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MASTERS IN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE EDUCATION

Code Title LH PH CH CU
Year One Semester One
MEL 6101 The Structure of English Language I 60 0 60 4
MEL 6102 Literary Theory 60 0 60 4
MEL 6103 Discourse Analysis 60 0 60 4
MEL 6104 Computer Applications 30 30 60 4
Year One Semester Two
MEL 6201 The structure of English Language II 60 0 60 4
MEL 6202 Sociolinguistics and Psycholinguistics 60 0 60 4
MEL 6203 Literature and Gender 60 0 60 4
MEL 6204 Educational Research (Quantitative) 60 0 60 4
Year Two Semester One
MEL 6301 Methodology of English and Literature Teaching 60 0 60 4
MEL 6302 Curriculum and Materials Development 60 0 60 4
MEL 6303 Literary Interpretation 60 0 60 4
MEL 6304 Educational Research (Qualitative) 30 30 60 4
Year Two Semester Two
MEL 6401 Dissertation

YEAR ONE SEMESTER ONE


MEL 6101: THE STRUCTURE OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE I

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COURSE LEADER: ………………………………………………………………..

PREAMBLE

Phonetics and phonology are not esoteric academic disciplines with no relevance to the real
world. Beyond the confines of linguistics, there are many kinds of specialists working with
language who need to be able to analyze and represent speech in a more sophisticated way
than that provided by the standard orthography.
A good understanding of phonology and phonetics is desirable, for it facilitates the diagnosis of
learners’ errors and provides the concepts and notation needed to represent accurately both
the learners’ speech and the target pronunciation.

The knowledge of syntax sets basis for the accurate combination of words to form phrases-
clauses and sentences in English.

The knowledge of morphology too, is relevant in the formation of adverbs, tense formation,
and formation of adjectives among others as you will discover during the study.

COURSE OBJECTIVES
1. The course helps one to explore the ways in which language uses the medium of
sound.
2. Discovers the restrictions on the ways in which sounds can combine to form words.
3. Establishes ways in which phonology relates to grammar and meaning.
4. Establishes the elements that are combined to form proper English words.
5. How to write correct sentences following the correct sentence patterns.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Phonology and Orthography

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1. Language as a system of sounds: phonemes
2. Production of speech sounds: the vocal organs
3. Vowels vs consonants: enunciation and articulation
4. Vowels of English :high vs low, front vs back
5. Long vowels, short vowels, diphthongs :minimal contrasts
6. Consonants of English :points of articulation
7. Consonants of English: voiced and voiceless
8. Consonants of English: plosives and fricatives; affricates and semivowels
9. Possible combinations of phonemes in English :syllable structure, consonant
clusters
10. Modifications of sound in context: allophones
11. phonetic transcription
12. Suprasegmental features of sound systems
13. English as a stress -timed language
14. The writing system: relationship to the sound system
15. English spelling

Morphology and Syntax


1. Language as words: what is a word?
2. Words as structural and structured elements: sequence, morphological structure
3. Grammatical vs lexical meaning : functions vs content words; inflection vs
derivational morphemes
4. Classes of content words: nouns, verbs, adjectives. adverbs; ways of determining a
word’s class
5. Phrase structure: noun phrases; verb phrases; adjective & adverb phrases;
prepositional phrases
6. Sentence structure :subject(NP) + predicate (VP); ways of identifying the subject
7. Noun phrases ,simple: core nouns; inflected forms; determiners
8. Noun phrases, complex: premodifiers and postmodifiers; types of postmodifier
9. Verb phrases: simple verb; inflections for number and tense
10. Verb phrases: complex verbs; auxiliaries for tense ,aspect, voice, modality;

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inflections for aspect, voice
11. Verb phrases: objects and complements
12. Verb phrases :particles and adverbials
13. Coordination: clauses, phrases, elements within phrases
14. Subordination and embedding
15. Related words of different classes: derivational morphemes
16. Use of the same words in different classes: zero suffixation
17. Formation of new words :suffixes and prefixes
18. Formation of new words: compounds, idioms, collocations
19. Borrowed vocabulary in English
20. Other methods of word formation
21. Manipulation of English structure: shifting elements in the sentence
22. Manipulation of English structure: nominalization and denominalization
23. Syntax and morphology in English poetry
24. Applications of syntax and morphology to writing prose

TEACHING METHODS
i) Research and class presentation.
ii) Interactive methods
iii) Guided discovery
iv) Lecture methods.

COURSE SCHEDULE
WEEK CONTENT HOURS
1 Phonology and Orthography 4
Language as a system of sounds: phonemes
Production of speech sounds: the vocal organs

2 Vowels vs consonants: enunciation and articulation 4


Vowels of English :high vs low, front vs back
Long vowels, short vowels, diphthongs :minimal contrasts

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3 Consonants of English :points of articulation 4
Consonants of English: voiced and voiceless
Consonants of English: plosives and fricatives; affricates and semivowels

4 Possible combinations of phonemes in English :syllable structure, 4


consonant clusters

5 Modifications of sound in context: allophones , phonetic transcription 4


Suprasegmental features of sound systems

6 English as a stress -timed language 4


The writing system: relationship to the sound system
English spelling.
7 Language as words: what is a word? 4
Words as structural and structured elements: sequence, morphological
structure

8 Grammatical vs lexical meaning : functions vs content words; inflection vs 6


derivational morphemes
Classes of content words: nouns, verbs, adjectives. adverbs; ways of
determining a word’s class

9 Phrase structure: noun phrases; verb phrases; adjective & adverb


phrases; prepositional phrases
Sentence structure :subject(NP) + predicate (VP); ways of identifying the
subject

10 Noun phrases ,simple: core nouns; inflected forms; determiners 8


Noun phrases, complex: premodifiers and post modifiers ;types of post
modifier
Verb phrases: simple verb; inflections for number and tense
Verb phrases: complex verbs; auxiliaries for tense, aspect, voice,
modality; inflections for aspect, voice

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Verb phrases: objects and complements
Verb phrases :particles and adverbials
11 Coordination: clauses, phrases, elements within phrases 4
Subordination and embedding
Related words of different classes: derivational morphemes
12 Use of the same words in different classes: zero suffixation 4
Formation of new words :suffixes and prefixes
Formation of new words: compounds, idioms, collocations
13 Borrowed vocabulary in English 2
Other methods of word formation
14 Manipulation of English structure: shifting elements in the sentence 4
Manipulation of English structure: nominalization and denominalization
15 Syntax and morphology in English poetry 4
Applications of syntax and morphology to writing prose

SUGGESTED READINGS
 Francis Katamba (1989) Introduction to Phonology
 Kuiper..& Scott.W. (1996) An Introduction to English Language Sound, Word and
Sentence
 Peter Roach (2000) English Phonetics and Phonology, A Self contained,
comprehensive Pronunciation course, Third Edition

MEL 6102: LITERARY THEORY

COURSE LEADER: ………………………………………………………………..

PREAMBLE

Literary theories lay ground for criticism; a method for revealing the reader-critic the total

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significance of the structure of words that is a work of art. Literary theories guide us in passing
judgment s or forming opinions on creative literary art works.

Someone once remarked that literature without criticism is like an egg that cannot be hatched.
Literature is meant to be read and enjoyed .And as you may realize, one cannot enjoy
literature unless one has read it. It is interesting to note that from a vast body of readers
emerge critics and theories.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

1 Literary theory guides the practice of study by identifying problems or gaps in the text
and the relevant solutions.
2 Appreciate the creation of authors.
3 Enables the reader to re-create as we try to find out what we intend to know.
4 Improves criticism, since it sets guidelines.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

1. The meaning and purpose of criticism


2. Literary theories
3. Marxist theory
4. Psychoanalytical theory
5. Textual semiotics
6. Post structuralism and deconstructionism
7. Hermiotics
8. Historicism
9. Feminist theory : gender, law, essentialism, patriarchy, gynocentrics,
phallolocentrism

TEACHING METHODS
1. Research and class presentation.

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2. Interactive methods
3. Guided discovery
4. Lecture methods.

COURSE SCHEDULE

WEEK CONTENT HOURS


1-2 The Meaning and purpose of criticism 8
3-4 Literary theories 8
5 Marxist theory 4
6 Psychoanalytical theory 4
7 Textual semiotics 4
8-9 Post structuralism and deconstructionism 8
10 Hermiotics 4
11 Historicism 4
12-15 Feminist theory : gender, law, essentialism, patriarchy, 16
gynocentrics, phallolocentrism

SUGGESTED READINGS

1 Atkins, C.D.(1983) Reading Deconstructionism /Deconstructive Reading


2 Cameron, D.(1991)The Feminist Critic of Language
3 Eagleton, T.( ) Literary Theory: An Introduction
4 Eagleton, T.( )Criticism and Ideology
5 Fish, S.(1980)Is There a Text in this class: The Authority of Interpretive Communities

MEL 6103 : DISCOURSE ANALYSIS

COURSE LEADER: ……………………………………………………………………

PREAMBLE
Discourse is any stretch of spoken or written language which is felt as complete in itself
(Hoey,1983).It must make sense in itself, not unrelated sentences must be related, properly

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connected, and flow smoothly.
The term discourse is used to refer to units larger than grammatical units of language.
Grammatical units of language include a phrase, a clause or a sentence. These may not make
meaning in isolation.

Discourse analysis is a study which involves studying how sentences in spoken and written
language form larger meaningful units. English examples of larger meaningful units are
paragraphs, letters, poems, conversations and reports. In other words it is a study of spoken
and written interaction.
OBJECTIVES:
1 To discover how natural spoken and written discourse looks and sounds
2 To provide quite different data from our own intuitive assumptions, or that of text book
writers which is based on pre-conceived pre-judgments originating from our knowledge
of traditional grammar and what we have been taught about vocabulary and intonation.
3 It opens up one’s understanding of the written text.
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
1. Text and texture
2. Cohesion: grammatical cohesion; lexical cohesion; conjunctions
3. Cohesive chains
4. The linguistic system
5. Reference
6. Substitution and ellipsis
7. Coherence
8. Concept of a model of reading process
9. Frames
10. Scripts
11. Conversational structure
12. Conjunction, pronominalization, collocation, reiteration and their role in discourse
analysis.
13. Ethnography of speaking
 Speech community

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 Speech style
 Speech events
 Components of speech events
 Norms of interaction

TEACHING METHODS
1. Research and class presentation.
2. Interactive methods
3. Guided discovery
4. Lecture methods.

COURSE SCHEDULE
WEEK CONTENT HOURS
1 Text and texture 4
2 Cohesion: grammatical cohesion; lexical cohesion; conjunctions 4
3 Cohesive chains 4
4 The linguistic system 4
5 Reference 4
6 Substitution and ellipsis 4
7 Coherence 4
8 Concept of a model of reading process 4
9 Frames 4
10 Scripts 4

11 Conversational structure 4
12 Conjunction, pronominalization, collocation, reiteration and their role in 4
discourse analysis.
13-15 Ethnography of speaking 12
 Speech community
 Speech style
 Speech events
 Components of speech events
 Norms of interaction

SUGGESTED READINGS

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Brown,G.& G.Yule (1996) Discourse Analysis,Cambridge University press

Crystal,D.(1987) The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Language,Cambidge University


Press,New York

Hanks,P.et al, (1990) The Collins English Dictionary,Collins,London&Glasgow

Malcom Couthard (1985) An Introduction to Discourse Analysis, New York.


www.eric.ed.gcy
www.wikipedia.org

MEL 6104: Computer Applications 4


Course outlines available in the School of Computer Sciences and Information Technology

YEAR ONE SEMESTER TWO


MEL 6201: THE STRUCTURE OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE II

COURSE LEADER: ……………………………………………………………………

PREAMBLE

Phonology, morphology and syntax are forms of language. But language is more than just
form. It is also communicative i.e., it conveys meaning.
Semantics is the study of meaning. Meaning may be attached to single words, phrases and

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sentences.

COURSE OBJECTIVES
On successful completion of the course students should be able to:
• Derive meaning out of the words they use in English appropriately and hence, teach
their learners correctly.
• Derive semantic properties of words as used in English sentences
• Use the knowledge acquired to teach their learners how to make meaning of the words
in context.

COURSE DESCRIPTION
• Semantic relations at the level of sentences
• Phrase structure rules
• Semantic relations and properties at the word(morpheme) level
• Semantic properties and relations at phrase level
• Synonyms, antonyms, polysemy, homophony
• Pragmatics
• Phrase structure units
• Transformation

TEACHING METHODS
1. Research and class presentation.
2. Interactive methods
3. Guided discovery
4. Lecture methods.

COURSE SCHEDULE
WEEK CONTENT HOURS
1-2 • Semantic relations at the level of sentences 8
3-4 • Phrase structure rules 8

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5-6 • Semantic relations and properties at the word(morpheme) 8
level
7-8 • Semantic properties and relations at phrase level 8
9 • Synonyms, antonyms, polysemy, homophony 4
10-12 • Pragmatics 12
13-14 • Phrase structure units 8
15 • Transformation 4
16-17 Exams -

SUGGESTED READINGS

• Austin,J.L.(1962) How to do things with words


• Francis Katamba (1989) Introduction to Phonology
• Kuiper..& Scott.W. (1996) An Introduction to English Language Sound, Word and
Sentence.
MEL 6202: SOCIOLINGUISTICS AND PSYCHOLINGUISTICS

COURSE LEADER: ……………………………………………………………………

PREAMBLE:
Sociolinguistics involves the study of the social aspects of language, such as: home
bilingualism, school setting, media (exposure), attitude, age and gender.

Psycholinguistics is the study of language processing mechanisms involved in producing and


understanding language. Psycholinguistics study how words, sentences and discourse
meaning are represented and compiled in mind.

OBJECTIVES:
On successful completion of the course, students should be able to:
1- Establish a context in which to teach English and Literature.
2- Establish how our social settings affect how we use language.
3- Establish how our mental faculties or cognitive affect language acquisition.
4-

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COURSE DESCRIPTION:
The course focuses on:
- Principles underlying the study of Sociolinguistics
- Social aspects of language.
- Elements that constitute language.
- Functions of language.
- Causes of language change.
- Sound change
- Language maintenance, shift and language death.
- Language Variation
- Language policy and planning.
- Bilingualism.
- Language and thought.
TEACHING METHODS
1. Research and class presentation.
2. Interactive methods
3. Guided discovery
4. Lecture methods.

COURSE SCHEDULE
WEEK CONTENT HOURS
1-2 Principles underlying the study of Sociolinguistics 8
3 Social aspects of language. 4
4-5 Elements that constitute language. 8
6 Functions of language. 4
7 Causes of language change. 4
8 Sound change 4
9-10 Language maintenance, shift and language death. 8
11 Language Variation 4
12-13 Language policy and planning. 8
14 Bilingualism. 4
15 Language and thought 4
16-17 Exams -

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SUGGESTED READINGS:
1- Longman Dictionary of applied Linguistics.
2- Wardhaugh , An Introduction to Sociolinguistics
3- Collin Baker, Foundations of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.
4- O’Grady et, al, Contemporary Linguistics.
5- Rod Ellis , Understanding Second Language Acquisition.
www. Wikipedia. Org
MEL 6203: GENDER LANGUAGE & LITERATURE TEACHING

COURSE LEADER: ……………………………………………………………………

PREAMBLE

Gender is define by Hale (1990) as, the socially constructed component of female and male
identity as distinctive from biological sex differences. It is important to point out that although
gender and sex are usually confused to mean the same thing, they are quite different
concepts. Society has a dynamic nature, it changes and people must equip themselves to
cope with the new changes.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

On successful completion of the course, learners should be able to;

• Address and re-address gender biases, imbalances, and injustices.


• Devise gender sensitive approaches to teaching and learning of literature and
language.
• To design gender sensitive teaching and learning materials.
• Equip their students with ability to think widely and deeply in all human affairs as it is
also a component of gender.

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COURSE DESCRIPTION

1. Definitions of gender and sex


2. National gender policies (Uganda)
3. Gendered nature of literature
4. Gendered nature of English
5. Approaches in the field of sex and language
6. Linguistic theory: Frame works and approaches
7. Finding patterns in children’s fiction

8. Themes and issues in women’s literature


9. Sex differences in language and linguistics
10. What is sex difference?

TEACHING METHODS
1. Research and class presentation.
2. Interactive methods
3. Guided discovery
4. Lecture methods.

COURSE SCHEDULE

WEEK HOURS
1 Definitions of gender and sex 4
2 National gender policies (Uganda) 4
3 Gendered nature of literature 4
4 Gendered nature of English 4
5 Approaches in the field of sex and language 4
6 Linguistic theory: Frame works and approaches 4
7 Finding patterns in children’s fiction 4
8 Themes and issues in women’s literature 4
9 Sex differences in language and linguistics 4
10 What is sex difference? 4

SUGGESTED READINGS

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• Martyna Wendy (1980) The psychology of the generic masculine
• Miller Casy and Kate Swift (1980) Writing for Writers,Editors and Speakers
• Women and Language in Literature and Society
MEL 6204: EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH (QUANTITATIVE)

COURSE LEADER: ………………………………………………………………..

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
By the end of the course, candidates should be able to;
1- Define what a quantitative research is.
2- Differentiate between quantitative and qualitative research.
3- Manage data collection and analyze it effectively.
4- Write research accordingly.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course focuses on:
Introduction to quantitative research, the functions of Research; Sampling designs; types of
quantitative research; measurement and data collection and analysis; frequency distribution
and graphs; Measures of central tendency, measures of variability, and academic writing in
research.

EVALUATION AND ASSESSMENT:


Two types of assessment will be used; that is summative and formative. A formative
assessment will carry 40% (coursework and presentations) and summative will carry 60%
(examination).

TEACHING METHODS
 Lectures
 Interactive methods
 Group work
 Brain storming

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COURSE SCHEDULE:

WEEK CONTENT HOURS


1-2 Introduction to quantitative research 8
3-4 The functions of Research 8
5-6 Sampling designs 8
7-8 Types of quantitative research 8
9-10 Measurement and data collection and 8
analysis
11-12 Frequency distribution and graphs 8
13 Measures of central tendency 4
14 Measures of variability 4
15 Academic writing in research. 4
16-17 Exams -

SUGGESTED READINGS:
Leedy, P.D. (1997), Practical Research, Planning and Design, 6th ed. New Jersey: Prentice
Hall Inc.

Koul, L. (1984), Methodology of Educational Research, 3rd ed., Delhi: UBS Publishers’
Distributors Ltd.

Kerlinger, F. N. (1964); Foundations of Behavioral Research, New York; Holt, Rinehart and
Winston Inc.

Melville, S. and Goddard, W. (1996); Research Methodology, An Introduction for Science and
Engineering Students.

YEAR TWO SEMESTER ONE

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MEL 6301: METHODOLOGY OF ENGLISH AND LITERATURE TEACHING

COURSE LEADER: ……………………………………………………………………

PREAMBLE

Methodology is the body of methods, rules and postulates employed by a particular discipline.
The analysis of the principles or procedures of inquiry in a particular field. The common idea
here is the collection, comparative study and the critique of the individual methods that are
used in a given discipline or field of study.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

On the successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

• Make an objective selection of methods and approaches to be used during the teaching
and learning of language and literature.
• Demonstrate competency in their deliverance of content
• Make a good judgment of the state of their learners and hence, be able to judge the
best way to handle them

COURSE DESCRIPTION
1. Collaborative language teaching techniques
2. Communicative language teaching techniques
3. Approach-philosophical principles which govern the content to be delivered and how to
deliver
4. Teacher and learner centered approaches
5. Cooperative learning techniques
6. The learning styles

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7. Topical and thematic approaches
8. Functional-notional approach
9. Communicative approach
10. Learner factors

TEACHING METHODS
1. Research and class presentation.
2. Interactive methods
3. Guided discovery
4. Lecture methods.

COURSE SCHEDULE
WEEK CONTENT HOURS
1-2 Collaborative language teaching techniques 8
3-4 Communicative language teaching 8
techniques
5-6 Approach-philosophical principles which 8
govern the content to be delivered and how
to deliver
7-8 Teacher and learner centered approaches 8
9 Cooperative learning techniques 4
10 The learning styles 4
11 Topical and thematic approaches 4
12-13 Functional-notional approach 8
14 Communicative approach 4
15 Learner factors 4
16-17 Exams -

SUGGESTED READINGS

• A hand book of Language teaching


• Any other relevant reference in this area.

MEL 6302: CURRICULUM AND MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT

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PREAMBLE
Effective and productive knowledge /content must go further beyond a syllabus. The curriculum
must be an explanation and justification of the purposes of such transmission and an
explanation of the effects of such exposure to the recipients

COURSE OBJECTIVES
On successful completion of the course, learners must be able to:
• Develop a curriculum for Language studies
• Implement the curriculum developed
• Evaluate Language courses appropriately
• Carry out effective assessment procedures

COURSE DESCRIPTION
• Hidden curriculum
• Planning models: Tyler, Linear, cyclic etc
• Socio-cultural or socio linguistic context (Factors which determine the curriculum)
• Determinants of design and implementation of the curriculum
• Philosophical issues of the curriculum
• Ideological factors which affect secondary school and university curriculum
• Non formal / indigenous education
• Procedures for designing a language course
• Language skills selection
• Needs analysis.
TEACHING METHODS
1. Research and class presentation.
2. Interactive methods
3. Guided discovery
4. Lecture methods.

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COURSE SCHEDULE
WEEK CONTENT HOURS
1-2 Hidden curriculum 8
Planning models: Tyler, Linear, cyclic etc
3-4 Socio-cultural or socio linguistic context (Factors which determine the 8
curriculum)
5-6 Determinants of design and implementation of the curriculum 8
7 Philosophical issues of the curriculum 4
8-9 Ideological factors which affect secondary school and university 8
curriculum
10 Non formal / indigenous education 4
11-12 Procedures for designing a language course 8
13-14 Language skills selection 8
15 Needs analysis. 4
16-17 Exams -

SUGGESTED READINGS
• A Hand book of language Teaching

MEL 6303 : LITERARY INTERPRETATION

COURSE LEADER: ……………………………………………………


PREAMBLE
More than two thousand years ago, the Roman poet Horace claimed that literature is "sweet"
and "useful." Since then, literature has been traditionally understood, at least in Western
cultures, as having the dual purpose of entertaining and educating its audience. Literary texts
are constructed in effect as objects of beauty, sources of pleasure and as conveyors of
messages and information. While authors often claim no practical purpose for their works, all
literature constitutes an attempt at persuasively conveying certain values and ideas. The

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entertaining and beautiful aspect of literary works acts in reality as part of the appeal and
attractiveness which the work tries to attach to the ideas which it seeks to convey. The beauty
of literature is therefore a part of its rhetoric, a device intended to strengthen the overall
persuasiveness and influence of the work on its audience. While the entertaining aspect of
literature may be rather obvious, understanding the ideas or values which a text advances is
not always a simple task. Part of the problem is the fact that the ideas of a literary text are
almost always presented in indirect or "symbolic" form. Take for example the following very
simple narrative.

COURSE OBJECTIVES
By the end of the course, learners should be able to:
• Analyze literary works from structuralist, semiological, feminist, Marxist, and
psychoanalytical perspectives, whereas earlier criticism tended to deal with moral or
political ideas, or with a literary work as a formal object independent of its creator.

COURSE DESCRIPTION
1. Literature by regions, periods, genres and author
2. Post structuralism
3. Reader response theory
• Gap filling
• Completion
4. Literary periods movements
• Caribbean literature
• European literature
• Australian literature
• African literature
• Canadian literature
• American literature
5. Reception theory
6. Hermeneutics

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7. Phenomenology
8. Objectivists
9. Relativists

TEACHING METHODS
1. Research and class presentation.
2. Interactive methods
3. Guided discovery
4. Lecture methods.

COURSE SCHEDULE
WEEK CONTENT HOURS
1 Literature by regions, periods ,genres and 4
author
2 Post structuralism 4
3-4 Reader response theory: 8
Gap filling
Completion
5 Literary periods movements 4
6-7 Caribbean literature & European literature 8
8-9 Australian literature & Canadian literature 8
10 American literature & African literature 4
11 Reception theory 4
12 Hermeneutics 4
13 Phenomenology 4
14 Objectivists 4
15 Relativists 4
16-17 -

SUGGESTED READINGS
• Gadamer,H. (1982) Truth and Method
• Hartman,G. (1981) Saving the Text: Literature/Derrida/Philosophy
• Jauss,H.R. (1982) Aesthetic Experience AND Literary Hermeneutics
• Jefferson,A. and Robey ,D. (1982) Modern Literary Theory: A comparative Introduction
• McDougal Littell (2000) The Language of Literature . Teachers’ Edition

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MEL 6304: Educational Research (Qualitative)

COURSE LEADER: ………………………………………………………………..

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
By the end of the course, candidates should be able to;
1- Define what a qualitative research is.
2- Differentiate between quantitative and qualitative research.
3- Manage data collection and analyze it effectively.
4- Write research accordingly.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course focuses on:
Introduction to qualitative research, Designing qualitative research; Data collection methods;
Measures of relationships; Measures of relative position: PR, Z-scores, T-scores etc. and
Academic writing in research qualitative methods.

EVALUATION AND ASSESSMENT:


Two types of assessment will be used; that is summative and formative. A formative
assessment will carry 40% (coursework and presentations) and summative will carry 60%
(examination).

TEACHING METHODS
 Lectures
 Interactive methods
 Group work
 Brain storming

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COURSE SCHEDULE:
WEEK CONTENT HOURS
1-2 Introduction to qualitative research 8
3-4 Designing qualitative research 8
5-6 Data collection methods 8
7-8 Measures of relationships 8
9-12 Measures of relative position: PR, Z- 16
scores, T-scores etc.
13-15 Academic writing in research qualitative 12
methods.
16-17 Exams -

SUGGESTED READINGS:
Leedy, P.D. (1997), Practical Research, Planning and Design, 6th ed. New Jersey: Prentice
Hall Inc.

Koul, L. (1984), Methodology of Educational Research, 3rd ed., Delhi: UBS Publishers’
Distributors Ltd.

Kerlinger, F. N. (1964); Foundations of Behavioral Research, New York; Holt, Rinehart and
Winston Inc.

Melville, S. and Goddard, W. (1996); Research Methodology, An Introduction for Science and
Engineering Students.

Wanting to be someone else is a waste of the person you are.

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Prince Wasajja Jamil, 2009

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