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1.

Introduction
We have no less than 6 (six) Vodnany hammermills. Total applied power is almost one
megawatt of electricity: 2 x 250kW + 4 x 110kW = 940kW. There is a rule for straw milling,
which states the approximate consumption of 20 kilowatts per hour and ton, meaning that our
capacities could suffice for 50 tons per hour: why can’t we mill more?

I have used available material for milling, scattered around the internet. The biggest mill
manufacturers like: CPM (former Roskamp – Champion), Bliss, Andritz (former Sprout –
Matador), Schutte Buffalo, have issued scholar and instructional materials depicting milling
problems. First of all, it is what one wants to mill.

2. The milling material


People mill everything: from ore and stone up to hard disks. The information about straw is
sparse because the main target group for mill producers is livestock feed and flour milling.
But, here and there, straw is mentioned. Straw or grain – there is one important rule: “keep the
moisture low.” Mill producers tend to avoid giving the capacity of their equipment as the
production amount per hour depends on the material being ground. If they do, a disclaimer
always states the maximum humidity. The numbers are in the range from 8 to 13%.

Humidity
Dry straw is brittle, therefore friable and easy to grind. Everything becomes harder as
the moisture increases. From our experience, it is beyond common sense to grind on
our equipment if the moisture content exceeds 30%.

Fiber
The other important influence is fiber in the raw material, the type and content, but
there is nothing we can do about it.

Fat
On the third place is the fat content. We all know very well that soy straw is much
harder to grind than all other crops. It is fibrous, all right, but the prevailing influence
is that of fat, which tends to choke the screen openings.

3. Mill types
Mills do come in various shapes and sizes, but in predominant use are two types: roller mills
and hammer mills.

We use both of them: roller mill is the bale crusher on the “A” line and, of course, our “Kahl”
pellet mills. The basic principle of their operation is to “squeeze” the material between
moving metal parts, of which at least one is rolling.

Hammermills are based on the swinging hammers, rotating in the closed chamber. Between
the material and the escape route from hammers is either some perforated sheet metal
(screens) or still shear plates, which we call: “counter knives”.

Hammermill with shear plates is the Roto Grind bale crusher on the “B” line. Vodnany mills
are hammermills with screens.

Our shear plate hammermill (Roto Grind) is working just fine, so there is more to think about
our screen hammermills. There is one principle and one big difference.

The difference between screen and shear plate hammermill is shown on picture 1.The internal
design of screen hammermills is shown on picture 2.

The “full circle” mill types are also called “U – flow” hammermills, and are developed lately,
but prevail on the market. The reason is simple: most important issue in milling is the finished
particle size, or FPS. It is what everything is all about: how big the material particles have to
be at the end of the milling process. The “full circle” hammermills have the biggest available
screen area for the same milling size.
4. Finished particle size determination

 The screen influence is 70%


Any material that enters the grinding chamber must be reduced to a size small
enough to pass through the screen that covers the mill's discharge opening. Because
of this the screen size generally provides 70% or more of the control over the
finished particle size.

 The force factor ‘s influence is 30%


The remaining 30% is attributed to the force of the impact on the material being
processing. In the case of hammer mills, force is determined by rotor speed, and the
size and number of hammers. Fast rotor speed with small screen and large or large
number of hammers produces fine finished particle size.

5. Open screen area

Two rules of thumb apply to hammermill screens in relation to applied screen area:
1. Never have less than 14 square inches per horsepower (120 cm²/kW) of screen area.
2. Never have less than 4 square inches per horsepower (35 cm²/kW) of “open area”.

Too little screen area makes a hammermill inefficient and cause significant heating of the
material being ground (also, excessive screen wear and damage together with leakage at
screen sealing areas.) When the heat generated exceeds 120ºF to 125ºF (44ºC to 46ºC)
capacity may be decreased as much as 50 percent.

(When designing the screen areas start with 24 of screen area per horsepower. The minimum
is 20 square inches per horsepower. This will allow a range of 6.0 to 7.2 square inches of open
screen area per horsepower.)

Application rpm in²/HP* in²/HP** cm²/kW


Typical range 3000/3600 10 – 16
Grain and easy to grind 3000/3600 12 – 14
Fiber, tough to grind 3000/3600 14 – 16
Typical range 1500/1800 10 – 21 10 – 20 85 – 170
Grain and easy to grind 1500/1800 14 – 16 12 – 16 100 – 140
Fiber, tough to grind 1500/1800 16 – 21 14 – 20 120 – 170

One very simple way of increasing hammermill capacity without significantly affecting the
finished grind or adding expense to the grinding system would be to replace the “up” side
screen with perforations that are 2/64” to 6/64” (0.8 to 2.5 mm) larger than the “down” side
screen. This may add 10 – 15% to the hammermill capacity and produce no noticeable
difference in the finished products.

6. Screen design

First thing to consider when choosing the screen design is the openings. There are two main
types, although much more are available on the market.
The “open screen area” is the true open space, where the sized particles have to pass.

In choosing the screen beside the dimensions of holes, there is their pattern to be chosen, as
well. Bad choice can significantly decrease hammermills capacity. This is called the “hole
stagger.”

This is happening due to the trail of hammers, during the rotation.

Not so obvious is the wear of screens. Wear out screens decrease the capacity significantly.

7. Hammer tip speed (“v”, on the first picture)


The peripheral speed of the hammer tips will have an effect on the particle size. Simply, the
faster the peripheral speed of the hammers, the smaller the particles produced by the impact of
the hammers. One foot per minute is 0.00508 meters in second.

Diameter size in inches (mm) Fpm (m/s) for 1500 rpm


38” (965.2) 17 907 (90.06)
44” (1117.6) 20 735 (105.33)
48” (1143) 22 620 (114.9)
52” (1320.8) 24 504 (124.48)

High tip speed is more that 18000 FPM, 13000 to 18000 FPM is considered intermediate tip
speed and less the 13000 FPM is low tip speed range. Lower tip speeds are best for coarser but
more uniform grind.
General rules for matching tip speed and screen hole size:
 Fine grinding (high fiber) and other tough to grind materials: speed more than 90 m/s
and screens 3mm and smaller
 Coarse but more uniform finished products: speed less than 65 m/s and screens 4 mm
and larger.

8. Number of hammers

The number and arrangement of hammers in the hammermill is called the hammer pattern.
The general rule for the amount of hammers for a given hammermill horsepower is one
horsepower per hammer for 3600 – rpm mills and two horsepower per hammer for 1800 – rpm
mills.

According to rotor diameter (hammer thickness ¼”)


Diameter HP / hammer
> 36” 2.5 – 3.5 (ideally about 3)
22”- 28” 1–2
<= 22” 1.5
28” 2

According to rotation per minute (hammer thickness ¼”)


rpm Hammer dimension HP / hammer
3000/3600 6-8” long x 2” wide 1–2
1500/1800 10” long x 2-1/2” wide 2.5 – 3.5

According to classification heavy is for up to 2 HP / hammer, medium, for 2.5 – 3 HP /


Hammer and light, for over 3 HP / Hammer. The lighter the pattern, fewer hammers are set for
the given horsepower. To produce finer grinds, heavier hammer patterns should be used. For
smaller screens it may be necessary to increase the number of hammers used in the hammer
pattern to prevent rocking of the hammers on the hammer pins.

9. Hammer patterns

The term “hammer pattern” refers to how the hammers are arranged in the grinding chamber.
It is considered very important for the trailing hammer to not “track” with the hammer
preceding it, thus providing for the complete screen coverage. Hammer patterns are staggered
for the maximum impacting efficiency. Hammers should be balanced and arranged on the rods
so that they do not trail one another. Several examples are shown on the next page.

10. Hammer Position


The clearance between the hammer tip and screen has a minor influence on hammermill
performance in most cases. Setting the hammer tip near the screen can be beneficial with
making fine grinds on fibrous or other tough to grind materials like meat and bone meal. For
most grinding applications, a coarse hammer pattern with the hammers further from the screen
will provide the greatest capacity and efficiency.

Coarse position – pins are further from screen, fine position is closer to screen.

Hammer setting (position)


 Coarse 3/8 to 1/2 inch gap from hammer tip to screen (7/16”)
 Fine 3/16 to 1/4 inch gap from hammer tip to screen (7/32”)

Hammers will typically be mounted on four pins only when processing friable materials to a
coarse, uniform finished product. This allows maximum product into the mill with minimum
number of contacts being made.
An example of practical scheme for hammers:

Target particle size


Fine (less than 400 microns)
>44” Rotor Hammermill
1800 RPM (20,000 to 25,000 FPM)
Heavy hammer patter
Small screen to hammer clearance

Medium (400 – 700 microns)


< 38” Rotor Hammermill
1800 RPM (15,000 to 20,000 FPM)
Double or Triple Pair Roller Mill

Coarse (greater than 700 microns)


< 38” Rotor Hammermill
1200 RPM (10,000 to 15,000 RPM)
Double Pair Roller Mill

11. Standard versus Hard-Faced Hammers


The hammer material we use in the production (hardened manganese steel) is the “European
style”, as usually refers to. In the USA they have a different approach: to hard – face the
shearing areas of the hammers.

The difference on the tip clearance due to wearing can be easy seen. Mr. Ejnar Lange, in
Denmark, is doing his own hard – facing, stating that the tip clearance is of the most
importance during the hammermill operation.

Screens have to be regularly replaced: depending on the material being ground and the screen
hole size, one set of high quality hard – faced hammermill will normally wear out 2 – 4 sets of
screen before the hammers require replacement.

The seriousness with which in the USA approach


the hammers hard – facing can be seen on the
illustration, which depicts the common hammer
hard – facing styles.

We have just recently found out that this can be


made, and they already regard it as common.
12. Air – assist systems

Air system design

The air – assist system that helps the grinding process and the air conveying system is one and
the same. This system requires replaceable flat – back elbows. The air – assist system design,
function and installation need to be done accurately in order for the hammermill grinding
system to work properly. In order to make an air assist system work, several items must be
factored, including the air flow into the mill, paths for the air and product out of the mill,
separating the product from the air stream, and controlling the path of the air in the system.

The advantage over gravity feed

In addition to assisting the evacuation of light or low density materials, the pneumatic suction
can increase throughput up to 400% over gravity discharge hammer mills. The design must be
correct. A poorly – designed or installed air system can cost a company up to 50% of the
production design capacity.

The air requirements (volume)

1 CFM (cubic feet per minute) = 28.31 l/min (liters per minute)

Rule of thumb for the amount of air required for a hammermill grinding system is:

o from 1 to 3 CFM per square inch of hammermill screen area or more precisely
o from 1.25 – 1.5 CFM per square inch of hammermill screen area (0.33 to 0.40 m3/h
per cm2)

The air requirements (speed)

The velocity
o the inlet air should normally not exceed 2000 – 2500 Ft/min (10 – 12.5 m/s)
o the outlet air should normally not exceed 250 – 500 Ft/min (1.25 – 2.5 m/s)

To permit the air assist to convey product through the grinding chamber and screen there must
be some place for the air to go when it discharges from the mill. Ideally, the air/product
conveyor will be large enough that even when operating at full capacity, the velocity of the air
will not exceed 2.5 m/sec. If this critical path does not exist there will be a high static pressure
outside the grinding chamber and the desired pressure drop across the screen may not exist.
Larger plenums will reduce the velocity even further and improve the air/fines separation. For
practical purposes, the plenum cannot be too large.

The air requirements (pressure drop)

“Rules of thumb” can lead into trouble if they are used in a general sense. The whole system
must be designed taking into consideration all pressure drops.

Pressure drop across the mill may range from 2 – 5" W.C., depending on system operating
conditions. One mbar (millibar) is 10.2 water column in millimeter or 0.4 water columns in
inches. Therefore 2 – 5" W.C. is 5 – 12.5 mbar.

All of this requires precise engineering, because the velocity in pneumatic pipes for straw
conveying must be between 23 and 25 m/s.
13. Feeding

Three critical criteria for a proper feeding drives are:


 the uniform curtain of product to the hammermill grinding chamber,
 full width top feed the curtain of product to be fed with full – width or near full –
with across the hammermill grinding chamber. (Example: 20” wide hammermill
needs an 18” wide feeder.)
 The feed must be regulated by variable speed device that adjusts the feed to ensure
that there is no more product than the main drive motor can tolerate.

Since most hammermills operate with a fixed rotor speed (tip speed) the only variable in
processing is the feed rate and so automation is really quite simple and straight forward.

14. Characteristics of Vodnany hammermills

We have two types of Vodnany mills in operation: four “small” mills of 110kW, and two
“big” mills of 250kW. Their main operational characteristics are:

Basic characteristics “Big” mill “Small” mill


Mill type industrial industrial
Installed power (kW) 250 110
Installed power (HP) 340 150
Shaft speed (rpm) 1500 1500
Grinding chamber width (mm) 1200 1200
Similar imperial unit width (in.) 48” 48”
Rotor diameter (mm) 1250 1000
Similar imperial diameter (in.) 49” 39”
Screen area (m2) 2.06 1.65
Opening type square square
Opening (mm) 10 x 10 10 x 10
Opening stagger correct correct
Open screen area (%) 44.4 44.4
Open screen area (m2) 0.914 0.733
Tip speed (m/s) 98 78
Tip speed (FPM) 19291 15354
Number of hammers 720 576
Hammer dimensions (mm) 215 x 60 x 3 215 x 60 x 3
Hammer pattern heavy heavy
Hard – faced no no
Tip clearance (mm) 5 30
Applied HP per hammer 0.5 0.2

FPS characteristics
Screen area per power (cm2/kW) 82.4 150
Open area per power (cm2/kW) 36.6 66.6
Power per hammer (HP / hammer) 0.8 0.26

Recommendations
Screen area per power (cm2/kW) 120 120
Open area per power (cm2/kW) 35 35
HP per hammer for 1500 rpm 2.5 – 3.5 2.5 – 3.5
HP / Hammers, for dia. > 36“ 3 3
Tip speed type high intermediate
Openings, matching speed type <= ø3 <= ø3
Fine and fibrous mat., HP/hammer <= 2 <= 2
Hammer clearance for straw (in.) 7/32” 7/32”
Hammer clearance for straw (mm) 5.5 5.5
15. The conclusion

1. Our “big” mills have been developed simply increasing the diameter of the “small”
mill. Therefore they have just 70% of the necessary screen area per unit of applied
power. It means that out of 250kW of installed power we can effectively utilize just
170 kW, the rest is wasted. Anyway, if we follow the rule of 20 kW per ton of straw,
170 kW should suffice for the production of 8 tons per hour.

2. Square type screens do have better utilization compared to round hole screens, that
are commonly used in the industry. The open question is the structural integrity of
this design, as it can be easily damaged by heavier particles of foreign material
entering into the mill.

3. By most criteria, we should have around 3 HP per hammer. We can utilize 170 kW,
that is 230 HP. For that power we should use around 80 hammers. At the moment
we have almost 10 times more than that.

4. These mills are obviously some kind of a prototype. We have big problems during
balancing the rotor, and due to excess vibration one of these mills has loosened up
beyond cheap and easy repair.

5. Eight tons per hour of the nominal capacity is never more than 80% during regular
operation, therefore we can not expect to have more than 6.5 tons per hour.

6. I think it is not feasible to embark on the reconstruction of our “big” mills.

7. In our “small” mills the engine is chosen well for the available screen area.
Therefore, we can expect to get 110 / 20 = 5.5 tons per hour production.

8. For that engine (150Hp) we should have 2.5 to 3.5 Hp per hammer, which means the
total number of hammers should be in the 30 up to 60 pieces range. Again, at the
moment we have 10 times more than that.

9. The same applies for fibrous material, which straw certainly is. For straw, 55 or less
total number of hammers, no more.

10. Hammer clearance on these mills is around six times bigger than it should be. There
is something very wrong with the hammer dimensions, if the clearance is so big.

11. Hammer thickness relies on the rule – to use bigger or bigger number of hammers
for tough to grind materials. This “or” can be misinterpreted. No one is using as thin
hammers for straw as we do. Standard hammer of ¼” is more than twice wider than
our 3mm hammers. Van Aarsen recommends 8 mm hammers. One Dane, Ejnar
Lange, uses the standard ¼” hammer
but the other, Geert Olesen, is
recommending 10 mm wide hammer
for straw, on our mill type. His
statement is obvious when we observe
the hammers width on the mill he put
in Karsko, Poland. This is a Stedman
made mill, with twisted hammers. The
width of these hammers is 5 cm or
more.

12. Normal utilization of the capacity for our “small” mills should be maximum 4.5 tons
per hour, and that is half of what we need. Therefore, we must use two of them.

This concludes the scope of the realistic expectations of the equipment we have currently in
use. What else is on the market today is given at the end of this document.
16. The final note

We have successfully implemented shear plate type hammermill for bale crushing (Roto
Grind), instead using the roller mill type crushing, which is in the predominant use today. It
means that the straw processing technology is not yet totally understood.

Also, everyone is using hammermills with screens, which are the best choice for grain milling.
I couldn’t help but to ask myself is it possible to use shear – plate type hammermill for straw
grinding? These mills are much cheaper (6 – 7 times) than screen type hammermills. They use
less power. They are easy to use. They don’t choke with wet material.

The investigation of this matter is on the way, and we expect answers real soon.

Pavle Cvetković

9
LIST OF HAMMERMILL SUPPLIERS

Amandus Kahl GmbH


Dieselstraße 5, Kahl offers the complete
AMANDUS
1 21465 Reinbek, Germany pelleting process line.
KAHL
W: www.akahl.de AKANA Hammermill

Andritz AG, Andritz (former Sprout –


Stattegger Strasse 18, Matador mills) is an
A- 8045 Graz, Austria, equipment supplier for
2 ANDRITZ
T: +43 316 6902-0 final grinding, pelleting
E: smbiofuel@andritz.com and cooling for the
W: www.andritz.com agricultural by- products.

Bliss Industries Inc.


P.O. Box 910, Ponca City,
Bliss Industries provide a
Oklahoma, U.S.A. 74602
3 BLISS wide range of machinery
T: 580-765-7787
for biomass processing.
E: sales@bliss-industries.com
W: www.bliss-industries.com

Bühler AG Bühler provides the


Novi Sad, Narodnog fronta 73/II complete biomass
4 21000 Novi Sad, Serbia pelleting line capable of
BÜHLER
Phone: +381 21 466 777 processing wood chips,
W:www.buhlergroup.com sawdust, straw and raw
vegetable materials.

CARTER DAY INT.


Complete line of size
500 73rd Ave. N.E.
reduction systems and
Minneapolis, Minnesota , U.S.A.
equipment including
5 CARTER DAY Tel: (763) 571-1000
Granulators, Pulverizers,
E: bulldog@carterday.com
Crushers, Hammermills,
W: www.carterday.com
& Shredders

Cormall A/S
Tornholm 3 Cormall offers the
6400 Sønderborg , Danmark complete pelleting process
6 CORMALL T: +45 7448 6111 line. The technology was
W: www.cormall.dk developed in 1970. Straw
E: info@cormall.dk mill RJA-D 1300/800
California Pellet Mill Co.
1114 E. Wabash Avenue, CPM is the world's
CPM
Crawfordsville, IN U.S.A. leading provider of
7 (ROSKAMP
T: 1-800-428-0846 process equipment and
CHAMPION)
E : sales@cpmroskamp.com automation systems.
W: www.cpmroskamp.com

LA MECCANICA S.r.l
Via Nicolini Padre, 1 La Meccanica provides
LA
8 35013 Cittadella, Italy complete biomass
MECCANICA
T: +39 049 9419000 pelleting lines.
E: lameccanica@lameccanica.it
W: www.lameccanica.it

MÜNCH-Edelstahl GmbH
Weststraβe 26
Münch provides the
40721 Hilden, Germany;
9 MÜNCH complete biomass
T: +49 2103 58996
pelleting line.
E: infor@muench-gmbh.net
W:www.muench-gmbh.com

Pelleting Technology BV
PELLETING Duinweg 18, 5482 VR
In the last 30 years PTN
TECHNOLOGY SCHIJNDEL, NETHERLANDS
10 developed and improved
(PT) T: +31 73 549 84 72;
their mills.
NEDERLAND E: info@ptn.nl
W:www.ptn.nl

Prater Sterling
2 Sammons Court, Bolingbrook,
IL 60440, U.S.A. Prater offers a wide range
PRATER
11 T: 630.759.9595 of equipment for particle
STERLING
E: info@prater-sterling.com size reduction
W: www.prater-sterling.com

PROMILL-STOLZ,
RN 12 28410 SERVILLE, France
Promill Stolz produces the
PROMILL T: +33 (0)2 37 38 91 93
12 full line of biomass
STOLZ E : promill@stolz.fr
pelleting systems.
W: http://promill.fr/en/index.php

Satake Australia Pty. Ltd.


15 Leland Street Penrith Satake Australia
N.S.W. 2750, Australia manufactures high quality,
13 SATAKE
T: 61 (02) 4725 2600 energy efficient hammer
E: info@satake.com.au mills. Mill Type FHMA
W: www.satake.com.au
Schutte-Buffalo Hammermill For more than eighty
61 Depot Street years, Schutte-Buffalo
SCHUTTE Buffalo, NY 14206, U.S.A. Hammermill had been
14
BUFFALO T: (716)855-1555 manufacturing a full line
E: info@hammermills.com of size reduction
W: www.hammermills.com equipment.

Stedman Machine Company


Since 1834 Stedman
129 Franklin Street
Machine Company has
15 STEDMAN Aurora, IN 47001, U.S.A.
been a consistent leader in
T: (800) 262-5401
size reduction technology.
W: www.stedman-machine.com

STOLZ SEQUIPAG SA,


route de Boisjean, 170 WAILLY Since 1952, STOLZ has
STOLZ BEAUCAMP, FRANCE designed, manufactured
16 (DESMET T: +33 (0)3 1 90 05 05 and installed equipment
BALLESTRA) E-mail : contact@stolz.fr providing industrials with
W: www.stolz.fr handling and process.

Van Aarsen b.v.


Heelderweg 11 6097 EW
Pahnell, The Netherlands Provides full biomass
17 VAN AARSEN
T: +31-0475-579444 pelleting lines.
E: info@aarsen.com
W: www.aarsen.com

Wynveen International b.v.


Wynveen offers the
6666 ZG Heteren, Holland
WYNVEEN complete pelleting process
18 T: +31 (0)26 - 47 90 699
line.
E: info@wynveen.com
W: www.wynveen.com

West Salem Machinery


665 Murlark Ave. NW Salem,
WSM’s Hammermills
Oregon, U.S.A.
19 WSM deliver superior
T: 800-722-3530
processing performance.
E: info@westsalem.com
W: www.westsalem.com
LISTS OF HAMMERMILL CHARACTERISTICS

Grinding chamber Screen Filter Fan No Hammer TIP


Data on the product Power (kW) Aspiration Pressure Bars Speed
(mm) area area power hammers dimension SPEED
No. MAKE TYPE MODEL Width Ø MIN STAND MAX dm2 m3/h m2 mm H2O kW - - mm rpm m/min

1 KAHL (DE) HM S/R AKANA 07.05 500 700 55 90 110 71 3000

2 KAHL (DE) HM S/R AKANA 07.08 800 700 90 132 160 110 4800

3 KAHL (DE) HM S/R AKANA 07.10 1000 700 132 160 200 150 6000

4 KAHL (DE) HM S/R AKANA 13.06 600 1250 160 200 250 180 7200

5 KAHL (DE) HM S/R AKANA 13.10 1000 1250 200 250 355 290 10800

6 KAHL (DE) HM S/R AKANA 13.12 1250 1250 250 315 400 360 13200

1 ANDRITZ (AUT) Multimill B 650/450 450 650 45 75 60 3000 3000

2 ANDRITZ (AUT) Multimill B 650/630 630 650 75 110 83 4000 3000

3 ANDRITZ (AUT) Multimill B 650/800 800 650 90 160 106 5000 3000

4 ANDRITZ (AUT) Multimill B 650/1000 1000 650 160 250 133 6300 3000

5 ANDRITZ (AUT) Multimill B 650/1400 1400 650 200 355 186 9000 3000

6 ANDRITZ (AUT) Multimill 01 1001 1000 160 250 136 6300 33 192

7 ANDRITZ (AUT) Optimill 500 500 1100 160 143 3600 20 4 72 1500

8 ANDRITZ (AUT) Optimill 700 700 1100 250 200 5000 24 4 104 1500

9 ANDRITZ (AUT) Optimill 900 900 1100 315 257 6400 33 4 136 1500

10 ANDRITZ (AUT) Optimill 1201 1200 1100 355 346 8800 4 1500

1 SATAKE (AUS) FHMA G5 376 11 28,3 2880 56,7

2 SATAKE (AUS) FHMA G6 527 22 33,6 2880 79,5

3 SATAKE (AUS) FHMA G7 650 37 55 46,5 2880 98,0

4 SATAKE (AUS) FHMA G8 650 37 90 53 2880 98,0

5 SATAKE (AUS) FHMA G18 1304 110 180 170 1440 98,3

6 SATAKE (AUS) FHMA G24 1304 150 220 213,5 1440 98,3

1 PROMILL STOLZ (FR) BNA 50 500 1384 315 150 11000 32-128

2 PROMILL STOLZ (FR) BNA 100 1000 1384 500 350 22000 64-128-256

3 PROMILL STOLZ (FR) BNA 150 1500 1384 630 400 34000 96-192-384

4 PROMILL STOLZ (FR) BNA 200 2000 1384 900 600 45000 128-256-512

1 PTN (NL) 670 - 760 670 760 110 160 6-8 1500/3000

2 PTN (NL) 670 - 1150 670 1150 160 250 6-8 1500/3000

3 PTN (NL) 670 - 1550 670 1550 250 315 6-8 1500/3000

4 PTN (NL) 1200 - 750 1200 750 132 200 6-8 1500/3000

5 PTN (NL) 1200 - 1000 1200 1000 160 250 6-8 1500/3000

6 PTN (NL) 1200 - 1250 1200 1250 250 355 6-8 1500/3000
Grinding chamber Screen Filter Fan No Hammer TIP
Data on the product Power (kW) Aspiration Pressure Bars Speed
(mm) area area power hammers dimension SPEED
No. MAKE TYPE MODEL Width Ø MIN STAND MAX dm2 m3/h m2 mm H2O kW - - mm rpm m/min

1 STOLZ (FR) RM 14 45 75 70 52

2 STOLZ (FR) RM 16 75 110 100 72

3 STOLZ (FR) RM 18 90 132 125 92

4 STOLZ (FR) RMP 110 110 160 150 112

5 STOLZ (FR) RMP 114 180 250 200 152

6 STOLZ (FR) RMP 116 200 355 220 168

7 STOLZ (FR) RMA 16 75 110 85 72

8 STOLZ (FR) RMA 18 90 132 110 92

9 STOLZ (FR) RMA 110 110 160 135 112

10 STOLZ (FR) RMA 114 180 200 195 152

11 STOLZ (FR) RME 12 45 40 28

12 STOLZ (FR) RME 14 55 70 40

13 STOLZ (FR) RME 17 110 110 56

1 LA MECCANICA (IT) 4P-LG MM270 1060 200 178 12000 118 120 120 70x6x242 1500 105

2 LA MECCANICA (IT) 4P-LG MM340 1060 250 236 15600 153 120 160 70x6x242 1500 105

3 LA MECCANICA (IT) 4P-LG MM540 1060 400 293 19500 191 120 200 70x6x242 1500 105

4 LA MECCANICA (IT) 4P-LG MM760 1060 560 466 31020 304 120 320 70x6x242 1500 105

1 VAN AARSEN (NL) GD 700 700 1250 132 200 257 3600-5400 7.5 - 11 8 120 220*/240**x 60x8

2 VAN AARSEN (NL) GD 1400 1400 1250 200 405 514 5400-10800 11 - 22 8 240 220*/240**x60x8

* Normal grinding, ≥ Ø 2 mm

** Fine grinding, < Ø 2 mm


WIDTH POWER SCREEN (sq. TIP SPEED
No MAKE TYPE MODEL Ø (In.) AIR (CFM) RPM
(In.) (HP) In.) (ft/min)

1 WSM (USA) 42 4236S 36 42 150-200


2 WSM (USA) 42 4254S 54 42 200-300
3 WSM (USA) 42 4260S 60 42 250-350
4 WSM (USA) 42 4272S 72 42 400-500
5 WSM (USA) 42 4284S 84 42 400-500
6 WSM (USA) 44 4430S 30 44 125-200
7 WSM (USA) 44 4440S 40 44 250-300
8 WSM (USA) 44 4460S 60 44 400-500
9 WSM (USA) 48 4864S 60 48 400-500
10 WSM (USA) 48 4872S 74 48 500-600
11 WSM (USA) 48 4888S 88 48 500-600
1 PRATER STERLING (USA) MM-5 10-30 750 450 1800/3600
2 PRATER STERLING (USA) MM-9 40-60 1200 900 1800/3600
3 PRATER STERLING (USA) MM-18 75-125 1800 1850 1800/3600
4 PRATER STERLING (USA) MM-36 150-300 3000 3650 1800/3600
5 PRATER STERLING (USA) G5 5-15 440 1800/3600
6 PRATER STERLING (USA) G6 15-30 540 1800/3600
7 PRATER STERLING (USA) G7 40-60 790 1800/3600
8 PRATER STERLING (USA) G8 75-125 860 1800/3600
9 PRATER STERLING (USA) G25 125-300 2700 1800/3600
1 STEDMAN (USA) 15 x 12 30 3600
2 STEDMAN (USA) 20 x 12 50 3600
3 STEDMAN (USA) 20 x 18 75 3600
4 STEDMAN (USA) 24 x 20 100 2400
5 STEDMAN (USA) 30 x 24 125 1800
6 STEDMAN (USA) 30 x 30 150 1800
7 STEDMAN (USA) 36 x 36 200 1200
8 STEDMAN (USA) 42 x 60 250 900
WIDTH POWER SCREEN (sq. TIP SPEED
No MAKE TYPE MODEL Ø (In.) AIR (CFM) RPM
(In.) (HP) In.) (ft/min)

1 CPM (USA) 11.5x38 1242 11,5 38 60-100 1553 - 1863 1800/1500 17898/14915
2 CPM (USA) 15x38 1620 15 38 75-125 2025 - 2430 1800/1500 17898/14915
3 CPM (USA) 20x38 2160 20 38 100-150 2700 - 3240 1800/1500 17898/14915
4 CPM (USA) 30x38 3240 30 38 150-200 4050 - 4860 1800/1500 17898/14915
5 CPM (USA) 40x38 4320 40 38 200-300 5400 - 6480 1800/1500 17898/14915
6 CPM (USA) 48x38 5148 48 38 300-350 6480 - 7722 1800/1500 17898/14915
7 CPM (USA) 11.5x44 1380 11,5 44 60-100 1725 - 2588 1800/1500 20730/17275
8 CPM (USA) 15x44 1800 15 44 100-150 2250 - 2700 1800/1500 20730/17275
9 CPM (USA) 20x44 2400 20 44 125-200 3000 - 3600 1800/1500 20730/17275
10 CPM (USA) 30x44 3600 30 44 200-300 4500 - 5400 1800/1500 20730/17275
11 CPM (USA) 40x44 4800 40 44 250-350 6000 - 7200 1800/1500 20730/17275
12 CPM (USA) 48x44 5,76 48 44 300-450 7200 - 8640 1800/1500 20730/17275
13 CPM (USA) 15x54 2,22 15 54 100-200 2775 - 3330 1500 21201
14 CPM (USA) 20x54 2,96 20 54 150-250 3700 - 4440 1500 21201
15 CPM (USA) 30x54 4,44 30 54 200-300 5550 - 6660 1500 21201
16 CPM (USA) 40x54 5,92 40 54 300-450 7400 - 8880 1500 21201
1 CARTER DAY (USA) P 160 5-10 450 360
2 CARTER DAY (USA) P 195 10-30 600 425
3 CARTER DAY (USA) P 241 40-75 1100 808
4 CARTER DAY (USA) XLT 24313 25-75 1200 954
5 CARTER DAY (USA) XLT 24320 75-125 1800 1422
6 CARTER DAY (USA) XLT 24326 100-200 2400 1854
7 CARTER DAY (USA) MZH 4216 75-100 2000 1270
8 CARTER DAY (USA) MZH 4222 100-150 2900 1795
9 CARTER DAY (USA) MZH 4232 150-200 4100 2583
10 CARTER DAY (USA) MZH 4241 250-300 5400 3370
11 CARTER DAY (USA) MZH 4250 300-400 6700 4158
WIDTH POWER SCREEN (sq. TIP SPEED
No MAKE TYPE MODEL Ø (In.) AIR (CFM) RPM
(In.) (HP) In.) (ft/min)

1 SCHUTTE BUFFALO (USA) 13 1320 12 1/2" 24" 2800 475 3600 22600
2 SCHUTTE BUFFALO (USA) 13 1340 17 1/2" 24" 3200 665 3600 22600
3 SCHUTTE BUFFALO (USA) 13 1360 20" 24" 4000 760 3600 22600
4 SCHUTTE BUFFALO (USA) 13 1380 24" 24" 5000 912 3600 22600
5 SCHUTTE BUFFALO (USA) 13 1390 36" 24" 1368 3600 22600
6 SCHUTTE BUFFALO (USA) 13 13100 48" 24" 1824 3600 22600
7 SCHUTTE BUFFALO (USA) 24 U flow 24-10 10" 24" 25-40 600 3600 22600
8 SCHUTTE BUFFALO (USA) 24 U flow 24-15 15" 24" 50-60 900 3600 22600
9 SCHUTTE BUFFALO (USA) 24 U flow 24-20 20" 24" 75-100 1200 3600 22600
10 SCHUTTE BUFFALO (USA) 24 U flow 24-24 24" 24" 100-150 1440 3600 22600
11 SCHUTTE BUFFALO (USA) 44 U flow 44-13 12 1/2" 44" 75-100 1200 1800 20700
12 SCHUTTE BUFFALO (USA) 44 U flow 44-17 17 1/2" 44" 100-125 1680 1800 20700
13 SCHUTTE BUFFALO (USA) 44 U flow 44-24 24" 44" 125-150 2304 1800 20700
14 SCHUTTE BUFFALO (USA) 44 U flow 44-30 30" 44" 200-300 2880 1800 20700
15 SCHUTTE BUFFALO (USA) 44 U flow 44-48 48" 44" 350-400 4608 1800 20700
16 SCHUTTE BUFFALO (USA) 44 U flow 44-60 60" 44" 400-500 5200 1800 20700
1 BLISS (USA) Eliminator 19" 5 - 100 312 - 1152 3600 17907
2 BLISS (USA) Eliminator 22" 15 - 150 513 - 1620 3600 20735
3 BLISS (USA) Eliminator 26" 15 - 150 608 - 1920 1800 12252
4 BLISS (USA) Eliminator 38" 25 - 500 950 - 6000 1800 17907
5 BLISS (USA) Eliminator 44" 40 - 600 1140 - 7200 1800 20735
6 BLISS (USA) Eliminator 52" 60 - 600 1656 - 6912 1200 16336
7 BLISS (USA) Eliminator 19" 10 - 50 576 3600 17907
8 BLISS (USA) Eliminator 22" 15 - 150 513 - 1620 3000/3600 17279/20735
9 BLISS (USA) Eliminator 38" 25 - 500 950 - 6000 1800 17907
10 BLISS (USA) Eliminator 44" 40 - 600 1140 - 7200 1500-1800 17279/20735
11 BLISS (USA) Eliminator 52" 60 - 600 1656 - 6912 1500 20420
WIDTH POWER SCREEN (sq. TIP SPEED
No MAKE TYPE MODEL Ø (In.) AIR (CFM) RPM
(In.) (HP) In.) (ft/min)

12 BLISS (USA) EMF 24115 11,50 24 40-60 3600


13 BLISS (USA) EMF 2415 15 24 60-75 3600
14 BLISS (USA) EMF 2420 20 24 75-100 3600
15 BLISS (USA) EMF 2430 30 24 125-150 3600
16 BLISS (USA) EMF 2440 40 24 150-200 3600
17 BLISS (USA) EMF 4815 15 48 125-150 1800
18 BLISS (USA) EMF 4820 20 48 150-200 1800
19 BLISS (USA) EMF 4824 24 48 200-250 1800
20 BLISS (USA) EMF 4830 30 48 250-300 1800
21 BLISS (USA) EMF 4840 40 48 300-400 1800
22 BLISS (USA) EMF 4848 48 48 400-500 1800

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