Sie sind auf Seite 1von 52

Managing and Caring for the Self

     (Learning to be a Better Learner)
1. Explain how learning occurs

2. Enumerate various metacognition and
studying techniques

3. Identify the metacognitive techniques that
you’d find  most appropriate for yourself
Is knowing the oneself enough?
No! Because who you are is partly
made up of your choices.
What is Learning?
Learning is the process of acquiring
new, or modifying existing,
knowledge, behaviors, skills, values,
or preferences.
✔ Learning is not just about studying for your quizzes
and exams

✔ Learning could occur outside the classroom when
you acquire a new move in your favourite sport or
skills on your new hobby, among others.
How do you think about thinking?
Have you heard about Metacognition?
Metacognition

Meta‐means beyond
Cognition‐ means mental processes
Metacognition

• Thinking beyond thinking
• It is the awareness and understanding of one's
own thought processes.
Metacognition
Metacognition
Answer the Metacognitive
Awareness Inventory (MAI) and
evaluate yourself as a learner
https://www2.viu.ca/
studentssuccessservies/
learningstrategist/documents/
MetacognitiveAwarenessinvento
ry.pdf
Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI)

1. On your notebook…
2. Read each statement carefully.
3. Write True or False as honest as possible.
Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI)
1. I ask myself periodically if I am meeting my goals.
2. I consider several alternatives to a problem before I
answer.
3. I try to use strategies that have worked in the past.
4. I pace myself while learning in order to have enough
time.
5. I understand my intellectual strengths and
weaknesses.
Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI)
6. I think about what I really need to learn before I
begin a task
7. I know how well I did once I finish a test.
8. I set specific goals before I begin a task.
9. I slow down when I encounter important
information.
10. I know what kind of information is most important
to learn.
Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI)
11. I ask myself if I have considered all options when
solving a problem.
12. I am good at organizing information.
13. I consciously focus my attention on important
information.
14. I have a specific purpose for each strategy I use.
15. I learn best when I know something about the topic.
Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI)
16. I know what the teacher expects me to learn.
17. I am good at remembering information.
18. I use different learning strategies depending on
the situation.
19. I ask myself if there was an easier way to do things
after I finish a task.
20. I have control over how well I learn.
Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI)
21. I periodically review to help me understand
important relationships.
22. I ask myself questions about the material before I
begin.
23. I think of several ways to solve a problem and
choose the best one.
24. I summarize what I’ve learned after I finish.
25. I ask others for help when I don’t understand
something.
Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI)
26. I can motivate myself to learn when I need to
27. I am aware of what strategies I use when I study.
28. I find myself analyzing the usefulness of strategies
while I study.
29. I use my intellectual strengths to compensate for
my weaknesses.
30. I focus on the meaning and significance of new
information.
Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI)
31. I create my own examples to make information more
meaningful.
32. I am a good judge of how well I understand
something.
33. I find myself using helpful learning strategies
automatically.
34. I find myself pausing regularly to check my
comprehension.
35. I know when each strategy I use will be most
effective.
Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI)
36. I ask myself how well I accomplish my goals once
I’m finished.
37. I draw pictures or diagrams to help me understand
while learning.
38. I ask myself if I have considered all options after I
solve a problem.
39. I try to translate new information into my own
words.
40. I change strategies when I fail to understand.
Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI)
41. I use the organizational structure of the text to
help me learn.
42. I read instructions carefully before I begin a task.
43. I ask myself if what I’m reading is related to what I
already know.
44. I reevaluate my assumptions when I get confused.
45. I organize my time to best accomplish my goals.
Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI)
46. I learn more when I am interested in the topic.
47. I try to break studying down into smaller steps.
48. I focus on overall meaning rather than specifics.
49. I ask myself questions about how well I am doing
while I am learning something new.
50. I ask myself if I learned as much as I could have once I
finish a task.
Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI)
51. I stop and go back over new information that is not
clear.

52. I stop and reread when I get confused.
Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI)
Scoring Guide
Directions:
For each True, give yourself 1 point in the Score
column.

For each False, give yourself 0 points in the Score
column.

Total the score of each category and place in box.
Declarative Knowledge

5.  I understand my intellectual strengths and
weaknesses.
10. I know what kind of information is most important
to learn.
12. I am good at organizing information.
16. I know what the teacher expects me to learn.
17. I am good at remembering information.
Procedural Knowledge

3.  I try to use strategies that have worked in the past.

14.  I have a specific purpose for each strategy I use.
 27.  I am aware of what strategies I use when I study.

33.  I find myself using helpful learning strategies
automatically.
Conditional Knowledge

15.  I learn best when I know something
18.  I use different learning strategies depending on the
situation
26.  I can motivate myself to learn when I need to.
29.  I use my intellectual strengths to compensate for
my weaknesses.
35.  I know when each strategy I use will be most
effective.
Planning
4.  I pace myself while learning in order to have enough time.
6.  I think about what I really need to learn before I begin a
task.
8. I set specific goals before I begin a task.
22.  I ask myself questions about the material before I begin.
23.  I think of several ways to solve a problem and choose the
best one.
42.  I read instructions carefully before I begin a task.
45.  I organize my time to best accomplish my goals.
Information Management Strategies
9.  I slow down when I encounter important
information
 13.  I consciously focus my attention on important
information.
 30.  I focus on the meaning and significance of new
information.
 31.  I create my own examples to make information
more meaningful.
 37.  I draw pictures or diagrams to help me
understand while learning.
Information Management Strategies
39.  I try to translate new information into my own
words.
41.  I use the organizational structure of the text to
help me learn
 43.  I ask myself if what I’m reading is related to what I
already know.
47. I try to break studying down into smaller steps.
48. I focus on overall meaning rather than specifics.
Comprehension Monitoring
1. I ask myself periodically if I am meeting my goals.
2. I consider several alternatives to a problem before I
answer.
11.   I ask myself if I have considered all options when
solving a problem.
 21.   I periodically review to help me understand
important relationships.
Comprehension Monitoring
28.   I find myself analyzing the usefulness of strategies
while I study.
34.   I find myself pausing regularly to check my
comprehension.
49.   I ask myself questions about how well I am doing
while learning something new.
Debugging Strategies
25.  I ask others for help when I don’t understand
something.
40.  I change strategies when I fail to understand.
44.  I re‐evaluate my assumptions when I get confused.
51.  I stop and go back over new information that is not
clear
52. I stop and reread when I get confused.
Evaluation
7. I know how well I did once I finish a test.
19. I ask myself if there was an easier way to do things after
I finish a task.
24.  I summarize what I’ve learned after I finish.
36.  I ask myself how well I accomplish my goals once I’m
finished.
38.  I ask myself if I have considered all options after I
solve a problem.
 50. I ask myself if I learned as much as I could have once I
finish a task.
               Answer the following questions
1. Do you agree with the results of MAI? Why or why
not?

2. Make a list of your Top 5 Tips/Secrets for Studying”
based on your personal experiences/preferences. Share
your answer to the class.

3. Does you MAI result consistent with your personal
Top 5 Tips/Secrets for Studying?
2 Aspects of Metacognition
1. Self Appraisal
‐your personal reflection on your knowledge and
capabilities
2 Aspects of Metacognition
2. Self‐Management of Cognition
It is the mental process you employ using what
you have in planning and adapting to successfully
learn and accomplish a certain task
       Variables in assessing your self as a
thinker
• Personal Variable‐ evaluation of your strengths and
weaknesses in learning

• Task Variable‐ is what you  know about the nature of
the task

• Strategy Variable‐ strategies and skills that you
already have in dealing with certain tasks.
Skills that will help you exercise
metacognition
1. Knowing your limits
‐have an honest evaluation of what you know and do not know

2. Modifying you approach‐ recognition of strategies

3. Skimming‐ browsing on keywords, phrases or sentences or table of
contents

4. Rehearsing‐ repetitions or writing, talking or doing

5. Self‐test‐ asking questions about the strategies and how to further
improve learning skills
                           Other Strategies

• Asking questions about your methods

• Self‐reflection

• Finding a mentor or support group

• Thinking out loud

• Have a positive attitude about welcoming errors
Types of Learners
1. Tacit Learners
‐learners without having to say or write
things down

2. Strategic Learners
‐ strategic plan of action toward a learning
experience
Other Tips In Studying
1. Make an outline of the things you want to learn
2. Break down the tasks smaller and more manageable details
3. Integrate variation in your schedule and learning experience.
Read materials with different topics and put topics together
4. Try to incubate your ideas‐ write your draft without doing
much editing , review on that after a few hours or days.
5. Revise, summarize and take down notes, when the deadline
is near.
6. Engage what you have learned. Highlight keywords etc.
Scenario: You are about to study for your
final examinations. All subjects provided at
least 3 reading materials one week before
the exam. Create a diagram or schedule
using the 5 metacognitive strategies, skills
and studying techniques on who you would
prepare for the next seven days.
Managing and Caring for the Self

(Do not Dream, Just Make it Happen)
Use Bandura’s Self‐Efficacy theory for Self‐
Assessment

Differentiate growth and fixed mindset by Dweck

Design personal goals adapting Locke’s goal
setting theory
On each designated box, draw your envisioned
Future Self. Who would you be

1. Five Years from now

2. Ten Years from now

3. 20 Years from now
Envisioned Self Plan

Answer the following questions

1. Who are you or what would you become
a. 5           b. 10      c.    20 years from now

2. What are your motivations for your envisioned self
a. 5            b. 10     c. 20 years from now
3. Outline your plans on how you will make your
envisioned self into reality

4. How do you feel after doing the exercise?

5. What is your perception on goal‐setting?
             Bandura’s Bobo Doll Experiment