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Group: Looking for Rhymes

Make a list of these rhyming words, and determine which are examples of internal rhyme and end
rhyme. Copy the table as shown below, and fill it out with the appropriate entries.

RHYMING WORDS in “The SEVEN AGES OF MAN”

END RHYME INTERNAL RHYME

 Make a song using the rhyming words you’ve taken from the text.
 Share your findings with the other groups.

THE SEVEN AGES OF MAN (from: “AS YOU LIKE IT” ) by: William Shakespeare

All the world’s a stage,


And all the men and women are merely players;
They have their exits and entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts
His acts being seven ages.
At first the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms;
And then the whining school boy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress’ eyebrow.
Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths, and bearded like a pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon’s mouth. And then the justice,
In fair round belly with good caper lined,
With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
Full of white saws and modern instances;
And so he plays his part.
The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and, slippered pantaloons,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;
His youthful hose well saved, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.
Group: The Best CLUE

Read the poem aloud once more, and watch out for words that suggest sounds of movements, actions
and meaning. Find examples of onomatopoeia in the poem.
Picture each word in your mind, and try to bring each image in clear focus. Use the following
questions to guide you.
What does it look like?
What kind of sounds does it make?
How does it move?
List them in the table shown below.
ONOMATOPOEIA in “The SEVEN AGES OF MAN”

Sample line / words It looks like The sound it makes How it moves

 Have members imitate the sounds that each onomatopoeic words make, after which blend each
sound to create an acapella melody.
Share your findings with the other group
THE SEVEN AGES OF MAN (from: “AS YOU LIKE IT” ) by: William Shakespeare

All the world’s a stage,


And all the men and women are merely players;
They have their exits and entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts
His acts being seven ages.
At first the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms;
And then the whining school boy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress’ eyebrow.
Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths, and bearded like a pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon’s mouth. And then the justice,
In fair round belly with good caper lined,
With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
Full of white saws and modern instances;
And so he plays his part.
The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and, slippered pantaloons,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;
His youthful hose well saved, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.
Group: IMAGERY
Read the poem silently and think of the images the words created in your mind. Picture them in
your mind and try to bring them in clear focus.
List these words that create clear pictures in your mind.
Share the feeling each image evokes.
Point out the real life experience or observation in life that each image suggests.
Copy the chart shown below and fill it out with the entries called for.

IMAGERY in “SEVEN AGES OF MAN”


Words/ Lines Images Created Feelings Evoked Meaningful Experience

 Act out the image that the words or lines give you.
Share your findings with the other groups.
THE SEVEN AGES OF MAN (from: “AS YOU LIKE IT” ) by: William Shakespeare

All the world’s a stage,


And all the men and women are merely players;
They have their exits and entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts
His acts being seven ages.
At first the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms;
And then the whining school boy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress’ eyebrow.
Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths, and bearded like a pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon’s mouth. And then the justice,
In fair round belly with good caper lined,
With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
Full of white saws and modern instances;
And so he plays his part.
The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and, slippered pantaloons,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;
His youthful hose well saved, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.
Group: Connect to Life
Impersonate the person each stages (starting from schoolboy – second childishness) reminded you of
and answer the following guide questions:

Which part makes / drives you to think of someone/ something in real life?
What kind of roles in life are conveyed in the poem?
What line(s) suggest how one can be effective in performing one’s role?
Is the message of the poem worthwhile? Prove your point.
How important is the poem’s message in your life? Share your responses with the other groups.

THE SEVEN AGES OF MAN (from: “AS YOU LIKE IT” ) by: William Shakespeare

All the world’s a stage,


And all the men and women are merely players;
They have their exits and entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts
His acts being seven ages.
At first the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms;
And then the whining school boy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress’ eyebrow.
Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths, and bearded like a pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon’s mouth. And then the justice,
In fair round belly with good caper lined,
With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
Full of white saws and modern instances;
And so he plays his part.
The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and, slippered pantaloons,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;
His youthful hose well saved, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.