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JUSTINE B. ASDALI JANUARY.

16, 2018
GED221 TEC115/ 6:30-7:30
BSED-ENGLISH
FIVE ARTICLE OF READING COMPREHENSION

ARTICLE 1

Title of Study The Role of Prosodic Sensitivity in Children’s Reading Development.


:
Author(s) : Karen Whalley and Julie Hansen
Source : http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.14679817.2006.00309.x/abstract
Date of July, 2006
Publication :
Insert Whalley, K. and Hansen, J. 2006. The role of prosodic sensitivity in
Citation here children's reading development. Journal of Research in Reading. 29(3). Pp.
: 288-303.

Research Problem

While the critical importance of phonological awareness (segmental phonology) to reading


ability is well established, the potential role of prosody (supra-segmental phonology) in
reading development has only recently been explored. This study investigated the role of
prosodic sensitivity in children’s reading ability

Research Findings Conclusions Recommendations

Phrase-level prosodic skills, After controlling for Further research is needed to


assessed by means of an phonological awareness and explore the relative
reiterative speech task, general rhythmic sensitivity, importance of prosodic skills
predicted unique variance in children’s prosodic skills in the comprehension of
reading comprehension, after predicted unique variation in spoken versus written
controlling for word reading word-reading accuracy and in language, and to determine
accuracy, phonological reading comprehension; an the extent to which different
awareness, and general evidence of the importance aspects of prosodic skill
rhythmic sensitivity of prosodic skills in reading contribute differentially to
development. different aspects of reading.
Theories Teaching Reading Approaches

Edward Thorndike’s Laws of Learning – the Based on the study the children were exposed
children were given the activities that to many activities such as word and phrase
measure their learning foundation, exercise identification.
their sensitivity and enhance their senses.

ARTICLE 2

Title of Study : Monitoring Early Reading Development in First Grade: Word


Identification Fluency Versus Nonsense Word Fluency
Author(s) : LYNN S. FUCHS, DOUGLAS FUCHS, and DONALD L.
COMPTON
Source : Council for Exceptional Children
Date of Publication : January, 2004
Insert Citation here : Fuchs, L. S., Fuchs, D., and Compton, D. L. 2004. Monitoring
Early Reading Development in First Grade: Word Identification
FluencyVersus Nonsense Word Fluency. Exceptional Children.
Vol. 71(1) Pp. 7-21.

Research Problem

Across general and special education, CBM users need to have confidence that the measures
they use to identify students for expensive, intensive services, in fact, yield the students most
at risk for poor reading outcomes.

Research Findings Conclusions Recommendations


This study compared two Results suggest that word Practitioners may wish to
potentially useful CBM identification fluency reconsider nonsense word
measures for monitoring functions better than fluency in favor of the CBM
early reading development in nonsense word fluency as a word identification fluency
first grade: word CBM tool for assessing early measure. Monitoring student
identification fluency and reading development in first progress frequently with
nonsense word fluency, and grade. Practitioners can have word identification fluency
almost all comparisons confidence that increases in can contribute importantly,
favored word identification word identification fluency beyond the simple collection
fluency over time reflect improved of fall screening data, to the
performance on important identification of students
end-of-year reading likely to experience difficulty
outcomes. in learning to read in the first
grade
Theories Teaching Reading Approaches
The processing fluency theory – the learner The learner must be exposed to activities
need to have an interaction between the wherein their learning is constantly
learner and the object that enhances their monitored. Their understanding and
learning. recollection of the concepts learned.

ARTICLE 3

Title of Study : Speaking Out for Language: Why Language is Central to Reading
Development?

Author(s) : David K. Dickinson, Roberta M. Golinkoff, and Kathy Hirsh-Pasek

Source : http://er.aera.net

Date of Publication : May, 2010

Insert Citation here : Dickinson, D.K., Golinkoff, R.M., and Hirsh-Pasek, K. 2010.
Speaking Out for Language: Why Language is Central to Reading
Development? Educational Researcher. Vol. 39 (4). Pp. 305–310.
DOI: 10.3102/0013189X10370204

Research Problem

In reading development, the role of language is often misplaced or overlooked. It is


important that the oral language is developed before later reading.
Research Findings Conclusions Recommendations

In an alphabetic language Language exerts pervasive The authors warn against the
children must identify the and indirect influences to use of more malleable code-
individual, meaningless reading. Unlike code-related based skills. It is
squiggles as letters, learn the skills that develop rapidly recommended based on the
letters and their associated during the years studied, article that teachers should
sounds, blend the individual language develops over an enhance the oral language
sounds into words, and then extended time span; because development of a child in
access the meanings the it is relatively difficult to preparation for reading.
words encode. Children must devise interventions that
integrate the meanings of the dramatically alter children’s
individual words into larger language abilities.
units that describe actions
and events in the world.

Theories Teaching Reading Approaches

Schema Theory – the learners are exposed to The approach used in this article is reading
the different units of language as basis of and language learning. Learners are
learning that further enhances the reading introduced to the basic concepts of language
development of the students. and further enhanced through reading.
ARTICLE 4

Title of Study : The Development of Reading in Children Who Speak English as a


Second Language

Author(s) : Nonie K. Lesaux and Linda S. Siegel

Source : DOI: 10.1037/0012-1649.39.6.1005

Date of Publication : 2003

Insert Citation here : Lesaux, N. and Siegel, L. 2003. The Development of Reading in
Children Who Speak English as a Second Language.
Developmental Psychology. Vol. 39 (6). Pp. 1005–1019. DOI:
10.1037/0012-1649.39.6.1005

Research Problem

Patterns of reading development were examined in native English-speaking (L1) children and
children who spoke English as a second language (ESL).

Research Findings Conclusions Recommendations

All children received Early identification and For all children to receive an
phonological awareness intervention for children at equal opportunity to develop
instruction in kindergarten risk is beneficial for ESL fluent reading skills, it is
and phonics instruction in speakers and also suggest critical that both native
Grade 1. By the end of Grade that the effects of English-speaking and ESL
2, the ESL speakers’ reading bilingualism on the speaking children at risk for
skills were comparable to acquisition of early reading reading failure be identified
those of L1 speakers, and skills are not negative and at a young age. Once they are
ESL speakers even may be positive. identified as having early
outperformed L1 speakers on reading difficulty, children
several measures. must receive early
intervention that includes,
but is not limited to, explicit
phonological awareness
instruction.
ARTICLE 5

Title of Study : Semantic Processing and the Development of Word-Recognition


Skills: Evidence from Children with Reading Comprehension
Difficulties

Author(s) : Kate Nation and Margaret J. Snowling

Source : Academic Press

Date of Publication : 1998

Insert Citation here : Nation, K. and Snowling, M. 1998. Semantic Processing and the
Development of Word-Recognition Skills: Evidence from Children
with Reading Comprehension Difficulties. Journal of Memory and
Language 39 (ML982564). Pp. 85–101. Academia Press.

Insert Citation here : Nation, K. and Snowling, M. 1998. Semantic Processing and the
Development of Word-Recognition Skills: Evidence from Children
with Reading Comprehension Difficulties. Journal of Memory and
Language 39 (ML982564). Pp. 85–101. Academia Press.

Research Problem

Children with specific reading comprehension difficulties were compared with control
children on tests of language skill.

Research Findings Conclusions Recommendations

The two groups performed at Despite having adequate Suggest reading exercises
a similar level on tests phonological decoding skills, that develops the semantic
requiring predominantly poor comprehenders have skills of the students; in order
phonological skills, but the problems reading words that to strengthen the poor
poor comprehenders are typically read with reading comprehension of the
performed less well on tests support from semantics. students, and not to
tapping semantic ability. These findings are related to compromise the development
Although the two groups connectionist models of of word recognition.
were matched for decoding reading development in
ability (as assessed by non- which phonological and
word reading), the poor semantic processes interact.
comprehenders were worse at
reading words with irregular
spelling patterns and low-
frequency words.

Theories Teaching Reading Approaches

Constructivism – learners are able to develop The students were to identify whether there is
understanding through experiencing. a difference in meaning between a pair of
words. The words were uttered by a recorded
voice in the DAT tape.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3773299/

http://er.aera.net

DOI: 10.1037/0012-1649.39.6.1005

Academic Press