 ISO symbol different from BIS symbol may be
material (Pulverizer) BIS. adopted.
30 Mixer, solid 51 58 ISO symbol different from ISO symbol may be
BIS. adopted.
Symbols for certain equipment are given in ISO but not in BIS. Therefore, these may be adopted
in BIS. These are given below:

Sl. No. Item ISO Sl. No.


1 Conveyor, scraper
a) One discharge 7(a)
b) Two discharge 7(b)
2 Conveyor, screw 9
3 a) Stockpile 12(a)
b) Layered stockpile 12(b)
4 Bucket wheel reclaimer 13
5 Screen (partitioned deck)
a) Two under-product 26(a)
b) Three under-product 26(b)
6 Vacuum pump 33
7 Drum filter (pressure) 52(b)
8 Disc filter
a) Vacuum filter 53(a)
9 Distributor 61
10 Spilitter box 62
11 Pressure belt filter 68
12 Spiral
a) Two product 69(a)
b) Three product 69(b)
13 Probability screen 70

Symbols for certain equipment are given in BIS but not in ISO. Therefore, these may be retained
in BIS. There are given below:

Sl. No. Item BIS Sl. No.


1 Diaphragm pump 9
2 Demagnetizer 14

Symbols for rest of the equipment are given in both BIS and ISO. Therefore, no change is
required for such equipment.

Sl. No. Item Sl. No. as given in


September 1984
issue
1 Beetle charger 2
2 Car haul/pusher 3
3 Apron conveyor 11
4 Two way chutes 16
5 Hopper 17
6 Shaking screen 21
7 Trommel screen 23
8 Hammer mill/Impact breaker 30
9 Single roll crusher 31
10 Double roll crusher 32
11 Ball or tube mill 33
12 Single stage blower 38(a)
13 Multistage blower 38(b)
14 Oil agglomeration cell 45
15 Heavy media tank 49
16 Feeding tank 50
17 Cyclone dust collector 70
18 Bag filter 71
19 Movable tripper 80
20 Semi-ground bunker 82
ANNEX IX
(Item 3.4.1)

METHOD OF TEST FOR THE DETERMINATION OF CROSSING POINT AND


IGNITION TEMPERATURE OF COAL

FOREWORD (Formal clauses will be added later)

The crossing point and ignition temperature of coal has been recognized by the Directorate
General of Mines Safety as an index for determining the relative susceptibility of coals to
spontaneous combustion. The Committee, therefore, felt that there should be a standard
procedure for determining the same throughout the country.

Crossing point and ignition temperature determination is simply an empirical method, but if the
experimental conditions are kept constant, they give a fairly good idea about the susceptibility of
a coal to spontaneous heating. The importance of such an index for coal categorization is all the
more essential in the case of newly mined collieries, as their spontaneous heating characteristics
ate not known. Of course, for the coals that are mined since long, some idea of such
characteristics might be there with the experience gained. This index may, therefore, be used to
compare the relative susceptibility of the coals, provided the tests carried out under similar
conditions.

Central Mining Research Institute (CMRI), Dhanbad determined the crossing point and ignition
temperature of a good number of coal samples from different coalfields in India. This standard is
based on the method followed by CMRI, Dhanbad. Since it is an empirical method to compare
spontaneous heating susceptibility of different coals, the experimental conditions should be
rigorously adhered to, otherwise, the repeatability of the results may be impaired.

In reporting the result of test or analysis made in accordance with this standard, if the final value,
observed or calculated, is to be rounded off, it shall be done in accordance with IS 2: 1960 ‘
Rules for rounding off numerical values (Revised)’.

1. SCOPE

This standard prescribed the method of test for the determination of crossing point and ignition
temperature of coal.

2. TERMINOLOGY

For the purpose of this standard the following definitions shall apply.

2.1 Crossing Point

If a definite amount of powdered coal sample is heated in a bath at a steady rate and a definite
flow of air or oxygen is maintained through the coal bed, the particular temperature at which coal
bed temperature crosses the bath temperature, due to oxidative heating, is termed as the crossing
point temperature of the sample concerned under the particular conditions. In fact, it is from this
temperature that the oxidative heating of the particular coal under that particular condition
becomes self-sustaining.
2.2 Ignition Temperature

This is the temperature when the actual ignition of the coal sample would start. It can be
obtained, if the powdered coal sample is heated even beyond the crossing point temperature
when the rate rise of coal bed temperature goes on increasing at a faster rate. Ultimately, a stage
comes when the coal bed temperature starts shooting up very fast, which may be considered as
the onset of ignition, termed as ignition temperature.

3. APPARATUS

3.1 Bath – Liquid or air bath

3.1.1 Liquid Bath – A 30 cm x 25 cm x 20 cm bath with covering lid, made out of suitable
material, sufficient to hold the sample holder (reaction tube), immersion coil heater – one regular
and one booster heater and a stirrer. The outside wall of the bath shall be properly insulated to
minimize heat loss.

3.1.2 Air Bath – A tubular heater with electrical heating arrangement.

3.2 Heater (for liquid bath) – Two 1000 watt (immersion coil type) heaters-one regular heating
and the other for maintaining the temperature.

3.3 Stirrer (for liquid bath) – An electric stirrer to keep the temperature uniform thought the
bath.
3.4 Thermocouples – Two thermocouples ranging 0 – 300 degree Celsius for recording
temperatures of coal bed and the bath. The casing shall be made of steel and the thermocouple
bad must be tough. The outer diameter of the steel casing not be more than five.

3.5 Sample Holder – The sample holder shall be made of Pyrex glass tube of 18-20 mm (1.8 –
2.0 cm) diameter, which shall be slightly tampered at the mouth where a standard glass joint of
25 mm diameter shall be fitted. The mouth shall be closed with rubber bung of suitable size,
through which thermocouple and the oxygen / air exit pipe shall pass. The total length of the tube
shall be 200 mm (20 cm). The other end of the same tube shall meet a 5-6 mm spiral glass tube,
which is wound round the sample holder. This spiral glass tube shall ensure attainment of bath
temperature to the incoming oxygen / air being introduced in the coal sample by giving large
flow time.

3.6 Manometer – A differential manometer shall be used to ensure that a steady flow of
oxygen /air is maintained throughout the experiment. Adequate arrangement shall be made to
control oxygen/air flow using stop cock/valve.
3.7 Oxygen/Air Input – Oxygen cylinder with regulator for supplying oxygen or a suitable
suction pump for supplying air shall be used. The suction pump shall be fitted at the exit point of
the sample holder for drawing in air through the reaction tube/sample holder.

3.8 Voltage Stabiliser – A suitable voltage stabilizer shall be used for getting a steady current
needed for the heaters (required to be heated at a definitely programmed rate).
3.9 Auto Transformer – An autotransformer or, variac shall be used for varying the voltage for
liquid /air batch (required to heat it up at a definitely programmed rate).

4.0 PROCEDURE

4.1 Test Conditions:

i) Weight of the coal sample: 20 gm


ii) Rate of oxygen flow: 80 – 100 ml/min
iii) Rate of heating: 1.0 degree Celsius/min
iv) Grain Size of coal: -212 µm IS Sieve
(-72 BSS Sieve)

NOTE 1- A heating rate of 0.5 degree Celsius has been found to be optimum but in certain
instances 1 degree Celsius/min may also be used to save the experiment time.

NOTE 2- Oxygen to be used shall be dry.

NOTE 3 – If air is used, then flow rate shall be 80 ml/min, being passed through water trap for
achieving nearly 100 percent humidity. But with air, it is difficult to obtain ignition temperature.

4.2 Procedure

The test sample is suggested to be equilibrated at 60% at 40 degree Celsius before determination
of crossing point & ignition point temperature.

Take 20 gm of coal sample –212 (m IS Sieve size in the sample holder over a glass wool
packing. Glass wool is used to avoid channeling effect and ensure uniform distribution of oxygen
throughout the coal bed. Some gentle tapping should be given over the sample holder for
uniform packing. The glass wool should be packed always up to a definite height.

Cover the coal sample with further quantity of glass wool packing. Close the sample holder
tightly with rubber bung through which the thermocouple and the outlet tube are allowed to pass.
Care is to be taken so that the thermocouple tip reaches up to the same depth of the coal bed in
all the experiments ( is nearly 5 mm above the bottom most point of the coal bed). Introduce the
tube up to a definitely marked depth of the liquid bath (or the air bath as the case may be) for all
experiments. The packing of reference coal bed as well as glass wool shall also be nearly the
same in every experiment.

Adjust the flow of oxygen /air so that same flow is maintained throughout the experiment.

Start raising the temperature of the liquid/air bath at a heating rate of 0.5 degree Celsius/min.
Start noting the temperature of the bath and cool sample at regular intervals of time. Manipulate
the voltage input to heaters in such a way that similar rate rise of bath temperature is maintained
throughout. At the beginning of the experiment, the rate of rise of coal bed temperature is less
than that of the moisture from coal. After sometime, the coal bed temperature starts rising at a
faster rate with simultaneous increase in auto oxidation rate. Then a time comes, when coal bed
temperature crosses the bath temperature. The crossing temperature can be obtained either by
directly noting the temperature of the two thermocouples or, more precisely by plotting the
graphs of the thermal profile of the coal bed as well as that of the bath, with time coordinate as
the abscissa.

If the experiment is continued for some more time, then it can be observed that the coal bed
temperatures goes on rising very sharply. Sharp inflation point may be noted as ignition
temperature.

The gas supply should then be cut off and hating of the bath be discontinued, otherwise the coal
may catch fire with a possibility of breakage of the sample holder.

4.3 Graphical Representation

Time – Temperature curves of both, the coal bed and liquid/air bath are drawn on the same graph
paper, using time coordinate as the abscissa. The point of intersection of the two curves, give the
crossing point of the coal sample under the particular conditions of the experiment.

The minimum temperature from which coal bed temperature, after attaining crossing point, starts
shooting up at a faster rate may be noted as the ignition temperature of the coal. The
experimental set up of crossing point and ignition temperature is shown in Fig.1 and typical
graphical representation of these is shown in Fig.2.

NOTE – The apparatus can be made more sophisticated by incorporating a programmable bath
and a reactor. The automatic programmable bath may be used in place of manually operated bath
and the thermocouple terminals can easily be connected with a two-pen recorder to get the graph
directly. This set up will not require constant attention so the operator can save lot of time for
some other work.
ANNEX X
(Item 3.4.2)

COKING COAL (NON INDIGENOUS) – SPECIFICATION

FOREWORD
(Formal clauses will be added later)
ICS No. 73.040

This draft standard gives requirements for coking coal (Non Indigenous). Coking coal is an
important raw material for steel industries in preparation of low ash metallurgical coke.

Indian coals and lignites classification and codification are specified in Indian standard IS
770:1977. This standard applies to coking coal (Non Indigenous) imported.

Coking coal is a bituminous coal with specific characteristic of coke formation .Coking coal
deposits in India are rare because of the high ash content in Indian bituminous coals. Steel
industry is importing coking coal from independence. Increased Steel production over years has
increased the coking coal imports. Now coking coal is mainly an imported from Australia,
NewZeland, South Africa and Indonesia. As this is obtained in bulk quantity involving foreign
currency payments , Indian customs and steel industry is in need of this standard.

Coking coal quality in a single mine varies with the parameters mentioned in the standard. Based
on these parameters the coal classified in to hard coking coal and semi/soft coking coal. The use
of these types of coal is mentioned in the standard. Coal with Crucible swelling number less than
3 are used as PCI (Pulverized coal injection) coal for energy purposes in blast furnace to reduce
the operational cost. PCI coals are used for heating purposes are not given as coking coals. They
have to be classified as Steam coals.

As Coking coal is a natural product with varied compositions crucible swelling number is taken
as prime criteria for classification purposes.

For the purposes of deciding whether a particular requirement of this standard is complied with,
the final values ,observed or calculated , expressing the results of a test or analysis ,shall be
rounded of in accordance with IS 2-1960. The number of significant places retained in the round
of values should be same as that of specified values in this standard

1 SCOPE

This standard prescribes the requirements and methods of sampling and test for coking coal
imported in country.

2 REFERENCES

The following Indian Standards contain provisions which, through reference in this text,
constitute the provisions of this standard. At the time of publication, the editions indicated are
valid. All standards are subject to revision, and parties to agreement based on the standard are
encouraged to investigate the possibility of applying the most recent editions of the standards
indicated below:

IS No Title

IS 436(Part 2):1965 Methods of sampling of coal and coke Part II: sampling of coke
(Revised)
IS 1350(Part 1):1984 Methods of test for coal and coke: Part 1 Proximate analysis
(second revision)
IS 1350(Part 3):1969 Methods of test for coal and coke: Part 3 Determination of
sulphur (first revision)
IS 1350(Part 5):1979 Methods of test for coal and coke: Part 5 Special impurities
(first revision)
IS 1353:1993 Methods of test for coal carbonization- caking index, swelling
number and (LT) grey king assay (first revision)
IS 3810(Part 3):1977 Glossary of terms relating to solid mineral fuels; Part III Coke

IS 9127(Part 5):2004 Methods for petrographic analysis of coal and anthracite:


/ISO 7404-5:1994 Part 5 Methods of determining microscopically the reflectance of
vitrinite (first revision)
ASTM D 2639 Standard Test Method for Plastic Properties of Coal by the
Constant-Torque Gieseler Plastometer

3 TERMINOLOGY

Coking coals are referred to coals with a quality that allows the production suitable to support
blast furnace charge. Soft/semi soft coking coals are referred to coking coals that can be blended
with a hard coking coal to produce an acceptable coke to support blast furnace charges. For the
purpose of this standard the definitions given in IS 3810: Part 3 shall apply.

4 TYPES

The coking coal shall be of two types namely Type 1, Type 2.


Type 1: Hard Coking Coal which on pyrolysis in absence of air produces a coke suitable to
support blast furnace charge.
Type 2: Soft/Semi Soft Coking coals are one used for blending purposes only.

5 REQUIREMENTS

Coking coal shall also conform to the requirements laid down in Table 1, when tested in
accordance with the methods referred to in col.6 of the Table. In some cases where %Volatile
matter .%Ash crosses the limit prescribed in the table and still crucible swelling number is more
than or equal to 5 or more than or equal to 3 , the sample will be classified as hard , semi soft
/soft coking coal respectively for classification purposes .
Table 1 Requirements for Coking Coal (Non Indigenous)

Sl No. Characteristic Requirements Method of test


Ref. to
Hard Coking Soft/Semi Soft
Coal Coking Coals
1 Moisture, Percent by Mass, 12 12 IS 1350 Part 1
as on received basis
2 Inherent Moisture, Percent 2.0 5.0 IS 1350 Part 1
by mass,on air dry basis,
Max
3 Volatile matter, Percent by 34 40 IS 1350 Part 1
mass,on dry basis, Max
4 Ash , Percent by mass, on 10 12 IS 1350 Part 1
dry basis, Max
5 Total Sulphur, Percent by 1.0 1.0 IS 1350 Part 3
Mass, on dry basis, Max
6 Phosphorus, Percent by 0.10 0.10 IS 1350 Part 5
mass, on dry basis, Max
7 Crucible swelling number, 5 3 IS 1353
Min.
8 Mean Max reflectance of 1.00-1.40 0.80-1.00 IS 9127(Part
Vitrinite 5):2004/ISO
7404-5:1994
9 Maximum Fluidity (ddpm) 300 min 1-3000 ASTM D 2639

6 SIZE CLASSIFICATION

The size shall be in the range 0-50 mm and fraction below 0.50 mm is 25% Max.

6.1 Sampling

The representative sample shall be drawn as prescribed in IS 436: Part 2.


ANNEX XI
(Item 5.1)

Doc: PCD 7(2275) Classification and Codification of Indian coals, lignites and Pseudo/semi-
anthracite (third revision of IS 770:1977)

History

• This standard was first published in 1955 as a tentative standard. It was then firmed in
1960 as a regular standard. The title of the standard was ‘General Classification of Coal’.
The revised version was published as IS 770:1964.
• The objective of the classification was to show the path of metamorphosis from brown
coals to anthracites and was not to be used to grade Indian coal.
• The standard covered the terminology and characteristics used in the classification along
with typical compositions for anthracites; bituminous coals; sub-bituminous coals and
lignites or brown coals.
• Second revision of this standard was published in 1977 by merging IS 770:1964 General
Classification of coals and IS 5018:1968 – ‘Classification of hard coals by type’. The
title of the standard was changed to ‘Classification and Codification of Indian Coals and
Lignites’. This standard covers Indian Coals ranging from lignites to anthracites
covering information on general characteristics and utilization of coal and lignites with
relation to their code numbers.
• First attempt to prepare revision of this standard was made in 1990 (Doc: PCD 7(879)C
July 1990) followed by another attempt in August 2004 (Doc: PCD 7(2275)C). The later
version was prepared by Ms Nandita Chaudhury, Convener PCD7:3 in consultation with
CFRI Scientists and Dr H.K. Mishra of CMPDIL. On wide circulation, large number of
comments was received on this draft which has been discussed in 7th Meeting held on 21
April 2005 in New Delhi and 8th Meeting held on 15 March 2007 in Kolkata.

• Though the document was finalized for printing for which formal approval of Chairman,
Sectional Committee as well as Chairman, Division Council was taken but it could not be
sent for printing as Ms. Nandita Chaudhary, the convener had not carried out changes
agreed for the “scope” of the document during the meeting and there was strong
resistance from the customs against publication of the standard as such.

• The observations of Customs Department on finalization of document are reproduced


below:

“Dr T.A. Srenivasa Rao presented the case of customs and had argued that the coal
classification can not be done both on basis of rank and end use both. Rank based
classification like ASTM and ISO Standards should be followed. The mixing of end use
based terms like coking coal creates a problem. It was also presented that the MMR %
can not be a sole parameter to call it as a coking coal. As from international standards
Volatile Matter % is directly related to MMR % and it can be a coking or non coking
coal. CIMFR presented an internal study to say it was valid but finally agreed it was not
possible to correlate the same. It was argued by Customs that CSN is for hard coal and it
comprises of both coking and non coking coal. It was also said that the formation of
mere button or caking is not synonymous with coking. It was wrong to interpret the
caking as coking. It was also pointed out that the draft gives the percent
Ash percent has to be washed below the 19 % level to do secondary parameters like CSN.
It was asked to explain by showing the documents of BHEL & CMPDI studies, it was
given in Indian coal it was not possible to wash Ash % below 25 percent level, then how
it was possible to interpret the coking property of coal. It was also shown to them as
percent inert cross certain level due to the inherent property of Indian coal it was not
possible to form a coke of required stability to call it as a coking coal. CIMFR tried to
explain it is for Indian coal and not for imported coal. It was asked by chairman what is
the problem faced by customs. It was

1. CIMFR issued reports saying used directly in arc furnace also as coking coal. This
was not correct.
2. CIMFR is also written letters to Customs saying they have to follow the IS 770 for
coking coal classification.
3. When asked to give coking coal specification it was said they do not have one.

In this scenario it was becoming difficult for customs to certify which coal is coking coal.

It was replied by CIMFR that by showing a document signed by 5 top scientists that it
was already a replied to Customs that weak coking coals used for blending purposes to
produce a metallurgical coke were not coking coals.

It was contested by Customs if it was true then all semi soft coking coals will be
eliminated from classification of coking coals. It was also shown that it was written in IS
770 from CSN 1 as coking coals (Weak coking coal). This is a contradiction and will
create a problem for customs in certifying the coking coals. CIMFR argued that IS 770 is
for Indian coals only and should not be compared with imported coals. Customs refused
to accept the standard in present form till coking coal term is removed. According to
them weak coking coals are non coking coals”.