Sie sind auf Seite 1von 35

.

. E-series B-RAS Configuration Basics Module 4: PPP over Ethernet Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

E-series B-RAS Configuration Basics

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

E-series B-RAS Configuration

Module Objectives

After successfully completing this module, you will be able to:

List the benefits of using PPP over Ethernet

Describe the two stages of PPP over Ethernet

Describe the basic life of a packet for PPP over Ethernet

Configure the E-series router for PPP over Ethernet

Verify PPP-over-Ethernet operation using show commands and logging

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

This Chapter Discusses:

• The benefits of using PPP over Ethernet;

• The life of a packet for PPP over Ethernet;

• Comparing and contrasting ATM access networks and Ethernet access networks;

• Configuring the E-series router for PPP over Ethernet; and

• Verifying PPP-over-Ethernet operation using show commands and logging.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-2

E-series B-RAS Configuration

Agenda: PPP over Ethernet

Overview of PPP over Ethernet PPP-over-Ethernet in Ethernet Access Network PPP-over-Ethernet Configuration and Troubleshooting

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

Overview of PPP over Ethernet The slide lists the topics we discuss in this chapter. We discuss the highlighted topic first.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-3

E-series B-RAS Configuration

Narrowband Remote Access

Modem RADIUS tyler@isp1.com Routers ISP1 RAS PPP Session Modem ISP2 RADIUS paul@isp2.com  Traditional remote
Modem
RADIUS
tyler@isp1.com
Routers
ISP1
RAS
PPP Session
Modem
ISP2
RADIUS
paul@isp2.com
 Traditional remote access:

Relatively slow access rates using dedicated POTS line

Point-to-point session between the PC and the RAS

RAS terminated the PPP session

Packets sent to appropriate routers

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

Narrowband Remote Access

Recall that with narrowband remote access, a single remote user had a single phone line to establish a point-to- point connection with a remote access server (RAS). A strict peer-to-peer—or one-to-one—relationship was established.

When a PC initiated a PPP session, the PC sent out PPP Link Control Protocol (LCP) packets across the link. Only one other device was on this dedicated, point-to-point connection: the RAS. Consequently, the only device capable of receiving these packets, and thus responding to these packets, was the RAS. Establishing a connection, authenticating the connection, and managing the connection was a fairly straightforward process, given this point-to-point scenario.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-4

E-series B-RAS Configuration

Multiple Clients per Logical Interface

DSL Modem PPP Session PPP Session DSLAM ATM DSL Modem ATM DSLAM Switch  PPP
DSL
Modem
PPP Session
PPP Session
DSLAM
ATM
DSL
Modem
ATM
DSLAM
Switch
 PPP over Ethernet:

diane@isp1.com

ISP1
ISP1

tim@isp1.com

ISP2
ISP2

ralph@isp2.com

ken@isp2.com

pam@isp1.com

High-speed access using shared POTS line

Multiple users per DSL modem

Multiple PPP sessions per logical interface

Connection methods:

ATM PVC or VLAN per CPE

Multiple PPP sessions per PVC

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

PPP over Ethernet

In this second PPP B-RAS environment, we address a small office or home with multiple PCs on an Ethernet network, which is connected to the DSL modem.

Unlike the traditional RAS environment, or even the PPP-over-ATM environment, no dedicated, point-to-point connection exists in a PPP-over-Ethernet (PPPoE) environment. In the old days, if a PC transmitted an LCP request, only one other device on the network could possibly receive it—the RAS. Now, using a shared LAN, the PC has no way of knowing where the RAS server is. In addition, the PC must know the specific MAC address of the RAS server because it sits on a LAN. It can no longer indiscriminately transmit PPP LCP requests. Before PPP negotiations can occur, the PC must determine where the B-RAS server is, what its MAC address is, and it must establish a session with it. Only then can the PC initiate a PPP session. Additionally, we need a means to support multiple PPP sessions across the same shared media. The solution to this problem is PPP over Ethernet.

Initially, most PPPoE installations used DSL as the connection method and, consequently, most DSLAMs were ATM based. In this environment, the E-series router supports multiple clients on a single ATM subinterface. In other words, a one-to-many relationship is formed—one PVC, many clients. To support this configuration, each DSL modem or group of users uses a single ATM PVC. We then configure PPPoE to support multiple users across this PVC. Finally, we configure a PPP interface per user.

More networks are transitioning from ATM to Ethernet. We discuss this topic later in the chapter.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-5

E-series B-RAS Configuration

PPPoERFC 2516

DSL Modem MAC=X
DSL
Modem
MAC=X

tim@isp1.com

MAC=A

DA IP=2.2.2.2

SA IP=1.1.1.2

PPP Header

PPPoE Header

SessionID=0x123

EtherType=0x8864

DA MAC=X

SA MAC=A

Physical
Physical

RFC 2516:

General frame format

PC requirements

Two stages of PPPoE:

Discovery stage

ISP1
ISP1
ISP2 ISP2
ISP2
ISP2

diane@isp1.com

PPP session stage

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

RFC 2516

When the user PC transmits IP data, the PC creates an IP datagram, encapsulates the IP datagram in PPP and PPPoE, and finally inserts this data into an Ethernet frame addressed to the E-series router—hence, the name PPP over Ethernet.

To transmit data using PPPoE, the user's PC requires special PPPoE software that installs a shim between the existing dial-up networking PPP stack and the Ethernet driver, which enables PPP sessions to be carried directly in standard Ethernet frames. Although the PC uses PPPoE, the actual user experience mirrors dial-up networking—a familiar experience to most current remote access users.

Because the PPP frames are encapsulated in Ethernet frames, multiple users can share the same DSL line.

PPPoE has two distinct stages:

Discovery stage: When a PC initiates a PPPoE session, it performs the discovery stage to determine which B-RAS to use, the Ethernet MAC address of the B-RAS, and a unique session ID. This discovery stage is a client-server relationship, where the PC is the client and the E-series router is the PPPoE server.

PPP session stage: Once the PC determines which B-RAS to use, the B-RAS MAC address, and the session ID, the connection transitions into a peer-to-peer relationship and initiates a standard PPP session using LCP.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-6

E-series B-RAS Configuration

PPPoE Discovery Stage

DSL Modem tim@isp1.com MAC=A DA=FF PPPoE Active MAC=X SA=A Discovery Initiation Type=Disc
DSL
Modem
tim@isp1.com
MAC=A
DA=FF
PPPoE Active
MAC=X
SA=A
Discovery Initiation
Type=Disc

diane@isp1.com

PADI

PPPoE Active

Discovery Request

PADR

PPPoE Services DA=X SA=A Type=Disc PPPoE SessionID= 0000
PPPoE
Services
DA=X
SA=A
Type=Disc
PPPoE
SessionID=
0000
DA=A SA=X Type=Disc
DA=A
SA=X
Type=Disc

Discovery Offer

PPPoE SessionID= 0000
PPPoE
SessionID=
0000

PADO

PPPoE Active

PPPoE Active

Discovery Session DA=A SA=X Confirmation Type=Disc
Discovery Session
DA=A
SA=X
Confirmation
Type=Disc
PPPoE SessionID= 1234
PPPoE
SessionID=
1234

PADS

ISP1
ISP1
ISP2 ISP2
ISP2
ISP2

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

PPPE Discovery Stage

Four steps exist in the discovery stage. When this stage completes, both peers know the PPPoE session ID and the peer's MAC address. Collectively, these attributes uniquely define the PPPoE session. The following list outlines the four steps:

• Initially, the PC broadcasts a PPPoE active discovery initiation (PADI), searching for all B-RAS servers that can provide the services the PC requests using the service-name tag. In our network, only the E- series router processes the PADI.

• If the B-RAS can service the request, it responds to the discovery packet with a unicast PPPoE active discovery offer (PADO) where the session ID is all zeros. If the B-RAS cannot provide the requested service, it does not respond with a PADO.

• If multiple B-RAS receive the PADI, the PC might receive multiple PADOs. In this case, the PC must choose one. In the diagram on the slide, the PC receives just one PADO from the B-RAS. The PC responds with a unicast PPPoE active discovery request (PADR) to the server it chooses to use. The PC now knows the MAC address of the B-RAS and needs the unique session ID.

• Finally, the B-RAS responds with a PPPoE active discovery session-confirmation (PADS). This packet contains the unique session ID or the PPPoE session.

At any time, either the client or the server can send a PPPoE active discovery terminate (PADT) packet to indicate that a PPPoE session is terminated. The Ethertype field for the discovery stage is 0x8863.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-7

E-series B-RAS Configuration

PPPoE PPP Session Stage

DSL diane@isp1.com Modem ISP1 tim@isp1.com MAC=A DA=X SA=A PPP LCP Type=PPP MAC=X
DSL
diane@isp1.com
Modem
ISP1
tim@isp1.com
MAC=A
DA=X
SA=A
PPP LCP
Type=PPP
MAC=X
PPPoE SessionID= 1234
PPPoE
SessionID=
1234
DA=A SA=X Type=PPP PPPoE SessionID= 1234
DA=A
SA=X
Type=PPP
PPPoE
SessionID=
1234

PPP LCP

ISP2 ISP2
ISP2
ISP2

PPP data is sent like any other PPP session

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

PPPoE PPP Session Stage

Once the PPPoE session is established, the PPP session stage begins. The PPP session stage is just like any other standard PPP session, starting with LCP negotiations and IP NCP negotiations. All Ethernet frames are unicast between the PC and the E-series router. The Ethertype field for PPP sessions is 0x8864.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-8

E-series B-RAS Configuration

PPP over EthernetLife of a Packet

IP=1.1.1.2 IP/PPP/PPPoE Connection Terminated IP=2.2.2.2 MAC=A on the E-series Router MAC=F MAC=E VPI/VCI 0/33 DSL
IP=1.1.1.2
IP/PPP/PPPoE Connection Terminated
IP=2.2.2.2
MAC=A
on the E-series Router
MAC=F
MAC=E
VPI/VCI 0/33
DSL
MAC=C
MAC=B
Bridge
MAC=D
DA IP=2.2.2.2
SA IP=1.1.1.2
PPP Header
PPPoE Header
DA IP=2.2.2.2
SessionID=0x123
Layer 3
SA IP=1.1.1.2
EtherType=0x8864
DA MAC=B
PPP Header
SA MAC=A
DA IP=2.2.2.2
DA IP=2.2.2.2
PPPoE Header
SA IP=1.1.1.2
SA IP=1.1.1.2
RFC 2684
SessionID=0x123
Layer 2
PID=0x000-07
OUI=0x00-80-C2
EtherType=0x8864
EtherType=0x0800
EtherType=0x0800
LLC=0xAA -AA-03
DA MAC=D
DA MAC=F
DA MAC=B
SA MAC=A
SA MAC=C
SA MAC=E
ATM VPI/VCI=0/33
Layer 1
Physical
Physical
Physical
Physical

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

Life of a Packet

In the PPP-over-Ethernet environment using ATM as the Layer 2 connection method, a DSL-capable bridge or modem is installed at the customer's location. The bridge is connected over a phone line to a DSLAM, which is in turn connected using ATM to the E-series router. An ATM PVC is provisioned from the E-series router to the customer's CPE device. Each PC has PPP-over-Ethernet client software installed. If a user at the customer's location wants access to the Internet, the basic packet flow is as follows:

• The user's PC generates an IP packet that is encapsulated in a PPP frame. A PPPoE header is added to this frame, which is then encapsulated in an Ethernet frame addressed to the E-series router. The Ethernet type field indicates that the upper-layer protocol is PPPoE.

• The DSL bridge receives the Ethernet frame and encapsulates the entire frame into an ATM cell. An RFC 2684 header is added at the beginning of the cell, indicating that the cell contains a bridged Ethernet frame.

• The cell(s) are then transmitted across PVC to the E-series router.

• The E-series router receives the cell, strips off the bridged Ethernet header, strips off the Ethernet frame, and verifies that the type field is PPP over Ethernet. If the type field is not PPP over Ethernet, the E-series router discards the frame. If it is PPP over Ethernet, the router strips the PPP frame and looks at the destination IP address, and determines the next-hop interface.

• The router encapsulates the IP datagram in the appropriate Layer 2 frame and transmits the data onto the Internet.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-9

E-series B-RAS Configuration

PPPoE over ATM Interface Columns

Diane@isp1.com Tim@isp1.com Ralph@isp2.com Pam@isp1.com IP Interface IP Interface IP Interface IP Interface PPP
Diane@isp1.com
Tim@isp1.com
Ralph@isp2.com
Pam@isp1.com
IP Interface
IP Interface
IP Interface
IP Interface
PPP Interface
PPP Interface
PPP Interface
PPP Interface
1
per User
1
per User
1
per User
1
per User
PPPoE Subinterface
PPPoE Subinterface
PPPoE Subinterface
PPPoE Subinterface
1
per User
1
per User
1
per User
1
per User
PPPoE
PPPoE
Major Interface
Major Interface
1
per Modem
1
per Modem
ATM PVC
ATM PVC
ATM Subinterface
ATM Subinterface
1
per
Modem
1
per Modem
ATM
Major Interface
OCxc/STMx

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

PPPoE over ATM Interface Columns

In a PPP-over-Ethernet environment, each modem can support multiple users or IP interfaces using multiple PPP interfaces. Therefore, for each modem, you must configure an ATM subinterface and ATM PVC. Then a new PPPoE major interface is created. Finally, for each user, a new PPPoE subinterface is created. Each PPPoE subinterface supports a PPP interface and an IP interface.

Remember that IP interfaces can be created statically or dynamically. In this example, we statically defined the ATM subinterfaces, the ATM PVCs, the PPPoE major interfaces, the PPPoE subinterfaces, and the PPP interfaces. Each IP interface is dynamically created using information from RADIUS or a profile definition.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-10

E-series B-RAS Configuration

Agenda: PPP over Ethernet

Overview of PPP over Ethernet

PPP-over-Ethernet in Ethernet Access Network

PPP-over-Ethernet Configuration and Troubleshooting

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

PPP over Ethernet in Ethernet Access Networks The slide highlights the topic we discuss next.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-11

E-series B-RAS Configuration

Ethernet-Based Access Networks

DSLAM
DSLAM

Ethernet-Based access networks :

Broadcast TV, VoD, VoIP, and gaming require higher bit rates and advanced QoS

Reduce the distance between the CPE and access node

Backhauled to Ethernet interface on E-series router

E-series router co-located with OLT in fiber networks

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

Ethernet-Based Access Networks

Early DSL deployments provided a higher-speed, best-effort delivery service primarily for data traffic. Most initial DSL networks were deployed in a pure ATM-based access network. Now more and more DSL service providers are looking to offer additional services requiring higher user bit rates, sophisticated quality of service (QoS), and scalable multicasting capabilities. These services include broadcast TV and video on demand (VoD), voice over IP (VolP), and gaming. In addition to PCs, subscribers now have IP phones and set-top boxes (STB) connected to routing gateways (RG) inside their homes. It is very difficult to deploy these types of services in a pure ATM environment.

Many of these services require significantly higher DSL synchronization rates than typical ADSL offers. The easiest way to increase synchronization rates is to shorten the distance between the access node in the provider's local POP—such as a DSLAM, an Ethernet switch, or an optical line terminal (OLT) in a fiber environment—and the RG. To shorten the distance, more and more access nodes will be deployed closer and closer to the end user. Ethernet-based networks provide a simpler way to meet the needs of these higher-speed networks. Ethernet- based networks provide higher-speed connections, packet-based QoS, simpler provisioning, IP multicast support, and redundancy in an efficient manner.

Several services, such as broadcast or IPTV, VoD, and gaming, use IP multicast as the delivery mechanism. Multicast is a bandwidth-conserving technology. Multicast is the delivery of information to a group of destinations simultaneously using the most efficient strategy to deliver the messages over each link of the network only once and only create copies when the links to the destinations split. IP's and Ethernet's inherent distribution and replication capabilities allow for video network scaleability using multicast.

Continued on next page.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-12

E-series B-RAS Configuration

Ethernet-Based Access Networks (contd.)

Gigabit Ethernet and Gigabit Passive Optical Network (GPON) are two transport technologies that are capable of delivering large amounts of bandwidth to a highly distributed access node network. More and more installations use Ethernet-based DSLAMs. There are two typical installation types. The first type implements a hybrid approach where the downstream connections still utilize standard ATM over ADSL running on the standard copper link because those are the most widely deployed technologies today. The upstream connection is backhauled to the B- RAS using Gigabit or 10-Gigabit Ethernet. In this instance, the DSLAM provides an interworking function between the ATM layer on the user side and the Ethernet layer on the network side. The second approach pushes some type of Ethernet connection all the way to the CPE device. Ethernet in the first mile (EFM) could employ a copper connection, such as Ethernet over VDSL, or a fiber connection such as EFM over single-mode fiber. With either approach, the connections are backhauled to Gigabit or 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces on the E-series router.

Fiber to the home / curb (FTTH/FTTC) is also growing in popularity, making use of passive optical networks (PON). A PON consists of an OLT at the service provider's central office and a number of optical network terminals (ONTs) near end users. A PON configuration reduces the amount of fiber and central office equipment required compared with point-to-point architectures. In this environment, the E-series router has 10-Gigabit or Gigabit Ethernet connection to the OLT. In this environment, typically, another aggregation device does not exist. The OLT has a point-to-multipoint, fiber to the premises network architecture in which unpowered optical splitters are used to enable a single optical fiber to serve multiple premises, typically 32.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-13

E-series B-RAS Configuration

VLANs

VLAN 100 VLAN Encap VLAN 101 ATM VLAN 200 DSLAM VLAN 201
VLAN 100
VLAN Encap
VLAN 101
ATM
VLAN 200
DSLAM
VLAN 201

CPE

VLAN options :

VLAN 100 S -VLAN Encap VLAN 101 S-VLAN 1 S-VLAN 2 VLAN 200 VLAN 201
VLAN 100
S -VLAN Encap
VLAN 101
S-VLAN 1
S-VLAN 2
VLAN 200
VLAN 201
CPE
VLAN Encap

Single-tagged VLANs

Double-tagged VLANs or stacked VLANs

S-VLANs

Service provider VLANs (S-VLAN) and customer VLANs (C-VLAN)

Similar to ATM VPI/VCI

Improve VLAN scaling

CPE or access node adds inner tag (C-Tag)

Access node or aggregation device adds outer tag (S-Tag)

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

VLAN Options

In these Ethernet-based networks, the E-series router is terminating thousands of users on some type of Ethernet interface. Virtual local area networks (VLANs) are implemented to manage large numbers of users coming in over a single physical interface. A VLAN enables multiplexing multiple IP and PPPoE interfaces over a single physical port using subinterfaces. VLANs are similar to ATM PVCs with a VLAN ID acting like the ATM PVC's VPI. The IEEE 802.1Q-tagged frames provide a 12-bit VLAN identifier. Therefore, one physical interface can support up to 4096 unique VLANs. Each VLAN has a single, unique VLAN ID or tag assigned to it. On the slide, the diagram on the left uses this single tagged approach. Notice that VLAN IDs must be unique within the access network.

In some Ethernet B-RAS environments where multiple access nodes are aggregated onto a single Gigabit Ethernet or 10-Gigabit Ethernet connection, this VLAN limit is inadequate. A stacked VLAN (S-VLAN) or double- tagged VLAN provides a two-level VLAN tag structure, extending the VLAN ID space to more than 16 million VLANs.

S-VLANs

Stacked VLANs were developed by the IEEE as a way to segregate the customer VLAN ID space (C-VLAN) from the service provider VLAN space (S-VLAN) and improve scaling. It is unfortunate that the IEEE 802.1ad standard uses the term S-VLAN to mean service provider VLAN space because the E-series router uses the term S-VLAN to mean any doubly tagged VLAN. Stacked VLANs require two different tags or IDs. The outer tag is called the service provider tag (S-Tag) and the inner tag is called the customer tag (C-Tag). These two tags are similar to the ATM VPI/VCI. Depending on the installation, the CPE device or access node adds the C-Tag and the access node or aggregation device adds the S-Tag. The E-series router performs decapsulation twice—once to get the S-Tag and once to get the C-Tag.

On the slide, the diagram on the right uses the double-tagged approach. In this environment, each access node is assigned a unique S-Tag, allowing the C-Tags to be reused.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-14

E-series B-RAS Configuration

VLAN Deployment Options

VLAN 100 VLAN 200 & 300 S-VLAN Encap VLAN 101 VLAN 201 & 300 S-VLAN
VLAN 100
VLAN 200 & 300
S-VLAN Encap
VLAN 101
VLAN 201 & 300
S-VLAN 1
VLAN 200
S-VLAN 2
VLAN 200 & 300
VLAN 201
VLAN 201 & 300
CPE
VLAN Encap
CPE
VLAN Encap
VLAN Encap
201 VLAN 201 & 300 CPE VLAN Encap CPE VLAN Encap DSLAM  1:1 VLAN: –

DSLAM

1:1 VLAN:

VLAN or S-VLAN per CPE

S-Tag or S-Tag/C-Tag must be unique across access network

N:1 VLAN

VLAN per type of traffic o per access node

S-Tag shared by many users

Video or multicast services

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

1:1 VLAN

Service providers might use different VLAN deployment options or models. Some providers make use of both options in the same network. The first approach, 1:1 VLAN, a single VLAN or S-VLAN is assigned to a single CPE device. The S-Tag or S-Tag/ C-Tag must be unique across the access network. This approach closely mimics the ATM VPI/VCI model. On the slide, the diagram on the left implements the 1:1 VLAN approach. Notice that each CPE device is assigned a unique S-Tag/C-Tag within the access network.

N:1 VLAN

With the N:1 VLAN approach, traffic is single-tagged with an S-Tag throughout the access network. There might be an S-Tag for a specific type of traffic or for each access node. With this approach, multiple users share the same S-Tag. A video or multicast service might take advantage of this scheme. On the slide, the diagram on the right implements the N:1 VLAN approach as well as the 1:1 VLAN deployment model. Each CPE device is a member of the 300 VLAN. This VLAN is used for a video multicast service. In addition, each CPE device is assigned a unique VLAN ID for user data traffic.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-15

E-series B-RAS Configuration

VLAN Interface Columns

PPPoE over VLAN PPPoE over S-VLAN IP and PPPoE over VLAN IP IP IP IP
PPPoE over VLAN
PPPoE over S-VLAN
IP and PPPoE over VLAN
IP
IP
IP
IP
IP
IP
PPP
PPP
PPP
PPP
PPP
PPP
PPPoE Sub
PPPoE Sub
PPPoE Sub
PPPoE Sub
PPPoE Sub
PPPoE Sub
IP over VLAN
PPPoE
PPPoE
PPPoE
IP
IP
Major
Major
Major
S-VLAN
VLAN 300
VLAN 100
VLAN
200
1 100
VLAN Sub
VLAN Sub
VLAN Sub
VLAN Sub
VLAN Major Int
GE
10 GE

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

VLAN Interface Columns

The E-series router supports several different VLAN configurations. First you must create the VLAN major interface. Next you create VLAN subinterfaces on top of the VLAN major interface. VLAN and S-VLAN subinterfaces can coexist over the same VLAN major interface.

IP over VLAN is the simplest configuration where one VLAN subinterface supports a single IP interface. This VLAN could be a N:1 VLAN supporting a multicast video service.

In a PPPoE-over-VLAN configuration, each VLAN subinterface supports a single CPE device. This VLAN could be

a 1:1 VLAN supporting a group of users at a single location. A PPPoE major interface is created for each CPE. On top of the PPPoE major interface, a PPPoE subinterface is created for each user. Each PPPoE subinterface supports a PPP interface and an IP interface. A PPPoE-over-S-VLAN configuration is very similar. In this configuration, you specify the S-VLAN ID instead of a single VLAN ID.

It is also possible to configure a dual-stack VLAN interface supporting both IP over VLAN and PPPoE-over-VLAN

interfaces. User data traffic might use the PPPoE encapsulation and voice or video traffic might use the IPoE encapsulation. In this environment, the router uses the Ethertype field to determine which interface column to use.

Remember that IP interfaces can be created statically or dynamically. In this example, we statically defined the VLAN or S-VLAN subinterfaces, the PPPoE major interfaces, the PPPoE subinterfaces, and the PPP interfaces. Each IP interface is dynamically created using information from RADIUS or a profile definition.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-16

E-series B-RAS Configuration

Agenda: PPP over Ethernet

Overview of PPP over Ethernet PPP-over-Ethernet in Ethernet Access Network PPP-over-Ethernet Configuration and Troubleshooting

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

PPP-over-Ethernet Configuration and Troubleshooting The slide highlights the topic we discuss next.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-17

E-series B-RAS Configuration

Initial B-RAS Configuration

Initial configuration:

All authentication requests go to the same RADIUS server

No AAA domain map required

Virtual routers and loopback interfaces already configured erx7(config)#radius authentication server 10.13.7.55

erx7(config-radius)#key training

erx7(config-radius)#exit

erx7(config)#radius accounting server 10.13.7.55 erx7(config-radius)#key training

erx7(config-radius)#exit

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

Initial Configuration Steps

The slide shows the configuration steps to take when initially setting up the router in a B-RAS environment. In this example, all authentication requests go to the same RADIUS server. No MA domain map is required in this environment. The virtual routers and their associated loopback interfaces are already configured. This RADIUS server is using standard UDP ports (port 1812 for authentication and port 1813 for accounting), which are the defaults on the E-series router.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-18

E-series B-RAS Configuration

IP Configuration

Dynamic IP interface configuration using RADIUS VSAs:

Virtual-Router-Name

Local-Interface-Name

Local-Address-Pool-Name

erx7(config)#profile generic-ip erx7(config-profile)#ip sa-validate

erx7(config-profile)#exit

Local address pool configuration:

Both address pools are localized to these virtual routers

erx7(config)#ip local pool isp1pool 172.16.3.2 172.16.3.254 erx7(config)#ip route 172.16.3.0 255.255.255.0 null 0

erx7(config)#vir VR2

erx7:VR2(config)#ip local pool isp2pool 182.16.3.2 182.16.3.254 erx7:VR2(config)#ip route 182.16.3.0 255.255.255.0 null0

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

Dynamic IP Interface Configuration

In this example, all IP configuration information required to build the user's IP interface, such as virtual router, local interface reference, and local IP address pool name, is being returned by RADIUS. Therefore, the profile used to create the user's IP interface only contains the IP source address validation command.

Address Pool Configuration

The RADIUS server returns the name of an address pool configured on the router. Because both address pool ranges are localized to the specific virtual router, a static route for each address range is configured pointing to the null 0 interface. Remember that address pool names are case sensitive.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-19

E-series B-RAS Configuration

PPPoE-over-ATM Configuration Steps  Configuration steps: PPPoE over ATM erx7(config)#int atm 6/2.12
PPPoE-over-ATM Configuration Steps
 Configuration steps:
PPPoE over ATM
erx7(config)#int atm 6/2.12
erx7(config-if)#atm pvc 12 0 112 aal5snap
erx7(config-if)#encapsulation pppoe
IP
IP
PPP
PPP
erx7(config-if)#interface atm 6/2.12.1
erx7(config-if)#encapsulation ppp
erx7(config-if)#ppp authentication chap
erx7(config-if)#profile ip generic-ip
erx7(config-if)#interface atm 6/2.12.2
PPPoE Sub
PPPoE Sub
PPPoE Major
erx7(config-if)#encapsulation ppp
erx7(config-if)#ppp authentication chap
erx7(config-if)#profile ip generic-ip
ATM PVC
ATM Subinterface
ATM
Major Interface
T3A / E3A
OCxc/STM1
Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

Configuration Steps for PPPoE over ATM

To configure PPPoE-over-Ethernet interfaces over ATM, first configure the clocking for the SONET controller. Next, create an ATM major interface, specifying the number of VCs per VP if necessary. For each group of users, create a PPPoE major interface. Next, create a PPPoE subinterface for each user, specifying PPP encapsulation. Configure any PPP parameters for the PPP interface, such as the PPP authentication method or keepalive timers. Finally, for a dynamically created IP interface, apply the appropriate profile. This configuration example uses the atm pvc command. It is also possible to use the pvc command.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-20

E-series B-RAS Configuration

PPPoE-over-ATM Dual-Stack Config Steps

Configuration steps:

IP and PPPoE over ATM

IP IP PPP PPP PPPoE Sub PPPoE Sub IP PPPoE Major Bridged Ethernet ATM PVC
IP
IP
PPP
PPP
PPPoE Sub
PPPoE Sub
IP
PPPoE Major
Bridged
Ethernet
ATM PVC
ATM Subint
OCx/STMx

Single ATM subinterface with IP &

PPPoE terminated at the router erx7(config)#int atm 6/2.13 erx7(config-if)#atm pvc 13 0 113 aal5snap erx7(config-if)#encapsulation bridge1483 erx7(config-if)#ip unnumbered loopback1

erx7(config-if)#pppoe

erx7(config-if)#exit

erx7(config)#interface atm 6/2.13.1 erx7(config-if)#encapsulation ppp erx7(config-if)#ppp authentication chap erx7(config-if)#profile ip generic-ip

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

Configuration Steps for Dual-Stack PPPoE over ATM

You can also configure a bifurcated interface that supports bridged Ethernet and PPPoE over the same ATM 1483 subinterface. To allow this dual-stack configuration, you must specify the bridged Ethernet encapsulation before you configure the PPPoE major interface. The remaining configuration steps are the same as other PPP-over- Ethernet interfaces. In this configuration, user data traffic might use the PPPoE configuration, and a set-top box might use the bridged Ethernet configuration.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-21

E-series B-RAS Configuration

PPPoE over Ethernet with VLANs

Configuration steps:

PPPoE over VLAN

IP
IP
IP
IP

PPP

PPP

PPPoE Sub

PPPoE Sub

 

PPPoE

 

Major

VLAN 100

VLAN Sub

VLAN

Major

Interface

GE

10 GE

erx7(config)#interface fastEthernet 3/1 erx7(config-if)#encapsulation vlan

erx7(config)#interface fast 3/1.100 erx7(config-if)#vlan id 100

erx7(config-if)#pppoe

erx7(config-if)#pppoe subint fast 3/1.100.1 erx7(config-if)#encapsulation ppp

erx7(config-if)#ppp auth chap erx7(config-if)#profile ip generic-ip erx7(config-if)#pppoe subint fast 3/1.100.2 erx7(config-if)#encapsulation ppp erx7(config-if)#ppp auth chap

erx7(config-if)#profile ip generic-ip

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

Configuration Steps for PPPoE over Ethernet with VLANs

To configure PPPoE-over-Ethernet interfaces (Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, and 10-Gigabit Ethernet) with VLANs, first configure the Ethernet interface, specifying VLAN encapsulation. For each VLAN or group of users, create a VLAN subinterface, assign a VLAN ID, and create a PPPoE major interface. Next, create a PPPoE subinterface for each user, specifying PPP encapsulation. Configure any PPP parameters for the PPP interface, such as PPP authentication method or keepalive timers. Finally, apply a profile for a dynamically created IP interfaces. In this configuration, there is a VLAN subinterface and PPPoE major interface per group of users. In other words, one physical Ethernet interface supports multiple VLAN subinterfaces. Each VLAN subinterface supports a single PPPoE major interface.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-22

E-series B-RAS Configuration

PPPoE over Ethernet with S-VLANs

Configuration steps:

erx7(config)#interface fastEthernet 3/1 erx7(config-if)#encapsulation vlan erx7(config-if)#interface fast 3/1.1100 erx7(config-if)#svlan ethertype 8100 erx7(config-if)#svlan id 1 100

erx7(config-if)#pppoe

erx7(config-if)#pppoe subint fast 3/1.1100.1 erx7(config-if)#encapsulation ppp erx7(config-if)#ppp auth chap erx7(config-if)#profile ip generic-ip erx7(config-if)#pppoe subint fast 3/1.1100.2 erx7(config-if)#encapsulation ppp erx7(config-if)#ppp auth chap erx7(config-if)#profile ip generic-ip

PPPoE over S-VLAN

IP
IP
IP
IP

PPP

PPP

PPPoE Sub

PPPoE Sub

PPPoE

Major

over S-VLAN IP IP PPP PPP PPPoE Sub PPPoE Sub PPPoE Major VLAN Major Interface GE

VLAN

Major

Interface

GE

10 GE

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

SVLAN

1 100

VLAN Sub

Configuration Steps for PPPoE over Ethernet with S-VLANs

To configure PPPoE-over-Ethernet interfaces (Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, and 10-Gigabit Ethernet) with S- VLANs, first configure the Ethernet interface, specifying VLAN encapsulation. For each S-VLAN or group of users, create a S-VLAN subinterface, assign a S-VLAN ID. By default, the E-series router uses the 9100 for the S-VLAN Ethertype. If the E-series router is connected to a device that uses the IEEE Standard 802.1ad, specify svlan ethertype 88a8. If the E-series router is connected to a device that uses 802.1 Q-in-Q tagging, specify svlan ethertype 8100. Next, create a PPPoE major interface and then create a PPPoE subinterface for each user, specifying PPP encapsulation. Configure any PPP parameters for the PPP interface, such as PPP authentication method or keepalive timers. Finally, apply a profile for a dynamically created IP interfaces. In this configuration, there is a S-VLAN subinterface and PPPoE major interface per group of users. In other words, one physical Ethernet interface supports multiple S-VLAN subinterfaces. Each S-VLAN subinterface supports a single PPPoE major interface. Remember that VLAN and S-VLAN subinterfaces can coexist on the same physical interface.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-23

E-series B-RAS Configuration

IP and PPPoE over Ethernet with VLANs

Configuration steps:

erx7(config)#interface fastEthernet 3/1 erx7(config-if)#encapsulation vlan erx7(config)#interface fast 3/1.200 erx7(config-if)#vlan id 200

erx7(config-if)#ip address 172.16.100.1/24

erx7(config-if)#pppoe

erx7(config-if)#pppoe sub fast 3/1.200.1 erx7(config-if)#encapsulation ppp erx7(config-if)#ppp auth chap

erx7(config-if)#profile ip generic-ip erx7(config-if)#pppoe sub fast 3/1.200.2 erx7(config-if)#encapsulation ppp erx7(config-if)#ppp auth chap erx7(config-if)#profile ip generic-ip

IP and PPPoE over VLAN

IP IP PPP PPP PPPoE Sub PPPoE Sub IP PPPoE Major VLAN 200 VLAN Sub
IP
IP
PPP
PPP
PPPoE Sub
PPPoE Sub
IP
PPPoE Major
VLAN 200
VLAN Sub
VLAN Major
GE
10 GE

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

IP and PPPoE over Ethernet with VLANs Configuration Steps

You can also configure a bifurcated interface that supports IP over Ethernet and PPPoE over the same VLAN subinterface. First create the VLAN subinterface and configure the VLAN ID. Next, configure the static IP interface. Create the PPPoE major interface and the remaining configuration steps are the same as other PPP- over-Ethernet interfaces. It is also possible to configure dual stack interfaces over S-VLANs.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-24

E-series B-RAS Configuration

How Can I Tell if It Works? (1 of 3)

ISP1
ISP1
DSL Modem
DSL
Modem

default

RADIUS=10.13.7.55

UDP=1812

key=training

VR2

default RADIUS=10.13.7.55 UDP=1812 key=training VR2 diane@isp1.com RADIUS 10.13.7.55 tim@isp1.com  Is the
default RADIUS=10.13.7.55 UDP=1812 key=training VR2 diane@isp1.com RADIUS 10.13.7.55 tim@isp1.com  Is the

diane@isp1.com

RADIUS

10.13.7.55

key=training VR2 diane@isp1.com RADIUS 10.13.7.55 tim@isp1.com  Is the user logged into the router? erx7#

tim@isp1.com

Is the user logged into the router?

erx7#show subscribers username username@domain

Is the router communicating with the RADIUS server?

erx7#show radius statistics erx7#test aaa ppp username@domain password

erx7#show aaa domain-map

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

Is the User Logged into the Router?

You can use some of the same troubleshooting commands that you used in a PPP-over-ATM environment. First, to determine if the user logged in to the router, use the show subscribers username username@domain command. If you execute this command in the default virtual router, you will see all users logged into the router, regardless of their virtual router. If you execute this command in a nondefault virtual router, you only see the users located in that specific virtual router. If the user is not logged in, refer to the following paragraph when you troubleshoot a PPP-over-Ethernet interface.

Is the Router Communicating with the RADIUS Server?

Use the show radius statistics command. Can the router authenticate the user locally? Use the test aaa ppp username password command. If you use a domain map, verify that the proper domain is mapped to the appropriate virtual router using the show aaa domain-map command.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-25

E-series B-RAS Configuration

How Can I Tell if It Works? (2 of 3) default DSL RADIUS=10.13.7.55 Modem diane@isp1.com
How Can I Tell if It Works? (2 of 3)
default
DSL
RADIUS=10.13.7.55
Modem
diane@isp1.com
UDP=1812
RADIUS
ISP1
key=training
10.13.7.55
VR2
tim@isp1.com

Is the physical link between the user and the router working?

erx7#show controller sonet slot/port erx7#show interface gigabitEthernet slot/port brief erx7#show atm vc atm slot/port vcd erx7#show interface gigabitEthernet slot/port.subinterface

Is the user successfully completing both stages of PPPoE?

erx7#show pppoe interface erx7#show pppoe interface interface

erx7#show pppoe subinterface erx7#show pppoe subinterface interface

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-26

E-series B-RAS Configuration

How Can I Tell if It Works? (3 of 3)

tim@isp1.com

default RADIUS=10.13.7.55 ISP1 UDP=1812 key=training VR2
default
RADIUS=10.13.7.55
ISP1
UDP=1812
key=training
VR2

What is the state of the user’s PPP session?

erx7#show ppp interface state down erx7#show ppp interface atm slot/port.subint statistics

Can the user communicate using IP?

erx7#ping a.b.c.d erx7#show ip interface fastethernet slot/port.subinterface erx7#ping a.b.c.d source address w.x.y.z erx7#show ip route | include slot/port.subinterface

Remember to set a statistics baseline to aid in troubleshooting

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

DSL Modem
DSL
Modem

diane@isp1.com

DSL Modem diane@isp1.com RADIUS 10.13.7.55
DSL Modem diane@isp1.com RADIUS 10.13.7.55
DSL Modem diane@isp1.com RADIUS 10.13.7.55

RADIUS

10.13.7.55

What Is the State of the User's PPP Session?

Once you verify that the user successfully completes both stages of PPPoE, examine the state of the PPP session. Determine if any PPP interfaces are in the down state using the show ppp interface state down command. Examine the user's PPP interface using the PPP commands listed on the slide.

Can the User Communicate Using IP?

Determine if the router can communicate with the user across the local link using the ping command. Verify that packets are being transmitted and received on the user's IP interface using the show ip interface gig slot/port. sub. pppoeSub command. If you can communicate with the user across the local link, determine if the user can communicate beyond the local link. You can do this by using the ping a.b.c.d source address w. x. y. z. The source keyword allows you to specify an alternate IP address as the source of the packet. In this case, specify an IP address on the router in a different subnet. This command verifies proper routing. Next, verify that the user's IP interface is listed as a host route in the routing table. Remember to use CLI output filtering, such as show ip route I include 6/1.1, to limit the number of routes displayed.

Setting a Statistics Baseline to Aid in Troubleshooting

Remember to use the baseline command to help during the troubleshooting process. The baseline command sets a statistics baseline for the requested counters, such as RADIUS statistics, IP interface statistics, or ATM interface statistics, to name a few.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-27

E-series B-RAS Configuration

Command Summary: PPPoE over ATM

Layer

Command

Result

IP

ping 172.16.3.2

Verifies network reachability IP configuration and statistics

Routes for 172.10.3.* Determines network path

show ip interface atm 6/2.12.1 show ip route | include 172.16.3. traceroute

PPP

show ppp interface atm 6/2.12.1 statistics

PPP interface statistics

PPPoE

show pppoe subinterface atm 6/2.12

Status of all PPPoE subinterfaces PPPoE statistics

show pppoe interface atm 6/2.12

ATM Sub-

show atm subinterface atm 6/2/0/112 show atm subinterface atm 6/2.12

Subinterface configuration and statistics

interface

ATM Major

show atm interface atm 6/2

ATM major interface status and statistics

Physical

show controller sonet 6/2

Controller status

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

PPPoE over ATM Command Summary This slides lists the commands used to troubleshoot a PPPoE-over-ATM environment, layer by layer.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-28

E-series B-RAS Configuration

Command Summary: PPPoE with VLANs

Layer

Command

Result

IP

ping 172.16.4.2

Verifies network reachability IP configuration and statistics

Routes for 172.10.4.* Determines network path

show ip interface gig 3/0.101.1 show ip route | include 172.16.4. traceroute

PPP

show ppp interface gig 3/0.101.1 statistics

PPP interface statistics

PPPoE

show pppoe subinterface gig 3/0.101

Status of all PPPoE subinterfaces

show pppoe interface gig 3/0.101

PPPoE statistics

VLAN

show interface gigabit 3/0.101

VLAN status and statistics

Physical

show interface gigabitEthernet 3/0

Port-level statistics

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

PPPoE over Ethernet with VLANs Command Summary This slides lists the commands used to troubleshoot a PPPoE over Ethernet with environment, layer by layer.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-29

E-series B-RAS Configuration

Useful Logging Categories

Useful logging categories for troubleshooting PPP-over-Ethernet interfaces:

pppPacket

pppoeControlPacket

aaaUserAccess

aaaServerGeneral

radiusClient

radiusSendAttributes

radiusAttributes

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

Useful Logging Categories for Troubleshooting PPP-over-Ethernet Interfaces

This slide lists several useful logging categories to aid in troubleshooting PPPoE interfaces on the router.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-30

E-series B-RAS Configuration

PPPoE Successful Log: PPPoE

DEBUG 10/05/2004 13:59:56 pppoeControlPacket (interface ATM6/2.221): PADI rx from 0090.1a41.306a, length 12, empty service name DEBUG 10/05/2004 13:59:56 pppoeControlPacket (interface ATM6/2.221): PADO tx to 0090.1a41.306a, length 40, empty service name DEBUG 10/05/2004 13:59:56 pppoeControlPacket (interface ATM6/2.221): PADR rx from 0090.1a41.306a, length 32, empty service name DEBUG 10/05/2004 13:59:56 pppoeControlPacket (interface ATM6/2.221): PADS tx to 0090.1a41.306a, length 40, connection made using session id 1 on sub interface 1

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

Viewing a PPPoE Successful Log

This slide shows the PPPoE session establishment between a PPPoE client and the E-series router. The PPPoE client sends out a PADI (an initiation) with a destination MAC address of all Fs, indicating a data-link broadcast and its MAC address as the source. In this example, the client is not requesting a specific service because the service-name tag is empty. The PPPoE subinterface's adminStatus and

operStatus must be up before the E-series router will respond to the user's initiation request. The router responds with a PADO (an offer), containing its source MAC address as well as the same service the PPPoE client requested. Again, notice that the service-name tag is empty. The PPPoE client then sends out a PADR (a request) for a unique session ID. The router responds with a PADS (session establishment), containing the unique session ID.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-31

E-series B-RAS Configuration

PPPoE Successful Log: PPP LCP & CHAP

DEBUG 10/05/2004 13:59:58 pppPacket (interface ATM6/2.221.1): ti me: 0.00, rx lcp confReq, id = 244, length = 19, mru = 1492, authenticatio n = chap MD5, magicNumber = 0x1a9aa44d DEBUG 10/05/2004 13:59:58 pppPacket (interface ATM6/2.221.1): ti me: 0.01, rx lcp confReq, id = 20, length = 14, mru = 1492, magicNumber =

0x6d56dbe7

DEBUG 10/05/2004 13:59:58 pppPacket (interface ATM6/2.221.1): ti me: 0.02, tx lcp confAck, id = 20, length = 14, mru = 1492, magicNumber =

0x6d56dbe7

DEBUG 10/05/2004 14:00:00 pppPacket (interface ATM6/2.221.1): ti me: 3.06, tx lcp confReq, id = 245, length = 19, mru = 1492, authenticatio n = chap MD5, magicNumber = 0x1a9aa44d DEBUG 10/05/2004 14:00:00 pppPacket (interface ATM6/2.221.1): ti me: 3.06, rx lcp confAck, id = 245, length = 19, mru = 1492, authenticatio n = chap MD5, magicNumber = 0x1a9aa44d DEBUG 10/05/2004 14:00:00 pppPacket (interface ATM6/2.221.1): ti me: 3.06, tx chap challenge, id = 200, length = 32, challenge length = 23, challenge = 17 21 74 67 75 f4 db 07 83 9e af ec 4c 98 08 74 5f 7 9 39 a3

88 6b ab, name = 'erx8' 65 72 78 38

DEBUG 10/05/2004 14:00:00 pppPacket (interface ATM6/2.221.1): ti me: 3.07, rx chap response, id = 200, length = 35, response length = 16, response =

97

d4 dc 75 43 f9 c6 70 1a cc df 89 80 e8 2d 2e, name = 'diane@isp1.com'

64

69 61 6e 65 40 69 73 70 31 2e 63 6f 6d

DEBUG 10/05/2004 14:00:00 pppPacket (interface ATM6/2.221.1): ti me: 3.33,

tx chap success, id = 200, length = 4

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

Viewing a PPP LCP and CHAP Successful Log

This slide shows the PPP LCP and CHAP negotiation process between the PPPoE client and the E-series router. Each peer sends an LCP configuration request with its options to the other peer. The minimum options are the MRU and the magic number. The router additionally sends out a third option—the authentication method, which, in the example, is CHAP. For the negotiation process to proceed, each peer must acknowledge the configuration request sent from the other peer. Once the process is successful, the E-series router sends a CHAP challenge to the client. The PPPoE client responds with a CHAP response containing the MD5-encrypted secret. The E-series router passes this for authentication to the RADIUS server. The router then forwards the results of the authentication with the RADIUS server onto the PPPoE client. The example displays a CHAP success. At this point, the peers can proceed onto NCP negotiation.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-32

E-series B-RAS Configuration

PPPoE Successful Log: PPP IP NCP

DEBUG 10/05/2004 14:00:00 pppPacket (interface ATM6/2.221.1): time: 3.33,rx ipNcp confReq, id = 138, length

= 10, ipAddress = 0.0.0.0

DEBUG 10/05/2004 14:00:00 pppPacket (interface

ATM6/2.221.1): time: 3.33,tx ipNcp confNak, id = 138, length

= 10, ipAddress = 172.16.3.5

DEBUG 10/05/2004 14:00:00 pppPacket (interface ATM6/2.221.1): time: 3.34, rx ipNcp confReq, id = 139, length = 10, ipAddress = 172.16.3.5

DEBUG 10/05/2004 14:00:00 pppPacket (interface ATM6/2.221.1): time: 3.34, tx ipNcp confAck, id = 139, length = 10, ipAddress = 172.16.3.5

DEBUG 10/05/2004 14:00:00 pppPacket (interface ATM6/2.221.1): time: 3.35, tx ipNcp confReq, id = 241, length = 10, ipAddress = 172.16.2.18

DEBUG 10/05/2004 14:00:00 pppPacket (interface ATM6/2.221.1): time: 3.38, rx ipNcp confAck, id = 241, length = 10, ipAddress = 172.16.2.18

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

Viewing a Successful PPP IP NCP Log

This slide shows the PPP IP NCP negotiation process between the E-series router and the PPPoE client. The option used with IP NCP is the IP address of the ATM subinterface to the client. The E-series router uses the loopback address referenced for the IP unnumbered address as its IP address. Initially, the client sends an IP address of 0.0.0.0, indicating that it does not have an address. The router responds to this request with an IP NCP configNak message, along with an IP address assigned from either the RADIUS server, a local pool, or a DHCP proxy client service. Once each peer successfully acknowledges each configuration request, PPP is considered completely initialized.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-33

E-series B-RAS Configuration

Review Questions

1. How is PPP over Ethernet different from PPP over ATM?

2. What are the two different stages of PPP over Ethernet?

3. What is the basic life of a packet for PPP over Ethernet?

4. How do you configure the E-series router for PPP over Ethernet?

5. What steps would you take to troubleshoot a PPP-over-Ethernet interface?

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

This Chapter Discussed:

• The benefits of using PPP over Ethernet;

• The life of a packet for PPP over Ethernet;

• Comparing and contrasting ATM access networks and Ethernet access networks;

• Configuring the E-series router for PPP over Ethernet; and

• Verifying PPP-over-Ethernet operation using show commands and logging.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-34

E-series B-RAS Configuration

Lab 4: Configuring PPPoE Interface

Lab Objectives:

Configure and troubleshoot static PPP-over-Ethernet interfaces on the E-series router.

Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

Lab 4: Configuring PPP over Ethernet The slide shows the objective for this lab.

Module 4: PPP over Ethernet

4-35