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The Initials of European

Philosophy
Joannes Richter

Abstract
This essay analyses the symbolism of the vowels “α, ι, ω” in the archaic Hellenic languages and the
various cities “Thebes”, representing their role as the most successful metropolises in the Bronze
Age.
The vowels “α, ι, ω” respectively “y, e, u” may play a role in the symbolism of the PIE-sky-gods
*Dyeus, the corresponding personal pronouns ἰώ (iṓ), ἱών (hiṓn) of the first person and the names
of leading tribes such as the Ionians.
One of these successful archaic metropolises seems to be Plato's legendary “Atlantis”, which may
be identified as the Kopais drainage project for the Boeotian metropolis Thebes (and Orchomenus).
Introduction
This essay integrates the symbolism of 3 vowels “ἰ, ά and ώ” and the triad of cities “Thebe(s)”,
representing their role as the most successful metropolis in the corresponding continents Africa,
Asia and Europe.
The vowels “ἰ, ά, ώ” respectively “y, e, u” may play a role in the symbolism of the PIE-sky-gods
*Dyeus, the corresponding personal pronouns of the first person and the names of some leading
tribes such as the Ionians.
In archaic eras the leading tribes may be identified as the wealthiest people, which managed to
successfully optimize their society. One of these archaic metropolises seems to be Plato's legendary
“Atlantis”, which may be identified as the Boeotian metropolis.

The 3 vowels “ἰ, ά and ώ”


The vowel core “io” in Διός and δῖος is equivalent to “iu” in Ju-piter and “eu” in Ζεύς. These
vowels may also refer to the personal pronouns of the single form ἰώ (iṓ), ἱών (hiṓn) and the dual
form (νώ, respectively the epic version νῶϊ), respectively noi, nui, noi, and nois.
The letters “ἰ and ώ” in the Boeotian ego-pronoun “ἰώ” and ι respectively ό in Διός may have been
included in the name Ionians (Greek: Ἴωνες, Íōnes). The Ionians (Greek: Ἴωνες, Íōnes, singular
Ἴων, Íōn) may have been named ἰώ (“I”)-sayers, which also is practiced in today's naming of the
Jauers (the Romansh / Grison people who use the personal pronoun “iau” as an ego-pronoun).
Usually the corresponding divine name is generated by adding a leading consonant “D” to the ego-
pronouns, for example “D” & “iéu” (Provencal) → Diéu. An equivalent formula may be applied in
Boeotian dialect: “Δ” & “ἰώ” & “ς” → ~ Διός.
The name Ionians first appears in Greek literature in Homer as Ἰάονες, iāones,1 used on a single
occasion of some long-robed Greeks attacked by Hector and apparently identified with Athenians,
and this Homeric form appears to be identical with the Mycenaean form but without the digamma
*-w-. This name also appears in a fragment of the other early poet, Hesiod, in the singular Ἰάων,
iāōn.[6]2
Therefore the vowels “ἰ, ά and ώ” may be interpreted as the Initials of European Philosophy.

The 3 cities “Thebe(s)”


The three cities “Thebe(s)” in Greece (Europe), Asia minor and Egypt (Africa) relied on fertile
plains.
The Boeotian plain had been drained and irrigated in a sophisticated, elaborate drainage system
with huge canals, cyclopean dykes and fortifications, which may have been destroyed around 1400
BC. The drainage tunnel, its creation and its destruction may have been described as an elaborate
key-element in the legendary metropolis “Atlantis” in Plato's dialogue Critias.
At an early stage of history the cities named “Thebes” may have described the centers of wisdom
and technology.
Thebe's name “*Tʰēgʷais” → Θήβαις (Thēbais) may refer to a philosophical core as a reference to
the elaborate drainage system with huge canals, cyclopean dykes and fortifications in the legendary
metropolis “Atlantis” in Plato's dialogue Critias. Thebe's vowels “tʰē(gʷ)ā” may be equivalent to
Θή(β)α.
1 Ventris, Michael; John Chadwick (1973). Documents in Mycenaean Greek: Second Edition. Cambridge University
Press. pp. 547 in the "Glossary" under i-ja-wo-ne. ISBN 0-521-08558-6., (source: Wikipedia's Ionians-Mycenaean)
2 Homer. Iliad, Book XIII, Line 685. (source: Wikipedia's Ionians-Mycenaean)
The philosophical core of Hellas
Hellas always had been scarcely populated mountainous region with various dialects. Of all
Hellenic dialects the Boeotian3 dialect seemed to have conserved most philosophical keywords.
Although the label Boeotian had been used as a marker for old-fashioned characters such as stupid
and foolish the city of Thebes was known as the source for the Greek alphabet and the sophisticated
drainage system for the Boeotian plain. The Greeks attributed the foundation of Thebes to Cadmus,
a Phoenician king from Tyre (now in Lebanon) and the brother of Queen Europa. Cadmus was
famous for teaching the Phoenician alphabet and building the Acropolis, which was named the
Cadmeia in his honor and was an intellectual, spiritual, and cultural center.

The Creation Legend


In order to derive the philosophical core we may combine two ancient legends which had been
preserved by Plato: (1) the creation legend in Symposium, which describes the creation of a dual
mankind and (2) the legendary description of Atlantis, which describes the sophisticated drainage
system of the Boeotian plain.

The androgynous dual concept for a creation legend


The androgynous dual concept for the first man (“Adam”) may be responsible for the usage for the
dual form νώ, νῶϊ (“we two”), which later became obsolete in most European languages4.
The dual form (νώ, respectively the epic version νῶϊ) for the personal pronoun of the 1st person in
ancient Greek language seems to correlate with the singular form ἰώ (iṓ), ἱών (hiṓn)5 of the
Boeotian dialect. Also Boeotian spells Δεύς (Deus) instead of Zeus. Attested also in Laconian and
Rhodian. δῖος is god-like, divine, whereas Ζεύς (the obl. cases formed from *di/s, gen. Διός; dat.
Διΐ, Δί [ι_], acc Δία) is interpreted in Lat. as Ju-piter.
The ancient dual form νῶϊ (“nooi”, “we two”) may also have caused a special version of the plural
form (nosotros, nosaltres, nosautres, etc...), which may be interpreted as “we others” in contrast to
“we two”6. The “we others”-structure is found in may European Romance languages (such as
Spanish, French, Italian, Dalmatian), but is absent in Germanic languages.

The vowel core “io”, “iu” or “eu”


The vowel core “io” in Διός and δῖος is equivalent to “iu” in Ju-piter and “eu” in Ζεύς. These
vowels may also refer to the personal pronouns of the single form ἰώ (iṓ), ἱών (hiṓn) and the dual
form (νώ, respectively the epic version νῶϊ), respectively noi, nui, noi, and nois (the plural form
“we” in respectively Aromanian, Istriot (Croatia), Romanian and Sardinian.
Maybe the vowels “i” and “o”, resp. “u” may have been chosen to represent a male half (“i”)
respectively a female half (“o” or “u”).

3 from Ancient Greek Βοιωτία (Boiōtía).


4 The etymology of the Greek dual form νώ (νῶϊ)
5 In Boeotian dialect the singular form for the personal pronoun 1st person is: ἰώ (iṓ), ἱών (hiṓn) – (English: “I”,
emphatic: ἰώνγα (iṓnga), ἰώνει (iṓnei), ἰώγα (iṓga)),
ἰώ iō and hiōn (Attic ἐγώ egō, I) (hiōnga iōga for egōge) (from Wikipedia: Boeotian )
6 Notes to the usage of Nos and Vos, Nosotros and Vosotros
The triphthongs Ἰάο, iau, iéu, jau, jeu, jou, eau, iau
The name Ionians first appears in Greek literature in Homer as Ἰάονες, iāones,7 used on a single
occasion of some long-robed Greeks attacked by Hector and apparently identified with Athenians,
and this Homeric form appears to be identical with the Mycenaean form *Iāwones, but without the
Digamma *-w-. This name also appears in a fragment of the other early poet, Hesiod, in the singular
Ἰάων, iāōn.[6]8
Often the vowel core represents a triphthongs such as iau, iéu, jau, jeu, jou, eau, iau, which often are
reduce to ia, io, iu, eu, je, jo, ju respectively singular vowels such as I.
Originally all these vowels were interpreted as long, isolated vowels, but often some of the vowels
may have been joined to a diphthong.

7 Ventris, Michael; John Chadwick (1973). Documents in Mycenaean Greek: Second Edition. Cambridge University
Press. pp. 547 in the "Glossary" under i-ja-wo-ne. ISBN 0-521-08558-6., (source: Wikipedia's Ionians-Mycenaean)
8 Homer. Iliad, Book XIII, Line 685. (source: Wikipedia's Ionians-Mycenaean)
The personal pronouns and the divine names

Dialects of the Swiss canton Grison


The greatest number of varieties jau, jeu, jou, ia, eau, eu which represent the singular form for the
ego-pronouns in are found as the personal pronouns for the dialects (Jauer or Rumantsch Grischun,
Sursilvan, Sutsilvan , Surmiran, Puter, respectively Vallader) in the Swiss canton Grison.

The formula for divine names


Usually the corresponding divine name is generated by adding a leading consonant “D” to the ego-
pronouns such as:
• Dio = “D” & “io” (Italian)
• Diéu = “D” & “iéu” (Provencal)
• Dïou = “D” & “Yiou” (Nîmes)9
• Deu = “D” & “eu” (Portuguese)
• Tyr = “T” & “y” & “r” (English)
• Ziu = “D” & “i(h)” (southern Germany)
Instead of an initial letter “D” we may also expect a “T”, “Th”, “Z” o r “S”, etc.
In Boeotian dialect we may correlate the singular form ἰώ (iṓ), ἱών (hiṓn)10 of the personal pronouns
of the first person and compose
• Διός = “Δ” & “ιό” & “ς” (ancient Greek)
• Διός ~ “Δ” & “ἰώ” & “ς” (Boeotian dialect)
• Διόνς ~ “Δ” & “ἱών” & “ς” (Boeotian dialect)

IO as a name
I asked Nathasja – a native Greek citizen - for the root of the name Ionic and she answered me
without any hesitation: IO, who in Greek mythology is known as one of the mortal lovers of Zeus.
Io (/ˈaɪ.oʊ/; Ancient Greek: Ἰώ [iːɔɔː] was, in Greek mythology, one of the mortal lovers of
Zeus. According to some stories, Zeus then turned Io into a heifer in order to hide her from
his wife;[5] others maintain that Hera herself transformed Io.[17][18]

The formula for the divine names in Germanic languages


A formula such as [Dio = “D” & “io” (Italian)] does not work for Germanic languages. Instead of
the singular form for the personal pronouns of the first person we may now correlate between a
divine name and the dual form of the ego-pronouns, which in Germanic languages may be shaped
as “wit”, “wut”, “wat” or “wet” (“we two”).
The correlation may be identified as (backward reading mode) “Tiw” o-o “wit” or (forward reading
mode) “Wut(an)” o-o “wut”.

9 “Yiou” & “Dïou” in the dialect of Nimes


10 In Boeotian dialect the singular form for the personal pronoun 1st person is: ἰώ (iṓ), ἱών (hiṓn) – (English: “I”,
emphatic: ἰώνγα (iṓnga), ἰώνει (iṓnei), ἰώγα (iṓga)),
ἰώ iō and hiōn (Attic ἐγώ egō, I) (hiōnga iōga for egōge) (from Wikipedia: Boeotian )
If the first symbol ᚠ may be interpreted as a digamma (Ϝ) (varying between /w/, /f/, /v/, etc.) these
words (“Tiw”/”Tuw”, “Wit”/”Wut”) may be identified inside the 3 initial runes ᚠᚢᚦ of the ᚠᚢᚦᚩᚱᚳ
(Ϝuthark/Ϝuthorc) alphabet11.

The dual form of the ego-pronouns in Mediterranean languages


Apart from the Greek dialects the Mediterranean European languages do not carry a dual form like
“wit”. In ancient Greek language the dual form (νώ, respectively the epic version νῶϊ) for the
personal pronoun of the 1st person does not really resemble to “wit”.
Instead the dual form (νώ, respectively the epic version νῶϊ for “we two”) correlates to Νόος (mind)
and νοῦς (Nous) (in English: “wit”, “knowledge”).
The νώ / νῶϊ (nō / nōi) -concepts seem to be the elder roots, cognate to Νοέω (to understand), Νόος
(mind) and νοῦς (Nous), to be followed by Latin-based Nos (“we”), nosco (“to know”) and
resulting in the Germanic concepts Wit (“we two”), wit (knowledge) and Tiw (God).

A singular form of the ego-pronouns in the name Θήβαις (Thēbais)


In Linear B the name of Thebes is te-qa-i,[n 1] understood to be read as *Tʰēgʷaii s (Ancient Greek:
Θήβαις, Thēbais, i.e. "at Thebes". The nominative name (*Tʰēgʷai) follows the rule of a Daylight-
Sky-God (*Tʰeiʷas”) as a concatenation of “Tʰ” and “ēgʷa”, which is very close to “ego”. The
corresponding PIE-root of the Daylight-Sky-God is *Dyḗws, but this name does not include a “g”.

11 From: A Short Essay About the Evolution of European Personal Pronouns


Overview of the formulas
The formulas for a few samples of Mediterranean languages and two Germanic languages may be
synthesized in one table as follows:
Divine Name Formula “D” & ego-pronoun (& “s”) Language / Dialect
Dio ~ “D” & “io” Italian
Diéu ~ “D” & “iéu” Provencal
Dïou ~ “D” & “Yiou” Nîmes12
Deu ~ “D” & “eu” Portuguese
Διός ~ “Δ” & “ιό” & “ς” ancient Greek
Διός ~ “Δ” & “ἰώ” & “ς” Boeotian dialect
“*Tʰēgʷais” → “*Tʰ” + “ēgʷa” + “s” Linear B
Θήβαις (Thēbais)

Tyr ~ “T” & “y” & “r” English


Ziu ~ “D” & “i(h)” southern German dialect
Table 1. Formulas for a number of Mediterranean languages and two Germanic languages
The formulas for the Germanic languages may be synthesized in one table as follows:
Initial Runes Divine name Personal-pronoun knowledge
of the ᚠᚢᚦᚩᚱᚳ “we two”
Language English English Greek English Greek
ᚠᚢᚦ “Wut(an)” wit νώ / νῶϊ (nō / nōi) wit νοῦς (Nous)
ᚦᚢᚠ “Tiw”
Table 2. Dual forms “we two” correlating to “knowledge” and the sky-gods Wutan and Tiw

12 “Yiou” & “Dïou” in the dialect of Nimes


The Ionian language as the dialect of ἸΏ-sayers (“I”-sayers)
The Boeotian dialect uses a singular form for the personal pronoun of the first person ἰώ / ἱών (“I”),
which obviously correlates to the Ionian dialect of the Ionian population.
The Ionians (Greek: Ἴωνες, Íōnes, singular Ἴων, Íōn) may have been named ἰώ (“I”)-sayers, which
also is practiced in today's naming of the Jauers (the Romansh / Grison people who use the personal
pronoun “iau” as an ego-pronoun)13.
In the time frame 1800 → 900 BCE the Ionians settled the Anatolian coastline between the ancient
cities of Smyrna (now Izmir in Turkey) and Halicarnassus (now Bodrum in Turkey). This
emigration may have developed gradually from 1800 BC up to 900 BC.
The catastrophic deluge of Lake Copais around 1100 BC may have contributed to these emigration
waves. Of course the deluges may have occurred repeatedly. The drainage of Lake Copais may have
been destroyed repeatedly by invasions, wars and/or earthquakes, which ravaged the dykes and
disrupted the water reservoirs.
The drainage-system at Lake Copais is documented in Notes to Frazer's "Pausanias's Description of
Greece".

1. Map of the Ionian emigration which may have been intensified after the deluge of Lake Copais
around 1400 BCE
(documented in Google maps “Atlantis in Lake Kopais”)

13 The name of the dialect is derived from a nickname based on the personal pronoun jau [ˈjaw] 'I', and can be
translated as 'the jau-sayers',[3] as this contrasts with Vallader eu, pronounced [ˈɛː], [ˈɛw], [ˈjɛ], [ˈjɐ], or [ˈjow] in the
Lower Engadine.
The etymological problem of a long vowel ώ (ṓ) in ION-related words
in Greek the first person dual personal pronoun νώ and νῶϊ (nṓ, respectively nṓi, “we two”) is
spelled with a long vowel ώ (ṓ).
Obviously the long vowels are preferred for sacred topics, which according to my studies is also
valid for the first person personal pronouns in singular ἰώ (iṓ) and ἱών (hiṓn) in Boeotian dialect.
Also in Attic dialect the first person personal pronouns in singular ἐγώ (egō, I) spelled with a long
vowel ώ (ṓ). Most of the names with a pattern “Io*”, such as: Ἰωνία / Ἰωνίη, Ἰώ, Ἰώ, Ἰοῦς, but for
the names at the west-side of Greece the short “o” is used, e.g. in: Ἰόνιος.
In Ancient Greek the adjective Ionios (Ἰόνιος) was used as an epithet for the sea between
Epirus and Italy in which the Ionian Islands are found because Io swam across it.[2]14
This argument seems rather unreliable as the Greek spelling Ἰώ is based on a long vowel ώ (ṓ).
Although they have the same Latin transliteration and Modern Greek pronunciation, the
Ionian Sea and Islands do not seem to be related to Ionia, an Anatolian region;
In Greek, the Ionian Sea and Ionian Islands are spelled with an omicron (Ιόνια), whereas
Ionia has an omega (Ἰωνία), reflecting a classical difference in pronunciation.
The two words are still distinguished by stress: the western "Ionia" is accented on the
antepenult (IPA: [iˈonia]), and the eastern on the penult (IPA: [ioˈnia]). In English, the
adjective relating to Ionia is Ionic, not Ionian.[citation needed]15.

@ English name Greek spelling Description Adjective


ω Ionia Ἰωνία / Ἰωνίη An Anatolian region; the ancient Ionic
(→ Iōnía) (ca 1100 BC) region including
western Asia Minor
ω Ionians (→ Ἴωνες, Íōnes, One of the four main ἰωνικός (iōnikós,
Íōnes), Ion singular Ἴων, Íōn) Hellenic tribes. “related to Ionians”).
Ionians, who sailed to the west
ω iṓ, ἰώ (iṓ), Boeotian singular pronoun (“I”) of
hiṓn ἱών (hiṓn) the first person
ω Noo, νώ, νῶϊ Greek dual form pronoun (“we 2”)
Nooi of the first person
ω Javan / Iáwōn *Ἰάϝων "Iáwōn" Ancestor of the Greek people

ω Io Ἰώ One of the mortal lovers of Zeus


ω Io, Ios Ἰώ, Ἰοῦς Name of the Moon in Argos

o Ionian Sea and Ἰόνιος related to Io Ionian Sea and Ionian (Ἰόνιος,
Ionian Islands Ionian Islands related to “Io”, “Ἰώ”)
Table - The etymological problem of a long vowel ώ (ṓ) in Ionian (Ἰόνιος)

14 LSJ, A Greek-English Lexicon s.v. Ἰόνιος.


15 Etymology (Ionian Islands)
The Mycenaean Era
Apart from Crete in archaic Hellas the most important Mycenaean cities were Mycenae (in
Argolis) and Thebes (in Boeotia), which both relied on a fertile plain. The Boeotian plain
arranged around Lake Copais had been drained and irrigated in a sophisticated, elaborate
drainage system with huge canals, dykes and fortifications, which have been destroyed
around 1100 BC. This deluge may have been documented by Plato in the legend of Atlantis.

Mycenae (in Argolis)


The period of Greek history from about 1600 BC to about 1100 BC is called Mycenaean in
reference to Mycenae. At its peak in 1350 BC, the citadel and lower town had a population of
30,000 and an area of 32 hectares.[3] Situated in the north-east corner of the Argive plain, it easily
overlooked the whole area and was ideally positioned to be a centre of power, especially as it
commanded all easy routes to the Isthmus of Corinth. Besides its strong defensive and strategic
position, it had good farmland and an adequate water supply16.
By 1200 BC, the power of Mycenae was declining; finally, during the 12th century BC, Mycenaean
dominance collapsed entirely. The eventual destruction of Mycenae formed part of the general
Bronze Age collapse in the Greek mainland and beyond. Within a short time around 1200 BC, all
the palace complexes of southern Greece were burned, including that at Mycenae.

Thebes (in Boeotia)


Both Mycenaean cities Mycenae (in Argolis) and Thebes (in Boeotia) relied on fertile plains.
The Boeotian plain had been drained and irrigated in a sophisticated, elaborate drainage system
with huge canals, cyclopean dykes and fortifications, which may have been destroyed around 1100
BC. One of the (regular ?) deluges may have been described by Plato in the legend of Atlantis,
which is included in the dialogues Timaeus and Critias17.

According to Homer's "Catalogue of Ships" (in the Iliad) the Boeotians formed the leading pack at
the first position with 6 captains 18 in the Trojan war, which may have occurred a few centuries or
even decades after an inundation of Lake Copais respectively the deluge of “Atlantis”.
North of the Ionian settlement the Cilician Thebe (Asia Minor) may be found in the map. Around
the Late Bronze Age collapse19 and the Trojan War (~1200 BC20) Cilician Thebe had been destroyed
by Achilles.
In 335BC Boeotian Thebes has been destroyed by Alexander the Great21. However Alexander also
ordered a hydraulic engineer named Crates of Chalcis to improve and clean up the drainage system
of Lake Copais22.

16 Source: (Wikipedia) Mycenae


17 "Lost Atlantis Found Again?" - Robert L. Scranton (1949) Source: JSTOR - 41662314.
18 First led by Thersander, then by: Peneleōs, Leïtus, Arcesilaus, Prothoënor and Clonius
19 The half-century between c. 1200 and 1150 BC
20 Those who believe that the stories of the Trojan War are derived from a specific historical conflict usually date it to
the 12th or 11th century BC, often preferring the dates given by Eratosthenes, 1194–1184 BC, which roughly
corresponds with archaeological evidence of a catastrophic burning of Troy VII,[4] and the Late Bronze Age
collapse.
21 Destruction by Alexander in 335 BC
22 The central channel may have been created or repaired by a hydraulic engineer named Crates of Chalcis in the time
of Alexander the Great
The three Thebes
The following three Thebes are mapped in “Atlantis in Lake Kopais”:
• Thebe Hypoplakia resp. Cilician Thebe (Asia Minor)
• Thebes, in Greece (Europe), inhabited from 2800 BC
• Thebes, in Egypt (Afrika), inhabited from 3200 BC; Theban rulers: 2160 BC-663 BC
Obviously each of the continents Africa, Asia and Europe generated its own Thebes-metropolis.
In Thebes (Egypt) and in the Hellenic Thebes the regularity of the annual, domesticated flood had
been welcomed. The fertility of the Thebe Hypoplakia is well documented, but the drainage and
irrigation system is unknown.
According to Wikipedia's List of mythological figures named Thebe all names Thebe represent
female characters, which indicates a very old goddess as a matriarch, who had been subordinated to
a dominant patriarchal sky-god such as Zeus.
Thebe (Ancient Greek: Θήβη) is a feminine name mentioned several times in Greek
mythology, in accounts that imply multiple female characters, four of whom are said to have
had three cities named Thebes after them. These cities are Boeotian Thebes, Thebes, Egypt
and Hypoplacian Thebes. Most may have been related to Zeus as a consort or daughter23.
The three cities “Thebe(s)” relied on fertile plains:
• Thebes, in Egypt was the main city of the fourth Upper Egyptian nome (Sceptre nome) and
was the capital of Egypt for long periods during the Middle Kingdom and New Kingdom
eras.
• The Kopais basin (ca. 20,000 ha) has been turned into the most fertile plain on mainland
Greece24. The drainage canal has been documented in Appendix 1 - The drainage-tunnel's
position at Lake Copais.
• Strabo, Herodotus,[7] Xenophon,[8] Polybius,[9] and Livy.[10] highlight the fertility and
richness of this plain25.
These three names seem to form a triad, which is related to a strange root “ThIV”. This root may be
considered as a philosophical or religious PIE-root as a reference to the sky-god *Dyeus, which in
Germanic philosophy is known as “*Teiwaz” or “Tiw”.
At an early stage of history the cities named Thebes may have described the centers of wisdom and
technology.

23 Source (Wikipedia): List of mythological figures named Thebe


24 Source: History of the Site - GLAS | Archaeology Department
25 Source (Wikipedia): Thebe Hypoplakia resp. Cilician Thebe (Asia Minor)
Conclusion

The three vowels “ἰ, a and ώ”


The vowel core “io” in Διός and δῖος is equivalent to “iu” in Ju-piter and “eu” in Ζεύς. These
vowels may also refer to the personal pronouns of the single form ἰώ (iṓ), ἱών (hiṓn) and the dual
form (νώ, respectively the epic version νῶϊ), respectively noi, nui, noi, and nois.
The letters “ἰ and ώ” in the Boeotian ego-pronoun “ἰώ” and ι respectively ό in Διός may have been
included in the name Ionians (Greek: Ἴωνες, Íōnes).
The Ionians (Greek: Ἴωνες, Íōnes, singular Ἴων, Íōn) may have been named ἰώ (“I”)-sayers, which
also is practiced in today's naming of the Jauers (the Romansh / Grison people who use the personal
pronoun “iau” as an ego-pronoun).
Usually the corresponding divine name is generated by adding a leading consonant “D” to the ego-
pronouns, for example “D” & “iéu” (Provencal) → Diéu. An equivalent formula may be applied in
Boeotian dialect: “Δ” & “ἰώ” & “ς” → ~ Διός.
The name Ionians first appears in Greek literature in Homer as Ἰάονες, iāones,26 used on a single
occasion of some long-robed Greeks attacked by Hector and apparently identified with Athenians,
and this Homeric form appears to be identical with the Mycenaean form but without the *-w-.
This name also appears in a fragment of the other early poet, Hesiod, in the singular Ἰάων, iāōn.
[6]27
Therefore the vowels “ἰ, ά and ώ” may be interpreted as the Initials of European Philosophy.

The three cities “Thebe(s)”


The three cities “Thebe(s)” in Greece (Europe), Asia minor and Egypt (Africa) relied on fertile
plains.
The Boeotian plain had been drained and irrigated in a sophisticated, elaborate drainage system
with huge canals, cyclopean dykes and fortifications, which may have been destroyed around 1400
BC. The drainage tunnel, its creation and its destruction may have been described as an elaborate
key-element in the legendary metropolis “Atlantis” in Plato's dialogue Critias.
At an early stage of history the cities named “Thebes” may have described the centers of wisdom
and technology.
Thebe's name “*Tʰēgʷais” → Θήβαις (Thēbais) may refer to a philosophical core as a reference to
the elaborate drainage system with huge canals, cyclopean dykes and fortifications in the legendary
metropolis “Atlantis” in Plato's dialogue Critias.
Obviously each of the continents Africa, Asia and Europe generated its own Thebes-metropolis.

26 Ventris, Michael; John Chadwick (1973). Documents in Mycenaean Greek: Second Edition. Cambridge University
Press. pp. 547 in the "Glossary" under i-ja-wo-ne. ISBN 0-521-08558-6., (source: Wikipedia's Ionians-Mycenaean)
27 Homer. Iliad, Book XIII, Line 685. (source: Wikipedia's Ionians-Mycenaean)
Contents
Abstract.................................................................................................................................................1
Introduction..........................................................................................................................................2
The 3 vowels “ἰ, ά and ώ”................................................................................................................2
The 3 cities “Thebe(s)”....................................................................................................................2
The philosophical core of Hellas..........................................................................................................3
The Creation Legend.......................................................................................................................3
The androgynous dual concept for a creation legend......................................................................3
The vowel core “io”, “iu” or “eu”....................................................................................................3
The triphthongs Ἰάο, iau, iéu, jau, jeu, jou, eau, iau........................................................................4
The personal pronouns and the divine names.......................................................................................5
Dialects of the Swiss canton Grison................................................................................................5
The formula for divine names..........................................................................................................5
IO as a name....................................................................................................................................5
The formula for the divine names in Germanic languages..............................................................5
The dual form of the ego-pronouns in Mediterranean languages....................................................6
A singular form of the ego-pronouns in the name Θήβαις (Thēbais)..............................................6
Overview of the formulas.....................................................................................................................7
The Ionian language as the dialect of ἸΏ-sayers (“I”-sayers).........................................................8
The etymological problem of a long vowel ώ (ṓ) in ION-related words........................................9
The Mycenaean Era............................................................................................................................10
Mycenae (in Argolis) ....................................................................................................................10
Thebes (in Boeotia)........................................................................................................................10
The three Thebes............................................................................................................................11
Conclusion..........................................................................................................................................12
The three vowels “ἰ, a and ώ”........................................................................................................12
The three cities “Thebe(s)”............................................................................................................12