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Worksheet #1 Sig. Fig.

s, Classification of Matter, Changes and Unit Analysis

1. Give the number of significant figures (sig. fig.s) for each of the following:

a. 57 2

b. 9.283 x 103 4

2. Give the correct number of sig. fig.s for the following operations:

a. 521 + 1.273 521 + 1.273 = 522.273 = 522 (3 sig figs; add/subtract; no places past
decima
l)

b. 2 x 22.2 44.4 = 4 x101 (1 sig fig; multiply/divide)

3. Write the following in scientific notation:

a. 5,672 5.672x103

b. 0.0031 3.1x10–3

4. Classify the following as an element, compound or a mixture. If it is a mixture, classify


as homogeneous or heterogeneous.
a. soda pop mixture; homogeneous

b. table salt, sodium chloride compound

5. Select whether the following are physical or chemical changes:


a. frying an egg chemical

b. melting an ice cube physical

6. A piece of Ag metal weighs 110.7 g and displaced 10.5 cm3 of water from a graduated
cylinder. What is the density of the silver metal?

( 110.7 g ) = 10.54 = 10.5 g/cm3


(10.5 cm3)

7. A jar contains a dozen pickles; there are 8 jars in a box and 10 boxes in a crate. How many
pickles are in a crate?

(12 pickles) (8 jars) (10 box) = 960 pickles/crate


(1 jar) (1 box) (1 crate)
General Chemistry I
Worksheet #2a Law of Constant Composition, Periodic Table Elements, Isotopes

1. Sulfur forms many different compounds such as SO2, SO3, S2O2 and S7O2. What concept does
this demonstrate?

Law of constant compostion.

2. Name each element. Classify each element below as a metal, metalloid (or semi-metal), or non-
metal. If it is a metal, further classify it as a main group, transition, lanthanide or actinide
metal.
a. K potassium, metal, main group

b. Fe iron, metal, transition metal

c. S sulfur, non-metal, main group

d. Ge germanium, metalloid, main group

3. Give the group name of the


following:
a. Cl halogens

b. Rn noble gases

c. Sr alkaline earth metals

d. Rb alkali metals

4. Give the number of p+, n0, and e– in the following isotopes:


17O2–

8 17neutrons&protons-8 protons = 9
neutrons 8 protons (defines the atom;
atomic #)
10 electrons (two more negative charges than positive charges)

5. Write the complete symbol of the atom/ion that has the

following: 50 p+, 68 n0, 50 e–

50 protons means tin, Sn, since same number of electrons as protons, has no charge.
50+68 = 118Sn
50
General Chemistry I Worksheet #3 Nomenclature, Formulae and Periodic Table

1. Name these polyatomic ions:

a. ClO3– chlorate anion

b. NH4+ ammonium cation

2. Name the following compounds:

a. BaI2 barium iodide

b. NCl3 nitrogen trichloride

c. P4O10 tetraphosphorous dec(a)oxide

d. CoBr3 cobalt(III) bromide

e. Mn3(PO4)4 manganese(IV) phosphate

f. Al(HCO3)3 aluminum bicarbonate (or aluminum hydrogen carbonate)

3. Name the following acids or bases:


a. HF hydrofluoric acid
b. H2C2O4 oxalic acid
c. NaOH sodium hydroxide

4. Write the formula for the chemical name below:


a. barium sulfate BaSO4
b. potassium sulfide K2S
c. sulfur dichloride SCl2
d. diphosphorous pentoxide P2O5
e. sodium sulfate monohydrate Na2SO4●1 H2O

5. Give formulas for the following acids or bases:


a. hydrobromic acid HB
b. calcium hydroxide Ca(OH)2
c. phosphoric acid H3PO4

6. Write the formula of the compound formed by combining the ions of:
a. Mg and O
(Mg2+ & O2–) MgO
b. 3+
Cr and S
(Cr3+ & S2–) Cr2S3
c. Al and Cl
(Al3+ & Cl–) AlCl3

7. Label the following on the periodic table: (see table below)


VIIIA
1 2

H He
1.008 IIA IIIA IVA VA VIA VIIA 4.003
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Li Be B C N O F Ne
6.941
11
9.012
12
Periodic Table of the Elements 10.811
13
12.011
14
14.007
15
15.999
16
18.998
17
20.180
18

Na Mg Al Si P S Cl Ar
22.990 24.305 IIIB IVB VB VIB VIIB VIII IB IIB 26.982 28.086 30.974 32.065 35.453 39.948
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36

K Ca Sc Ti V Cr Mn Fe Co Ni Cu Zn Ga Ge As Se Br Kr
39.098 40.078 44.956 47.867 50.942 51.996 54.938 55.845 58.933 58.693 63.546 65.409 69.723 72.64 74.921 78.96 79.904 83.798
37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54

Rb Sr Y Zr Nb Mo Tc Ru Rh Pd Ag Cd In Sn Sb Te I Xe
85.468 87.62 88.906 91.224 92.906 95.94 (98) 101.07 102.906 106.42 107.868 112.411 114.818 118.710 121.760 127.60 126.904 131.293
55 56 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86

Cs Ba Lu Hf Ta W Re Os Ir Pt Au Hg Tl Pb Bi Po At Rn
132.905 137.327 174.967 178.49 180.948 183.84 186.207 190.23 192.217 195.078 196.967 200.59 204.383 207.2 208.980 (209) (210) (222)
87 88 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118

Fr Ra Lr Rf Db Sg Bh Hs Mt Ds Rg Cn Nh Fl Mc Lv Ts Og
(223) 226.025 (262) (267) (270) (271) (270) (277) (278) (281) (281) (285) (284) (289) (288) (293) (294) (294)

57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70

La Ce Pr Nd Pm Sm Eu Gd Tb Dy Ho Er Tm Yb
138.906 140.116 140.908 144.24 (145) 150.36 151.964 157.25 158.925 162.500 164.930 167.259 168.934 173.04
89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102

Ac Th Pa U Np Pu Am Cm Bk Cf Es Fm Md No
227.028 232.038 231.036 238.029 237.048 (244) (243) (247) (247) (251) (252) (257) (258) (259)

alkali metals Group IA (H – Fr)


alkaline earth metals Group IIA (Be – Ra)
transition metals IIIB – IIB (same as the d-block; see above)
halogens Group VIIA (F – At)
noble gases Group VIIIA (He – Rn)

8. Given the following compounds, give the number of each species that they contain.

a. CH4 1 carbon atom, 4 hydrogen atoms

b. (CH3CO2)2Pb 4 carbon atoms, 6 hydrogen atoms, 4 oxygen atoms, 1 lead


atom (this actually is a lead(II) ion; the other part is two acetate
ions)

c. Na2SO4●10H2O 2 sodium ions, 1 sulfur, 4 oxygen, 10 water molecules


(or 2 sodium, 1 sulfur, 14 oxygen and 20 hydrogen
General Chemistry I
Worksheet #3 Writing and balancing reactions, molecular mass, stoichiometry (unit analysis), %
composition and limiting reagent

1. Balance each of the following reactions:

1 Na3PO4(aq) + 3 AgNO3(aq) -(reaction arrow)- > 3 NaNO3(aq) + 1 Ag3PO4(s)

4 FeO(s) + 1 O2(g) -(reaction arrow)- > 2 Fe2O3(aq)

1 CH3CH2OH(ℓ) + 3 O2(g) -(reaction arrow)- > 2 CO2(g) + 3 H2O(aq)

2 NI3NH3(s) -(reaction arrow)- > 2 N2(g) + 3 I2(g) + 3 H2(g)

1 Cu(s) + 2 HNO3(aq) -(reaction arrow)- > 1 Cu(NO3)2(aq) + 1 H2(g)

2. Write out the balanced chemical equations (including phases) for the following:

a. When solid sodium is added to water, it produces sodium hydroxide and diatomic
hydrogen gas.
2 Na(s) + 2 H2O(l) -(reaction arrow)- > 2 NaOH(aq) + H2(g)

b. The reaction between solid phosphorous (P4) and bromine (a diatomic liquid) forms solid
phosphorous tribromide.
1 P4(s) + 6 Br2(l) -(reaction arrow)- > 4 PBr3(s)

c. Aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate and silver(I) nitrate react to form a solution of
sodium nitrate and solid silver carbonate.

Na2CO3(aq) + 2 AgNO3(aq) -(reaction arrow)- > 2 NaNO3(aq) + Ag2CO3(s)

d. “Burning liquid gasoline (C8H18).”

2 C8H18(l) + 25 O2(g) -(reaction arrow)- > 16 CO2(g) + 18 H2O(l)


3. A 50.51 g sample of a compound made from phosphorous and chlorine is decomposed. Analysis
of the products showed that 11.39 g of phosphorous atoms were produced. How much chlorine
does the compound contain?

50.51 g P + Cl
– 11.39 g P
39.12 g Cl

4. When solid sodium is added to water, it produces sodium hydroxide and hydrogen gas. How
many moles of hydrogen gas was produced from 0.8 moles of sodium and excess water?

2 Na(s) + 2 H2O(l) -(reaction arrow)- > 2 NaOH(aq) + H2(g)

(0.8 moles Na) (1 mole H2) = 0.4 moles H2


( 2 mole Na)

5. In your own words, define limiting reagent.

It limits how much product you can form. You run out of the limiting reagent before you run out
of any other reactant.

6. Calculate the mass percent of sulfur and oxygen in sulfur dioxide, SO2.

[(1 S)(32.07 g S / 1 mole S)] x 100 = 50.05 % S


[ 64.08 g / 1 mole SO2 ]

[(2 O)(15.99 g O / 1 mole O)] x 100 = 49.91 % O


[ 64.08 g / 1 mole SO2 ]

7. Styrene oxide has a very pleasant odor and is used as a raw material for the production of
phenylethyl alcohol used in perfumes. If the percent composition follows, what is the empirical
formula of styrene oxide?

C = 79.97% H = 6.71% O = 13.32%

(79.97 g C)( 1 mole C ) = 6.6580634 / 0.8325520 ≈ 8


(12.011 g C)

(6.71 g H)(1 mole H ) = 6.6567460 / 0.8325520 ≈ 8


(1.008 g H)

(13.32 g O)( 1 mole O ) = 0.8325520 / 0.8325520 = 1


(15.999 g O)

C8H8O, MM ≈ 120 g/mole


If, in a separate experiment, the molecular mass of the sample was found to be about 110 g/mole, what is
the molecular formula of styrene oxide?

C8H8O, MM ≈ 120 g/mole divided by 110 g/mole is about one, so it is both the empirical and
molecular formula

8. Water reacts with calcium carbide to produce Ca(OH)2 and acetylene. The acetylene produced by
this reaction was used to light miner helmet lamps:

CaC2(s) + 2 H2O(ℓ) -(reaction arrow)- > Ca(OH)2(s) + C2H2(g)

a. What is the molar mass (MM) of acetylene (C2H2)?

26.02 g/mole (from adding two carbons (at 12.011 g/mole) with two hydrogens (at 1.008
g/mole).

b. If 52.3 g of water reacts with excess calcium carbide, what mass of acetylene is made?

(52.3 g H2O)( 1 mole H2O)(1 mole C2H2)(26.02 g C2H2) = 37.8 g C2H2


(18.01 g H2O)(2 mole H2O) (1 mole C2H2)

c. What is the molar mass (MM) of calcium carbide (CaC2)?

64.10 g/mole (from adding one calcium (at 40.078 g/mole) with two carbons (at 12.011
g/mole).

d. How much acetylene could be formed if 20.1 g of calcium carbide and 12.5 g of water
reacted? Is there a limiting reagent?

(20.1 g CaC2)( 1 mole CaC2)(1 mole C2H2)(26.02 g C2H2) = 8.17 g C2H2 CaC2 is limiting
(64.10 g CaC2)(1 mole CaC2)(1 mole C2H2)

(12.5 g H2O)( 1 mole H2O)(1 mole C2H2)(26.02 g C2H2) = 9.03 g C2H2


(18.015 g H2O)(2 mole H2O)(1 mole C2H2)
General Chemistry I
Worksheet #4a Concentration, electrolyte types, classifying and balancing reactions, solubility rules and
acid/base chemistry

1. a. Calculate the molarity of a 0.1846 g sample of potassium dichromate if it is dissolved in


enough water to give 500.0 mL of solution.

(0.1846 g K2Cr2O7)( 1 mole K2Cr2O7 )( 1 ) (1000 mL) = 0.001255 M K2Cr2O7


(294.18 g K2Cr2O7)(500.0 mL)( 1 L )

b. What is the molarity of the potassium ion?

K2Cr2O7(s) 2 K+(aq) + Cr O2 72–(aq)

(0.001255 mole K2Cr2O7)( 2 mole K+ ) = 0.002510 M K+


( 1L )(1 mole K2Cr2O7)

2. Calculate the mass of sodium hydroxide in 250.0 mL of a 0.4000 M solution.

(0.4000 mole NaOH)( 250.0 mL )( 1 L )(40.004 g NaOH) = 4.000 g NaOH


( 1L ) (1000 mL) ( 1 mole NaOH )

3. How would you prepare 1.0 L of a 0.50 M solution of sulfuric acid from concentrated
(18 M) sulfuric acid?

(0.50 mole H2SO4)( 1.0 L )( 1L ) = 0.0278 L


( 1L ) (18 mole H2SO4 )

Take 27.8 mL of 18 M sulfuric acid and place into a 1.0 L volumetric flask and dilute up to the
mark (1.0 L).

4. Categorize the equations as: precipitation, redox. or acid-base.

2 Fe2O3(s) + 3 C(s) 4 Fe(s) + 3 CO2(g)

type: redox.

1 HCOOH(aq) + 1 NaOH(aq) 1 Na(HCOO)(aq) + 1 H2O(l)

type: acid-base_

1 CdSO4(aq) + 1 K2S(aq) 1 CdS(s) + 1 K2SO4(aq)

type: precipitation
5. Predict the products, balance the reaction and predict whether any products are insoluble precipitates.
For any reactions that form precipitates, write the balanced ionic and net ionic equations. Don’t forget
phases!

Solubility Rules (apply in order)

1. All Na+, K+, and NH4+ compounds (salts) are soluble.


2. All NO3–, C2H 3O 2–, ClO3–, and ClO –4 salts are soluble.
3. All Ag+, Pb2+, and Hg22+ salts are insoluble.
4. All Cl–, 2–
Br–, and I– salts are soluble.
5. All CO , O2–, S2–, OH–, SO 2–, CrO 2–, Cr O 2–, and PO 3– salts insoluble, except CaS, SrS,
3 3 4 2 7 4
BaS and Ba(OH)2.
6. All SO42– salts are soluble except Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+.

a. _1_Na2S(aq) + _1_ZnCl2(aq) 2 NaCl(aq) + ZnS(s)

2 Na+(aq) + S2–(aq) + Zn2+(aq) + 2 Cl–(aq) 2 Na+(aq) + 2 Cl–(aq) + ZnS(s)

S2–(aq) + Zn2+(aq) ZnS(s)

b. _1_(NH4)2CrO4(aq) + _2_AgNO3(aq) 2 NH4NO3(aq) + Ag2CrO4(s)

2 NH4+(aq) + CrO42–(aq) + 2 Ag+(aq) + 2 NO3–(aq) 2 NH4+(aq) + 2 NO –3(aq) + Ag2CrO4(s)

2 Ag+(aq) + CrO42–(aq) Ag2CrO4(s)

c. _1_Mg(C2H3O2)2(aq) + _1_Na2SO4(aq) MgSO4(aq) + 2 NaC2H3O2(aq)

No insoluble product formed, so no ionic or net ionic needed.

5. a. Complete and balance the following reaction. Put a circle around the base and underline the acid.

_2_HIO(aq) + _1_ Ca(OH)2(aq) 2 H2O(l) + Ca(IO)2(aq)


UNDERLINED

b. Write the balanced reaction that takes place when acetic acid reacts with lithium hydroxide.

HC2H3O2(aq) + LiOH(aq) LiC2H3O2(aq) + H2O(l)

6. Classify the following as a strong acid/base, weak acid/base, covalent (molecular) compound, salt,
organic compound or atomic. Further classify as a strong, weak or non-electrolyte.
a. K2O strong base, strong electrolyte
b. H3BO3 weak acid, weak electrolyte
c. titanium(II) chloride salt, strong electrolyte
d. Mg3(PO4)2 salt, strong electrolyte
e. hexane, C6H12 (CH3CH2CH2CH2CH2CH3) molecular, non-electrolyte
General Chemistry I Worksheet #4b Redox. Chemistry, acid/base chemistry, precipitation reactions
and titrations

1. Complete and balance each reaction. Classify each of the reactions by reaction type (acid/base,
precipitation or redox).

a. _1_ H2C2O4(aq) + _1_ Na2O(aq) _1_ H2O(l) + _1_ Na2C2O4(aq)

type: acid/base

b. _1_ Pb(NO3)2(aq) + _1_ Na2S(aq) _1_ PbS(s) + _2_ NaNO3(aq)

type: precipitation

c. _1_ HCl(aq) + _1_ NaOH(aq) _1_ H2O(l) + _1_ NaCl(aq)

type: acid/base

d. _1_ Cu(s) + _4_ H+(aq) + _2_ NO3– _1_ Cu2+(aq) + _2_ NO2(g) + _2_ H2O(ℓ)

type: redox.

2. Give the oxidation number of each element in the following balanced reactions.
metal↓ ↓element ‘by itself’ ↓ ionic

a. 4 Al(s) + 3 O2(g) 2 Al2O3(s)

Al(s) = 0, O in O2(g) = 0, Al in Al2O3(s) = +3, O in Al2O3(s) = –2

b. 2 MnO4–(aq) + 6 H+(aq) + 5 H2C2O4(aq) 2 Mn2+(aq) + 10 CO2(g) + 8 H2O(l)

Mn in MnO4–(aq) = +7, O in MnO4–(aq) = –2, H+(aq) = +1, H in H2C2O4(aq) = +1,


C in H2C2O4(aq) = +3, O in H2C2O4(aq) = –2

Mn2+(aq) = +2, C in CO2(g) = +4, O in CO2(g) = –2, H in H2O(l) = +1, O in H2O(l) = –2


3. In number 3, part a (above), circle the oxidizing agent, and put a square around the reducing
agent (on the reactant side).

4. a. Break benzoic acid down into its proton and polyatomic anion (yes, include charges!).

HC7O2H5 H+ + C7O2H5–

b. Break calcium hydroxide down into its ions. Ca(OH)2  Ca2+ + OH–

c. Write the reaction that occurs between benzoic acid, HC7O2H5, and calcium hydroxide.

HC7O2H5 + Ca(OH)2 Ca(C7O2H5)2 + 2 H2O

5. a. Complete and balance the following reaction. Put a circle around the base (Ca(OH)2)
and underline the acid (HIO) (not done below; google sites problem).

2_HIO(aq) + _1 Ca(OH)2(aq) 2 H2O(l) + Ca(IO)2(aq)

b. Write the balanced reaction that takes place when acetic acid reacts with lithium hydroxide.

HC2H3O2(aq) + LiOH(aq) LiC2H3O2(aq) + H2O(l)

6. A 25.00 mL sample of vinegar (a dilute solution of acetic acid, HC2H3O2(aq)) was titrated with
0.500 M NaOH(aq). The stoichiometric point was reached when 38.1 mL of the base had been
added.

a. Find the concentration of acetic acid in the vinegar. (Hint: writing a balanced
chemical equation of the reaction is a good start).

HC2H3O2(aq) + NaOH(aq) NaC2H3O2(aq) + H2O(l)

(0.500 mole NaOH)(38.1 mL)( 1 L )(1 mole HC2H3O2) ( 1 )(1000


mL) ( 1 L ) (1000 mL)( 1 mole NaOH )( 25.00 mL )( 1 L )

= 0.762 M HC2H3O2(aq)

b. Circle the strong species in the question above (#7, above part a).
General Chemistry I Worksheet #5 Gas Laws, mole fraction and MM

R = 0.08206 atm•L/mole•K, 1 atm = 760 torr = 760 mm Hg

1. Acetylene is a gas used as a fuel for some welding torches. If 0.52 L of acetylene has a
pressure of 1824 torr, what is the pressure (in atms) if the volume is decreased to 0.39 L?
V1 = 0.52 L P1V1 = P2V2 (Boyle’s Law)
P1= (1824 torr)( 1 atm ) = 2.400 atm
(760 torr) P2 = P1V1
V2
V2 = 0.39 L
P2 = ? P2 = (2.400 atm)(0.52 L)
(0.39 L)
P2 = 3.2 atm

2. A gas-filled balloon having a volume of 2.50 L at 1.2 atm and 25 oC is allowed to rise to the
stratosphere (about 30 km above the surface of the Earth), where the temperature and pressure
are –23 oC and 3.00 x 10–3 atm, respectively. Calculate the final volume of the balloon.

V1 = 2.50 L P1V1 = nRT1


P1 = 1.2 atm P1V1 = P2V2
T1 = 25oC T1 T2
V2 = ? (1.2 atm)(2.50 L) = (3.00x10–3 atm)(V2)
P2 = 3.00x10–3 atm (25oC + 273.15) (–23oC + 273.15)
T2 = –23oC
V2 = 840 = 8.4x102 L

3. Styrene oxide is a fairly simple aromatic organic compound that has a pleasant odor and is
often used in the perfume industry. If 2.07 g of the compound is vaporized completely into a
closed 1.04 L flask at 435 oC, the pressure in the flask is found to be 735 torr. Calculate the
formula weight of the styrene oxide.

FW = g/mole PV = nRT
m = 2.07 g n = PV/RT
V = 1.04 L n = ( 0.967105 atm )( 1.04 L )
T = 435oC + 273 = 708.15 K (0.0821 atm•L/mole•K)(708.15 K)
P = (735 torr)(1 atm/760 torr) = 0.967105 atm
n=? n = 0.0172997 mole styrene oxide

FW = g/mole = 2.07 g/0.0172997 mole

FW = 120 g/mole
4. If the air above a perfume bottle has 0.0444 moles of oxygen (O2(g)) and 0.227 moles of
perfume (whatever brand you prefer here!), calculate the mole fraction of oxygen in the
headspace (air above the perfume) in the bottle.

0.0444 moles of oxygen (O2(g)) + 0.227 moles of perfume = 0.0671 total moles

Mole fraction of O2(g), O2 = 0.0444 moles of oxygen (O2(g)) / 0.0671 total moles = 0.662

5. Magnesium metal reacts with hydrochloric acid solution to produce magnesium chloride solution
and hydrogen gas (diatomic). The hydrogen gas was collected over water (PH2O at 0.0oC = 4.58
torr, taken from page 335). What mass of magnesium is needed to react with excess hydrochloric
acid to produce 0.25 L of diatomic hydrogen gas at STP (1.0 atm and 0.0oC)?
Mg(s) + 2 HCl(aq)  MgCl2(aq) + H2(g) PV = nRT

P = 1.000 atm – ((4.58 torr )(760 torr/1 atm)) = 0.99397 atm


n = PV/RT
n=? nH2 = (0.099397 atm) (0.25 L)
atm•L
VH2 = 0.25 L (0.0821 /mole•K)(273.15 K)
T = 0.0oC + 273.15 = 273.15 K nMg = 0.01108079 mole H2 (1 mole Mg)
(1 mole H2) Mass
Mg = 0.01108079 mole Mg(24.305 g Mg/1 mole Mg) mMg = 0.27 g
Mg

6. Consider the diagram shown below.

(63.0 torr)(1 atm/760 torr) = 0.082894 atm (403 torr)(1 atm/760 torr) = 0.5302632 atm 1.00 L
0.500 L
a. What will be the partial pressure of each gas when the stopcock is opened?
b.
Once the stopcock is opened, the new volume will be 1.50 L (1.00 L + 0.500L). P1V1 = P2V2
(for H2) P1V1 = P2V2 (for O2)
(0.082894 atm)(1.00 L) = P2(1.50 L) (0.5302632 atm)(0.500 L) = P2(1.50 L)
P2 (for H2) = 0.055263 atm P2 (for O2) = 0.1767544 atm

b. What will be the pressure in the flasks when the stopcock is opened? Ptotal =

PH2 + PO2
Ptotal = 0.055263 atm + 0.1767544 atm
Ptotal = 0.23202 atm
Physical and Chemical Changes and Properties of Matter Worksheet
Classify the following as chemical change (cc), chemical property (cp), physical change (pc), or physical property (pp).

1. _____ Heat conductivity 8. _____ Combustible


2. _____ Silver tarnishing 9. _____ Water freezing
3. _____ sublimation 10. _____ Wood burning
4. _____ magnetizing steel 11. _____ Acid resistance
5. _____ length of metal object 12. _____ Brittleness
6. _____ shortening melting 13. _____ Milk souring
7. _____ exploding dynamite 14. _____ baking bread

Identify the following as being true or false to the left of the sentence.

_____ 15. A change in size or shape is a physical change.


_____ 16. A chemical change means a new substance with new properties was formed.
_____ 17. An example of a chemical change is when water freezes.
_____ 18. When platinum is heated, then cooled to its original state, we say this is a physical change.
_____ 19. When milk turns sour, this is a physical change because a change in odor does not indicate a chemical change.
_____ 20. When citric acid and baking soda mix, carbon dioxide is produced and the temperature decreases. This must be a chemical
change.

Identify each of the following as a physical or chemical change.


21. _____ You leave your bicycle out in the rain and it rusts.

22. _____ A sugar cube dissolves.

23. _____ Scientist break-up water into oxygen and hydrogen gas.

24. _____ Burning coal for a barbecue.

25. ______ Trimming a bush because it has grown too tall.


Classifying Matter Worksheet
Classify each of the following substances as an element, a compound, a solution (homogenous mixture, or a
heterogeneous mixture.

1. Sand 2. Salt 3. Pure Water

4. Soil 5. Soda just opened 6. Pure air

7. Carbon Dioxide 8. Gold 9. Brass

10. Oxygen 11. Italian Salad Dressing 12. Salt Water

13. Raisin Bran 14. Silver 15. Lithium Iodide

16. Apple Pie 17. Kool Aid 18. Sugar Water

19. Chocolatechip Cookie 20. Gatorade 21. Gold

22. tacos 23.Lead 24. Ceasar Salad

25. Calcium 26. Whole Milk 27. Skim Milk

28. hydrogen peroxide 29. Potassium 30. Sugar

31. Raisin Bran Cereal with Milk 32. Raisin Bran Cereal without Milk
Identify each of the following as an example of a physical property or a chemical property.

1. Silver tarnishes when it comes in contact with hydrogen sulfide in the air.

2. A banana is yellow.

3. A sheet of copper can be pounded into a bowl.

4. Barium melts at 725 C.

5. Gasoline is flammable.

6. A diamond is the hardest natural substance.

7. Helium does not react with any other element.

8. A bar of lead is more easily bent than is a bar of aluminum of the same size.

9. Potassium metal is kept submerged in oil to prevent contact with oxygen or water.

10. An apple will turn brown is left in oxygen.

11. Diamond dust can be used to cut or grind most other materials.

12. Acid in tomato sauce can corrode aluminum foil.

13. Rocks containing carbonates can be identified because they fizz when hydrochloric acid is applied.

14. A piece of charcoal, which is mostly the substance carbon, glows red, gives off heat, and becomes a gray ash.
STOICHIOMETRY MAP FOR CHEMICAL REACTIONS

Double lined boxes are Conversion Factors to convert from one quantity to another.

BALANCED CHEMICAL EQUATION

REACTANTS PRODUCTS
GIVEN WANTED
grams grams

grams divided by
grams divided by

moles multiplied by
moles multiplied by

molar mass molar mass

mole
MOLES ratios MOLES
reactant

xA yB + zC

GIVEN: WANTED:

Grams A x 1 mole A x y mole B x g B = Gram B


gA x mole A 1 mole B

molar mass A mole ratio from molar mass B


the balanced equation
Stoichiometry Practice Worksheet
Balancing Equations and Simple Stoichiometry

Balance the following equations:

1) N2 + F2 NF3

2) C6H10 + O2 CO2 + H2O

3) HBr + KHCO3 H2O + KBr + CO2

4) GaBr3 + Na2SO3 Ga2(SO3)3 + NaBr

5) SnO + NF3 SnF2 + N2O3

Solve the following stoichiometry grams-grams problems:

6) Using the following equation:

2 NaOH + H2SO4  2 H2O + Na2SO4

How many grams of sodium sulfate will be formed if you start with 200 grams of
sodium hydroxide and you have an excess of sulfuric acid?

7) Using the following equation:

Pb(SO4)2 + 4 LiNO3  Pb(NO3)4 + 2 Li2SO4

How many grams of lithium nitrate will be needed to make 250 grams of lithium
sulfate, assuming that you have an adequate amount of lead (IV) sulfate to do the
reaction?

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Use the following equation to answer questions 8-11:

2 C6H10 + 17 O2  12 CO2 + 10 H2O

8) If I do this reaction with 35 grams of C6H10 and 45 grams of oxygen, how many
grams of carbon dioxide will be formed?

9) What is the limiting reagent for problem 6?

10) How much of the excess reagent is left over after the reaction from
problem 6 is finished?

11) If 35 grams of carbon dioxide are actually formed from the reaction in
problem 6, what is the percent yield of this reaction?

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Answer the following stoichiometry-related questions:

12) Write the balanced equation for the reaction of acetic


acid with aluminum hydroxide to form water and
aluminum acetate:

13) Using the equation from problem #12, determine the


mass of aluminum acetate that can be made if I do this
reaction with 125 grams of acetic acid and 275 grams of
aluminum hydroxide.

14) What is the limiting reagent in problem #13?

15) How much of the excess reagent will be left over in


problem #13 after the reaction is complete?

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Review Material For Exam I

1. Since 1982, a US 1 cent coin is 97.59% zinc and 2.41% copper. According to the US
Mint website, the volume of the coin is 0.0270 in3. It has a density of 6.94 g/cm3.
Calculate the number of copper atoms in the coin.

2. Give the group name of the following:

a. I

b. Te

c. Xe

d. Mg

e. Li

3. Write the formula and proper name of the compound formed by combining:

a. Ca and N

b. K and O

c. Fr and F

d. Al and P

e. Ba and Br

f. Sr and Se

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4. Give the proper name of the following substances (show work for ionic):

Na2SO4

SeF4

Cl2O7

Na2O

Mn2O3

CuCl

Cr2O3

ClF3

BaS

Cu(NO3)2

N2O5

N2F2

MgI2

Al2(SO4)3

CaCO3

5. Write the chemical formula for the following compounds (show work for ionic):
copper(I) oxide

dichlorine pentoxide
bismuth(III) fluoride
tin(II) fluoride
xenon tetroxide
lead(II) dichromate
mercury(II) sulfate
sulfur tetrafluoride
nickel(II) phosphate
dinitrogen tetrafluoride
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6. Give the number of protons, neutrons and electrons for the following:
58Cu+

58Fe3+

24Ne

17O2–

187Au3+

74Br–

30P3–

189Os4+

196Hg

204Pb

7. Calculate the following:

a. number of atoms in 7.46 g of Li

b. number of atoms in 32.0 g of Br2

c. number of molecules in 43.0 g of NH3

d. number of molecules in 7.585 g CCl4

e. moles of SO42- ions in 14.3 g of Cr2(SO4)3

f. moles of H in 11 g H3PO4

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8. Oxalic acid is a toxic substance used by laundries to remove rust stains. Its
composition is 26.7% C, 2.20% H and 71.1% O by weight. What is the empirical
formula? The formula weight is approximately 90 g/mole. What is the molecular
formula?

9. Adipic acid is used in the manufacture of nylon. The composition of the acid is 49.3% C,
6.90% H and 43.8% O by weight. What is the empirical formula? The formula weight
is approximately 146 g/mole. What is the molecular formula?

10. Butane, C4H10, is used in lighters because it is highly flammable and easily liquefied.
Calculate the mass of water produced from the complete combustion of 3.00 moles of
butane.

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11. White phosphorous, P4, is prepared by fusing calcium phosphate with carbon and sand
(SiO2) in an electric furnace.

Ca3(PO4)2 + SiO2 + C P4 + CaSiO3 + CO

How many grams of calcium phosphate are required to give 5.00 g of phosphorous?

12. The following reaction is used to make carbon tetrachloride

CS2(s) + Cl2(g) CCl4(s) + S2Cl2(s)

Calculate the number of grams of carbon disulfide needed to react exactly with 62.7 g of
chlorine gas.

13. Titanium(IV) chloride is obtained from titanium(IV) oxide by the following process:

3 TiO2(s) + 4 C(s) + 6 Cl2(g) 3 TiCl4(g) + 2 CO2(g) + 2 CO(g)

A vessel contains 4.15 g TiO2, 5.67 g C and 6.78 g Cl2. How many grams of
titanium(IV) chloride can be produced?

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