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ANNUAL REPORT OF THE


OFFICE OF THE
OMBUDSMAN
JULY 2013 – JUNE 2014

2013-2014 ANNUAL REPORT


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TABLE OF CONTENT

TABLE OF CONTENT....................................................................................................................... 2
ABBREVIATION ............................................................................................................................... 7
FOREWORD ..................................................................................................................................... 12
INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................. 14
1.SENSITAZATION ......................................................................................................................... 16
1.1. TRAININGS OF DIFFERENT CATEGORIES OF CITIZENS ............................................... 16
1.1.1. Training on preventing and fighting injustice, corruption and other related offenses ............. 16
1.1.2. Training on the law on leadership code of conduct and access to information ....................... 20
1.2. DELIVERING MESSAGE TROUGH MASS MEDIA ............................................................. 22

1.3. DELIVERING MESSAGE THROUGH MEDIA ...................................................................... 23


1.3.1. Newspapers .............................................................................................................................. 23
1.3.2. Radio and television ................................................................................................................ 23
1.3.3. Sensitization through song....................................................................................................... 23
1.4. ORGANISING NATIONAL DIALOGUE ON CORRUPTION IN PUBLIC PROCUREMENT
23

1.5. ORGANIZATION OF ANTI-CORRUPTION WEEK .............................................................. 24


1.5.1. Launching of the anti-corruption week ................................................................................... 24
1.5.2. Youth anti-corruption day ....................................................................................................... 25
1.5.3. Anti-corruption football competition....................................................................................... 26
1.5.4. Sensitization through media .................................................................................................... 27
1.5.5. International Anti-Corruption Day .......................................................................................... 29
2. FIGHTING INJUSTICE................................................................................................................ 30
2.1. RECEIVING AND FOLLOW UP OF INJUSTICE COMPLAINTS ........................................ 30
2.1.1. Injustice complaints brought to the Office of the Ombudsman ............................................... 31
2.1.2. Written injustice complaints .................................................................................................... 31
2.1.3. Judgment review complaints ................................................................................................... 34
2.1.4. Injustice complaints treated during this year but received in previous years .......................... 35
2.1.5. Complaints received through cyber café ................................................................................. 36
2.1.6. Receiving and resolving injustice complaints in the sectors ................................................... 37
3. PREVENTING AND FIGHTING CORRUPTION AND RELATED OFFENCES .................... 38
3.1. ANALYSIS AND INVESTIGATION OF CORRUPTION CASES ......................................... 39
3.1.1. Categories of corruption cases ................................................................................................. 39
3.1.1.1. Maladministration ................................................................................................................. 39
3.1.1.2. Public procurement ............................................................................................................... 39
3.1.1.3. Misuse of public funds ......................................................................................................... 40

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3.1.1.4. Embezzlment ........................................................................................................................ 40


3.1.1.5. Sex based corruption ............................................................................................................ 40
3.1.2.5. Investigation on mismanagement in Rwanda Muslim Community (RMC) ........................ 49
3.1.2.6. Investigation on tender Nº049/W/NOCB/MIJESPOC/2011-2012 concerning the
construction of Huye Stadium ........................................................................................................... 50
3.1.2.7. Investigation in University of Rwanda ................................................................................ 52
3.1.2.8. Case of mismanagement in Gasabo District ......................................................................... 53
3.2. COORDINATION OF ACTIVITIES OF THE ADVISORY COUNCIL TO FIGHT AGAINST
CORRUPTION AND INJUSTICE ................................................................................................... 54
3.2.1. Meetings of the National Advisory Council to fight against corruption and injustice ............ 54
3.2.2. Technical Committee ............................................................................................................... 54
3.2.3. Functioning of Anti-Corruption Advisory Council against corruption and injustice at District
level ................................................................................................................................................... 55
3.3. IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL ANTI-CORRUPTION POLICY ....................... 55

4. MONITORING THE ENFORCEMENT OF GOOD GOVERNANCE PRINCIPLES ............... 58


4.1. ASSESSMENT OF PROGRAMS AND OPERATIONAL AUDIT OF PUBLIC AND
PRIVATE INSTITUTIONS .............................................................................................................. 58
4.1.1. Operational audit of public institutions ................................................................................... 58
4.1.1.1. Ministry of Health (MoH) .................................................................................................... 59
4.1.1.2. Rwanda Social Security Board (RSSB) ................................................................................ 59
4.1.1.3. Motovehicle Inspection Center ............................................................................................ 60
4.1.2. Assessment of government programs ...................................................................................... 61
4.1.2.1. Crop Intensification Program (CIP) ..................................................................................... 61
4.1.2.2. Umurenge Saving and Credit Cooperatives (SACCOs) ....................................................... 62
4.1.3. Assessment of private institutions and associations ................................................................ 63
4.1.3.1. Rwanda Cement Industry (CIMERWA) .............................................................................. 64
4.1.3.2. Kabuye Sugar Works (KSW) .............................................................................................. 64
4.1.3.3. Société Rwandaise d’Assurances (SORAS Group Ltd) ...................................................... 65
4.1.3.4. Société Nouvelle d’Assurance du Rwanda (SONARWA Holdings Limited/SHL) ............. 65
4.1.3.5. Rwandese Federation of Football Association (FERWAFA) ............................................. 66
4.2. Monitoring of the implementation of Ombudsman’s recommendations .................................... 67

4. 3. Monitoring the observance of the principles governing conduct of leaders ............................. 71


4.3.1. Investigation on cases related to conduct of leaders ................................................................ 72
4.3.1.1. Cases related to leaders behaviour in their duties ................................................................. 72
4.3.2. Monitoring of interdictions and incompatibilities of Senior officials ..................................... 73
4.2. MONITORING THE IMPLEMANTATION OF ACCESS TO INFORMATION LAW ......... 74

5. RECEIVING AND VERIFYING THE FILES OF DECLARATION OF ASSETS .................... 75


5.1. SENSITAZATION FOR DECLARERS .................................................................................... 75

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5.2. RECEIVING THE DECLARATION OF ASSETS FROM THE DECLARERS PROVIDED


BY THE LAW ................................................................................................................................... 76

5.3. RECEIVING AND VERIFICATION OF DECLARATION OF ASSETS OF ....................... 77

POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS ..................................................................................................... 77

5.4. ANALYSIS AND VERIFICATION OF FILES OF ASSETS DECLARATION ..................... 77

5.5. COMPARISON OF ASSETS DECLARED BY LAND OFFICERS AND HEAD OF


FINANCE SERVICES UNDER MINISTRIES FOR THE PAST 3 YEARS (2011 – 2013) ........... 78

5.6. INVESTIGATION ON NON DECLARED ASSETS ............................................................... 79

5.7. SEEKING ADMINISTRATIVE SANCTIONS FOR THOSE WHO FAILED TO DECLARE


IN 2013 80

6. COORDINATION OF THE ACTIVITIES OF THE OFFICE OF THE OMBUDSMAN ........... 80


6.1. CAPACITY BUILDING ............................................................................................................ 80

CONCLUSION ................................................................................................................................. 84
REQUEST ......................................................................................................................................... 86
ANNEXES......................................................................................................................................... 87
Annex 1: Asset declaration ............................................................................................................... 88
Annex 2: Dossiers sent to national presecution .............................................................................. 101
Annex 3: Implementation of recommandations of public and private institution .......................... 103
Annex 4: Implementations of recommandations of Parliament on the report of 2012-2013 of the
office of the ombudsman…………………………………………………………………………..128

Annex 5: Institutions that did not designate staff in charge of providing information ................... 128
Annex 6: People convicted of corruption cases ............................................................................. 132

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LIST OF TABLES
Table no 1: Training on preventing and fighting injustice corruption and other related offenses 16

Table no 2: training on law of leadership code of conduct and access to information ..................... 20

Table no 3: Number of written complaints in 2013-2014 ................................................................. 31

Table no 4: Written injustice complaints by category ....................................................................... 32

Table no 5: Judgment review complaints .......................................................................................... 34

Table no 6: Injustice complaints treated during this year but received before .................................. 35

Table nº7: Complaints received through cyber café ......................................................................... 36

Table nº 8: Received complaints in Nyagatare District during the anti-injustice week ................... 38

Table nº 9: Complaints left with Nyagatare District ........................................................................ 38

Table No 10: Cases of corruption ...................................................................................................... 40

Table no 11: Activities for the implementation of anti-corruption policy ........................................ 55

Table n°12 : Number of recommendations provided and the level of their implementation. .......... 67

Table n◦13: Comparison of status of implementation of recommendations between the periods of


2012-2013 and 2013-2014. ................................................................................................................ 70

Table no 14 : Declaration of assets for the year 2014 ....................................................................... 76

Table no 15: Declaration of assets from the employees who left their jobs ..................................... 76

Table no 16 : Verification of assets in the year 2013-2014............................................................... 78

Table no 17 : Comparison of assets declared by Land Officers and Heads of Finance Services in
Ministries (2011 -2013) ..................................................................................................................... 79

Table No 18 : Training provided to the staff of the Office of the Ombudsman ............................... 81

Table No 19: Visitors of the Office of the Ombudsman .................................................................. 82

Table No 20 : Excution of the budget............................................................................................... 83

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LIST OF FIGURES

Figure n◦1: Categories of complaints received ................................................................................ 33

Figure n◦2: Injustice complaints treated during this year but received before ................................. 35

Figure n◦3: Complaints received through cyber café ....................................................................... 37

Figure n◦4: Comparison of status of implementation of recommendations between the periods of


2012-2013 and 2013-2014……………………………………………………………………….….71

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ABBREVIATION

ADIB: Association pour le Développement Islamique de Bugarama


AMUR: Association des Musulmans du Rwanda
BDF: Business Development Fund
BIB: BRD Insurance Brokerage
BID: Banque Islamique de Développement
BNR: Banque Nationale du Rwanda
BRD: Banque Rwandaise de Développement
CHNO: The Chancellery for Heroes, National Orders
CHUB: Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Butare
CHUK: Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Kigali
CIP: Crop Intensification Programme
CMAC: The Capital Market Advisory Council
CNLG: Commission Nationale de Lutte Contre le Génocide
CRR: Croix Rouge Du Rwanda
EAAACA : East African Association of Anti Corruption Authorities
EAC : East African Community
EDPRS: Economic Development and Poverty Reduction Strategy
ESI: Ecole Secondaire Inférieure
EWSA: Energy, Water and Sanitation Authority
FARG: Fonds d’Assistance aux Rescapés du Génocide
FERWAFA: Fédération Rwandaise de Football Association
FIFA: Fédération Internationale de Football Association
FPR: Front Patriotique Rwandais
GIP: The Gishali Integrated Polytechnic
GMO: Gender Monitoring Office
GS: Groupe Scolaire
HEC: Higher Education Council
ICK: Institut Catholique de Kabgayi
ICT: Information and Communication Technology
ILPD: The Institute of Legal Practice and Development
INATEK: Institut d’Agriculture, de Technologie et d’Education de Kibungo
INES: Institut d’Enseignement Supérieur

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INMR: The Institute of National Museums of Rwanda


IPB: Institut Polytechnique de Byumba
IPRC: The Integrated Polytechnic Regional Center
IRST: Institut de Recherche Scientifique et Technologique
JADF: Joint Action Development Forum
KIE: Kigali Institute of Education
KIST: Kigali Institute of Science and Technology
KSW : Kabuye Sugar Works
KWAMP: Kirehe Community Watershed Management Project
LODA: Local Development Agency
LSPIU: Livestock Single Project Implementation Units
MAJ: Maison d'Accès à la Justice
MHC: Media High Council
MIDIMAR: Ministry of Disaster Management and Refugee Affairs
MIFOTRA: Ministère de la Fonction Publique et du Travail
MIGEPROF: Ministry of Gender and Family Promotion
MIJESPOC Ministère de la Jeunesse, du Sport et et de la Culture
MINADEF: Ministry of Defence
MINAFFET: Ministère des Affaires Étrangères et de la Coopération
MINAGRI: Ministère de l’Agriculture
MINALOC: Ministry of Local Government
MINEAC: Ministry of East African Community
MINECOFIN : Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning
MINEDUC: Ministère de l’Education
MINICAAF: Ministry of Cabinet Affairs
MINICOM: Ministère du Commerce et de l’Industrie
MINIJUST: Ministry of Justice
MININFRA: Ministry of Infrastructure
MININTER: Ministry of Internal Security
MINIRENA Ministry Of Natural Resources
MINISANTE: Ministère de la Santé
MINISPOC: Ministry of Sports and Culture
MMI: Military Medical Insurance
MOH: Ministry of Health

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MYICT: Ministry of Youth and Information and Communication Technology


NAEB: National Agricultural Export Development Board
NAWOCO: National Women Council
NCBS: National Capacity Building Secretariat
NCC: National Commission for Children
NCPD: National Commission of Persons with Disabilities
NCST National Commission for Science and Technology
NDBP: National domestic biogas programme Rwanda
NEC: National Electoral Commission
NFPO: National Consultative Forum for Political Organisations
NGOs: Non- Governmental Organizations
NIC: National Itorero Commission
NIDA: National ldentification Agency
NISR: National Institute of Statistics of Rwanda
NISS: National Intelligence and Security Services
NPPA: National Public Prosecution Authority
NURC: National Unity and Reconciliation Commission
No Number
NWC: National Women Council
NYC: National Youth Council
OAG: Office of the Auditor General
ONATRACOM: Office National des Transports en Commun
ONP: Office National des Postes
PADAB: Projet d’appui Dévelopement Agriculture de Bugesera
PAPSTA: Plan for the Agriculture Transformation
PAREF: Projet d’Appui à la Reforestation
PDC: Parti Démocratique Centriste
PDI: Parti Démocratique Idéal
PHH&S: Post Harvest Handling and Storage Task Force
PFM Public Finance Management
PL: Parti Libéral
PPC: Parti pour le Progrès et la Concorde
PS: Parti Social Imberakuri
PSC: Public Service Commission

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PSD: Parti Social Démocrate


PSP: Parti for Solidarity and Progress
PSR: Parti Socialiste Rwandais
RAB: Rwanda Agriculture Board
RALC: Rwanda Academy of Language and Culture
RBA: Rwanda Broadcasting Agency
RBC Rwanda Biomedical Center
RBS: Rwanda Bureau of Standards
RCA: Rwanda Cooperative Agency
RCAA: Rwanda Civil Aviation Authority
RCS: Rwanda Correctional Service
RDB: Rwanda Development Board
RDRC: Rwanda Demobilization and Reintegration Commission
REB: Rwanda Education Board
REMA: Rwanda Environment Management Authority
RGB: Rwanda Governance Board
RHA: Rwanda Housing Authority
RIAM: Rwanda Institute of Administration and Management
RIG: Rwanda Investment Group
RLDSF: Rwanda Local Development Support Funds
RLRC: Rwanda Law Reform Commission
REMA: Rwanda Environment Management Authority
RMC: Rwanda Muslim Association
RMI: Rwanda Management Institute
RNCU: Rwanda National Commission for UNESCO
RNP: Rwanda National Police
RNRA: Rwanda Natural Resources Authority
RNYC: Rwanda National Youth Council
RPPA: Rwanda Public Procurement Authority
RRA: Rwanda Revenue Authority
RSSB: Rwanda Social Security Board
RSSP: Rural Sector Support Project
RTC: Rwanda Trading Company
RTDA: Rwanda Transport Development Agency

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RURA: Rwanda Utilities Regulatory Authority


SACCO: Savings and Credit Co-operative
SGF: Special Guarantee Fund
SONARWA: Société Nationale d'Assurances du Rwanda
SORAS: Société Rwandaise D'assurance
SPIU: Single Project Implementation Units
SSFR: Social Security Fund of Rwanda
TB: Tribunal de Base
TFI: Task Force on Immunization
TGI: Tribunal de Grande Instance
TTC: Teacher Training Colleges
UDPR: Union Démocratique du Peuple Rwandais
UR-CAASVM: University of Rwanda College of Agriculture, Animal Sciences &
Veterinary Medicine
UR-CBE: University of Rwanda College of Business and Economics
UR-CE: The University of Rwanda- College Of Education
UR-CMHS: University of Rwanda-College of Medicine and Health Sciences
UR-COSTECH: University of Rwanda - College of Science and Technology
UR-Huye: University of Rwanda Huye Campus
UR-Nyagatare : University of Rwanda Nyagatare Campus
WDA: Workforce Development Authority
YBE: Year Basic Education

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FOREWORD

Annually, the Office of the Ombudsman prepares a report of its activities which is presented to His
Excellency the President of the Republic of Rwanda and to the two Chambers of Parliament.

The Government and the Supreme Court are given copies of the report as it is provided in article 35
of the Law no 76/2013 of 11/9/2013 establishing the mission, powers, organization and functioning
of the Office of the Ombudsman. The above mentioned law provided to the Office additional
missions.This report therefore highlights main accomplishments in the different activities in 2013-
2014 which include:.
 Sensitization aimed at preventinting and fighting injustice and corruption;
 Fighting injustice;
 Preventing and fighting against corruption;
 Monitoring the observance of good governance principles;
 Receiving and verifying declared assets and;
 Coordination of the activities of the Office of the Ombudsman.

In this year, the Office of the Ombudsman put much emphasis in promoting good governance
especially in preventing and fighting injustice, corruption and related offenses. Also as mandated by
the law, the Office of the Ombudsman has the powers to carry out investigations of corruption
related offenses and to submit to courts of law suspects of such offenses for prosecution.

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In implementing its responsibilities, the Office of the Ombudsman makes recommendations to


other institutions with the aim of improving service delivery focusing on the general interests of the
citizens. It is in this regard that citizens are also urged to play a role in what is done in their interest
by disasociating themselves from corruption tendencies as well as fighting corruption and its related
offenses.
In this regard therefore, the Office takes this opportunity to express its gratitude to all institutions,
both public and private, Non-goverment organisations and each person who contributed towards the
fulfilment of its mandate in this year of 2013-2014.

CYANZAYIRE Aloysie

Ombudsman

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INTRODUCTION

As planned, the Office of the Ombudsman implemented its action plan 2013-2014. Different
activities were done basing on the following mandates as provided for in article 4 of the Law no
76/2013 of 11/09/2013 determining the mission, powers, organization and functioning of the Office
of the Ombudsman:

1. to act as a link between the citizens and public and provateinstitutions;


2. to prevent and fight against injustice, corruption and related offenses in public and private
entities;
3. to receive and examine complaints from individuals and associations in connection with the
acts of civil servants, State organs, and private institutions and mobilize such civil servants
and institutions to resolve those complaints if it findsthey are founded;
4. to receive annually declaration of assets from persons determined by the law;
5. to receive annually declaration of assets of political organizations and verify their origin and
their use;
6. to advise Cabinet and other concerned institutions as regards strengthening and improving
their policy of preventing, fighting and punishing corruption and related offences;
7. to make a follow up of how policy of prevention and fight against injustice, corruption and
related offences is implemented by public and private institutions;
8. to make a follow up of the respect of laws relating to conduct of politicians and leaders;
9. to sensitize the population to refrain from corruption and related offences in general and to
train for the same purpose employees either in public and private institutions or non
government organizations;
10. to prepare and make public the list of persons definitively convicted for corruption and
related offences and the sentences received;
11. to contribute to strengthening of good governance in all institutions by drawing the
attention of such institutions where their functioning and relations are weak due to their
contradictions wiyh the law, with their respective responsibilities, with the State general
policy or because they have negative impacton the population;
12. to sensitize the population to work together with public and private institutions to build the
country and dare to denounce bad practices based on injustice, corruption and related
offences;

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13. to advise public and private institutions as to improvement of the quality of services
delivered to the population;
14. to submit annually its program and activity report to the President of the Republic and the
Parliament, both Chambers and reserve copies to other State organs;
15. Follow up the enforcement of the Law relating to access to information;
16. to perform any other duties as may be assigned by law.

In the program of sensitizing the population on how to prevent and fight injustice and corruption,
the Office of the Ombudsman carried out training and dialogue with different categories of the
populaion. Trainings ralating to Organic Law nº 11/2013/OL of 11/09/2013 modifying and
complementing the Organic Law nº 61/2008 of 10/09/2008 on the leadership code of conduct, and
the Law nº 4/2013 of 08/02/2013 relating to access to information were also carried out.

In preventing and fighting injustice, the Office of the Ombudsman received 1.033 written injustice
complaints, and other 386 complaints through its program of receiving complaints at a District.
Complaints amounting at 2,572 regarding court judgment review due to injustice were received.

In its endeavors of preventing and fighting corruption, the Office of the Ombudsman received and
carried out investigation on 102 cases related to corruption. The Office of Ombudsman also
assessed public and private institutions, projects and programs. A follow up on the implementation
of the recommendations given by the Office of the Ombudsman was made for institutions audited in
2012-2013.

Regarding the activity of receiving and verifying declaration of assets using technology, the Office
of the Ombudsman received declarations of assets of 8,742 persons out of 8,777 of those supposed
to declare property while 35 officials did not declare their assets. For the activity of verifying the
origin of declared assets the Office of the Ombudsman of Rwanda verified assets of 1,320 persons.

Furthermore, in the follow up of the implementation of the Organic Law No 11/2013 of 11/09/2013
modifying and completing the Law No 61/2008 of 10/09/2008 on leadership code of conduct and
the Law N0 04/2013 of 08/02/2013 relating to access to information. The Office of Ombudsman
carried out investigation on members of Parliament both chambers, Ministers and Permanent
Secretaries in Ministries. Twenty nine (29) cases of non complying with the above mentioned
Organic Law were investigated on senior officials.

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To accomplish its mission, the Office of the Ombudsman used funds from the national budget
amounting to 1,801,751,306 Rwandan Francs.

1. SENSITAZATION

The Office of Ombudsman prepared and carried out trainings to different categories of citizens in
Rwanda in order to sensitize them on their role in preventing and fight corruption and other related
offenses. Different discussions were organized specifically in anti Corruption week. The Office of
Ombudsman conducted trainings on the organic law of leadership code of conduct and on the Law
related to access to information.

1.1. TRAININGS OF DIFFERENT CATEGORIES OF CITIZENS

1.1.1. Training on preventing and fighting injustice, corruption and other related offenses

In a bid to prevent and fighting injustice, corruption and related offences, the Office of the
Ombudsman prepared and carried out trainings to different categories of citizens in Rwanda. In
those trainings the Office of ombudsman focused on every category’s role in preventing and
fighting injustice corruption and other related offenses. Recommendations from the trainings were
sent to different institutions. The number of trainees who attended were two thousand three hundred
thirty seven (2,337) out of two thousand four hundred twenty seven (2,427) planned, the average of
attendance reached to 96,2% as shown on the following table:

Table no 1: Training on preventing and fighting injustice corruption and other related
offenses

DATE Venue Categories of Trainees Number Number of Theme


of invited Participants
06/01/2014 Nyamagabe Executive Secretaries of cells 88 87 Preventing and
06/01/2014 Karongi Executive Secretaries of cells 88 88 fighting
06/01/2014 Ruhango Executive Secretaries of cells 58 55 corruption, their
06/01/2014 Kicukiro Executive Secretaries of cells 43 43 role in the
07/01/2014 Kicukiro Officers in charge of Socio- 38 38 activity and
Economic Development good service

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DATE Venue Categories of Trainees Number Number of Theme


of invited Participants
(SEDO) of Cells delivery
07/01/2014 Karongi Officers in charge of Socio- 88 88
Economic Development
(SEDO) of Cells
07/01/2014 Ruhango Officers in charge of Socio- 56 53
Economic Development
(SEDO) of Cells
07/01/2014 Nyamagabe Officers in charge of Socio- 88 88
Economic Development
(SEDO) of Cells
08/01/2014 Musanze Executive Secretaries of cells 67 67
08/01/2014 Rubavu Executive Secretaries of cells 80 78
08/01/2014 Gicumbi Executive Secretaries of cells 108 108
09/01/2014 Musanze Officers in charge of Socio- 61 61
Economic Development
(SEDO) of Cells
09/01/2014 Ngoma Executive Secretaries of cells 64 64
09/01/2014 Rubavu Officers in charge of Socio- 80 79
Economic Development
(SEDO) of Cells
09/01/2014 Gicumbi Executive Secretaries of cells 104 104
10/01/2014 Ngoma Officers in charge of Socio- 64 63
Economic Development
(SEDO) of Cells
13/01/2014 Kayonza Executive Secretaries of cells 51 51
13/01/2014 Bugesera Officers in charge of Socio- 73 73
Economic Development
(SEDO) of Cells
14/01/2014 Nyamasheke Executive Secretaries of cells 67 69
18/01/2014 Nyamasheke Officers in charge of Socio- 68 64
Economic Development
(SEDO) of Cells

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DATE Venue Categories of Trainees Number Number of Theme


of invited Participants
23/01/2014 Rwamagana Officers in charge of Socio- 61 61
Economic Development
(SEDO) of Cells
24/02/2014 Rusizi Executive Secretaries of cells 90 88
24/01/2014 Huye Different Religious leaders of 80 80
churches from Huye, Gisagara
and Nyaruguru
25/01/2014 Rusizi Officers in charge of Socio- 82 73
Economic Development
(SEDO) of Cells
31/01/2014 Kigali town Leaders of Anti-Corruption 152 152 The role of
clubs in Rwanda Anti-Corroption
clus in the
sensitisation
03/02/2014 Diocese, of Women Leaders 80 80 Preventing and
04/02/2014 Kibungo Pastors 40 40 fighting
05/02/2014 Anglican Youth Leaders 106 100 corruption, their
Church role in the
08/02/2014 Catholic Leaders of Diocese 120 70 activity and
Church of good service
Rutongo delivery
Diocese
10/02/2014 Catholic Catechists and other 80 70
Church of representatives of religious
Bare/Diocese
of Kibungo
Total Number 2.427 2.337
Percentage =2337/2427= 96,2 %

Objectives of the training

The Office of the Ombudsman prepared and carried out trainings to different categories of citizens
with the purpose of preventing and fighting injustice and to instill the culture of detesting

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corruption and reporting it. In this year the Office of Ombudsman focused on executive secretaries
of cells, and the Officers in charge of Socio-Economic Development (SEDO) of Cells. The reason
behind is because those civil servants are near and live daily with citizens and they can play a big
role in transforming them towards preventing and fighting corruption and injustice. This sector is
also among those where corruption is reported to be rampamt and where good service delivery is
lacking.

During the training, the trainees were reminded ofbetter ways of good service delivery aimed at
promotion of good governance, and they were also asked to do their best to solve citizens’
complaints and in implementing the execution of Gacaca courts and mediators decisions.

The different categories of trainees were sensitized to play a significance role in explaining to
citizens their right and to encourage them to settle their grievances without necessarily going in
courts.

Recommendations/ given by the participants


The trainees in these different categories were happy with the training as it related to
responsibilities of their jobs. After the training, the trainees committed themselves to play a role in
good service delivery and in preventing and fighting corruption. The trainees also appreciated the
knowledge acquired about preventing and fighting injustice, corruption and related offences as well
as promotion of good governance. They expressed their willingness to partner with the Office of the
Ombudsman in this cause. They also recommended that such trainings be carried out for other
citizens to enable everyone to participate in this cause.

In particular the executive secretaries (ES) and officers in charge of Socio-Economic Development
(SEDO) of Cells made the following demands/recommendation:
 Rwanda National Police should collaborate with local authorities especially in execution of
court decisions and on security of citizens as they both have it as one of their
responsibilities.
 Plan of regular trainings regarding the most applicable laws especially those relating to
execution of courts judgments. They also expressed difficulty in making reports regarding
execution of judgements where the loosing party cannot compersate due to the ‘ubudehe’
category one belongs to. A similar case is whereby the losing party registered his/her

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properties in other people’s names which complicates execution of court decisions, Gacaca
courts decisions or Conciliators committees’ decisions.

 The trainees requested the Office of the Ombudsman to advocate for them to the concerned
ministry to have special insurance to cover occupational hazards that may occur during
extra-working hours.

1.1.2. Training on the law on leadership code of conduct and access to information

In a bid to sensitize the population about the above mentioned laws in 2013 - 2014, the Office of the
Ombudsman had planned sensitization of different categories of people including journalists, ,
Internal Auditors in districts and Legal officers and public relation officers at the sectors, Districts
andin all publics instituions.. 735 persons were trained out of 961 that had been planned.

Table no 2: training on law of leadership code of conduct and access to information

DATE Venue Categories of Trainees Number Number of


of invited Participants
07/01/2014 Nobleza Hotel Public Relation Officers (Kigali City, 162 97
Kicukiro Public Institution, Distrits and Sector
found in Kigali city )
08/01/2014 Nobleza Hotel Internal auditors ( Kigali City, Public 127 84
Kicukiro Institution, Distrits and Sector found in
Kigali city )
08/01/2014 Nobleza Hotel Legal officers ( Kigali City, Public 127 52
Kicukiro Institutions, Distrits and Sectors found in
Kigali city )
8/01/2014 Hotel ST André Public Relation Officers, Internal 55 42
Muhanga Auditors and Legal officers (Muhanga,
Kamonyi and Ruhango)
08/01/2014 Procure /Huye Public Relation Officers, Internal 72 72
Auditors and Legal officers (Huye,
Nyamagabe, Nyanza, Nyaruguru,
Gisagara, ILPD and Southern Province)

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DATE Venue Categories of Trainees Number Number of


of invited Participants
09/01/2014 RPF conference Public Relation Officers, Internal 107 102
room Musanze Auditors and Legal officers (Burera,
Gakenke, Gicumbi, Musanze, Rulindo
and Nothern Province)
14/01/2014 Motel Public Relation Officers, Internal 39 39
Rubavu/Rusizi Auditors and Legal officers (Nyamasheke
and Rusizi)
15/01/2014 Dereva Hotel Public Relation Officers, Internal 72 68
Rwamagana Auditors and Legal officers (Rwamagana,
Bugesera, Nyagatare, Gatsibo, n’Intara
y’Iburasirazuba)
15/1/2014 Conference room Public Relation Officers, Internal 47 47
Ngoma Auditors and Legal officers (Kirehe,
Kayonza, and Ngoma)
15/01/2014 Betaniya Hotel Public Relation Officers, Internal 36 36
Karongi Auditors and Legal officers (Rutsiro,
Karongi, and Ouestern Province)
15/1/2014 Hotel Ubumwe Public Relation Officers, Internal 46 46
/Rubavu Auditors and Legal officers (Ngororero,
Nyabihu and Rubavu)
29/01/2014 Nobleza Hotel Journalists 71 50
Kicukiro
Total 961 735
Percentage 100% 76%

Training was also conducted in 9 higher instutions of learning out of 12 instituitions planned

The institutions that attended the training are the following :

 ICK ;
 IPB;
 INATEK;

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 Umutara Polytechnique;
 Gabiro Military Academy;
 ISAE Busogo;
 INES Musanze;
 Tumba College of Technology;
 ILPD.

The institutions that did not attend the training are the following:
 UR – Huye Campus
 Nyakinama Military Academy
 Musanze Police Academy

The objective of this training

This training was attended by Public Relation Officers, Internal Auditors and Legal officers in all
the districts and public institions. The purpose of the above trainings was to create awareness of the
laws that the Office of the Ombudsman is mandated to implement as well as sensitizing the trainees
to provide information on those who do not observe them. The training in Higher Learning
Institutions was intended to instill in the students the culture of integrity as well as preparing future
leaders.

1.2. DELIVERING MESSAGE TROUGH MASS MEDIA

 The Office of the Ombudsman published 3 editions of “Umuvunyi Magazine”. 9,000 copies
of the magazine were distributed in different parts of the country, different institutions as
well as to those who come to seek the services of the Office;
 The Office of the Ombudsman also prepared 4,500 brocures explaining the work of the
Office as well as the activities geared towards fighting corruption;
 The Office of the Ombudsman also used billboards in passing out its message in the city of
Kigali and its surbubs.

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1.3. DELIVERING MESSAGE THROUGH MEDIA

1.3.1. Newspapers

The Office of the Ombudsman delivered messages promoting its activities through different
newspapers including those online.

1.3.2. Radio and television

The Office of the Ombudsman passed promotional messages through radios and television and took
time to explain to the citizens relevent laws governing the Office of the Ombudsman, its activities
and others related to its mandate. The Office of the Ombudsman used Radio Rwanda, community
radios, private radios and Rwanda Television.

1.3.3. Sensitization through song

The Office of the Ombudsman produced a song with the message mobilizing the Rwandan citizens
to fight against corruption and report it wherever suspected. The song was sung by popular
musicians among the youth and it was particularly encouraging them to play their role in the fight
against corruption.

1.4. ORGANISING NATIONAL DIALOGUE ON CORRUPTION IN PUBLIC


PROCUREMENT

The Office of the Ombudsman organized a workshop on corruption in public procurement held on
19th November 2013. It was attended by 75 participants including representatives of public
institutions, the private sector and the platform of civil society. The main aim of the workshop was
to analyze the state and loopholes of corruption in public procurement and to put together strategies
to prevent and fight it.

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During that workshop, following topics were discussed:


 Strategies of preventing and fighting corruption in public procurement;
 Corruption in public procurement;
 Research of Transparency International Rwanda on the analysis of contract management in
the infrastructure sector in Rwanda;
 Role of private sector in preventing and fighting corruption in public procurement;
 Professionalism and integrity as a way of fighting corruption in public service.

Different views from participants led to resolutions to be implemented by public institutions, private
sector and civil society. Those resolutions were submitted to concerned institutions.

1.5. ORGANIZATION OF ANTI-CORRUPTION WEEK

The United Nations General Assembly in its resolution no 58/4 adopted on 31st October 2003 in
Merida-Mexico, set aside the 9th December of every year as the International Anti-corruption Day.
The aim of celebrating that day is to raise citizens' awareness on bad effects of corruption and to
encourage them to play an active role in preventing and fighting it. In a bid to celebrate this day, the
Office of the Ombudsman prepares on annual basis an anti-corruption week which ends on the 09th
December. In the fiscal year 2013/2014, the week was launched on 04th December 2013 in Huye
District with the theme “Corruption undermines Rwandan values” and closed on 09th December
2013 in Kigali.

In collaboration with other institutional members of the National Advisory Council to fight against
corruption and injustice, different activities including talk shows on radios and television, messages
on billboards and websites, football competition, and youth anti-corruption day were organized.

1.5.1. Launching of the anti-corruption week

The anti-corruption week was launched on 4th December 2013 in Huye District basing on its
initiatives in fighting against corruption. The ceremony was preceded by an anti-corruption walk
from Huye multipurpose house (imberabyombi) to the Stadium of University of Rwanda, College of
Arts and Social Sciences (CASS). After the walk, speeches and songs emphasizing on the theme

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were presented. Different authorities who participated in that day encouraged the citizens to play a
big role in combating corruption.

1.5.2. Youth anti-corruption day

In partnership with Kigali City, the Office of the Ombudsman organized on 05th December 2013, a
youth anti-corruption day which started with a walk from RAFIKI Club (Nyamirambo) to
Nyamirambo Regional Stadium. The objectives of this day were to sensitize youth about the evils
and effects of corruption and encourage them to desist from it, report and fight against it and its
related offenses. After the march, there were different presentations and speeches all focusing on
the theme of the year. Authorities who participated in that day gave messages encouraging the
youth to be a good example in the fighti against corruption. Youth members of anti-corruption clubs
from Universities delivered an anti-corruption message through a skit.

Youth participated in that day

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Anti-corruption message was delivered through a skit

1.5.3. Anti-corruption football competition

In collaboration with FERWAFA and Ministry of Culture and Sport, the Office of the Ombudsman
organized two football competitions on 08/12/2013 in order to disseminate anti-corruption message.
The first competition was between 2 teams of journalists (one of presenters from broadcasting
services and other of writers from newspapers) and the second was between Rayon Sports and
Police FC.

The objective of these competitions was to sensitize people on the negative effects of corruption,
and to encourage them to play a role in preventing and fighting it through sport.

During the half time of the competition between Rayon Sports and Police FC, the Deputy
Ombudsman in charge of preventing and fighting corruption and related offences and the Guest of
Honor, Honorable Minister of Sports and Culture delivered a message calling citizens to be partners
in the battle against corruption. These competitions were watched by around fifteen thousands
(15,000) citizens.

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Police FC being awarded after winning Rayon Sport FC

Fans of teams at Amahoro Stadium

1.5.4. Sensitization through media

In preparing the opening of anti corruption week in Huye District, the Office of the Ombudsman in
partnership with Huye District provided a presentation through Salus Radio on the achievements in

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the fight against of corruption. The listeners were informed about the negative effects of corruption
and were reminded of their role in fighting it.

On 5th December 2013 there was a talk show on different local radios countrywide. The talk show
was delivered by some stakeholders in the fight against corruption including the Office of the
Ombudsman, Supreme Court, Rwanda National Police and Ministry of Local Government.

On 8th December 2013, in partneship of the Office of the Ombudsman with Ministry of Local
Government, Rwanda National Police, Supreme Court, National Public Prosecution Authority and
Ministry of Justice, a talk show was aired on both Rwanda Television and Radio Rwanda on the
role of everybody in preventing and fighting coruption. Citizens were given opportunity to ask
questions and also express their views.

Different social networks were also used to sensitize people and to advertise the anti-corruption
week activities countrywide as well as outside the country.

Talk show on radio and television by different institutions on preventing and fighting corruption

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1.5.5. International Anti-Corruption Day

On 9th December, at Kigali Serena Hotel, the International Anti -Corruption Day was celebrated
and also the anti-corruption week was closed. Presentations regarding fighting corruption were
given.

Leaders present at the celebration of International Anti-Corruption Day

Among the presentations made were those by the Private Sector Federation on their role in fighting
against corruption, Platform of Civil Society on the role of civil society in fighting against
corruption and the Office of the Ombudsman on the status of implementation of the National anti
corruption policy. Participants were given opportunity to exchange ideas and views aiming at
strengthening the anti corruption strategies.

In his remarks, the guest of honor, President of the Senate emphasized on the evils of corruption
and called upon all citizens to combine their efforts in fighting it and promote Rwandan values.

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2. FIGHTING INJUSTICE

As it was in its action plan of 2013/2014, the Office of the Ombudsmn carried out different
activities aimed at fighting injustice including recieving complaints of injustice from citizens, going
to Districts and Sectors and solving injustice cases in public gatherings where the citizens and local
authorities played a vital roleas well making a follow-up of the works of the anti-corruption clubs.

2.1. RECEIVING AND FOLLOW UP OF INJUSTICE COMPLAINTS

In accordance with article 4 of the Law no76/2013 of 11/9/2013 determining the mission, powers,
organization and functioning of the Office of the Ombudsman, the Office of the Ombudsman has
the following mandate:

 To act as a link between the citizen and public and private institutions;
 To prevent and fight injustice, corruption and related offences in public and private entities;
 To receive and examine complaints from individuals and associations in connection with the
acts of civil servants, State organs and private institutions;
 To mobilise such civil servants and institutions to resolve those complaints if it finds they
are founded.

It is in this regard that the Office of the Ombudsman received different injustice complaints brought
by citizens. These include those brought to the Office of the Ombudsman, those that were received
through written letters, email, telephone calls and those received by the staff of the Office of the
Ombudsman during the anti-injustice week at the field.

During the year 2013-2014, 1.033 written complaints were received. Among them 577 were
resolved, 214 were channeled to the concerned institutions. 386 complaints were received through
visits to Districts out of which 368 were resolved. The Office also received 2.572 complaints for
court judgement review and 1.306 of these were handled.

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2.1.1. Injustice complaints brought to the Office of the Ombudsman

There are two categories of citizens who come to Office of the Ombudsman with injustice related
complaints; those that come for the first time seeking advice on their complaints and those that
come for follow up of their dossiers lodged with Office. For those that come for the first time, some
are given advice straight awaywhile others are advised to put their complaints in writing if the
Office finds they need thorough analysis or investigation. Others are advised to take their
complaints to the concerned institutions that are supposed to handle the complaints in the first
instance.

2.1.2. Written injustice complaints

The written injustice complaints also fall into two categories. The first category is where the
complainant claims to have been treated unjustly by a fellow citizen or an institution. The second
category is where one party writes to the Office requesting for a review of a court judgment due to
injustice.

Table no 3: Number of written complaints in 2013-2014


District Total number of Resolved Oriented Pending
received complaints complaints complaints complaints
Bugesera 49 29 11 9
Burera 17 4 6 7
Gakenke 51 42 4 5
Gasabo 36 12 14 10
Gatsibo 22 0 3 19
Gicumbi 40 16 14 10
Gisagara 11 8 3 0
Huye 23 15 8 2
Kamonyi 16 9 3 4
Karongi 42 35 4 3
Kayonza 16 4 3 9
Kicukiro 45 17 6 22
Kirehe 18 12 3 3
Muhanga 20 11 0 9
Musanze 26 7 5 14
Ngoma 38 32 4 2
Ngororero 8 3 4 1

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District Total number of Resolved Oriented Pending


received complaints complaints complaints complaints
Nyabihu 20 15 2 3
Nyagatare 68 48 6 14
Nyamagabe 50 25 22 3
Nyamasheke 20 10 1 9
Nyanza 30 26 2 2
Nyarugenge 81 42 33 6
Nyaruguru 22 13 9 0
Rubavu 14 5 7 2
Ruhango 20 12 0 8
Rulindo 27 19 3 5
Rusizi 20 16 0 4
Rutsiro 35 30 2 3
Rwamagana 39 15 13 11
Institutions 107 45 19 43
Grand total 1.033 577 214 242
Percentage 100% 56% 21% 23%

In all the injustice complaints received, 56% were resolved, while 23% are still undergoing
investigation. 21% were channeled to the concerned institutions. The complaints the Office
channels to the concerned institutions are those that do not fall under competencies of the Office of
the Ombudsman or those that were supposed to have been handled by competent institutions first.

Table no 4: Written injustice complaints by category

Nº Category Number of complaint Percentage


1. Administration and labor 140 14%
2. Complaints regarding RSSB 16 2%
3. Commercial complaints 14 1%
4. Complaints related to courts judgments 187 18%
5. Land disputes 398 39%
6. Complaints related to property (not land) 12 1%
7. Social complaints 56 5%
8. Insurance complaints 21 2%
9. Execution of court judgments 149 14%
10. Others 40 4%
Grand Total 1.033 100%

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Figure no 1: Categories of complaints received

This Figure shows that the bigger number of complaints falls in the category of land disputes. This
is caused by the program of land registration and land management policies. These initiatives
increased the number of conflicts among family members, as well as conflicts between leaders and
people who would to use their land differently from what policies desidnate. There are also
complaints of young survivors of the Genocide against Tutsi in 1994 whereby the Government
offered their land to other people during the land re-distribution process or whereby the land was
illegally sold off by their guardians. The number of such complaints is further increased by some
people who have right to land but its nolonger in their possession because of different reasons and
now seek resettlement from the government.

Looking at the number of complaints since the Office of the Ombudsman was established, land
disputes complaints are always dominant followed by complaints related to court judgments and
here still the subject matter in most cases is land. This is due to the fact that majority of Rwandans
depend on land, in that anything that any issue related to land, threatens their interests. There are
also those that are always eager to use any means to increase their land.

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There is therefore need to put more effort in implementing the policies in place on land
administration and also devise strategies to reduce dependence on land while ensuring prosperity of
the citizens.

2.1.3. Judgment review complaints

According to the article 79 of the Organic Law nº.03/2012OL of 13/06/2012 relating to the
structure, functioning and powers of the Supreme Court, the Office of the Ombudsman was
entrusted with powers of requesting the Supreme Court to review a judgment rendered at the last
instance due to injustice. If the office receives such complaint and it finds there is no injustice in the
decision of the court, it informs the complainant. If there is evidence of injustice in the case, the
Office writes to the Chief Justice, requesting for a review of the case.

Table no 5: Judgment review complaints


Year when received Number of Treated complaints during the year 2013-2014 Non treated
complaints Review requested Review rejected Total complaints
received
Complaints received in 1.749 23 526 549 1.200
2013/14
Received before 2013-2014 823 24 733 757 66
Total 2.572 47 1.259 1.306 1.266
Percentage 3,6% 96,4% 100%
Percentage on the 100% 1,8% 49,0% 50,8% 49,2%
received complaints

As shown in the table above, there are Judgment review complaints received in 2013-2014 some of
which were analyzed while others are still pending. There are also other complaints that were
received in previous years including those received in the year 2012-2013 and those that were
received before the Office of the Ombudsman was given powers to request review of court
judgments due to injustice. Among the 1.306 complaints received, only 47, equal to 3.6 %, were
sent to Supreme Court for review.

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According to the report given by Supreme Court, among 611 complaints sent for review, the Office
of the Inspector General of courts and tribunals has analysed 30 complaints. In those analysed, 18
cases were confirmed for review due to injustice. In these, the Supreme Court has so pronounced
itself on three (3) cases where indeed injustice was confirmed and is yet to pronounce itself on two
(2) others.

2.1.4. Injustice complaints treated during this year but received in previous years

There were outstanding complaints from previous years that the Office of the Ombudsman handled
during this year. Among them, there are those that were completed, those that were channelled to
the concerned institutions because they were out of the powers of the Office, and those that are
being worked on pending their fully analysis.

Table no 6: Injustice complaints treated during this year but received before

Number of Followed up completed Oriented Still under


complaints complaints investigation
Total 917 481 129 309
Percentage 100% 52% 14% 34%

Figure no 2: Injustice complaints treated during this year but received before

1
61 complaints equal to 47 sent to Supreme Court requesting review in 2013-2014 plus 14 complaints received in
2012-2013

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2.1.5. Complaints received through cyber café

In order to facilitate the citizens to lodge their complaints with the Office of the Ombudsman
cheaply and fast, the Office set up cyber cafés managed by anti-corruption clubs and people use
them without having to come to the headquarters of the Office of the Ombudsman.

Table nº7: Complaints received through cyber café

District Complaints Complaints sent to Complaints Complaints Complaints


received the Office of the sent to concluded sent to Local
Ombudsman MAJ with advice Governments
Rubavu 27 6 0 16 5
Rusizi 241 26 44 100 71
Ngoma 4 3 0 1 0
Nyagatare 3 3 0 0 0
Total 275 38 44 117 76
Percentage 100% 14% 16% 43% 28%

The complaints in the table above shows the total number of complaints received through cyber
café during this year and those that were sent to the Office of the Ombudsman. Those that were
concluded or seeking advice and those that required to be sent to other institutions, were done by
the anti-corruption clubs of youth that manage these cyber cafés. Those that were not sent to the
Office of the Ombudsman are mainly complaints of judgments concluded definitely by competent
courts and those that are still undergoing trials in different courts. The anti-corruption club members
analysises these complaints and advises the citizens accordingly. Complaints of injustice falling
within the competences of the Office of the Ombudsman are te ones sent to it for their follow up.

This table also shows that the cyber café of Rusizi District received the bigger number of
complaints compared to others. This is because the anti-corruption club that manages it is specially
structured. It operates at district level but it has its representatives in every sector of Rusizi District,
and this makes it possible to receive complainants from all Sectors. Regarding Nyagatare and
Ngoma, the anti-corruption clubs did not do their tasks as agreed.

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Regarding the anti-corruption club of Ngoma, the Memorandum of Understanding with the Office
of the Ombudsman was rescinded and the cyber café was relocated to INATEK. The anti-corruption
club of Nyagatare committed itself to make more effort to achieve the intended objectives.

Figure no 3: Complaints received through cyber café

2.1.6. Receiving and resolving injustice complaints in the sectors

Pursuant to its program of going to grassroots to receive and resolve citizes’ complaints, the Office
of the Ombudsman carried out anti-injustice week in Nyagatare from 05 to 09 May 2014. Before
the real activity, citizens were informed of the sites where to meet the agents of the Office of the
Ombudsman along with the Local leaders at District, Sector and Cell and Village levels.

This program intended to sensitize citizens on the mission, powers and functioning of the Office of
the Ombudsman; instill the culture of preventing and combating corruption and injustice and giving
information in this regard. After the session of sensitization, citizens are given chance to air out
their complaints and the staff of the Office of the Ombudsman in collaboration with the local
leaders at different levels address them.

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Table nº 8: Received complaints in Nyagatare District during the anti-injustice week

All complaints Concluded complaints Complaints left with District


386 220 166
100% 57% 43%

As the above table shows, among the complaints received in Nyagatare District, those that were
resolved immediately are 57%. Complaints that were not resolved immediately and needed to be
addressed by the District were 47%. These complaints left with the District were sent to the District
in a report for further follow up, and the District was given a deadline to have resolved them and
submitted the report to the Office of the Ombudsman.
Nyagatare District submitted a report on complaints resolved and those that were still in progress.
The following table shows the number of complaints resolved by Nyagatare district after being
requested by the office of the Ombudsman.

Table nº 9: Complaints left with Nyagatare District

Complaints Complaints left with Resolved complaints Complaints in


submitted by the Nyagatare by the progress
district in report Office of the
Ombudsman
185 166 138 47

In the above table, it is clear that Nyagatare District gave report on 185 complaints, yet the
complaints left by the Office of the Ombudsman were 166. The difference of 19 complaints is
comprised of complaints that were already logged with the District and it deemed necessary to
include them in the report to the Office of the Ombudsman. Out of the 185 complaints, 138 were
resolved and 47 were still underway pending further investigation.

3. PREVENTING AND FIGHTING CORRUPTION AND RELATED OFFENCES

In a bid to prevent and fight corruption and related offenses, the Office of the Ombudsman received
complaints and information on corruption and other related offenses. It analyzed them and
conducted investigations and decisions were taken in this regard. It also coordinated the activities of
the Advisory Council to fight against corruption and injustice.

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3.1. ANALYSIS AND INVESTIGATION OF CORRUPTION CASES

The Office of the Ombudsman has the mandate to preventg and fight corruption and related
offences in public and private institutions. In fulfilling this mandate, thorough investigations were
carried out on reported or initiated corruption cases and other related offenses. In 2013-2014, 121
cases related to corruption were investigated including 19 which were pending at the end of 2012-
2013 and 102 received in 2013-2014.

3.1.1. Categories of corruption cases

The Office of the Ombudsman received several information related to corruption, its loopholes and
misuse of public funds in 2013-3014. The Office investigated some of the cases in order to assess
their reliability and provide necessary recommendations.
The following table shows the number of corruption related cases received, their different
categories, resolved cases and those still pending.

3.1.1.1. Maladministration

The Office of the Ombudsman carried out investigations on reported cases of maladministration in
public and private institutions or companies as well as cooperative societies. In those investigations
carried out, it was observed that citizens usually suspect corruption on officials due to actions of
such institutions that are not in their interest. Usually those exist in the monitoring of illegal
constructions, in complaints handling or the issuance of permits. For some cases, there are no
evidences of such maladministration. The Office provided recommendations to institutions where
maladministration was found in order to improve their functionning.

3.1.1.2. Public procurement

Corruption is suspected in public procurement due to the breach of laws and procedures which leads
to corruption loopholes. This category includes also irregularities concering the contract execution.

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3.1.1.3. Misuse of public funds

There were also allegations related to the misuse of public funds by some officials. In the
investigations carried out, some cases of such misuse were observed, like misallocation of resources
or the use of public funds for private interests and later reimbursed. Loopholes of corruption were
also identified. The Office of the Ombudsman provided recommendations for the rational use of
public funds.

3.1.1.4. Embezzlment

There are some reported allegations alluding to embezzlement of public funds. In such cases, the
Office of Ombudsman conducts investigations, and where there is evidence of the alleged
embezzlement, such cases are forwarded to the National Police.

3.1.1.5. Sex based corruption

Some allegations received indicated cases where citizens were required to offer sex based
corruption in order to be offered a job or to be snug in service. The Office of the Ombudsman
investigated those allegations but did not find any evidence that may form basis for such case to be
submitted to courts of law. The table below shows the categories of corruption cases and their
status.
Table No 10: Cases of corruption
Category Received cases Concluded Cases forwarded to Pending cases
cases Prosecution or Police
Maladministration 61 55 0 6
Bribery 5 0 5 0
Misuse of funds 8 8 - 0
Embezzlement 5 4 - 1
Procurement 19 15 3 1
Sex based 4 4 - 0
corruption
Total 102 86 8 8
Percentage 100% 84% 8% 8%
Cases reported to the Office of the Ombudsman were treated as follows

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• In 86 concluded cases, the following were identified:


 In cases of maladministration which leads to injustice, the Office of the Ombudsman
formulated recommendations to improve the administration;
 In cases where there was no tangible evidence justifying corruption demanded or offered
but corruption loopholes were identified, the Office of the Ombudsman provided
recommendations to improve the functioning in order to eliminate those loopholes;
 In 8 cases where evidence was discovered, 7 of these were forwarded to Prosecution.
They are related to soliciting and receiving unlawful advantages for provision of services
and breach of procurement procedures. 1 case was submitted to the National Police for
further investigations because it was out the competence of the Office of the
Ombudsman.
• There are 8 cases which are still undergoing thorough investigations before a final decision
is made.
• There are also19 cases which were outstanding by the end of 2012-2013 but were also are
concluded.

3.1.2. Analysis and Investigation of some information related to corruption and related
offences

The Office of the Ombudsman received different information regarding corruption in some
institutions, corruption loopholes, and wastage of government resources in 2013/14. Investigations
were done on some of the information to establish their truthfulness and there by give
recommendations. The institutions that were investigated are the following:

 Energy, Water and Sanitation Authority (EWSA)


 Ngororero District
 Nyarugenge District
 Polytechnic Institute of Byumba (IPB)
 Huye Stadium
 Rwanda Muslim Society
 Gasabo District
 University of Rwanda, Huye Campus

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3.1.2.1. Energy, Water and Sanitation Authority (EWSA)

In EWSA, investigations were carried out on the following projects:


 The project for distribution of biogas in homes (NDBP);
 The project for extraction of peat from Karisimbi mountain
These projects started in 2008. The investigation carried out basing on information of corruption in
these projects showed the following irregularities:

a) In the project of distribution of biogas in homes:

 Biogas plants set up in 2010 which are not functioning due to mistakes made during
construction on the part of the contractors who did not complete the works as agreed and
were not penalised; a few other biogas plants which are not functioning because the owners
don’t use them as specified;

 Biogas plants set up country wide until February are 3,499. In 15 districts where
investigations were carried out, in 1,341 biogas plants that were constructed, those
functioning are 999, while 342 don’t;

 Until June 2013, this project had been given a budget amounting to 2,909,923,894 Frw and
used 2,899,891,446 Frw including an amount of 2,170,097,595 Frw which was used in what
was termed as “program cost” and an amount of 729,793,851 Frw which was used on the
real project (subsidie);

 Comparing the amount of money spent on the real project and the amount of money used in
other activities that were termed as “program cost” the amount used on the project is way
less (25.16%). The authorities concerned, say it because at at beginning of the project, it was
much needed to sensitize the citizens on its usefulness and also that its implementation is
still being followed up;

 Credit facilities extended to citizens in regard to this project attracts high interests of 24% in
a period of 1 year;

 It was also discovered that some biogas plants that malfunction and fail to be repaired
because those who can repair them are contractors of EWSA only.

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b) The project for extraction of peat from Karisimbi mountain

 Preliminary analysis conducted by the Office of the Ombudsman on this project in general,
12 tenders were assessed out of 15 tenders awarded in that project. The Auditor General’s
report had indicated 3 tenders were awarded that were not included in the procurement plan
and physical verificationin the tender for works on the road Sashwara – Kabatwa. The
assessment of the Office of the Ombudsman showed the following:

 The tender for this project was studied well because it was divided into 12 other tenders
some of which did not comply with the laws and regulations governing public procurement.

 Tenders were awarded with disregard of order of execution of work which led to delays in
some works because there were other works that needed to be executed first but whose
tenders had not been awarded on time. A typical example is where a tender for extraction of
peat was awarded before awarding the tender for preparing the site where the peat would be
extracted from and the tender for transportation of equipment to be used in the extraction of
the peat.

 Until 24 April 2014, the project for extraction of peat had consumed funds amounting to
541,496,581 Frw and 20,111,922.58 USD. There were also other invoices that had not yet
paid amounting to 5,436,005,778.90 Frw and other disputed costs amounting to
3,440,729,426.31 Frw. In total, this project was suspended after consuming an amount of
22,108,854,934.19 Frw;

 In the disputed costs, there is an amount 1,382,944,117.1 EWSA was fined by one company
which was in charge of extracting peat. This was after it was given an authorisation letter to
commence work and after delivering its equipment it found that the preliminary works
(building of a road and accessing water to site which were supposed to be done by another
company) were not yet over. The letter of authorisation to this company was written on
28/12/2012 but the preliminary works were over in April 2013;

 Poor contract drafting which led to loss of public funds. For example, is the contract with
Yashinoya, there was no provision for penalties for a contractor who delayed work. This
delayed the progress of other works by other contractors which led them to fine the
government. Another example is the contract of GWDC, a company charged with preparing
the site for peat extraction whereby it would be paid even when there was no work done.

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Recommendations given:

After assessing all the tenders where corruption was reported in these projects mentioned above and
the mistakes made, EWSA was given the following recommendations:

 EWSA and the Districts should follow-up the contractors who left unfinished biogas plants,
those not properly done to be redone, to repare the damaged ones.

 EWSA should train and follow up persons who buld biogas plants.

 MININFRA should advocate for the citizens in SACCOs in order to reduce the interest rates
for credits facilities for biogas and to have uniform rates across the country.

 EWSA should in future study the tenders putting emphasis on whether there are other
tenders involved and to be done on time

 EWSA should evaluate projects of peat extraction to ascertain whether the benefits of the
project out weigh the losses the government might incur;

 Pursuing administratively those who led government to incur losses especially those who
awarded tender contract to the extraction company before completion of preliminary works;

 Legal officers of EWSA are hereby advised to always thoroughly assess the contracts before
they’re signed by both parties.

 The process for awarding tenders in EWSA is worrying because it does not follow the laws
and regulations related to public procurement in Rwanda.

A report on these projects was availed to EWSA and it provided its thoughts and promised to
correct all the mistakes involved.

3.1.2.2. Investigation in Ngororero District

The Office of the Ombudsman made follow up of the information about corruption cases in
awarding of tenders and management of district land in Ngororero District. Some of the
irregularities found are the following:

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a) Non observance of the law and regulations governing public procurement

 Ngororero District does not notify the unsuccessful bidders the outcome of the the
bidding as provided by the law.
 Awarding tenders not included in the procurement plan;
 Awarding tenders with no performance security security given;
 Disqualifying bidding entities with less value from bidding in unclear circumstances.
For example, SODIMEX offered amount of 150,427,277 Frw was disqualified
because on its documents, it was written on “SARL” while Trading Licence whose
documents were written on “Ltd” was not. The tender committee neglected the fact
that “SARL” is used in French as “Ltd” is used in English

b) Non bservance of the Tender contract


 When contractors don’t observe the provision of the tender contract, they are not
penalised;

 Some contractors fail to execute their tenders and the district fails to withhold the
performance security.

c) Management of District land and assets

On the issue of management of district land, those in charge could not show which land is
owned by the district, where it is located and what it is used for.

Recommendations given

The District of Ngororero was advised to observe the law and regulations governing public
procurement and those responsible for the mistakes which appeared in the report of the Office of the
Ombudsman to be penalised.

The Office of the Ombudsman provided a detailed report to the District of Ngororero it it gave its
thoughts on the issues raised. The report was also forwarded to National public Prosecution for
follow up of the offenses that appeared in awarding of tenders.

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3.1.2.3. Investigation in Nyarugenge District

The Office of the Ombudsman carried out investigations on corruption loophole and misuse of
public resources in Nyarugenge District in order to give recommendations where there are such
cases and also pursue those involved. Preliminary investigations in assessing different documents
including those concerning awarding of tenders in the fiscal year 2011-2012, reports of auditors and
some documents of financial management in payment of funds related to the tenders assessed. In
the investigations, the folloing was discovered:

 Non compliance with with the time frame for bidders in preparation of bidding documents.
This was visible in 5 tenders out of the 25 investigated which is contrary to Article 4 Law
No12/2007 of 27/03/2007 on public procurement as amended and complimented todate.

 Poor studies which leads to extention of works which eventually leads to extra costs. In 3
tenders investigated, this issue was evident. For example, Tender
No029/MT/2011/2012/NYG had been budgeted for an amount of 777,056,076 Frw but was
spent on an amount of 811,741,825 Frw; Tender No018/MT/2011-2012 which was budgeted
for an amount of 270,700,000 Frw was spent on an amount of 305,243,070 Frw; Tender
No06/MT/2011-2012 had been budgeted for an amount of 36,137,910 Frw but was spent on
an amount of 43,126,200 Frw;

 Delay in commencing works whose tenders were awarded which affects the contractor and
other beneficiaries;

 Mismanagement of fuel for vehicles;

 Misappropriation of funds. This was evident the District was given funds amounting to
2,041,060,777 Frw by the Ministry of Internal Security for the construction of a prison in
Mageragere. This project project was not implemented as planned because an amount of
876,418,821 Frw was used by the District in other activities;

 Mismanagement of rental houses in Nyabugogo Park. The District signed agreements with
different tenants for rent at the price of 300,000 Frw and 200,000 Frw for houses on ground
floor and first floor respectively. These tenants also rented out these premises at exorbitant
costs ranging from 550,000 Frw to 1,000,000 Frw without paying taxes corresponding to
these costs.

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Recommendations given

Nyarugenge District was given the following recommendations:

 To observe the timeframe stipulated in the Law No12/2007 of 27/03/2007 on public


procurement regarding publishing and opening of tenders;
 To prepare proper studies of projects of works and services, showing facts of works
needed and verified by a group of experts in those works instead of just one person as it
was done;
 To avoid delaying commencement of works after contracts have been signed;
 To set up proper mechanisms for managing fuel meant for vehicles and other
equipments observing regulations that govern them;
 To observe the laws and regulations governing management of public assets and to
expedite the building of Mageragere Prison;
 To re-draft the contracts for rent of the houses in Nyabugogo especially in clauses
setting the costs for rent per month putting into onsideration the size of the house one
operates on.
The Office of the Ombudsman provided Nyarugenge District with a detailed report and they gave
their view. The report was also submitted to National Public Prosecution Authority to pursue the
offenses involved.

3.1.2.4. Investigation in the Polytichnic Institute of Byumba (IPB)

The Office of the Ombudsman carried out investigations on information it had received with
allegations of injustice, favouritism and mismanagement of resources and staff in the Polytichnic
Institute of Byumba (IPB).
The Office of the Ombudsman carried out an assessment of the following;
 Service delivery;
 Observance of rules and regulations;
 Relations between leaders and staff;
 How students concerns are addressed;
 Management of staff.
Investigations carried out on the activities of IPB of 2011 and 2012 showed the following.

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a) Non compliance with administrative sunctions and appeals


The rules and regulations governing IPB provide for an Appeals Commission which is referred to in
case a member of staff is not satisfied with the sanctions sought against him or her. It was
discovered that this commission was never established. None of the 10 staff who were dismissed
since 2009 was given chance to appeal the decision instead, a disgruntled staff seeks court redress.
This sometimes may result in unfair dismissal.

b) Non compliance with regulations governing public procurement


The regulations determining utilisation of resources provide for ways of selecting contractors for
provision of materials and services. In some cases these regulations were not complied with and
instead IPB would provide funds to workers for purchasing some equipment directly without
necessarily observing the provisions of the regulations. This leads to purchasing materials
expensively and also may provide loopholes for corruption.

c) Non compliance with regulations concerning payment of contractors


The rules and regulation of IPB provide for payment of contractors for provision of materials and
services by cheque and the seller to issue receipts for payment and documents for list of goods
purchased.
These rules and regulations were not followed in paying contractors as seen in the following cases:
 Lack of supporting documents to effect payment of contractors; no purchase order, no
documents for proof of delivery, receipt of materials;
 Issuing cheques in the names of staff of IPB instead of the names of the contractor who
supplied materials. Moreover, there’s no document proof of receipt of payment by the
contractor;
 Handing staff cash to purchase materials and sometimes provided with mission allowances
to go and purchase them in Kigali yet payment receipts show they were purchased in
Gicumbi.
Repercussions are that IPB might have made over payments, purchase of unnecessary or more than
needed materials, or likelihood of corruption between the staff of IPB and the contractors.

d) Payments with no justification


In the analysis of payment receipts of 2011 and 2012, an amount of 20,080,014 Frw was paid
contrary to provisions of the the rules and regulations of IPB whereby there were some cheques
issued bearing only the signature of the head of finance and the head of the institution with no other

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accompanying document which makes it hard to ascertain what such amount of money was paid
for.

Recommendations given

After identifying the irregularities by the investigations carried out, the Office of the Ombudsman
gave the following recommendations:
 IPB should strictly observe the regulations governing management of resources in relation to
making payments;
 IPB should establish proper filing of purchase related documents and all other documents
related to such transactions;
 To establish the appeals commission for reference in case of discontent with a decision
taken against any staff;
 To hire more stuff in order to avoid combining responsibilities of procuring and managing
assets.
The office of the Ombudsman submitted a detailed report to the management of the Institute and
they gave their views. Thereafter, the report was also submitted to Administrative Council of IPB
and other concerned institutions

3.1.2.5. Investigation on mismanagement in Rwanda Muslim Community (RMC)

The Office of the Ombudsman received a complaint on the management of Islamic Health Center of
Bugarama whereby it was allegedly seized by ADIB (Association pour le Développpement
Islamique de Bugarama) yet the Center was constructed for the general interests of all muslims in
Bugarama and on their land.
Investigations revealed the following:

 Health Center is erected on the plot of RMC (former AMUR) according to land titles. It was
constructed under the funding of Islamic Bank for Development;
 Financial and material support to the Health Center was sought in the name of ADIB. All
the Muslims of Rusizi thought were members of ADIB but it was found, according to its
status, that ADIB is composed of only15 members. There are also some equipments that are
used in the Health Center while others stored due to lack of expertise of its workers who are
supposed to use them;

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 Part of the funds of about 75,000$ was not accounted for according to the report of Islamic
Bank for Development and as a result some projects were not implemented such as the
construction of Kamembe Primary school;
 There is unaccountable use of funds of the Health Center. From 2008 to 2012, funds
amounting to 19,644,851 Rwf transferred by the District of Rusizi and meant for staff
salaries of the Health Center that does not have any financial supporting documents on how
it was utilised which makes it hard to ascertain whether it was properly utilised.
Additionally, there’s also an amount of 7,226,556 Rwf meant for the functioning of the
Health center deducted from its account but also unaccounted for;
 There is dispute between ADIB members and Bugarama muslims who allege that ADIB
illegallyseized the property which is meant for the general interests of all muslims.

The Office of the Ombudsman requested RMC at national level to resolve these issues. In a meeting
convened on 7/6/2014 and chaired by the Rwanda Mufti Sheikh Ibrahim Kayitare, the following
were agreed on:
 Islamic Health Center of Bugarama belongs to ADIB but it was constructed on
RMC/Bugarama’s land;
 The equipments were given to the Health Center as a donation and therefore belong to the
Health Center;
 RMC will sign a partnership agreement with ADIB as regarding the management of the
Health Center because it is constructed on the property of RMC/Bugarama;
 The issue related to the construction of Bugarama Primary school was not discussed in that
meeting.

The Office of the Ombudsman finds the resolutions of the meeting between the disputing parties
sufficient and urges them to adhere to them or to make recourse to courts of law if not satisfied.

3.1.2.6. Investigation on tender Nº049/W/NOCB/MIJESPOC/2011-2012 concerning the


construction of Huye Stadium

The Office of the Ombudsman investigated the case related to the construction of Huye stadium and
noticed a big delay of completion of works. The construction of the stadium was a plegde by HE

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The President of the Republic when he visited Huye District during the presidential elections
campaigns in 2003.

The construction works of Huye stadium were dived in two phases. The first phase which was to
level the pitch and layout the synthetic turf started in 2011 while the second phase which was the
construction works started in 2012. In general, 5 tenders were awarded including the feasibility
study awarded by the District, two tenders for the execution of works in phases two phases and two
tenders for the supervision of works. These four tenders were awarded by the Ministry of Sports
and Culture. The funds for the construction of the stadium were allocated by the Government of
Rwanda.

After analyzing all documents related to the construction of Huye stadium and conducting
interrogations of different persons, the following irregularities were identified:

a) Additional works not planned


Additional works which were not planned for in the feasibility study were carried out which also led
to unexpected extra costs. This affected the supervision contract which was renewed to cover the
additional work and this led to more unplanned expenses incurred. This resulted from poor
feasibility study.

b) Works delays
Works delayed because the designs which were to be used by the contractor were not available on
time and additional works not planned for as mentionned above. Consequently, this led to delays in
the construction works and unplanned extra costs incurred.

c) Unnecessary payment to the supervision company


According to the contract, Ng’andu Consulting Ltd, the supervising company was to be paid
228,685,000 Rfw, meaning a monthly payment of 17,591,153 Rwf. The company specified the use
of the funds as acquisition of the materials, vehicles, payment of salaries for workers, and others.
During the contract extension period, the consultant company continued to be paid the same
monthly amount yet some equipment were bought only once and some activities were already
completed within the period of the initial contract and were not continuous and MINISPOC should
have deducted that amount from the renewed contract. The Office of the Ombudsman noticed an
unnecessary payment amounting to 12,946,120 Rwf.

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d) Reduction of the number of seats in stadium


The terms of reference of the feasibility study had provided for 13,500 seats, but later the number
was reduced to 10,000 seats. The reduction was decided in order to comply with FIFA requirements
providing seat measures. This also shows that the study was not properly carried out in order to
ensure the required standards.

Following the irregularities mentioned above, the Government of Rwanda will incur an unnecessary
extra payment of 915,472,186 Rwf for additional works not planned, contracts renewal more than
once for the contractor and the supervising company due to works delays.

After analyzing the above mentionned irregularities, the Office of the Ombudsman recommended
the following:
 All concerned parties should strive for the fair completion of works;
 MININFRA should make a close follow up of execution of the remaining works to avoid
another addendum contract which may incur extra expenses and delays of works;
 Public institutions should be reminded to be careful in preparing terms of reference in
tenders to avoid mistakes that may lead the Government to extra expenses;
 All organs related to construction of stadiums should work as a team to make sure that the
study is well done before works begin to avoid repeating works already done. Such a study
can serve as reference for future sonstructions of stadiums.

3.1.2.7. Investigation in University of Rwanda

The Office of the Ombudsman received a complaint about lecturers at University of Rwanda, Huye
Campus who worked overtime but without payment for the extra time. Analysis of documents
showed that there are 33 lecturers who received their arrears from 2010 to 2013 amounting to
70,293,045 Rwf. It was also found out that as the investigations were ongoing, 15 more lecturers in
the Faculty of Science were paid 25,200,000 Rwf. (the payment was done on 24/03/2014.

So far 162 lecturers have not yet been paid for the overtime for the period from 2010 to 2013. This
resulted in arrears amounting 391,974,146 Rwf that the University of Rwanda owes to lecturers.

This is a violation of the lecturers’ rights which might affect their duties of lecturing.. To overcome
such situation, the University should set up mechanisms for a quick payment of existing errears but

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also establish the mechanisms of paying overtime on time. It is in this regards, the University was
requested to establish the arrears payment program.

3.1.2.8. Case of mismanagement in Gasabo District

After receiving allegations of mismanagement in Gasabo District, the Office of the Ombudsman
carried out an audit of some services of the District. It analysed the procurement procedures,
contract management and unpayment of contractors in line with their contracts with the District.
The audit identified the following irregularities:
 All tenders are not awarded as planned: out of 94 planned tenders in 2012 - 2013, only 64
were awarded. This resulted in the District not achieving its objectives in terms of
development and service delivery. According to the District officials explanations, this
happens when the planned tender is nolonger relevat or due limited budget;
 The contract period is not respected: the District did not monitor the execution of some
contracts for final reception. Some delays stem from the fact that the District does not pay
the contractors the bills submitted on time;
 The District delays to pay the contractors and other patners: this resulted in a huge debt
exceeding 1billion Rwandan francs. The delays in payment mostly results from poor
planning where sometimes the District starts to implement some activities it without budget;
 The debt owed by the District to different contrators from 2012 to 7/4/214, the time of
conducting the audit, is 1,387,703,926 Rwf. An amount of 1,137,370,928 Rwf was supposed
to be paid from the District own revenues while an amount of 96,572,818 Rwf was to be
given by the development partners.

The fact that the District to owes such a big debt may lead it to lack of trust from the public which
may affect its development and may also lead to judicial proceedings against the government.
Irregularities in procurement procedures may create loophole for corruption.

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3.2. COORDINATION OF ACTIVITIES OF THE ADVISORY COUNCIL TO FIGHT


AGAINST CORRUPTION AND INJUSTICE

Basing on the Presidential Order no 64/01 of 12/02/2014 determining the responsibilities,


organisation and functioning of the Advisory Council to fight against corruption and injustice, the
Office of the Ombudsman is mandated to coordinate all activities of Advisory Council to fight
against corruption and injustice. The Council was established to enhance collaboration in
preventing and fighting against corruption and injustice.

The Office of the Ombudsman organized the meetings of Advisory Council to fight against
corruption and injustice at national level and meetings of the Technical Committee of the Council.
The Office also made a follow up of activities of Advisory Council to fight against corruption and
injustice at District and Sector levels.

3.2.1. Meetings of the National Advisory Council to fight against corruption and injustice

At national level, the Office prepared and chaired meetings of the Advisory Council to fight against
corruption and injustice on the following topics:

 Responsibilities and the functioning of Advisory Council to fight against corruption and
injustice;
 Implementation of the National anti-corruption policy;
 The issue public asset recovery basing on court decisions of convicts of corruption and
related offences (still being pursued);
 The issue of recovery of public properties illegally acquired by individuals (still being
pursued).

3.2.2. Technical Committee

Members of the Technical Committee are from the institutional members of Advisory Council to
fight against corruption and injustice. The Office of the Ombudsman chaired the meetings of that
Committee and discussed the following items:

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 Implementation of resolutions adopted by the Advisory Council to fight against corruption


and injustice at National level on the recovery of public property illegally obtained by
individuals;
 Implementation of the National anti-corruption policy;
 Preparation of anti-corruption week held in December 2013;
 Responsibilities of the Technical Committee of Advisory Council to fight against corruption
and injustice at National Level;
 Exchange of information on statistics relating to injustice cases, corruption and related
offences from institutional members of Advisory Council;
 Functionning of Asset Recovery Inter-Agency Network for the Eastern Africa.

3.2.3. Functioning of Anti-Corruption Advisory Council against corruption and injustice at


District level

As provided for by the Presidential Order nº 64/01 of 12/02/2014, an Advisory Council was
established at District level. In 2013-2014, the Office of the Ombudsman made a follow up of
different activities of those Councils. Advisory Councils were also established at Sector level, and
their members were trained in all districts. Trainings focused on their responsibilities and the
Councils’ functioning.

3.3. IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL ANTI-CORRUPTION POLICY

The Office of the Ombudsman has the mandate of coordinating and monitoring the implementation
of the National anti-corruption policy. In this regards, all institutions, public or private, were
informed about that policy. Particulary, concerned institutions were requested to provide reports on
quarterly basis.

Table no 11: Activities for the implementation of anti-corruption policy

no Institution Activities in the National anti-corruption policy for


implementation
Office of the Ombudsman  Strengthen annual anti-corruption dialogue;
 Monitor the implementation and impact of Leadership code of
conduct ;

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no Institution Activities in the National anti-corruption policy for


implementation
 Strengthen the training policy to service the needs of anti-
corruption institutions;
 Initiate a national awards scheme to recognize integrity and
exemplary service;
 Develop special awareness program for anti-corruption clubs in
secondary, higher institutions of learning and other youths clubs in
local administration;
 Strenghen an annual anti-corruption compaign to promote public
participation, awareness and ownership;
 Identify and promote national values as core values for society;
 Establish the anti-cooruption Public Private partnership framework
through diologues;
 Monitor the impact of anti-corruption legislation and its
enforcement.
MIFOTRA  Address performance and accountability in the public service;
 Monitor public attitudes to accountability issues and service
delivery.
Itorero ry’Igihugu  Introduce anti-corruption course in Itorero ry’Igihugu.
RCAC  Use corruption convicts to educate the public through testimonies
MHC  Get involved in the anti-corruption action campaign
MINUJUST  Set up the specail anti-corruption court;
 Strenghen cooperation to improve the handling of corruption cases;
 Prepare a framework to strenghen the confiscation of assets;
 Monitor Rwanda's compliance with United Nations Convention
against Corruption (UNCAC) and take steps to close gaps;
 Initiate mutual legal assistance arrangements with relevant foreign
countries;
 Pursue the EAC anti-corruption framework arrangements
MINECOFIN  Adopt e-procurement and e-payment systems in order to limit
physical personal contact in making payments;
 Build capacity of financial officers;

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no Institution Activities in the National anti-corruption policy for


implementation
 Improve effectiveness of internal audits and audit committees for
the purpose of strengthening internal controls in financial
management and reporting;
 Improve bidding process, value for money, controls, and
transparency in public procurement
MINEAC  Pursue the EAC anti-corruption framework arrangements
MINEDUC  Introduce anti-corruption course in secondary school curriculum
PSF and NGOs  Promote ethical standards in non-state actors through the
introduction of the code of conducts
 Continue fostering partnerships between public and private
institutions in order to ensure effective service delivery and
accountability

In the reports gathered, it was identified that some institutions don’t report as required.
Instistutions that reported include:
• Rwanda Correctional Services
• Media High Council
• Ministry of Justice
• Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning
• Ministry of East African Community
• Ministry of Public Service and Labor
• Ministry of Education through Rwanda Education Board (REB)
• Itorero ry’Igihugu

Institutions that did not report:


• Private Sector Federation
• Civil Society Platform

In the reports submitted, it appears that institutions tried to implement activities provided in the
National anti-corruption policy, those that are not implemented are continous activities or activities
that take a long time to implement.

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4. MONITORING THE ENFORCEMENT OF GOOD GOVERNANCE PRINCIPLES

4.1. ASSESSMENT OF PROGRAMS AND OPERATIONAL AUDIT OF PUBLIC AND


PRIVATE INSTITUTIONS

An operational audit aims at examining how institutions fulfil their responsibilitities looking at their
functioning, compliance with their internal rules and regulations, collabolation with other organs
and the complementarity of their responsibilities with the general national policy. The audit
concerns all aspects of management of an institution with emphasis on issues that might be
vurnerable to loopholes of corruption and injustice. With the operational audit, important
recommendations are provided to improve the functionning of the audited institution in terms of
efficiency and effectivness.

The operational audit is conducted basing on some attributions of the Office of the Ombudsman,
including:
 prevent and fight injustice, corruption and related offences in public and private entities;
 advise Cabinet and other concerned institutions as regards strengthening and improving their
policy of preventing, fighting and punishing corruption and related offences;
 contribute to the strengthening of good governance in all institutions.

4.1.1. Operational audit of public institutions

Public institutions must comply with laws and regulations governing them for public interest.
Audited institutions include the Ministry of Health, Rwanda Social Security Board and the
Motorvehicle Inspection Center. In general, audited institutions were selected basing on the
following:
• the fact that services of such institution are sought or have an impact on a big number of
population;
• basing on information received by the Office of the Ombudsman on the functioning of an
institution that may have loopholes for corruption.

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4.1.1.1. Ministry of Health (MoH)

Ministry of Health was selected to be audited due to its highly needed services it provides to all
citizens of the country and the big budget it uses from the national budget and donors. MoH has the
mandate to ensure citizens universal access to health services by providing health centers, hospitals,
medical equipments and availing drugs to government pharmacies.
The operational audit revealed the following challenges and irregularities:
 Some health related buildings are not appropriate: some buildings are not appropriate for
their intended use. An example is where you find a hospital with a maternity ward which
does not have a place for proper waste disposal;
 Medical equipments purchased but not used yet are needed. For example there are
equipments meant for treatment of kidney in CHUK not used and different equipments in
Bushenge Hospital which are also not being used yet they’re needed;
 A debt of 6,095,586,853 Rwf owed to different health centers and hospitals: this mostly
results from insurance coverage (mutuelle de santé contributions) meant to be paid by MoH
and districts;
 Lack of proper procurement procedures in District Pharmacies;
 Tenders planned but not executed and tenders executed but not planned for;
 Incomplete files of some staff;
 Doctors and public servants working in District Hospitals do not get their gratification
resulting from their annual performance evaluation: their performances are evaluated but
they are not given the bonus yet their counterparts at MoH get it. Although, during the
operational audit, it was discovered that all necessary steps had been taken for them to get
the bonus for the years 2011 and 2012.

To improve its functioning, MoH should observe laws and regulations governing the management
of its staff, assets, and public procurement procedures. Employees on the same level should be
given the same PBF bonus in order to avoid favoritism and nepotism tendencies.

4.1.1.2. Rwanda Social Security Board (RSSB)

Rwanda Social Security Board is an institution providing many services to many persons being civil
servants or other citizen in general, and has a great impact on wellbeing of the population. Basing

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on its services, the Office of the Ombudsman audited the operations of RSSB mainly to identify if
there were no loopholes for corruption. Social Security Board is mandated to promote social
security, mutual health benefits, servent pensions payment, collection and management of clients'
contributions provided by the law.

The operational audit identified the following irregularities:


• Delays in reporting the financial statement regarding budget execution to the Ministry of
Finance and economic Planning and National Bank;
• Lack of finacial supporting documents;
• Ineffiency in payment of contributions;
• Poor management of debts owed to RSSB;
• Insufficent internal audits in RSSB and its branches;
• Inspection of contributors not done appropriately;
• Some buildings set up in different corners of the Country are not being utilized;
• Irregularities in public procurement procedures.

In order to improve its functioning, RSSB should comply with laws and regulations governing use
of resources, adopt strong investment strategies and promote good management of property,
improve audit and inspection as well as implement the recommendations provided.

4.1.1.3. Motovehicle Inspection Center

Motorvehicle Inspection Center is part of the Department of Traffic and Road safety in Rwanda
National Police. The Center has been operational since 2008 and mandated with the responsiblity to
conduct technical inspection for all road vehicles in order to prevent and reduce the rate of road
accidents.
The Center was selected to be audited based on information gathered that there were
maladministration and also corruption tendencies in the provision of technical control certificate.

Motorvehicle Inspection Center makes effort in conducting technical inspection of road vehicles
and providing certificate for roadworthiness. In 2012, inspection was done on 64,201 vehicles
while in the first 8 months of 2013 38,022 vehicles were inspected. Vehicle with technical problems
are not given the certificate allowing them to operate on Rwandan roads unless the problems are

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fixed. Even though the Center availed the number of vehicles inspected, the number of all vehicles
supposed to be technically controlled is still unkown.

Motorvehicle Inspection Center has adopted corruption preventive strategies such as awareness
meetings, trainings, talk shows in media and rotation of staff on duty. Those suspected to be
involved in corrupt practices were administratively punished and some even dismissed from
Rwanda National Police.

Recomendation made to the center was to respect laws and regulations governing resources
management and to also conduct the technical control of Rwanda National Police vehicles and those
of Rwanda Defense Force as they also transport human beings.

4.1.2. Assessment of government programs

Government programs assessed in 2013-2014 include Crop Intensification Program (CIP) and
Umurenge Saving and Credit Cooperatives (SACCOs). Objectives of the assessment were to
evaluate their implementation and see if they achieve their targets and to examine if there are no
loopholes for corruption and injustice in their management. Those programs were chosen due to
their great impact in promoting farmers and small and medium investment as they play a big role in
social and economic development.

4.1.2.1. Crop Intensification Program (CIP)

CIP is a government program with the goal of promoting agriculture by significantly increasing the
production. The program focuses on the following:

• Consolidation of land use;


• Improved seed and fertiliser use;
• Proximity extension service by proximity service providers;
• Agricultural product marketing;
• Promote agro inputs dealer’s network;
• Stimulate reliable, private-sector input and output markets through technology;
• Food sufficiency.

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In implementing the consolidation of land use, land parcels consolidated increased from 28.016 ha
in 2008 to 602,000 ha in 2012. The priority crops, depending on the nature of the soil, are; maize,
beans, rice, soy beans, cassava, bananas, irish potato, wheat and sunflower.

Rwanda Agriculture Board plays a big role in the implementation of that program by providing
improved seed and fertiliser to increase food productivity. The assessment revealed that the
implementation of that program has the following contraints:
• the level of citizens understanding of the program is still low;
• Insufficient improved seeds;
• Little financial capacity of farmers which makes fertiliser unaffordable.
• Lack of sufficient production storage facilities;
• Climate change.

For a better impact of Crop Intensification Program to farmers, the following must be considered:
• Strengthen agricultural cooperatives because they have easy access to market for their
production;
• Reinforce SACCOs and other credit and savings schemes so as to be able to provide needed
loans to farmers;
• Increase the improved seeds;
• Initiate the improved storage facilities of production;
• Monitor the distribution of fertilizers;
• Strengthen sensitization of the population on the benefits of the program.

4.1.2.2. Umurenge Saving and Credit Cooperatives (SACCOs)

Umurenge Saving and Credit Cooperatives (SACCOs) started in 2009, and it is operational in all
Administrative Sectors of the Country. The purpose of establishing Umurenge SACCO was to
allow people especially in rural areas to have access to financial institutions in order to save money,
access loans and credits.
SACCOs have acheived many important things for the citizens’ development. The number of
members is increasing due to the mobilization system. As long as members increase, their savings
are increasing as well. SACCOs provide loans to members to finance their development projects

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such as farming, and small or midium businesses. The assessment covered 3 SACCOs per District
in 10 Districts.

The following challenges were idenified in SACCOs’ functionning:


• Administrative committees not yet established;
• Administrative organs don’t meet as required;
• Insufficiency of audit;
• Audit reports not submitted to concerned institution;
• Audit recommendations are not implemented;
• Financial documents not properly filled;
• Insecurity of money and offices where they operate;
• Staff members who misappropriate the funds and do not pay back or delay to do so;
• Insufficient use of technology in functioning of SACCOs;
• Loans provided without guarantee/Security;
• Delays in paying back loans or not paying them especially by those in administration of
SACCO or by those they are given to without guarantee;
• Lack of transparency in recruitment;
• Lack of capacity to some staff members.

For the improvement of SACCOs functioning, the following recommendations should be


implemented:
• SACCO administrative organs should observe laws and regulations governing them;
• Ensure security of funds and their proper management;
• Put in place proper mechanisms of loan management and recovery;
• Adopt strategies of preventing loopholes of corruption and injustice;
• Conduct audit on regular basis and implement the recommendations given.

4.1.3. Assessment of private institutions and associations

Private institutions and associations assessed in 2013-2014 are Cement Industry (CIMERWA),
Kabuye Sugar works, Society Rwandaise d'Assurance (SORAS Group Ltd), Société Nouvelle
d’Assurance du Rwanda (SONARWA Holdings Limited) and Rwanda Federation of Football
Association (FERWAFA). They were selected to be assessed because their services reach a big

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number of population, therefore they must prevent and fight corruption and injustice in their
functioning aiming at promoting good governance.

4.1.3.1. Rwanda Cement Industry (CIMERWA)

CIMERWA is a private company in which the Government has 16.55% shares, Pretoria Portland
Cement (PPC Ltd): 51%, Rwanda Social Security Board
(RSSB): 20.24%, Rwanda Investment Group (RIG): 11.45% and SONARWA: 0.76%. CIMERWA
plays a crucial role in the welfare of the population living in the neighboring Administrative
Sectors. It established a Health Center, a nursery and primary school and it has also provided the
neighboring population with water for free of charge. However, the production of cement has
reduced from 102.935,75 tons in 2007 to 81.648 tons in 2012. The main causes of decrease in
production are the old machines, the cost of fuel oil, high prices of key input such as the stone
called gypsum imported from Kenya.

During the assessment, some irregularities were noticed in human resources management due to the
fact that some employees’ files were incomplete and employees dont have accident insurance.
Assets and petty cash are not well managed and the internal regulations on procurement are not
respected.

CIMERWA was given the following recommendations:


• Initiate the ways of taking care of its employees by subscribing to accident insurance for
them;
• Promote principles of good human resources management, and respect their rights;
• Establish internal rules and regulations; ;
• Observe in whole internal procurement procedures manual;
• Ensure good financial and asset managements.

4.1.3.2. Kabuye Sugar Works (KSW)

KSW is a company producing sugar from its sugar plantations and plantations of citizens. It has two
shareholders: Independent Sugar Corporation Ltd holds 49,500 shares and Koduvayur Parasuraman
Eswar with 500 shares.

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KSW faces a challenge of decrease of production due to the fact that in 3.148 ha, sugar cane can
only be planted on 1,700 ha (54%) while the remaining is unexploited due to floodings and water
stagnation. The decrease of production of sugar is also caused by insufficiency of appropriate
machinery for sugar cane transformation.

KSW has not yet achived its target of producing 17,000,000 kg of sugar per year. In the financial
year of 2011-2012, KSW produced 8,384,500 kgs of sugar while in 2012-2013 it produced
7,939,850 kgs.

With the aim of boosting the sugar cane harvest and sugar production, KSW has a strategy of
increasing sugar cane cultavation on uphills and swampy area, draining swamps where sugar canes
are grown, using fertilizers and mobilizing farmers to form cooperatives. Successful
implementation of those strategies needs the partnership of KSW and concerned institutions such as
MINAGRI, MINICOM, RCA and Districts.

4.1.3.3. Société Rwandaise d’Assurances (SORAS Group Ltd)

SORAS is a private insurance company created in 1984, it has a big role in the development of the
population because it contributes to their savings and investiments. There are loopholes
for corruption in the procurement process of SORAS Group Ltd due to lack of proper procurement
plan and procurement procedures manual.

In compensating a client, there is a time frame of five days for a client to be compensated but
sometimes this time is exceeded. There is no mechanism established to inform clients progress of
their cases or missing documents.

SORAS Group Ltd was recommended to establish internal rules and regulations, corruption
preventive strategies and improve service delivery.

4.1.3.4. Société Nouvelle d’Assurance du Rwanda (SONARWA Holdings Limited/SHL)

SONARWA is composed of two insurance companies with different managing organs, SONARWA
General Insurance Company Limited (SONARWA General) and SONARWA Life Insurance
Company Limited (SONARWA Life). The assessment revealed that SONARWA does not have

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internal rules and regulations; it lacks a procurement plan and long term business plan. Even if
SONARWA is audited by external auditors such as the Central Bank of Rwanda and Rwanda
Revenue Authority, some audit recommendations are not implemented.

As regards service delivery, SONARWA set time frame of handling all claims of clients related to
accidents, but delays in reparation of vehicles, payment of bills and compensation were observed.
There is the lack of a mechanism to inform clients the progress of their cases or missing documents.
In order to achieve its attributions, SONARWA was recommended to establish internal rules and
regulations and improve service delivery.

4.1.3.5. Rwandese Federation of Football Association (FERWAFA)

FERWAFA is a non-governmental organization with the mandate of coordinating all football


activities in the country, promoting a sustainable football development and cooperation with other
federations.

The budget of FERWAFA is delived from subscriptions of its member clubs, funds from FIFA and
money from competitions and other partners. At the time of assessment, the subscription of member
clubs was totaling to 4,686,000 Rwf was not yet paid by teams of the first division while a total of
1,732,000 Rwf was not yet paid by teams of the second division. This leaves FERWAFA with
insufficient funds, a big challenge which hampers its good functioning.

FERWAFA works closely with MINISPOC in the management of national team in covering all
expenses of the National team. However, the partnership between the two is not good because of a
debt of 382,615,748 Rwf which is the attributed to FERWAFA yet it is supposed be paid by
MINISPOC. FERWAFA is owed an amount of 100 000USD by SPOT FIVE Company. This
company was the successful bidder to sell services of advertisement in all matches of the national
competition cup of under 20 held in Rwanda in 2009; SPOT FIVE collected money for the
advitisement at the stadium by different companies and had an obligation to pay FERWAFA an
amount of 100 000 USD as provided for in the contract.

The following are challenges in the functionning of FERWAFA,:


 Lack of legal personality;
 Lack of internal rules and regulations;

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 Failure to implement the resolutions of the General Assembly;


 Lack of annual financial report;
 Lack of action plan.
For the improvement of its functioning FERWAFA should be an association legally accepted with
manuals regulating the financial and administrative procedures.
FERWAFA should establish sustainable measures to increase its resources, promote accountability
and transparency vis-à-vis its members and partners and prevent loopholes of embezzlement of its
resources.

4.2. Monitoring of the implementation of Ombudsman’s recommendations

The Office of the Ombudsman is mandated with advising public and private institutions in order to
improve the quality of services delivered to the population.

For this purpose, Office of the Ombudsman conducts operational audit in public institutions in order
to assess their functioning and make recommendations for the improvement of their performance in
terms of efficiency and effectiveness. After issuing recommendations, the Office undertakes a
follow up to evaluate the implementation of these recommendations.

In this period of 2013-2014, the follow up was conducted in 51 Institutions and 43 of them have
reported how the given recommendations were implemented.
The following table shows how 43 Institutions have implemented the given recommendations.

Table n°12 : Number of recommendations provided and the level of their implementation.

No Institutions Number of Recommendations Recommendations Recommendations


recommendations implemented in process to be not yet
provided implemented implemented
1. Nyagatare District 12 6 (50%) 3 (25%) 3 (25%)

2. Gicumbi District 10 3 (30%) 1 (10%) 6 (60%)

3. Nyarugenge District 11 8 (73%) 2 (18%) 1 (9%)


4. Gatsibo District 15 7 (47%) 1 (6%) 7 (47%)
5. Gakenke District 12 3 (25%) 7 (58%) 2 (17%)

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No Institutions Number of Recommendations Recommendations Recommendations


recommendations implemented in process to be not yet
provided implemented implemented
6. Ngoma District 12 6 (50%) 2 (7%) 4 (33%)
7. Musanze District 12 10 (83%) - 2 (17%)
8. Kayonza District 14 6 (43%) 2 (14%) 6 (43%)
9. Ruhango District 11 7 (64%) - 4 (36%)
10. Nyanza District 13 8 (61%) 4 (31%) 1 (8%)
11. Ngororero District 8 4 (50%) 1 (13%) 3 (37%)
12. Rwamagana District 9 7 (78%) - 2 (22%)
13. Nyamagabe District 11 10 (91%) 1 (9%) -
14. Huye District 6 5 (83%) - 1 (17%)
15. Muhanga District 14 11 (79%) 2 (14%) 1 (7%)
16. Nyaruguru District 15 12 (80%) 3 (20%) -
17. Rusizi District 8 4 (50%) 1 (13%) 3 (37%)
18. Rubavu District 9 4 (45%) 3 (33%) 2 (22%)
19. Nyamasheke District 10 8 (80%) 2 (20%) -
20. Nyabihu District 12 10 (84%) 1 (8%) 1 (8%)
21. Huye Prison 6 3 (50%) 3 (50%) -
22. Rubavu Prison 11 6 (55%) 3 (27%) 2 (18%)
23. Nyanza Prison 6 5 (83%) 1 (17%) -
24. RCAA 3 2 (67%) 1 (33%) -
25. REB 6 - 4 (67%) 2 (33%)
26. Murunda Hospital 5 3 (60%) 1 (20%) 1 (20%)
27. RMI 7 2 (29%) 5 (71%) -
28. Nyamata Hospital 14 10 (71%) 3 (22%) 1 (7%)
29. TTC Kirambo 3 2 (67%) 1 (33%) -
30. Urugaga Imbaraga 9 5 (56%) 3 (33%) 1 (11%)
31. Bugesera District 15 9 (60%) 2 (13%) 4 (27%)
32. Gisagara District 12 6 (50%) 5 (42%) 1 (8%)
33. Rulindo District 10 6 (60%) 3 (30%) 1 (10%)
34. Kamonyi District 11 9 (82%) 2 (18%) -
35. RHA 3 3 (100%) - -
36. EWSA 5 5 (100%) - -

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No Institutions Number of Recommendations Recommendations Recommendations


recommendations implemented in process to be not yet
provided implemented implemented
37. RDB 5 4 (80%) 1 (20%) -

38. MIFOTRA 7 5 (71%) 2 (29%) -


39. Gisenyi Hospital 10 6 (60%) 4 (40%) -
40. Muhororo Hospital 4 3 (75%) - 1 (25%)
41. TTC Save 3 2 (67%) 1 (33%) -
42. Partners in Health 3 3 (100%) - -

43. TTC ZAZA 2 2 (100%) - -

Igiteranyo 384 240 (63%) 81 (21%) 63 (16%)

As it is indicated by the table, among the 43 Institutions that reported how the recommendations
provided by Office of the Ombudsman were implemented, 36 of them implemented the
recommendations at the level of 50% and above while 7 Institutions are at the level of
implementation below 50%.

The 8 Institutions that did not report how the recommendations given were implemented are the
following:
 Gasabo District
 Kicukiro District
 Burera Distict
 MINAGRI
 MINAFFET
 RRA
 CCOAIB
 Kilinda Hospital

In the year 2013-2014, also follow up was conducted for the institutions reported in 2012-2013
which did not implemented any recommendations, reminding them to report the status of
implementation. The following table shows the comparison of status of implementation of
recommendations between the periods of 2012-2013 and 2013-2014.

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Table n◦13: Comparison of status of implementation of recommendations between the periods


of 2012-2013 and 2013-2014.

No Institutions Number Status of implementation of Status of implementation of


of recommendations in the period of 2012-2013 recommendations in the period of 2013-
recomme (%) 2014 (%)
ndations Recommend Recommend Recommenda Recommend Recommend Recommend
provided ations ations in tions not yet ations ations in ations not
implemented process to be implemented implemented process to be yet
implemented implemented implemente
d
1. TTC 6 4 67% 2 33% 0 5 83% 1 17% 0 0%
Kirambo
2. Murunda 8 3 37.5% 2 25% 3 37.5% 6 75% 1 12.5% 1 12.5
Hospital %
3. RIAM 7 0 0% 3 43% 4 57% 2 29% 5 71% 0 0%
4. Nyamata 14 0 0% 0 0% 14 100% 10 71% 3 22% 1 7%
Hospital
5. Urugaga 9 0 0% 0 0% 9 100% 5 56% 3 33% 1 11%
imbaraga
6. TTC Save 6 3 50% 3 50% - 5 83% 1 17% -
7. TTC ZAZA 7 5 71% 2 29% 0 7 100%
8. Partners in 6 3 50% 3 50% - 6 100% - -
Health
9. Muhororo 8 4 50% 2 25% 2 25% 7 87.5% - 1 12.5
Hospital %
Total 71 100% 22 31% 17 24% 32 45% 53 74% 14 20% 4 6%

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Figure n◦4: Comparison of status of implementation of recommendations between the periods


of 2012-2013 and 2013-2014.

The above table shows that in the period of 2013-2014, there was an improvement in implementing
the recommendations compared to the period of 2012-2013. In fact, in the period of 2012-2013,
among the 64 (100%) recommendations given to 9 institutions, 27% only were implemented, 23%
were in process of being implemented while 50% were not implemented however in the period of
2013-2014, it was noticed that 72% of the given recommendations were implemented, 22% were in
process of being implemented and 6% were not yet implemented.

4. 3. Monitoring the observance of the principles governing conduct of leaders

In order to monitor the implementation of Organic Law N° 11/2013/0L of 11/09/2013 modifying


and complementing the Organic Law nº 61/2008 of 10/09/2008 on the leadership code of conduct as
well as the Law N° 04/2013 Of 08/02/2013 relating to access to information, the Office of The
Ombudsman conducted the following activities:

 Investigation of cases related to misconduct of leaders;

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 Monitoring of how leaders comply with those laws.

4.3.1. Investigation on cases related to conduct of leaders

The Office of the Ombudsman conducted investigations on the cases concerning the behaviour of
leaders at work place and outside. Those cases are categorized according to their context. The
Office of the Ombudsman also conducted investigation on cases related to the Access to
Information Law.

4.3.1.1. Cases related to leaders behaviour in their duties

The Office of the Ombudsman received different information concerning misconduct of Leaders at
their work place. That information was received in the following way:

a) Cases related to mis use of government vehicles.

The Office of the Ombudsman received information concerning the misuse of government vehicles
in two Higher Institutions of Learning by Senior Officials in those institutions. The investigations
found the information to be true and the Office of the Ombudsman sought administrative sanctions
against one of the leaders.
The same leader is also accused for the following other misconducts:
- Failing to pay items/ assets bought from Public auction;
- Failing to pay house rent of the institution;
- Unjustified absenteeism at work.
The investigation found that the allegations of the leader’s behaviour was relevant and the cases
submitted to the National Public Prosecution Authority.

b) Case related to the Leader who was remunerated contrary to law


The Office of the Ombudsman received information stating that a Leader in High Learning
Institution was over remunerated. The investigation found that he was paid a salary of a Rector,
instead of that of a Vice Rector. The said leader was requested to pay back the extra amount due in
Public Treasure, and he did it.

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c) Case related to the Expatriates staff


The Office of the Ombudsman received the information concerning illegal recruitment and
renewing of contracts of foreign employees in High Learning Institutions.

The investigations found out that those employees were recruited without competition and their
contracts where illegally renewed. The Office of the Ombudsman discussed with the concerned
authorities on those findings and agreed to correct that maladministration.

d) Case related to one leader in one District in Western Province

A Senior Official in a certain District in Western province allowed a person claiming to be an


employee of European Union to operate in the whole district with farmers in all sectors within the
district. He lied to the targeted population that the European Union would fund their projects and
asked them to give some contribution in order to select their projects.
In collaboration with Rwanda National Police, the investigations found that 9 farmers from different
sectors lost 619 050 Rwf hoping that their projects would be financed. The District availed to that
person claiming to be employee of European Union all details of those farmers and this made it
easy to contact them. The case was transmitted to Police.

4.3.2. Monitoring of interdictions and incompatibilities of Senior officials

 The Office of the Ombudsman conducted a monitoring on article 6 of the Organic Law N°
11/2013/0L of 11/09/2013 modifying and complementing the Organic Law nº 61/2008 of
10/09/2008 on the leadership code of conduct related to contracts prohibited to a leader. The
monitoring aimed to assess if leaders have personal contracts with a foreign country or an
international organization that has diplomatic relations with the Republic of Rwanda. The
monitoring found that there are some leaders who concluded some personal contracts but
which don’t compromise the general interests of the State.
 The monitoring also was done on the Organic Law concerning other incompatibilities with
the duties of a leader. The monitoring based on the article stating that “A Leader governed
by this Organic Law shall be allowed to be a member of a non- governmental organization.
However, he/she shall not be authorized to head a non- governmental organization, except
where such an organization is exclusively comprised of leaders governed by this Organic
Law or an organization primarily composed of leaders irrespective of other persons not

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subject to this Law who may join. It was observed that fifteen (15) leaders did not respect
that provision and they have been contacted and all of them resigned.
 During this financial year of 2013-2014, in order to verify if leaders implement all the
provisions of those two laws, the Office of the Ombudsman carried out a monitoring of
implementation of the Organic Law. That monitoring activity was done on the new Cabinet
members, Senior Officials in Ministries, Senators, Deputies and other Senior Officials who
work in the Parliament, both Chambers. The activity targeted 136 Senior Officials. 120 were
monitored.

The finding of this monitoring was:

 Leaders who didn’t set the internal rules and regulation in their institutions;
 One leader who didn’t pay tax on immovable properties ;
 3 Senior Officials who received gifts in line of work but didn’t declare them as provided by
the Presidential Order.

4.2. MONITORING THE IMPLEMANTATION OF ACCESS TO INFORMATION LAW

Since the Office of the Ombudsman was assigned to monitor the implementation of the Law n°
04/2013 of 08/02/2013 relating to Access to Information, the Office received different complaints
related to the access to information as follows:

 A news paper brought a case to the Office of the Ombudsman complaining of not getting
information requested in different organisations.
 A lawyer was complaining on behalf of his client for not being provided with information
from a small financial institution. For both cases the Office found the complaints relevant
and requested the institutions to provide the information sought. In these cases the people
who were supposed to provide the information claimed they were not aware of the
provisions of the law.

 Other two issues were sorted out by just directly contacting the concerned entities and they
provided the information.

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5. RECEIVING AND VERIFYING THE FILES OF DECLARATION OF ASSETS

During the year of 2013-2014, The Office of the Ombudsman implemented the mandate of
receiving and verifying of files of declaration of assets made by leaders, civil servants and Rwandan
political organizations as follows:
 Sensitization for declarers;
 Receiving the declaration of assets from persons determined by the law;
 Receiving the declaration of assets of political organizations and verifying their origin and
their use;
 Analysis and verification of files of declaration of assets;
 Comparison of assets declared by Land Officers and the Head of Finance services under
ministries within 3 years (2011-2013);
 Investigation on non declared assets;
 seeking administrative sanctions against those who failed to declare in the year 2013;
 Upgrading the Online Declaration of Assets System (ODAS).

5.1. SENSITAZATION FOR DECLARERS

In order to make sensitization of the persons who have to declare their properties as stipulated by
the law, the Office of the Ombudsman did the following:
 Broadcasting on different local radios, announcements through the private and public news
papers;
 Short messages on declarer’s mobile phones;
 Posting on the Office of the Ombudsman website a video showing the steps of the online
declaration process;
 Publishing the activity of declaration of assets as well as its importance on national radio
and television.

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5.2. RECEIVING THE DECLARATION OF ASSETS FROM THE DECLARERS


PROVIDED BY THE LAW

During the year 2014, through the Online Declaration of Assets System, the Office of the
Ombudsman received the declaration of assets of the leaders from different institutions as well as
the civil servants provided by the Law No 76/2013 of 11/9/2013 determining the mission, powers,
organization and functioning of the Office of the Ombudsman.

Table no 14 : Declaration of assets for the year 2014

Expected declarers Who did declare Who failed to declare


8.774 8.742 32
100% 99.6% 0.4%

32 individuals failed to declare their assets. The table showing the level of accomplishment of
declaration of assets activity as provided by the Law is found on the appendix no 1.

In addition, the Office of the Ombudsman received the files of the declaration of assets from 17
civil servants who left their jobs as it is provided by law. Those individuals are in the following
institutions:

Table no 15: Declaration of assets from the employees who left their jobs

No Institutions Number Left post


1 MINAFFET 1 1st councilor
2 MINAGRI 1 Permanent Secretary
3 MINIJUST 11
4 MUSANZE District 2 - Executive Secretary
- Vice-Mayor
5 RSSB 1 Director General
6 COURTS 1 Judge

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5.3 RECEIVING AND VERIFICATION OF DECLARATION OF ASSETS OF

POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS

As it is provided by the article 4, paragraph 5 of the Law no 76/2013 of 11/9/2013 determining the
mission, powers, organization and functioning of the Office of the Ombudsman, the Office received
and verified the assets declaration from 10 Rwandan political parties. Those 10 political parties are
FPR-Inkotanyi, PDC, PDI, PL, PPC, PSD, PS Imberakuri, PSP, PSR, and UDPR.

That verification highlighted the following findings:


 Political parties that use improper accounting: PDC, PDI, PPC, PS Imberakuri, PSP, PSR,
UDPR. For instance, their submitted financial statements such as balance sheets and
income statement were not clear.
 For FPR-Inkotanyi in Nyagatare District, some properties did not clearly appear in their
submitted balance sheet;
 Except PSD, other political parties use improper filing that can lead to lose some
documents/files;
 During the verification activity, PPC didn’t have the work address / office;
 PPC, PS Imberakuri and UDPR had no permanent employee;
 Some political parties such as PDC, PDI, PPC, PSP, PL, PSR, and UDPR did not implement
the recommendations from the Office of the Ombudsman’s 1st verification conducted in
2009.
 FPR-Inkotanyi implemented the Ombudsman’s recommendations, but in some districts, its
implementation is still in process.

5.4. ANALYSIS AND VERIFICATION OF FILES OF ASSETS DECLARATION

During the year 2013-2014, The Office of the Ombudsman analyzed and verified 1,320 files of
assets declaration. 1,320 persons who have been verified are from different categories and different
institutions as follows:

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Table no 16 : Verification of assets in the year 2013-2014

No Categories Number
1 Deputies 80
2 EWSA 107
3 NEC 9
4 NISR 27
5 PADAB 12
6 PAREF 4
7 PHS 23
8 NCBS 17
9 RBC 103
10 RBS 72
11 RDB 65
12 REB 53
13 RGB 17
14 RLDSF 21
15 RSSP 26
16 SPIU/MOH 30
17 SPIU/MINAGRI 27
18 Kigali City 57
19 Districts(30) 546
20 WDA 24
TOTAL 1,320

Among 1,320 persons who were verified, 1,306 persons had the legally accepted source of their
properties and 14 persons failed to explain clearly the source of their properties which necessitated
conducting thorough investigations which are still in process.

5.5. COMPARISON OF ASSETS DECLARED BY LAND OFFICERS AND HEAD OF


FINANCE SERVICES UNDER MINISTRIES FOR THE PAST 3 YEARS (2011 – 2013)

During the year 2013-2014, the Office of the Ombudsman made comparisons of the assets of 100
persons including 50 persons from Land Services in all districts (30); 20 persons from Finance

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services in all ministries and 30 persons from Rwanda Natural Resources Authority (RNRA). The
compared assets were those which declared in last 3years (2011, 2012 and 2013) with the purpose
of highlighting if the increase of declared assets is proportional to the declared revenues.
That comparison put into consideration how the declared houses, lands and money have increased
within those 3 years.
The results of the comparison are shown in the table below:

Table no 17 : Comparison of assets declared by Land Officers and Heads of Finance Services
in Ministries (2011 -2013)

No Categories of declarers Number Compared Results


assets
1 Land Officers at district 50 Houses, lands For 47/50 persons, the increase of
level and money in assets was normal and the source was
the banks clear.
For the 3/50 persons, thorouh
investigation was recommended in
order to clarify the source of their
assets.
2 Staff of Rwanda Natural 30 Houses, lands For 27/30 persons, the increase of their
Resources Authority and money in assets was normal and its source was
(RNRA) the banks clear. While 3/30 persons needed
further investigation.
3 Heads of Finance 20 Houses, lands For 17/20 persons, the increase of
Services in ministries and money in declared assets was normal and its
the banks source was clear.
For 3/20 persons their source of assets
needed a thorough investigation.

5.6. INVESTIGATION ON NON DECLARED ASSETS

During the year 2013-2014, the Office of the Ombudsman conducted investigation on 4 cases
related to the assets declaration. Those 4 cases were outtanding from the year 2012-2013. In one

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case there was enough evidence and has been submitted to the National Public Prosecution
Authority (NPPA) while 3 cases lacked evidences.

Also, the investigation on 17 cases related to illicit enrichment has been conducted. Among those
cases, 4 cases including 6 persons were completed and sent to the National Public Prosecution
Authority; 5 cases had satisfying explanations and have been archived. However, 8 cases are still
under investigation.

5.7. SEEKING ADMINISTRATIVE SANCTIONS FOR THOSE WHO FAILED TO


DECLARE IN 2013

The 2012-2013 Ombudsman’s annual report showed 211 (2%) persons who failed to declare their
assets as it is provided by the Law. The Office of the Ombudsman sent to the concerned institutions
letters seeking administrative sanctions against them and requested them to declare their assets as of
2013. The institutions that received the above mentioned letters responded as follows:
 32 employees left their jobs and are no longer in public institutions;
 179 employees were requested to fulfill the assets declaration and were also given
administrative sanctions as following:
- 64 employees were requested to give official explanations;
- For 36 employees, 1/4 of their monthly salary has been deducted;
- 44 employees have been reprimanded;
- 35 employees have been given warning letters.

6. COORDINATION OF THE ACTIVITIES OF THE OFFICE OF THE


OMBUDSMAN

6.1. CAPACITY BUILDING

The staff of the Office of the Ombudsman were trained on the following topics:

 Conflict management;
 Anti-corruption, financial crimes and Assets recovery;
 Customer Care/Service delivery;

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 Logistic and stock management.

Table No 18 : Training provided to the staff of the Office of the Ombudsman

Date Training done Number of Place of training Institution


trainings
03-07/02/2014 Conflict management 4 Muhanga District RMI (Rwanda
31/03-04/04/2014 4 Management Institute)
14-18/04/2014 Anti-corruption, financial 45 La Palisse Hotel Interpol
crimes and Assets Nyandungu
recovery)
06/05/2014 Customer Care/Service 28 Nobleza Hotel RDB
14/05/2014 delivery 22 Nobleza Hotel RDB
23-27/06/2014 Logistics and stock 1 Muhanga District RMI(Rwanda
management Management Institute)

Training organised by Interpol

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6.2. RELATIONS BETWEEN THE OFFICE OF THE OMBUDSMAN WITH


OTHER INSTITUTIONS

In a bid to promote good relations with institutions of foreign countries, the Ombudsman and
Deputy Ombudsmen and other staff of the Office attended different meetings and workshops in
different countries including Uganda, Kenya, Burundi, Korea, Senegal, Astria, Panama and Ghana.
The office of the Ombudsman also had different visitors from different countries. The following
table shows visitors of the Office of the Ombudsman from different countries.

Table No 19: Visitors of the Office of the Ombudsman

No Date Institution that Purpose Results


visited
1 03- Delegates to the General meeting of The Genaral meeting was
08/11/2013 General meeting of institutions in charge of successfully held and the
institutions in charge fighting corruption in association launched
of fighting corruption East Africa and the
in East Africa official opening East
African Association of
Anti Corruption
Authorities in recovery
of illegally acquired
wealth
2 17- The Head of To see Rwanda’s He held a meeting with the
18/02/2013 Transparency activities in the fight Ombudsman and commended
International against corruption Rwanda’s efforts in the fight
against corruption
3 24/02- Minister in charge of Learn lessons from Learnt lessons from Rwanda
01/03/2014 Good Governance of Rwanda on good in promotion of good
the Republic of governance governance
Malawi
4 27- The Ombudsman of Lessons from Rwanda Both institutions exchanged
20/03/2014 the Republic of and signing of good practices and signed
Ghana agreement on cooperation agreement
cooperation between
both institutions

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No Date Institution that Purpose Results


visited
5 13- Delegation from To prepare trainings on The training was done and a
19/04/2014 Interpol investigations in decision was made to have
different institutions more trainings in order to
appreciate the concept of
investigation further
6 27/05/2014 Students from the Study tour on Rwanda’s Held discussions with the
University of Indiana development Deputy Ombudsman in charge
in USA of fight corruption. They
appreciated the steps taken by
the Rwandan government in
fighting corruption

6.3. BUDGET AND ASSETS OF THE OFFICE

In order to fulfil its responsibilities, the Office of the Ombudsman utilised its budget in the
following way:

Table No 20 : Excution of the budget

Budget item Budget for 2013-2014 Amount used Balance


Office supplies and consumables 101,932,725 101,931,937 788
Water and power bills 12,000,000 12,000,000 0
Communication 33,288,800 33,160,078 119,722
Bank charges 100,000 100,000 0
Public relations and awareness 316,284,820 313,991,777 2,293,043
Professional and contractual services 74,126,375 71,225,439 2,900,936
Transport and Travel 327,086,479 324,473,023 2,613,456
Maintenance and repairs 54,272,579 48,982,763 5,289,816
Spare parts 5,600,000 5,600,000 0
Security and social order 30,740,000 30,335,716 404,284
Office materials nad services 1,537,083 1,537,083 0
Office equipment, furniture and fittings 34,600,000 34,433,000 167,000

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Budget item Budget for 2013-2014 Amount used Balance


ICT equipment, software and other ICT 90,302,830 82,793,977 7,508,853
assets
Salaries 609,260,156 609,260,156 0
Social Security transfers 122,490,440 121,775,903 714,537
Subscriptions to different organizations 10,300,000 10,143,454 156,546
Total 1,823,921,897 1,801,753,306 22,168,591
Percentage 100% 99% 1%

The budget of the Office of the Ombudsman was eutilised to the tune of 99%. The amount not
utilised is 22,168,591FRW:

 Funds amounting to 7,508,853FRW were meant for activities that would not be achieved in
time;
 Funds amounting to 5,289,816FRW were meant for a contractor who did not finish the work
contracted;
 Funds amounting to 2,900,936FRW were also meant for a contractor who did not finish the
work contracted;
 Funds amounting to 2,613,456 were meant for payment of transportation costs within the
country but invoices were not availed on time;
 Funds amounting to 2,293,043FRW were meant for payment of radio programs but the
contractors did not issue invoices on time.

CONCLUSION

In this year, 2013/14, the Office of the Ombudsman excuted the activities it had planned in its
action plan as mandated by by the Law No 76/2013 of 11/9/2013 determining the mission, powers,
organization and functioning of the Office of the Ombudsman.

In the act of sensitization, different categories of citizens were trained in a bid to sensitize them to
fight injustice, corruption and related offenses and good service delivery. In this category, trainings
were done for Religious leaders, youths and women groups, Executive Secretaries of Cells as well
as those in charge of social welfare and development at cell level. Trainings on the Law governing

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leadership code of conduct and the Law on access to information were also carried out and targeted
public relations officers, internal auditors, legal officers in government institutions as well as
journalists. In collaboration with other institutions, the Office of the Ombudsman celebrated the ant-
corruption week and the International Anti-corruption Day. In that week, messages and discussions
explaining the evils of corruption were passed calling upon the citizens to decist from it and report
it whenever and wherever they see it.

In a bid to fight injustice and corruption, the Office of the Ombudsman received 1,033 cases of
injustice and 2,572 cases seeking judicial review due to injustice. Among the challenges the Office
faces include cases of injustice that take long to be resolved like cases where cases involving many
parties which also require concerned institutions to first thoroughly study them before they handled.
They are also institutions that do not provide requested information on time which makes the Office
of the Ombudsman to delay in making a decision. There’s also limited personnel vis-a-vis the
number of complaints the office receives.

In the fight corruption and related offenses, the Office of the Ombudsman carried out investigations
on 102 corruption related cases. 66 cases showed tendencies of maladministration of institutions.

In a bid to promote good governance, the functioning of government institutions, projects and
policies, private institutions and societies were assessed. The Office of the Ombudsman highlighted
to assessed institutions where good service delivery is lacking and gave recommendations for
improvement.

In 2014, 8,742 dossiers of declaration of assets by leaders and other officials prescribed by law were
received. Those who failed to declare their assets were 32 only. Declared assets of 1,320 leaders
and Officials were assessed.

In monitoring the implementation of the Leadership code of conduct, the Office of the Ombudsman
discovered that some leaders do not adhere to the provisions of this law in carrying out their duties
and those who, it appeared they did not were advised to do so while those who were suspected of
some offenses, their cases were forwarded for prosecution.

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REQUEST

In accordance with Organic Law nº.03/2012OL of 13/06/2012 relating to the structure, functioning
and powers of the Supreme Court, the Office of the Ombudsman was entrusted with powers of
requesting the Supreme Court to review a judgment due to injustice. These extra responsibilities led
to a large number of cases seeking for review due to injustice. Due to the nature of these cases, it
takes a lot of time to analyse them and more keep coming as more citizens become aware of this
avenue. There is therefore need to increase capacity of the Office by increasing the number of
personnel who handle these cases so that citizens can have quick and better services.

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ANNEXES

Annex 1: Asset Declaration

Annex 2: List of people sent to the Procecution

Annex 3: Implementation of recommandation of the Office of the Ombudsman

Annex 4: Implementation of recommandation of Parliament on annual report of the Office of the


Ombudsman of 2012-2013

Annex 5: Public Institutions that haven’t designated stuff responsible for providing information

Annex 6: people convicts of corruption cases

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ANNEX 1 : ASSET DECLARATION

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No Institution Persons who are Who declared Who did not declare Names Position
supposed to declare
High officials (the President of the Republic, the President of Senate, the Speaker of Chamber of Deputies, Prime Minister and the President of Supreme
Court)
1 High officials (the President of 5 5 0
the Republic, the President of
Senate, the Speaker of Chamber
of Deputies, Prime Minister and
the President of Supreme Court)
2 Ministers and State Ministers 27 27 0

3 Senators 78 78 0
4 Deputies 24 24 0
Total 134 134 0
Chamber of Deputies

1 Employees of Senate 43 43 0
2 Employees of chamber of 19 19 0
Deputies.
Total 62 62 0
Supreme Court and Prosecution

1 Supreme court 364 364 0

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No Institution Persons who are Who declared Who did not declare Names Position
supposed to declare
2 Prosecution 195 195 0
Total 560 560 0
President’s Office and Ministries

1 Office of the President 72 72 0


2 PRIMATURE & NCST 37 37 0
3 MINICAAF 20 20 0
4 MIDIMAR 24 24 0
5 MIFOTRA 26 25 1 TUMUSIIME Tender Committee
Member
6 MIGEPROF 17 17 0
7 MINADEF 547 542 5 Lt Col MAJYAMBERE Army Senior Officer
Justus
Maj BURABYO Antoine Army Senior Officer
Maj HAKIZIMANA Army Senior Officer
Pascal
Maj RUTIYOMBA Army Senior Officer
Joseph
Maj KIRENGA Edgard Army Senior Officer

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No Institution Persons who are Who declared Who did not declare Names Position
supposed to declare
8 MINAFFET 86 85 1 MUNYAKAYANZA 2nd councelor
Samuel
9 MINAGRI 28 28 0
10 MINALOC 27 27 0
11 MINEAC 18 18 0
12 MINECOFIN 98 98 0
13 MINEDUC 21 21 0
14 MINICOM 19 19 0
15 MINIJUST 36 36 0
16 MININFRA 31 31 0
17 MININTER 14 14 0
18 MINISANTE 62 62 0
19 MINISPOC 17 17 0
20 MYICT 22 22 0
21 Office of Government 11 11 0
Spokesperson
Total 1 233 1 226 7
Public Institutions and other Institutions where the State has Shares.

1 BIB 7 7 0

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No Institution Persons who are Who declared Who did not declare Names Position
supposed to declare
2 BDF 9 9 0
3 BNR 61 61 0
4 BRD 95 95 0
5 Caraes Ndera 14 13 1 IYAMUREMYE Jean Director of Nursing
Michel
6 CHUB 25 25 0
7 CHUK 74 74 0
8 CHNO 9 9 0
CMAC 7 7 0
9 CNLG 16 16 0
CNDP 23 23 0
10 CRR 35 35 0
11 EWSA 422 422 0

13 GMO 10 10 0
14 GIP 14 14 0
15 HEC 14 14 0
16 ILPD 13 13 0
17 INMR 31 31 0
18 IPRC East 16 16 0

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No Institution Persons who are Who declared Who did not declare Names Position
supposed to declare
19 IPRC South 20 20 0
20 IRST 17 17 0
21 NIC 15 15 0
22 KAVUMU College of Education 10 9 1 HAGABURIMANA Director
Emmanuel
23 IPRC Kigali 24 24 0
24 LSPIU 10 10 0
25 MHC 10 10 0
26 MMI 13 13 0
27 NAEB 42 42 0
28 NEC 35 35 0
29 NAWOC 12 12 0
30 NCBS 15 15 0
31 NCC 12 12 0
32 NCPD 12 12 0
33 NFPO 8 8 0
34 NIDA 9 9 0
35 NISS 48 48 0
36 NISR 21 21 0
37 NURC 12 12 0
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No Institution Persons who are Who declared Who did not declare Names Position
supposed to declare
38 NYC 9 9 0
39 OAG 109 109 0
40 ONATRACOM 22 22 0
41 ONP 50 50 0
42 PAREF 6 6 0
43 PHH&S 22 22 0
44 PSC 15 15 0
45 RAB 101 101 0
46 RBA 29 29 0
47 RLRC 16 16 0
48 RALC 11 11 0
49 RBC 118 118 0
50 RBS 71 71 0
51 RCA 44 44 0
52 RCAA 22 22 0
53 RCS 88 88 0
54 RDB 78 78 0
55 RDRC 24 24 0
56 REB 40 40 0
57 REMA 25 25 0
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No Institution Persons who are Who declared Who did not declare Names Position
supposed to declare
58 RURA 64 64 0
59 RGB 22 22 0
60 RHA 30 30 0
61 LODA 19 19 0
62 RMI 14 14 0
63 RNCU 7 7 0
64 RNP 294 294 0
65 RNRA 33 33 0
66 RPPA 34 34 0
67 RRA 778 778 0
68 RSSB 291 291 0
69 RSSP 29 29 0
70 RTC 14 14 0
71 RTDA 28 28 0
72 RWANDAIR 64 64 0
73 SGF 17 17 0
74 SONARWA 8 8 0
75 SPIU/MOH 30 30 0
76 SPIU/PAPSTA 17 17 0
77 TFI 14 14 0
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No Institution Persons who are Who declared Who did not declare Names Position
supposed to declare
78 Tumba College of Technology 11 11 0
79 Umwalimu SACCO 19 19 0
80 UR-CAASVM 33 33 0
81 UR-CBE 24 23 1 Michael KIMENYI Procurement Officer
82 UR-CE 31 31 0
83 UR-CMHS 13 13 0
84 UR-COSTECH 26 26 0
85 UR-Huye Campus 31 30 1 Jean Paul MUREKEZI Dean Of Faculty
86 UR-Nyagatare Campus 18 18 0
87 WDA 26 26 0
Total 4.179 4.175 4
Employees of Provinces, City of Kigali, District, and Sectors

I Employees City of Kigali 62 62 0


1 GASABO 132 132 0
2 KICUKIRO 70 70 0
3 NYARUGENGE 60 60 0
Total 324 324 0
Employees of Eastern Province Districts
II Employees of Eastern Province 14 14 0

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No Institution Persons who are Who declared Who did not declare Names Position
supposed to declare
1 RWAMAGANA 100 100 0
2 KAYONZA 77 76 1 MUKANDOLI Janviere Bursar / ES
Kabarondo
3 GATSIBO 85 85 0
4 NYAGATARE 91 88 3 KARAMBIZI Wilson Head of H.C
CYONDO
MUREKATETE Julliet Head Teacher
KARANGAZI S.S
NKURIKIYIMANA Accountant /
Jean Pierre CYONDO H.C
5 BUGESERA 112 112 0
6 KIREHE 54 54 0
7 NGOMA 67 67 0
Total 600 596 4
Employees of Western Province Districts
III Employees of Western Province 14 14 0
1 KARONGI 113 109 4 MUKAMASABO Bursar
Therese
MUKANKWAYA Bursar
Theresie

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No Institution Persons who are Who declared Who did not declare Names Position
supposed to declare
NIGURE Thomas Head Teacher
MUKESHIMANA Bursar
Charlotte
2 NGORORERO 89 89 0
3 NYABIHU 67 66 1 KANAMUGIRE Noel Executive Secretary
4 NYAMASHEKE 97 96 1 NAHIMANA Zachee Head of H.C
5 RUBAVU 75 75 0
6 RUSIZI 89 85 4 HATEGEKIMANA Head of H.C
Augustin
MUKARURANGWA Accountant
Annonciata
NKULIKIYE Domitien Verificator
MUKESHIMANA Head of H.C
Didace
7 RUTSIRO 90 86 4 KABANDA Manzi Officer
Olivier
MANIRAGUHA Head of H.C
Beatrice
MUYOBOKE Jerome Accountant
NGEMANYI Theoneste Accountant

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No Institution Persons who are Who declared Who did not declare Names Position
supposed to declare
Total 620 606 14
Employees of North Province and Districts
IV Employees of North Province 12 12 0
1 BURERA 66 65 1 MFITUMUKIZA Elisee Accountant
2 GAKENKE 86 85 1 NZAMURAMBAHO Head of H.C
Vincent
3 GICUMBI 106 105 1 HAKIZIMANA Firmine Accountant
4 MUSANZE 80 80 0
5 RULINDO 93 93 0
Total 443 440 3
Employees of Southern Province and Districts
V Employees of Southern Province 12 12 0
1 GISAGARA 72 72 0
2 HUYE 78 78 0
3 KAMONYI 67 67 0
4 MUHANGA 69 69 0

5 NYAMAGABE 94 94 0
6 NYANZA 86 86 0
7 NYARUGURU 64 64 0

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No Institution Persons who are Who declared Who did not declare Names Position
supposed to declare
8 RUHANGO 77 77 0
Total 619 619 0
GENERAL TOTAL 8.774 8.742 32
Percentage 100% 99,6% 0,4%

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ANNEX 2: DOSSIERS SENT TO NATIONAL PRESECUTION

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DOSSIERS SEND TO NATIONAL PROSECUTION

Institution Number of People Categories of people

High institution (Ministry, 9  Leaders


Private and public institutions )  Project coordinators
 Staff
 Consultants
Local government 37  Mayors
 Vice Mayor
 Executive Secretary of Districts
 Executive Secretary of Sector
 Staff (tender commette members and
land officer)
 Citizens (Bidders)
Justice sector 1  Secretary of court

Security 1

Journalist 1  Journalist

Total 49

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ANNEX 3: IMPLEMENTATION OF RECOMMANDATION OF PUBLIC AND PRIVATE


INSTITUTION

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Implementation of recommandations

1. Green color shows that the recommendation have implemented


2. Yellow color shows that the recommendation is in procedd of implementation
3. Red color shows that the recommendation is not yet implementated.

Institutions Recommendations Status of


implementation
NYAGATARE Ensure better management of assets and provide necessary
DISTRICT materials regarding the codification of materials so that the store
keeper makes himself codification of new materials
Recruit personnel missing on the organizational structure
Update files of the staff and improve the system of filing
Empower capacity building for the staff, particularly the staff
working in administrative sectors
Respect the rules and regulations regarding the promotion and
recruitment
Respect the public tender procedures and regulations
Speed up the establishment of service delivery guidelines related
to internal organization of the District and how services should
be delivered to the end user
Provide in the budget sufficient means of transport for the staff
to achieve their responsibilities
Develop internal rules and regulations which should help it to
improve its functioning in specific areas
To release on time money allocated to sectors for their daily
activities
To support sectors in acquiring required equipment and office
materials
Improve collaboration with partners
GICUMBI Ensure better management of assets by addressing some
DISTRICT irregularities found:
- Lack of software for the store management;

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Institutions Recommendations Status of
implementation
- Use of outmoded method in management of items;
- Lack of enough space for keeping items;
- No regular valuation of items;
- No report of depreciation of durable properties;
- Lack of internal store control by hierarchical authority.
Provide necessary materials regarding the codification of
materials so that the store keeper makes herself codification of
new materials
Improve collaboration with partners
Recruit personnel missing on the organizational structure
Update files of the staff and improve the system of filing
Respect the days set for the payment of complete file
Empower capacity building for the staff, particularly the staff
working in administrative sectors
Ensure implementation of recommendations from the Office of
the Auditor General of State Finance as well as other auditors

To support sectors in acquiring required equipment and office


materials
Sensitize parents to follow up the education of their children so
as to prevent students’ drop out
NYARUGENGE Update and disseminate Citizen’s Charter as to enhance good
DISTRICT service delivery
Reinforce monitoring mechanisms mainly in cells and villages
Reinforce trainings towards authorities for making them aware of
their responsibilities in the implementation of public policies
Implement, alone or with other institutions, capacity building
programme for improving staff skills and production

Comply with regulations as regards staff management in order to


avoid any loophole of injustice
Respect regulations and procedures regarding financial resource

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Institutions Recommendations Status of
implementation
management by improving taxes collection
Improve the execution of the judicial decisions
Enforce better assets management procedures through regular
stock taking, codifying some assets, updating store cards and
register of assets
Establish better mechanisms for resources and investors
mobilisation
Keep up best practices.
Nyarugenge District should insure District buildings
GATSIBO Respect the law determining the organization and functioning of
DISTRICT the District
The auditors should respect their annual plan and produce on
time reports
Update Citizen’s Charter as to enhance good service delivery
Improve the implementation of interventions, Gatsibo District
Joint Action Forum should conspicuously play its role of
supporting and coordinating activities of District partners by
increasing organized field visits
Improve collaboration with partners
File tender documents as provided for
Maintain petty cash and ensure its good management
Ensure better management of assets by:
- conduct physical stocktaking regularly;
- Use store card and restore a stock for logistics;
- Make a periodical inventory of assets.
Ensure District buildings
Record and codify equipment and materials in order to prevent
misappropriation and theft
Plan and implement capacity building of staffs
Replace non-qualified staff with qualified ones

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Institutions Recommendations Status of
implementation
Update files of the staff and improve the system of filing
Respect the Presidential Order no57/01 of 15/10/2006
determining the structure and functioning of Villages, Cell and
Sectors especially in meeting sessions of the Sector Council,
commissions of Sector Council and Bureau of Sector Council
The District Council should launch the process of recruitment in
order to reduce and overcome the problems of insufficiency and
unqualified staff for the best and fast development of the people
GAKENKE Disseminate citizen’s charter so as to enhance good service
DISTRICT delivery
Implement, alone or with other institutions, capacity building
programme for improving staff skills and production
Comply with regulations as regards staff management in order to
avoid any loophole of injustice for demoting or promoting
employees
Comply with regulations concerning financial management by
supporting expenditures
Comply with regulations concerning tenders procedures
Enforce better assets management procedures through:
- regular stock taking,
- codifying and valuation some assets,
- updating store cards,
- avail software for stock management.
Establish Peer Review Mechanism for promoting clean audit
Reinforce taxes collection mechanisms
Allocate the functioning budget to sectors without delays
Update files of the staff and improve the system of filing;
Insure District buildings
Correct irregularities found in human resource management:
- Lack of annual leave programme and evidence of leaving

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taken in employees’file
- Mismatch between empolyees’academic qualification and
his/her post. This disparity concerns 4 employees.
NGOMA Put in place strong mechanisms for correcting delays of receipt
DISTRICT books
Codify the remaining equipments and materials in order to
prevent misappropriation and theft and make improvement in
inventory of assets
Partners through JADF should report their action plans and their
achievements as provided
Do its best in providing money for daily activities to sectors at a
reasonable time
Ensuring that management of taxes collected is done in
accordance with laws
Ensure better management of assets and conduct physical stock
taking regularly
Observe some procurement procedures so as to enforce laws and
promote transparency
Empower the monitoring and evaluation of funds used by sectors
The Commissions of the District Council should meet regularly
Comply with petty cash replenishment ceiling of 100,000Rwf
and withdraw of 20,000Rwf as stipulated in the financial
management manual for central administration
Update files of the staff and improve the system of filing

Sensitize the Sectors to respect Ministerial Order regulating PFM


MUSANZE Update the files of its staff
DISTRICT Encourage members of JDAF to submit their action plans for
better participation on District performance contracts
Codify equipment and materials in order to prevent
misappropriation and theft

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implementation
Improve meeting sessions of the commissions of the District
Council
Recruit new employees to occupy the vacant posts
Find the logistics software
Elaborate the taxpayers software
Provide sectors with needed materials and equipments
Separate the attributions of the officer in charge of Health from
those of the employees in charge of education in the 5 Sectors
(Shingiro, Nyange, Gashaki, Nkotsi, Remera)
Improving the internal audit by increasing the number of entities
to be audited
Find an office for customer care near the reception
Improve and respect the procurement plan
KAYONZA Update the files of its staff and improve the filing system
DISTRICT Recruit new employees to occupy the vacant posts mostly in
Sectors
Provide Sectors with required materials and equipments
Improvise strategies that would facilitate revenue collectors to
deposit the amount collected in the limit of the time provided
like opening accounts in banks that are easily accessible to those
supposed to make deposits
Elaborate internal rules and regulations
Establish a specific guidelines determining how land should be
distributed and managed
Make an exhaustive report on unoccupied land and those
distributed
Respect the law and regulations governing procurement
wholesomely
Codify the remaining equipments and materials in order to
prevent misappropriation and theft and make improvement in

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implementation
inventory of assets
Encourage partners through JADF to report their action plans
and their achievements as provided
Consistently sign the contracts as agreed upon in the agreement

Provide the Sectors in an efficient way the operating funds


To set up strategies that might help internal auditors to
implement their action plans
Improve the meeting sessions of the Sector Councils

RUHANGO Put in place strong mechanisms to avoid delays of receipt books


DISTRICT by Sectors
Codify equipment and materials in order to prevent
misappropriation and theft and make improvement in inventory
of assets
Maintain a complete list of taxpayers which should be regularly
updated and reviewed by a revenue officer
Encourage partners through JADF to report their action plans
and their achievements as provided
Do its best in providing money for daily activities to Sectors at a
reasonable time
Ensuring that management of taxes collected is done in
accordance with laws
Ensure better management of assets and conduct physical stock
taking regularly
Observe procurement procedures so as to enforce laws and
promote transparency
Empower the monitoring and evaluation of funds used by
Sectors
Sensitize the Sectors to respect the Presidential Order regulating
the functioning of Sector Council

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Sensitize the Sectors to respect Ministerial Order regulating PFM
NYANZA Put in place strong mechanisms to avoid delays of receipt books
DISTRICT Codify the remaining equipment and materials in order to
prevent misappropriation and theft and make improvement in
inventory of assets
Observe procurement procedures so as to enforce laws and
promote transparency
Deliver to MININFRA all assets which are not in use
Encourage partners through JADF to report their action plans
and their achievements as provided
District commissions meet monthly as the law stipulates
Empower the monitoring and evaluation of funds used by
Sectors
Sensitize Sectors to hold JDAF meeting according to the
regulation
Release on time money allocated to Sectors for their daily
activities
To establish internal rules and regulations
Encourage Sectors Council meeting to meet regularly
Initiate budgeting system to improve fair planning and control of
expenditures
Support Sectors and cell in acquiring required equipment office
and materials.
NGORORERO Elaborate and disseminate Citizen’s Charter as to enhance good
DISTRICT service delivery;
Implement, alone or with other institutions, capacity building
programme for improving staff skills and production;
Comply with regulations as regards staff management in order to
avoid any loophole of injustice. Employees’ files should be
complete. Examination is required for the recruitment of

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Institutions Recommendations Status of
implementation
contractual workers.
Cleaning services should be awarded to a private company on
basis of a public tender;
Respect regulations and procedures regarding financial resource
management by improving taxes collection and public
procurement;
Reinstate the use of petty cash in as far as the regulation
governing its management is still into force;
Enforce better assets management procedures through regular
stock taking, codifying some assets, updating store cards and
register of assets;
Insure district buildings;
RWAMAGANA Respect the law determining the organisation and functioning of
DISTRICT the district;
Update the files of its staff and improve the filing system ;
Improve meeting sessions of the Commissions of the District
Council;
Improve meeting sessions of the Sector Council;
Improve meeting sessions of the Commissions of the Sector
Council;
Recruit new employees to occupy the vacant posts ;
Provide sectors with needed materials and equipments;
Respect the procurement plan ;
Provide the sectors with budget without delays
NYAMAGABE Meetings of the commissions are not regular as required by the
DISTRICT law.
Vacant posts which need to be filled
Improve filling system in financial department
Respect the law and regulations governing public procurement
Ensure better management of assets, use software of assets

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implementation
management and conduct physical stocktaking regularly, Record
and codify equipment and materials in order to prevent
misappropriation and theft
Set up strategies that might help internal auditors to implement
their action plans
Follow up the functioning of Sector Councils and Sectors PFM
Provide the sectors in an efficient way with the operating funds
Comply with petty cash management regulations
Not award tenders at Sector level
Respect the Presidential Order n057/01 of 15/10/2006
determining the structure and functioning of village, Cell and
Sector especially in meetings sessions of the Sector Council,
commissions of Sector Council and Bureau of Sector Council
HUYE DISTRICT Ensure sound mechanism of monitoring the execution of tenders
contracts;
Ensure complete filing system of tender documents;
Ensure strong internal control mechanisms to detect the
irregularities in resources management at Sectors level;
Establish strong mechanisms for resources and investors
mobilisation;
Provide capacity building program mechanisms for Sectors
officers for fair public management;
Provide the Sectors with equipments such photocopying
machines in order to save money and time used by having
recourse to external suppliers;
MUHANGA Elaborate internal rules and regulations;
DISTRICT
Update the files of its staff and improve the filing system ;
Respect the law and regulations governing public procurement;
Respect the law determining the organization and functioning of
the District especially in meetings sessions of District

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implementation
Commissions ;
Follow up the functioning of Sector Councils and Sectors PFM;
Use software of assets management and conduct physical
stocktaking regularly;
Make a periodical inventory of assets;
Codify the remaining equipments and materials in order to
prevent misappropriation and theft and make improvement in
inventory of assets;
Provide the sectors in an efficient way with the operating funds;
Set up strategies that might help internal auditors to implement
their action plans.

Respect the Continuous 57/01 of 15/10/ 2006 determining the


structure and function of Village, Cells and Sector especially in
meetings sessions of the Sector council
Keep all supporting documents for any payments made
Attach mission clearance and mission reports to the payment
documents
Carry out regular PFM meetings
NYARUGURU Respect the law determining the organization and functioning of
DISTRICT the district;
Improve the implementation of interventions, Nyaruguru District
Joint Action Forum should conspituously play its role of
supporting and coordinating activities of District partners by
increasing organise field visits;
Improve collaboration with partners;
File tender documents as provided for;
Ensure better management of assets and conduct physical
stocktaking regularly;
Record and codify equipment and materials in order to prevent
misappropriation and theft;

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implementation
Make a periodical inventory of assets;
Empower capacity building of staffs;
Recruit personnel missing on the organizational structure;
Replace non-qualified staff with qualified ones;
Update files of the staff and improve the system of filing; and
Execute all Gacaca judgements relating to properties;
Find offices, equipments and necessary materials missing on
sectors ;
Provide sectors with financial resource without delay.
RUSIZI DISTRICT Update the files of its staff and improve the filing system ;
Respect the law and regulations governing public procurement;
Follow up the functioning of Sector Councils and Sectors PFM;

Codify the remaining equipments and materials in order to


prevent misappropriation and theft and make improvement in
inventory of assets;

The level of budget should be improved in order to achieve the


objectives of the district in as far as development is concerned
Provide the sectors in an efficient way with the operating funds
and also providing sectors with required material and equipments
Set up strategies that might help internal auditors to implement
their action plans
Implement the capacity building plans
RUBAVU Update the files of its staff and improve the filing system ;
DISTRICT Respect the law and regulations governing public procurement;
Make a control on the staff in charge of follow up of the
execution of works by successful bidders especially those
working in the areas where they are more likely to be corrupt;
Follow up the functioning of Sector Councils and sectors PFM;
Codify the remaining equipments and materials in order to

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implementation
prevent misappropriation and theft and make improvement in
inventory of assets;
The level of budget execution should be improved in order to
achieve the objectives of the district as far as development is
concerned;
Provide the sectors in an efficient way with the operating funds
and also providing sectors with working materials and
equipments;
Set up strategies that might help internal auditors to implement
their action plans

Correct irregularities found in sectors financial management


relating especially:

to keep in files expenses supporting documents; to sign contracts


with services delivers; to comply with petty cash management
regulations; and to attach mission clearance and mission reports
to the payment documents.

NYAMASHEKE Codify equipments and materials in order to prevent


DISTRICT misappropriation and theft make improvement in inventory of
assets;
Respect procurement procedures as recommended by internal
audit and external bodies;
Respect all requirements on human resources management;
Hold public financial management as the law provides;
Ensure capacity building of the staff;
Ensure better management of assets and conduct physical stock
taking regularly;
Reinforce the monitoring and evaluation system of funds;
Respect Ministerial Order regulating meetings of PFM in
Sectors;

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implementation
Provide Sectors with needed infrastructure, materials and
equipments;
Provide the Sectors budget without delays.
NYABIHU Put in place strong mechanisms for correcting delay of receipt
DISTRICT books
Codify the remaining equipment and materials in order to
prevent misappropriation and theft and make improvements in
inventory of asset
Do its best in providing operating costs to sector on time
Ensuring that management of taxes collected is done in
accordance with law;
Ensure better management of assets and conduct physical stock
inventory
Observe procurement procedures so as to enforce laws
Empower the monitoring and evaluation of funds used by sectors
Sensitize the sectors to respect the Presidential Order regulating
the functioning of Sector Council
Sensitize the sectors to respect Ministerial Order regulating
PFM,
Complete staff files
Sensitize local collections to return the receipt on time
Prepare and submit the sectors budget at District
HUYE PRISON Respect the rules and procedures in procurement in order to
promote efficiency in public fund management and transparency
Record and codifying equipment and materials in order to
prevent misappropriation and theft
To collaborate effectively with other concerned institutions as
regarding prisons rights
Complete employees files
Make periodical inventory of assets

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Institutions Recommendations Status of
implementation
Complete prisoners files as the law obliges them to do.
RUBAVU PRISON Elaborate the strategic plan for the Prison;
Respect the laws and regulations on public funds management
and by making sure all expenses have the required documents;
Pay all their arrears;
Show the production reports for the previous years and record
the yield of production;
Update files of the staff and improve the system of filing;
Respect the rules and procedures in procurement in order to
promote efficiency and transparency in public fund management;

Improve the filing system of the procurement documents;


Record and codify equipment and materials in order to prevent
misappropriation and theft;
Make periodical inventory of assets and codifying ;
Make sure that Prisoners’ files are complete.
Collaborate with other concerned institutions in order to avoid
injustices which might result from illegal detention.

NYANZA PRISON Respecting the laws and regulations on public funds


management;
Respecting the rules and procedures in procurement in order to
promote efficiency and transparency in public fund management;
Recording and codifying equipment and materials in order to
prevent misappropriation and theft;
Making periodical inventory of assets and codifying ;
Avoid illegal detention and complete files of prisoners;
To comply with the Law n° 34/2010 of 12/11/2010 establishing
the functioning and organization of Rwanda Correctional Service
in order to improve the living and social welfare conditions of
prisoners. It should also comply with other laws in respect of

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implementation
prisoners rights.
Rwanda Civil Insure the respect of procurement procedures and rules;
Aviation Authority Improve record keeping;
(RCAA) Improve the respect of procurement plan.

Rwanda Education Provide books, equipments of laboratories and other didactic


board ( 9 & 12 YBE materials to schools.
Assessment) Put more efforts in recruiting qualified teaching staff especially
in rural areas.
Help schools in effective monitoring of students’
behavior/conduct by providing other personnel in charge of
discipline.
Speed up the program of giving electricity to schools
Provide trainings for accountant secretaries of schools
Efficiently sensitize the parents on their role in education.
MURUNDA The Board of Directors of Murunda Hospital and the Ministry of
HOSPITAL Health should study the opportunity to increase the number of
human resource especially doctors and nurses
The Ministry of Health should pay all arrears of pooling risk as
well as the Rutsiro District pooling risk
The Ministry of Health should pay all arrears of pooling risk as
well as the Rutsiro District pooling risk
Murunda Hospital should recruit an internal auditor who is
competent in order to strengthen the functioning and the
management
Murunda Hospital should insure the respect of procurement
procedures and rules in order to promote efficiency in public
fund management and transparency.
Rwanda RIAM has to develop some key documents for the smooth
Management running of its activities and to achieve its goals. These are:
Institute (RMI) The strategic plan;

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implementation
Internal regulations;
Manuals of procedures
To accelerate the process of approval of the new organisational
structure
To separate the post of the Chairperson of the Board of Directors
from the post of the Executive Secretary of Public Sector
Capacity Building Secretariat (PSCBS) because this one is the
main funder and it may result into conflict of interests
To manage the movement of the staff working on two campuses
from Murambi to Kigali and vice versa
To put in place the system of payment of debts and recovery
To initiate the marketing system to broaden the training to the
private sector and the civil society
To renew old buildings and build the new ones to satisfy the
needs of the customers
NYAMATA District should improve its way of sensitization of citizens to
HOSPITAL adhere to Mutual health insurance scheme and pay its
contribution
The board of directors should study the opportunity to increase
the number of human resource especially doctors and nurses
The MOH should pay all arrears of poling risk as well as the
Bugesera District
Put in place strong mechanisms for assisting children
malnourished
Put in place strong mechanisms for recovering debts
In Collaboration with MOH and the board of directors of
Nyamata hospital should study the problem of transfer
Ensure the specialized training of staff to improve their
performance
Respect the law governing the board of directors

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implementation
Librarian should elaborate instruction of borrowing and lending
books
Recruit personnel missing on the organizational structure
Ensure the ways of avoiding bad effect which can be caused by
expired drugs kept in stores
Carry out periodic and annual inventory of stocks
Recruit an internal auditor in order to strengthen the functioning
and the management

Ensure the respect of procurement procedure and rules in order


to promote efficiency in public management and transparency
TTC KIRAMBO Respect the rules and procedures in procurement, especially in
planning tenders, methods to be used and filings
Fence the school to avoid unauthorized going out
To recover its debts
URUGAGA Elaborate the strategic plan
IMBARAGA Elaborate and complete internal rules and regulations.
Elaborate the new strategies for collecting the contributions from
the groups of members.
Collaborate with local institutions to strengthen the farmers to
improve the way of store the harvest.
Elaborate the system of following up the members in
implementing the activities of projects.
Strengthen the audit system by recruiting the qualified auditors
and training the existing.
Comply with regulations regulating the management of "petit
cash" and complete the financial documents.
Inventory the assets of Urugaga Imbaraga so that it would be
known and well managed.
BUGESERA Update the files of its staff and improve the filing system
Elaborate internal rules and regulations

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Institutions Recommendations Status of
implementation
DISTRICT Respect the law and regulations governing public procurement
Follow up the functioning of Sectors Councils
Codify the remaining equipments and materials in order to
prevent misappropriation and theft and make improvement in
inventory of assets
Improve the management of stock
Improve the level of budget execution in order to achieve the
objectives of the District in as far as development is concerned
Provide the Sectors in an efficient way with the operating funds
and also providing Sectors with required materials and
equipments
Service delivery/ date of receipt of invoices and date of payments
District Council/ irregularity of the meetings of District Council
Commissions
Insufficient number of District staff considering the needs of
District and the activities to be carried out.
Lack of capacity building plan and report
The audited institutions which is very low comparing to the areas
to be covered
Irregularities in sectors PFM meetings,
Sectors assets management/reports on stock management,
physical stock inventory, movable assets not codified
GISAGARA Update the files of its staff and improve the filing system
DISTRICT Respect wholesomely the law and regulations governing the
public procurement
Follow up the functioning of Sectors Councils and Sectors PFM
Codify the remaining equipments and materials in order to
prevent misappropriation and theft and make improvement in
inventory of assets
Update the register for the movable and immovable assets of the

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District
Provide the Sectors in an efficient way with the operating funds
and also providing Sectors with required materials and
equipments
Set up strategies that might help internal auditors to implement
their action plans effectively
Sign on all spaces provided on the requisition forms
Improve financial management in Sectors
Submit evaluation reports to the concerned institutions as the
order provides
Make follow up of assets that were misappropriated by its
employees
RULINDO Consolidate internal rules and regulations
DISTRICT Update the files of its staff and improve the filing system
Respect the law and regulations governing public procurement
Follow up the functioning of Sectors Councils and Sectors PFM
Codify the remaining equipments and materials in order to
prevent misappropriation and theft and make improvement in
inventory of assets
Provide the Sectors in an efficient way with the operating funds
and also providing Sectors with required materials and
equipments
Make a follow up on the financial management of the Sectors as
regards petty cash management and the filing of cash books as
well as keeping supporting documents
Improve the stock management system
Improve revenue collection system so as to become more and
more self sufficient
Set up strategies that might help internal auditors to implement
their action Plans,

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implementation
KAMONYI Update the files of its staff and improve the filing system
DISTRICT Respect the law and regulations governing the public
procurement
Ensure the good functioning of Commissions of District Council
Follow up the functioning of Sectors Councils and Sectors PFM
Codify the remaining equipments and materials in order to
prevent misappropriation and theft and make improvement in
inventory of assets
Improve the stock management as far as reconciliation of items
in stock and items on cards is concerned
For better management of the stock, materials from ancient stock
should be separated from those in the current stock
Look for an appropriate location for the stock in order to separate
it from the office of logistics to avoid the risk of
misappropriation
The level of budget execution should be improved in order to
achieve the objectives of the District as far as development is
concerned
Provide the Sectors in an efficient way with the operating funds
and also providing Sectors with required materials and
equipments
Set up strategies that might help internal auditors to implement
their action plans
RWANDA Insure the respect of procurement procedures and rules
HOUSING Improve the filing system
AUTHORITY Avoid mistake in reporting

EWSA Respect of the provisions of the law no12/2007 of 27/03/2007 on


public procurement as amended and complemented to date
Ensure proper filling of all documents related to the tender
including payment proof

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implementation
Ensure proper archiving of tenders
Ensure regular reporting; Submit monthly and progress reports
Ensure regular internal control of procurement system
RDB Respect Presidential Order no46/01 of 29/07/2011 governing
modalities for the recruitment, appointment and nomination of
public servants especially respecting the time frame
Respect Prime Minister’s Order no121/03 of 08/09/2010
establishing the procedure of performance appraisal and
promotion of public servants harmonize the format
Put in place internal rules and regulations and statutes of RDB
personnel
In collaboration with MIFOTRA the organization structure of
RDB should be revised
In collaboration with Presidential Office, Board of Directors
must be established
MIFOTRA Respect Presidential Order no46/01 of 29/07/2011 governing
modalities for the recruitment, appointment and nomination of
public servants
Respect Prime Minister’ Order no121/03 of 08/09/2010
establishing the procedure of performance Appraisal and
Promotion of Publics Servants
Establish internal rules and regulations
Establish audit committee as the Ministerial Instructions orders
them to do
Complete the employees files and improve the filing
Respect the deadline of submitting recruitment report to the
Public Service Commission as the Presidential Order stipulates
Recruit employees as the structure indicates
GISENYI Office of the Ombudsman recommends that Mr. Augustin
Rulinda who illegary occupied the post of mutuelle de santé

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implementation
HOSPITAL should stop occupying it with immediate effect
The hospital should complete the employees’ files and improve
the filing,
Make follow up for those employees who have resigned to
necessary make handover
Respect the presidential
order relating to recruitment
The hospital assets should be codified
The inventory of assets by independent appointed employees
should be respected by the hospital
Asset register should be updated as required
Gisenyi District Hospital should comply with existing laws and
regulations governing public procurement
Director of Gisenyi Hospital and Hospital Administrator should
stop to sign on evaluation report
Gisenyi Hospital should make proper filing of the procurement
documents
MUHORORO Respect the rules and procedures in procurement, especially in
HOSPITAL planning tenders, methods to be used and filing;
Ensure hospital’s cleanness;
Put more emphasis on sensitization and education towards the
target population for diseases prevention.
Recruit an internal auditor
TTC SAVE Respect the rules and procedures in procurement in order to
promote efficiency in public fund management and transparency
Recording and codifying equipment and material in order to
prevent misappropriation and theft
Making periodical inventory of assets

PARTNERS IN The members of tender committee should have a determined


mandate.

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implementation
HEALTH The composition of tender committee should not be based on
position held in organization.
Improve their collaboration with PIH/IMB.
TTC ZAZA Strengthen the measures set up regarding the living conditions of
students;

Extend the library in order to keep more books in good order as


well as accommodating more students and other beneficiaries.

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ANNEX 4: IMPLEMENTATIONS OF RECOMMANDATIONS OF PARLIAMENT ON THE


REPORT OF 2012-2013 OF THE OFFICE OF THE OMBUDSMAN

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ANNEX 5: INSTITUTIONS THAT DID NOT DESIGNATE STAFF IN CHARGE OF


PROVIDING INFORMATION

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List of institutions that did not designate staff in charge of providing information

A. MINISTRIES
1. MINADEF (Ministry of Defense)
2. MINAFFET (Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation)
3. MINEDUC (Ministry of Education)
4. MINIJUST (Ministry of Justice)
5. MININFRA (Ministry of Infrastructure)
6. MININTER (Ministry of Internal Security)
B. PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS
1. HEC (Higher Education Council)
2. ILPD (Institute of Legal Practice and Development)
3. INMR (Institute of National Museums of Rwanda)
4. LWH (Land and Husbandry, Water Harvesting and Hillside Irrigation)
5. NAFA (National Forestry Authority)
6. NAWOC (National Women Council)
7. NLC (National Land Center)
8. NURC (National Unity and Reconciliation Commission)
9. OGMR (Rwanda Geology and Mines Authority)
10. Parliament Chamber of Deputies
11. PSCBS (Public Service Capacity Building Secretariat)
12. RBA (Rwanda Broadcasting Agency)
13. RBS (Rwanda Bureau of Standards)
14. RDB (Rwanda Development Board)
15. RDRC (Rwanda Demobilization and Reintegration Commission)
16. REB (Rwanda Education Board)
17. RIAM (Rwanda Institute of Administration and Management)
18. RTDA (Rwanda Transport Development Agency)
19. RURA (Rwanda Utilities Regulatory Agency)
20. Rwandair
21. WDA (Workforce Development Authority)
22. OGS (Office of Government Spokes Person)
23. CHUK
24. CHUB

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25. NU (National University)
26. RHODHA

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ANNEX 6: PEOPLE CONVICTED OF CORRUPTION CASES

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133

PEOPLE CONVICTED OF CORRUPTION CASES 3rd Term 2013

N° CASE IDENTITY OF THE SEX PROFESSIO COURT CRIME SENTENCE


NUMBER CONVICT N COMMITED
1. RPA0081/12/ NGERAGEZE Joseph, Male Farmer HC RWAMAGANA Giving a bribe of 2 years of
Son of Barambirwa 14,500 Rwf imprisonment and a
HC/RWA
Joseph and fine of 29,000 Rwf
Mukamparirwa Marie
born in 1977,

Residence of Mwizibire-
Nkanga- Sake-Ngoma-
Eastern Province

2. RPA 0049/13/ UHORANINGOGA Male Farmer HC RUSIZI Giving a bribe of 3 years


Méthode, Son of imprisonment of
HC/RSZ 20,000 Rwf
Gahunde Léonard and and a fine of 50,000
Mukandirima, Residence Rwf
of Kadasomwa-
Kamashangi-Kamembe-
Rusizi-Western Province

3. RP NGIRUWONSANGA

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N° CASE IDENTITY OF THE SEX PROFESSIO COURT 134 CRIME SENTENCE
NUMBER CONVICT N COMMITED
0150/13/TGI/ J.d’Amour, Son of Male Driver TGI RUBAVU Giving a bribe of 6 years of
Shyirambere and 7,000 Rwf imprisonment
RBV
Nyiragasigwa, Residence
of Nyamwishyura-
Bisizi- Nyakiriba-
Rubavu-Western
Province

4. RP DUSENGIMANA Male Driver TGI RUBAVU Giving a bribe of 1 year of


0192/13/TGI Innocent, Son of 5,000 Rwf imprisonment
Nyamwema and
/RBV
Barayavuga, Residence
of Kabuyo- Binama-
Matyazo- Ngororero-
Western Province

5. RP0122/13/ BAHEMBERA Male Farmer TGI MUSANZE Giving a bribe of 2 years of


Augustin, Son of 30,000 Rwf imprisonment and a
TGI/MUS
Byigero and fine of
Nyirakaruhije, Born in
60,000 Rwf
1980 in Kamegeri-
Gisovu- Cyanika-

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N° CASE IDENTITY OF THE SEX PROFESSIO COURT 135 CRIME SENTENCE
NUMBER CONVICT N COMMITED
Burera-Nothern Province

6. RP0059/13/ NYIRAKIMONYO Female Farmer TGI NYAMAGABE Giving a bribe of 2 years of


Anne Marie, Daughter 2,000 Rwf imprisonment and
TGI/NYBE
of Nyirimana and a fine of 4,000
Kamanzi born in 1973 Rwf
Residence of Nkanda-
Nkanda- Busanze-
Nyaruguru- Southern
Province

7. RP0436/13/ KARUYONGA Male "Inkeragutaba TGI NGOMA Receiving a bribe 1 year of


Sylverien, Son of ra" of 20,000 Rwf imprisonment and a
TGI/NGOMA
KAYONGA Nicodème fine of
and Mukangarambe
100,000 Rwf
Laurence, Born in 1964,
Residence of Kabeza-
Kabarondo-Kayonza-
Eastern Province

NDUNGUTSE Claude, Male "Inkeragutaba TGI NGOMA Receiving a bribe 1 year of


Son of GAHANGA and ra" of 20,000 imprisonment and a

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N° CASE IDENTITY OF THE SEX PROFESSIO COURT 136 CRIME SENTENCE
NUMBER CONVICT N COMMITED
Nyirabakinahe, Born in Rwf fine of
1980, Residence of
100,000 Rwf
Kabarondo- Cyabajwa-
Kabarondo-Kayonza-
Eastern Province

MUNYABUGINGO Male "Inkeragutaba TGI NGOMA Receiving a bribe 1 year of


Adrien, ra" of 130,000 imprisonment and a
fine of
Son of Ngaboyisonga Rwf
and Musabyeyezu, Born 100,000 Rwf
in 1980, Residence of
Kanyeganyege- Kabura-
Kabarondo-Kayonza,
Eastern Province

MAKOMBE Callixte,
Son of Makombe Ernest
Male "Inkeragutaba TGI NGOMA Demanding and 1 year of
and Mukajomene, Born
ra" receiving a bribe imprisonment and a
in 1972, Residence of
of 40,000 Rwf fine of
Nyagasambu- Musumba-
Nyamirama- Kayonza- 100,000 Rwf

2013-2014 ANNUAL REPORT


N° CASE IDENTITY OF THE SEX PROFESSIO COURT 137 CRIME SENTENCE
NUMBER CONVICT N COMMITED
Eastern Province

8. RP0158/13/ RWAKABISHYA Male "Inkeragutaba TGI Ngoma Demanding and 1 year of


John, Son of Gapfunsi ra" receiving a bribe imprisonment and a
TGI/NGOMA
and Nyangore, Born in of 40,000 Rwf fine of
1968, Residence of
100,000 Rwf
Rumuli- Nyamugali-
Nyamugali- Kirehe-
Eastern Province

9. RP0015/13/ YUMVUHORE Male Farmer TGI MUHANGA Giving a bribe of 2 years of


Ildephonse Son of 180,000 Rwf imprisonment
TGI/MHG
Mukurarinda and
Mukarutamu, Born in
1982, Residence of
Nyamagana- Ruhango-
Ruhango- Southern
Province

10. RP0015/13/ HABIMANA Léonard, Male Pastor TGI MUHANGA Giving a bribe of 2 years of
Son of Kangabo and 180,000 Rwf imprisonment
TGI/MHG
Mukamugasa, Born in

2013-2014 ANNUAL REPORT


N° CASE IDENTITY OF THE SEX PROFESSIO COURT 138 CRIME SENTENCE
NUMBER CONVICT N COMMITED
1943, Residence of
Nyamagana-Ruhango-
Ruhango, Southern
Province

11. RPA NIYONGABO


0254/13/TGI/N J.Baptiste, Son of
Male Procurement TGI Demanding and 1 year of
YGE Minani and
Officer NYARUGENGE receiving a bribe imprisonment and a
Nyirabuyange, Born in
of 500,000 Rwf fine of 3,000,000
1979, Residence of
Rwf
Kamutwa- Kacyiru-
Gasabo-MVK

12. RP KAYIJAMAHE Male Businessman TGI Giving a bribe of 1 year of


0029/13/TGI/N Anastase, Son of NYARUGENGE 30,000 Rwf imprisonment and a
YGE Rutayabwirwa and fine of 60,000
Mukarubunge, Born in Rwf
1980, Residence of
Murakazaneza-
Amahoro- Gisenyi-
Rubavu- Western

2013-2014 ANNUAL REPORT


N° CASE IDENTITY OF THE SEX PROFESSIO COURT 139 CRIME SENTENCE
NUMBER CONVICT N COMMITED
Province

13. RP1027/12/TG NDAYAMBAJE Male Driver TGI Giving a bribe of 5 years of


I/NYGE J.Claude, Son of NYARUGENGE 4,000 Rwf imprisonment and a
Nsengimana and fine of 60,000
Kamuzima, Born in 1980 Rwf
Residence of Rwimbogo-
Nyarugunga- Kicukiro-
MVK

14. RP 0119/13/ CPL KIZA Steven, Son Male Policeman TGI Demanding and 1 year of
of Karama and NYARUGENGE receiving a bribe imprisonment and a
TGI/NYGE
Mukamwezi, Born in of 200,000 Rwf fine of 900,000
1985, Residence of Rwf
Kacyiru- Gasabo- MVK

2013-2014 ANNUAL REPORT


N° CASE IDENTITY OF THE SEX PROFESSIO COURT 140 CRIME SENTENCE
NUMBER CONVICT N COMMITED
PC NDAYISENGA Male Policeman TGI Demanding and 8 years and 6
Emmanuel, Son of NYARUGENGE receiving a bribe months of
Kayida and of 200,000 Rwf imprisonment and a
Mutumwinka, Born in fine of 900,000
1987, Residence of Rwf
Rukoma- Kamonyi-
Southern Province

MUYENZI Michel, Son Male Businessman TGI Giving a bribe of 1 year of


of Muyenzi Richard and NYARUGENGE 200,000 Rwf imprisonment and a
Musindarwejo ,Born in fine of 400,000
1973, Residence of Rwf
Nyamugali- Nyamabuye-
Gatsata- Gasabo-MVK

15. RP0415/13/ SHUMBUSHO Male Businessman TGI MUHANGA Giving a bribe of 1 year of
Sosthène, Son of 2,000 Rwf imprisonment and a
TGI/MHGA
Gashugi and fine of 20,000
Nyiraminani, Born in Rwf
1980, Residence of
Gitwa- Gasayo-
Karengera- Nyamasheke-

2013-2014 ANNUAL REPORT


N° CASE IDENTITY OF THE SEX PROFESSIO COURT 141 CRIME SENTENCE
NUMBER CONVICT N COMMITED
Western Province

16. RP HABINSHUTI Male Motocyclist TGI NYAGATARE Giving a bribe of 2 years of


0183/13/TGI/ J.Claude, Son of 10,000 Rwf imprisonment
Niyonsenga and
NYG
Uwamaliya, Born in
1990, Residence of
Rurenge- Gahurura-
Rukomo- Nyagatare-
Eastern Province

17. MUSABYIMANA Male Policeman TGI NYAGATARE Receiving a bribe 5 years of


Célestin, Son of of 20,000 Rwf imprisonment and a
RP
Nzabanita and fine of 100,000 frw
225/13/TGI/
Muhawenimana, Born in
NYG
1984, Rubazo-
Nyarugunga- Rwankuba-
Karongi- Western
Province

2013-2014 ANNUAL REPORT


N° CASE IDENTITY OF THE SEX PROFESSIO COURT 142 CRIME SENTENCE
NUMBER CONVICT N COMMITED
18. RP NZAMURAMBAHO Male Local Defense TGI KARONGI Receiving a bribe 1 year of
0079/13/TGI/ Jean, Son of Mushobozi of 11,000 Rwf imprisonment and a
and Mukashyaka, Born in fine of 60,000
KGI
1983, Nyabinyenga- Rwf
Kagabiro- Mubuga-
Karongi- Western
Province

NZAYISENGA Xavier, Male Local Defense TGI KARONGI Receiving a bribe 1 year of
Son of Bangana and of 11,000 Rwf imprisonment and a
Mukashyaka, Born in fine of 60,000
1983,Nyabinyenga- Rwf
Kagabiro- Mubuga-
Karongi- Western
Province

19. UWIZERWA Olivier, Male Driver TB NYARUGUNGA Giving a bribe of 2 years of


Son of Kayinamura and 2,000 Rwf imprisonment and a
RP
Uwimana, Born in 1980, fine of 4,000 Rwf
0214/13/TB/N
Residence of Rusororo-
YRGA
Gasabo- MVK

2013-2014 ANNUAL REPORT


N° CASE IDENTITY OF THE SEX PROFESSIO COURT 143 CRIME SENTENCE
NUMBER CONVICT N COMMITED
20. SEBAHUNGU Elie, Son Male Farmer TB KIREHE Giving a bribe of 1 year of
of Mutabaruka and 56,000 Rwf imprisonment and a
RP
Musabyimana, Born in fine of 150,000
0170/13/TB/
1992, Nyamiryango- Rwf
KRH Gatore- Kirehe- Eastern
Province

21. RP GATETE Ibrahim, Son Male Motocyclist TGI GASABO Giving a bribe of 1 year of
0372/13/TGI/ of Hakiba and 5,000 Rwf Imprisonment
Mukakarenzi, Born in
GSBO
1990, Residence of
Munanira- Rugarama-
Nyamirambo-
Nyarugenge- MVK

22. RP GATSINZI Augustin, Male Driver TGI GASABO Receiving a bribe 3 years of
0361/13/TGI/ Son of Karenzi and of 35,000 Rwf imprisonment and a
Mukarukwaya, Born in fine of 105,000
GSBO
1964, Residence of Rwf
Kadobogo- Kagugu,
Kinyinya- Gasabo-MVK

2013-2014 ANNUAL REPORT


N° CASE IDENTITY OF THE SEX PROFESSIO COURT 144 CRIME SENTENCE
NUMBER CONVICT N COMMITED
23. RP MUYOBOKE Cedric, Male TGI GASABO Giving a bribe of 1 year of
0259/13/TGI/ Son of Rutoto and 2,000,000 Rwf imprisonment and a
Nyirangoga, Residence fine of 4,000,000
GSBO
of Amarembo- Rwf
Musezero- Gisozi-
Gasabo- MVK

24. UMUHOZA M.Rose, Female - TGI GASABO Giving a bribe of 1 year of


Daughter of Sindayigaya 2,000,000 Rwf imprisonment and a
and Kabanyana, fine of 4,000,000
Residence of Ruhogo- Rwf
Rudashya- Ndera-
Gasabo- MVK

25. RP NTAGANIRA Male Student TGI GASABO Giving a bribe of 6 years of


0185/12/TGI/ François, Son of 400,000 Rwf imprisonment and a
Ryezembere and fine of 800,000
GSBO
Kampire, Born in 1978, Rwf
Residence of Tabiro-
Nyagatovu- Kimironko-
Gasabo- MVK

2013-2014 ANNUAL REPORT


N° CASE IDENTITY OF THE SEX PROFESSIO COURT 145 CRIME SENTENCE
NUMBER CONVICT N COMMITED
BATAMULIZA Female Businesswoma TGI GASABO Giving a bribe of 6 years of
Jeanne, Daughter of n 400,000 Rwf imprisonment and a
Kayinamura and fine of 800,000
Mukangenzi, Born in Rwf
1978, Residence of
Zindiro- Kimironko-
Gasabo- MVK

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PEOPLE CONVICTED OF CORRUPTION CASES 1st Term 2014 146

N° CASE IDENTITY OF THE CONVICTED SEX PROFESSION COURT CRIME SENTENCE


NUMBER COMMITED
1. RPA0864/12/H TURATSINZE Cyrille, son of Male Permanent HC KIGALI Receiving a bribe Imprisonment of
C/KIG RIVUZENDE Christia and Secretary to of 2,000,000Rwf 5years and a fine of
MUKAKALINDA Venantie, born in 1971, MINALOC 4,000,000
residence of Rwinyana-Byimana-Gisozi-
Gasabo-MVK

HARELIMANA RWEGO René, son of Male Businessman HC KIGALI Complicity with Imprisonment of 5
HARELIMANA Martin and TURATSINZE years and a fine of
MUKAMUNANA Sifora, born in 1980, Cyrille in receiving 4,000,000
residence of Gapfupfu- Nyakabanda- a bribe of
Nyarugenge- MVK 2,000,000Rwf

2. RPA MAJYAMBERE Emmanuel, son of Male Haircutter HC KIGALI Giving a bribe of Imprisonment of 2
0710/13/HC/KI NDUWIMANA and MUKANKUSI, born in 60,000Rwf years
G 1984, residence of Intwari- Kimironko-
Gasabo- MVK

3. RPA0691/13/H NSABIMANA Ildephonse, son of Male "Inkeragutabar HC KIGALI Asking a bribe of Imprisonment of 2
C/KIG NGIRINSHUTI fidèle and a" 60,000Rwf years
MUKARUTABANA Hélène, residence of
Inganzo- Katabaro- Kimisagara- Nyarugenge-

2013-2014 ANNUAL REPORT


N° CASE IDENTITY OF THE CONVICTED SEX 147 COURT
PROFESSION CRIME SENTENCE
NUMBER COMMITED
MVK

NSENGIYUMVA Eric, son of Male "Inkeragutabar HC KIGALI Asking a bribe of Imprisonment of 2


NGIRINSHUTI and MUKATURATSINZE, a" 60,000Rwf years
residence of Inganzo- Katabaro- Kimisagara-
Nyarugenge- MVK

NSABIMANA Martin ,son of Male Local Defense HC KIGALI Asking a bribe of Imprisonment of
NZABARINDA and UWIRAGIYE, 60,000Rwf 2years
residence of Inganzo- Katabaro- Kimisagara-
Nyarugenge- MVK

TWIZEYIMANA Jean Bosco, son of Male Local Defense HC KIGALI Asking a bribe of Imprisonment of 2
KAREGEYA and 60,000Rwf years
MUKARUSHEMA,residence of Inganzo-
Katabaro- Kimisagara- Nyarugenge- MVK

4. RPA0787/13/H MASABO Jean, son of UKOZIVUZE and Male Driver HC KIGALI Giving a bribe of Imprisonment of 1
C/KIG NYIRAHABIYAMBERE, residence of 10,000Rwf year and a fine of
Nyamugali-Kamugarura-Nyamugali- Ngoma- 40,000Rwf
East

5. RPA0024/14/H NDAYISHIMIYE Frodouald, son of Male Driver HC Giving a bribe of Imprisonment of 2

2013-2014 ANNUAL REPORT


N° CASE IDENTITY OF THE CONVICTED SEX 148 COURT
PROFESSION CRIME SENTENCE
NUMBER COMMITED
C/RW NYIRINDEKWE and MUKAMURIGO RWAMAGA 20,000Rwf years and a fine of
Lydia, born in 1984, residence of Kabakene- NA 40,000Rwf
Muhima- Muhima-Nyarugenge- MVK

6. RPAA0018/13/ RWAKABISHYA John, son of GAPFUNSI Male Chief of Village HC Asking a bribe of Imprisonment of 2
HC/RWG and NYANGORE, born in 1968, residence of RWAMAGA 20,000Rwf years and a fine of
Rumuli- Nyamugali- Nyamugali- Kirehe-East NA 100,000Rwf

7. RPA0053/14/H NKURUNZIZA Fred alias MAGURU, son Male Businessman HC Giving a bribe of
C/RWG of GATSINZI Faustin and KANTENGWA RWAMAGA 200,000Rwf
Imprisonment of 1
Stéphanie, born in 1978, residence of Barija- NA
year and 6 months
Nyagatare-Nyagatare- Nyagatare-East

8. RWAMBIBI Africana alias Firikano, son Male Farmer HC Giving a bribe of Imprisonment of 1
of Barusa and Nyirankesha, residence of MUSANZE 10,000Rwf year suspended in
RPA0379/13/H
Mbuga,- Bushenyi- Bungwe- Burera- North 1 year and a fine of
C/MUS
20,000 Rwf

9. RPA UWINGABO Intime, son of BASABOSE Male Businessman HC Giving a bribe of Imprisonment of
0340/13/HC/MU and SIBOMANA, residence of Rukereza- MUSANZE 20,000Rwf 1year and a fine of
S Kigombe- Muhoza-Musanze- North 54,000Rwf

2013-2014 ANNUAL REPORT


N° CASE IDENTITY OF THE CONVICTED SEX 149 COURT
PROFESSION CRIME SENTENCE
NUMBER COMMITED
10. RPA0092/13/H MUKAGATARE Théophile, daughter of Female Farmer HC Giving a bribe of Imprisonment of 7
C/NYA BARAMBONEJE and NYIRANDUHIJYE, NYANZA 15,000Rwf and years and a fine of
residence of Kondo- Ruhango- Rongi- forgery 30,000Rwf
Muhanga- South

11. RPA NDAYISHIMIYE Theophile, son of Male Farmer HC Giving a bribe of Imprisonment of 1
0437/13/HC/NY HAVUGIMANA Philippe and NIYOYITA NYANZA 22,000 Rwf year and a fine of
A Sidonie, residence of Nyarutovu- Rwinyana- 220,000Rwf
Bweramana- Ruhango-South

12. RPA 0067/14/ UWIMANIHAYE Célèstin, son of Male Farmer HC Giving a bribe of Imprisonment of 1
NTAKIRUTIMANA Augustin, residence of NYANZA 1,000 Rwf year and a fine of
HC/NYA
Bihembe- Nkakwa- Nyagisozi-Nyaruguru- 5,000Rwf
South

13. RPA 0062/12 SIBOMANA Olivier, son of Male Farmer HC Giving a bribe of Imprisonment of 2
MUJAWAMARIYA Ancille, residence of NYANZA 3,000Rwf years and a fine of
/HC/NYA
Gitima- Tyazo- Muhanga-Muhanga-South 15.000Rwf

14. RPA 0072/14 MBARUSHIMANA Viateur, son of Male Farmer HC Giving a bribe of Imprisonment of 3
NYAMUZIGA and BURUHUKIRO, NYANZA 30,000Rwf years
/HC/NYA
residence of Kivumu- Kigarama-Mwendo-

2013-2014 ANNUAL REPORT


N° CASE IDENTITY OF THE CONVICTED SEX 150 COURT
PROFESSION CRIME SENTENCE
NUMBER COMMITED
Ruhango-South

15. MANIZABAYO Jean Claude, son of Male Conductor TGI Giving a bribe of Imprisonment of 1
NZABAMBARIRWA Faustin and KAKUZE NGOMA 6,000Rwf year and a fine of
RP0830/13/TGI/
Clémentine, born in 1983, residence of 100,000Rwf
NGOMA
Mburabuturo- Mburabuturo-Mukarange-
Kayonza-East

16. RPA0031/14/TG SANGANO Florent, son of MBURANO Male Farmer TGI Giving a bribe of Imprisonment of 6
I/NYG Fabien and NYIRAKABANO Monique NYAGATA 50,000Rwf months and a fine
RE of 50,000Rwf

17. RP0536/13/TGI/ NZEYIMANA Théogène, son of Male Moto cyclist TGI Giving a bribe of Imprisonment of 1
GAKWAYA and MUHIMPUNDU Goretti, MUHANGA 5,000Rwf year and a fine of
MHG
born in 1989, residence of Gikoma-Ruhango-
10,000Rwf
Ruhango-South

18. RP0540/13/TGI/ MUKANYONGA Damrse, daughter of Female Farmer TGI Giving a bribe of Imprisonment of 1
MHG NGUGE Henock and GIRINKA Marthe, MUHANGA 50,000Rwf year and 6 months
residence of Kiruri-Mukingo-Nyanza-South suspended in 1
year and a fine of
16,000Rwf

2013-2014 ANNUAL REPORT


N° CASE IDENTITY OF THE CONVICTED SEX 151 COURT
PROFESSION CRIME SENTENCE
NUMBER COMMITED
19. RP0499/13/TGI/ NYANDWI Gallican, Son of Male Driver TGI Giving a bribe of Imprisonment of 1
MHG NGABONZIZA and NYIRAZESA, born in MUHANGA 10,000Rwf year and a fine of
1984, residence of Nyabisindu-Nyarubaka- 20,000Rwf
Kamonyi-East

20. RP0550/13/TGI RUKUNDO Janvier, son of NSABIMANA Male Driver TGI Giving a bribe of Imprisonment of
MHG Evariste and MUKAGASANA Alphonsine MUHANGA 5,000Rwf 1year and 6
months suspended
in 1 year

21. RP0396/13/ MUGIRANEZA Gratien, son of Male Moto cyclist TGI HUYE Giving a bribe of Imprisonment of 1
NDAGIJIMANA Jean and 10,000Rwf year and a fine of
TGI/HYE
NYIRANSABIMANA Anonciata, born in
50,000Rwf
1983, residence of Nyarunazi-Sabusa- Kansi-
Gisagara-South

22. RPA0201/13/ SEBUDANDI Vedaste, son of Male In charge of TGI HUYE Receiving Imprisonment of 6
NSABIMANA and NYIRABUGARE forestry in years and a fine of
TGI/HYE 50.000Frw
Anonciata, born in 1983, residence of Mbogo- Ntyazo and
150,000 Rwf
Gikondo- Gisagara-Soueth Kibirizi Sectors

23. RP0376/13/ TUYISENGE Egide, son of Male Moto cyclist TGI HUYE Giving a bribe of Imprisonment of 6
HAGUMUBUZIMA Joseph and

2013-2014 ANNUAL REPORT


N° CASE IDENTITY OF THE CONVICTED SEX 152 COURT
PROFESSION CRIME SENTENCE
NUMBER COMMITED
TGI/HYE MUKAMUDENGE Vestine, born in 1987, 15,000Rwf years and a fine of
residence of Rugunga-Gisagara- Mamba-
150,000Rwf
Gisagara- South

SEBUHUNGU Athanase, son of Male Moto cyclist TGI HUYE Giving a bribe of Imprisonment of 6
SEBUDANDI Claude and UZANINKA 15,000Rwf years and a fine of
Alvine born in 1984, residence of Rugwiza-
150,000Rwf
Gakoma-Mamba- Gisagara-South

24. RP0051/13/ DUSENGIMANA Jacqueline, son of Male Farmer TGI Giving a bribe of Imprisonment of 2
HANYURWIMFURA and MUKAGATARE, NYAMAGA 25,000Rwf years suspended in
TGI/NYBE
born in 1994, residence of Gicaca- BE 3 years and a fine
Mudasomwa- Tare- Nyamagabe- South of 50,000 Rwf

25. RP0227/13/TGI/ RUGIMBANA Anaclet, residence of Male Farmer TGI Giving a bribe Imprisonment of 1
MUS Mpinga-Shyira-Nyabihu-Western MUSANZE year and a fine of
20,000Rwf

26. RPA0223/13/TG KANEZA Alexis, son of KAZENEZA and Male Fisherman TGI RUSIZI Giving a bribe of Imprisonment of 2
I/RSZ SEBAGENI Sonia, born in 1988, residence of 38,000Rwf and years and a fine of
Ijwi -Kivu- Bukavu-RDC 25US$ 150,000Rwf

MUNGUYIKO Moise, son of MUSORO Male Fisherman TGI RUSIZI Giving a bribe of Imprisonment of 2

2013-2014 ANNUAL REPORT


N° CASE IDENTITY OF THE CONVICTED SEX 153 COURT
PROFESSION CRIME SENTENCE
NUMBER COMMITED
Mudahigwa and NZAMUKUNDA, born in 38,000Rwf and years and a fine of
1994, residence of Kivu- Bukavu-RDC 25US$ 40,000 Rwf

2013-2014 ANNUAL REPORT