Sie sind auf Seite 1von 93

A

 Prac'cal  Approach  to  the    


Full  Blood  Count  (FBC)  
 
AY  2015/2016  
Seniors  Teaching  Programme  

Picture  Source:  h>p://imagebank.hematology.org/Content/668/3666/3666_full.jpg  


Composi1on  of  Blood  

Blood  
Cells   Plasma  
    Serum  
RBCs     Water  
WBCs   CloMng   Electrolytes  
Platelets   factors   Organic  Nutrients  (e.g.  Glu)  
Organic  Waste  (e.g.  Urea,  Cr,  Bil)  
Albumin  
Other  proteins  
Overview  
 

 1.  Approach  to  Anemia  


 2.  Approach  to  Bleeding  Diathesis  
 3.  Approach  to  WBC  Derangements  
 
 4.  Synthesis  of  Knowledge  

Picture  Source:  h>p://imagebank.hematology.org/Content/668/3666/3666_full.jpg  


Anemia:  Clinical  findings  
•  History  sugges'ng  diagnosis  +  severity:  

–  Fa'gue  
–  Decreased  exercise  tolerance  
–  Dizziness  (non-­‐ver'ginous)  
–  SOB  
–  Chest  pain  &  palpita'ons  

•  Exact  e'ology  of  anemia  determines  presence  


of  other  symptoms  
Anemia:  Clinical  findings  
•  PE  signs  sugges'ng  diagnosis  +  severity:  

–  Conjunc'val  pallor  

•  Exact  e'ology  of  anemia  determines  presence  


of  other  signs  
Relevant  FBC  Parameters  (Males)  
Haemoglobin  (Hb)    13  –  17    g/dL  
Haematocrit  (Hct)      40  –  50      %  
RBC  Count        4.3  –  5.8    x  10^12/L  

 
Mean  corpuscular  
volume  (MCV)      80  –  100  fL  
 
Re'culocyte  count    1  –  2      %  
NOTE:  Re'culocyte  count  is  usually  ordered  separately  from  the  FBC,  but  
discussed  together  with  the  above  parameters  due  to  its  relevance.  
Relevant  FBC  Parameters  (Males)  
Haemoglobin  (Hb)    13  –  17    g/dL  
Haematocrit  (Hct)      40  –  50      %  
RBC  Count        4.3  –  5.8    x  10^12/L  

Plasma  volume  
Relevant  FBC  Parameters  (Males)  
Haemoglobin  (Hb)    13  –  17    g/dL  
Haematocrit  (Hct)      40  –  50      %  
 =  Volume  of  RBC  /  Volume  of  blood  
RBC  Count        4.3  –  5.8    x  10^12/L  
  40  -­‐  50%  

Plasma  volume  
Relevant  FBC  Parameters  (Males)  
Haemoglobin  (Hb)    13  –  17    g/dL  
=  Mass  of  Hb  /  Volume  of  blood  
Haematocrit  (Hct)      40  –  50      %  
RBC  Count        4.3  –  5.8    x  10^12/L  
  13  –  17  g/dL  

Plasma  volume  
Relevant  FBC  Parameters  (Males)  
Haemoglobin  (Hb)    13  –  17    g/dL  
Haematocrit  (Hct)      40  –  50      %  
RBC  Count        4.3  –  5.8    x  10^12/L  
=  Number  of  RBC  /  Volume  of  blood  

Plasma  volume  
Relevant  FBC  Parameters  (Males)  
Haemoglobin  Microcy1c  
(Hb)  
hypochromic  
 13  –  17    g/dL  
Haematocrit  (Hct)  
(MCHC)      40  –  50      %  
RBC  Count          4.3  –  5.8    x  10^12/L  
MCV  <  80   Macrocy1c  
   
MCV  >  100  

Mean  corpuscular  
volume  (MCV)      80  –  100  fL  

Concept  and  relevance  of   Normocy1c  


MCV  will  be  explained    
more  thoroughly  in  a   MCV  80  –  100  
later  slide.  
Relevant  FBC  Parameters  (Males)  
Plasma  volume  
Haemoglobin  (Hb)    13  –  17    g/dL  
Haematocrit  (Hct)      40  –  50      %  
RBC  Count        4.3  –  5.8    x  10^12/L  

 
Mean  corpuscular  
volume  
Re1culocytes  (aMCV)
re  immature    RBCs  in  the  
  peripheral  
 80   –  100They    ifndicate  
circula'on.   L   the  
bone  marrow’s  ability  to  synthesise  new  RBCs.  
 
Re'culocyte  count    1  –  2      %  
NOTE:  Re'culocyte  count  is  usually  ordered  separately  from  the  FBC,  but  
discussed  together  with  the  above  parameters  due  to  its  relevance.  
Classifica1on  of  anemia  
•  First  thing  to  be  aware  of:  different  methods  
of  classifying  anemia  exist!  For  example:  

–  Microcy'c  /  Normocy'c  /  Macrocy'c  


(MCV)  
 
–  Decreased  produc'on  /  Increased  loss  
(Re(culocyte  count)  
We’ll  focus  primarily  on  
MCV  classifica'on  
 
Microcy1c  anemia  
 
MCV  <  80  
Microcy1c  anemia  
MCV  <  80  

•  The  key  concept  behind  microcy'c  anemia  is  


underproduc1on  of  Hb    
Globin  chain  Deficiency  =    
   Thalassemia  

Porphyrin  ring  Deficiency  =    


   Sideroblas'c  anemia  

Iron    Defieiency  =    
   Fe  deficiency  anemia  

Source:  h>p://www.nmihi.com/a/iron-­‐deficiency-­‐anemia.htm  
Microcy1c  anemia  
MCV  <  80  

•  The  key  concept  behind  microcy'c  anemia  is  


underproduc1on  of  Hb    

•   3  core  differen'als:  
–  Iron  deficiency  anemia  
–  Thalassemia  
–  Sideroblas1c  anemia  *rare*  

•  Typically  there  is  underproduc1on  of  RBCs,  


therefore  re'culocyte  count  is  expected  to  be  low.  
Microcy1c  anemia  
MCV  <  80  

Addi'onal  features  on  history  


Iron  deficiency   Chronic  bleeding  from  any  orifice,  most  commonly:    
anemia   -­‐  GIT:  hematochezia  /  melena  /  change  in  bowel  habits  
           -­‐>  Colorectal  CA?  /  Pep'c  ulcer  disease?  
-­‐  PV:  menorrhagia  

Thalassemia   For  undiagnosed  thal  minor  adults,  family  history  of  thalassemia  
may  be  present.    
 
Full  ‘long  case’  history  for  thal  intermedia  &  major  will  not  be  
covered  here,  as  they  are  usually  diagnosed  in  childhood.  
 
Sideroblas1c   Lead  poisoning  
anemia   Or  other  features  of  myelodysplas'c  syndrome  
(rare)  
Microcy1c  anemia  
MCV  <  80  

Addi'onal  features  on  PE  


Iron  deficiency   -­‐  Koilonychia  
anemia   -­‐  Angular  stoma11s  

-­‐  Plus  signs  of  underlying  disease,  e.g.  


           -­‐>  irregular,  hard,  fixed  mass  on  PR  exam  
Thalassemia   -­‐  No  addi'onal  signs  on  PE  for  thal  minor  
-­‐  Chipmunk  facies,  frontal  bossing,  hepatosplenomegaly,  
jaundice  for  thal  intermedia  &  major,  amongst  many  other  
features  (will  not  cover  here)  

Sideroblas1c   -­‐  No  addi'onal  signs  typically  


anemia  
(rare)  
Microcy1c  anemia  
MCV  <  80  

Inves'ga'ons  
Re1culocyte   Iron  panel   Hemoglobin   PBF  features  
count   electrophoresis   (apart  fr  MCHC)  
Iron  deficiency   Low   Serum  iron  (L)   Normal   -­‐  
anemia   Ferri'n  (L)  
Transferrin  (H)  

Thalassemia   Low   Serum  iron  (N/H)   ↑  Abnormal  Hb   Target  cells  


Ferri'n  (N/H)   e.g.  HbH,  HbA2,  
Transferrin  (N/L)   HbF  

Sideroblas1c   Low   Serum  iron  (N/H)   Normal   Ringed  


anemia   Ferri'n  (N/H)   sideroblasts  
(rare)   Transferrin  (N/L)   with  Prussian  
blue  stain  
Microcy1c  anemia  
MCV  <  80  

Inves'ga'ons  
 
NOTE:  It  is  prudent  to  inves'gate  further  if  cause  is  
determined  to  be  Fe  deficiency  anemia,  especially  in  an  
elderly  individual  with  higher  cancer  risk.  Don’t  just  
stop  at  the  diagnosis  of  Fe  deficiency!  
 
e.g.  OGD  /  colonoscopy  for  BGIT  
Microcy1c  anemia  
MCV  <  80  

•  Differen'a'ng  iron  deficiency  anemia  VS  thalassemia  


based  on  FBC  indices:  
 
–  Mentzer  index  =  MCV  /  RBC  count  
Thalassemic  pts  compensate  by  synthesising  more  RBCs,  
while  Fe  deficiency  anemia  pts  do  not.  Hence:  Mentzer  index  
<13  sugges've  of  thalassemia;  Mentzer  index  >13  sugges've  
of  Fe  deficiency  
 
–  Red  cell  distribu1on  width  (RDW)  
Usually  RDW  high  in  iron  deficiency  (some  cells  large,  others  
small);  RDW  low  in  thalassemia  (uniformly  small  cells)  
Macrocy1c  anemia  
 
MCV  >  100  
Macrocy1c  anemia  
MCV  >  100  

•  The  key  concept  behind  macrocy'c  anemia  is  


an  underproduc1on  of  cells  rela1ve  to  
hemoglobin.    
–  Compare  this  to  microcy'c  anemias,  where  
hemoglobin  is  underproduced  rela've  to  cells  
–  Concept  will  become  clearer  in  subsequent  slides  

•  This  is  an  RBC  underproduc1on  problem,  therefore  


re'culocyte  count  is  expected  to  be  low.  
Macrocy1c  anemia  
MCV  >  100  

•  E'ologies  broadly  divided  into  megaloblas'c  


VS  non-­‐megaloblas'c  causes  

Megaloblas1c   Non-­‐megaloblas1c  
Folate  (B9)  deficiency   Alcoholism  
B12  deficiency   Liver  disease  
Hypothyroidism  
Myelodysplas'c  syndrome  
Spurious:  Re'culocytosis  
Megaloblas1c  anemia  
•  Vitamins  B9  (folate)  and  B12  are  essen'al  for  
cell  division  to  occur,  due  to  synthesis  of  
precursors  
–  Deficiency  of  B9  &  B12  therefore  means  
underproduc'on  of  RBC  cells  
–  However,  Hb  produc'on  remains  the  same  
–  Hence  each  RBC  is  filled  with  more  Hb  

•  Megaloblast  =  big  RBC  precursors  


Megaloblas1c  anemia  
Normal  scenario  

Body  is  capable  of  


making  5  RBCs  

Megaloblas1c  anemia  

Body  is  capable  of  


making  only  3  RBCs  
Megaloblas1c  anemia  
•  This  phenomenon  of  impaired  cell  division  
occurs  in  other  cell  lineages  too  

–  Impaired  nuclear  division  of  neutrophil  precursors  


=  hypersegmented  neutrophils  (can  see  on  PBF)  

–  Impaired  division  of  intes'nal  cells  =  similar  


megaloblas'c  change  as  well    
(fun  fact;  totally  irrelevant  to  clinical  prac'ce)  
Megaloblas1c  anemia  
Physiology  of  folate  
•  Folate  (vitamin  B9)  is  obtained  mainly  from  
dietary  sources  in  green  vegetables  
•  Absorbed  in  jejunum  
•  Body  stores  are  minimal,  can  become  
deficient  in  months  
•  Needs  to  be  acted  on  by  a  series  of  enzymes  
(e.g.  dihydrofolate  reductase)  to  be  
physiologically  ac've  
Megaloblas1c  anemia  
Physiology  of  vitamin  B12  
•  Vitamin  B12  is  obtained  from  animal  proteins  
•  Intrinsic  factor  secreted  from  gastric  parietal  
cells  binds  and  stabilises  B12  in  GIT  
•  B12-­‐IF  complex  absorbed  in  terminal  ileum  
•  Large  hepa'c  stores;  deficiency  takes  years  to  
develop  
Megaloblas1c  anemia  
Addi'onal  features  on  history  
Folate   Ask  about  e'ologies:  
deficiency    
-­‐  Malnutri'on  (e.g.  elderly,  alcoholics)  
-­‐  Increased  consump'on  (features  of  pregnancy,  cancer)  
-­‐  Folic  acid  antagonist  drugs  (e.g.  methotrexate)  

B12  deficiency   Ask  about  e'ologies:  


 
-­‐  Strict  vegan  
-­‐  Pernicious  anemia  (autoimmune  history)  
-­‐  Post-­‐gastrectomy  
-­‐  Terminal  ileum  resec'on  
-­‐  Malabsorp'on  (e.g.  features  of  Crohn’s)  
Megaloblas1c  anemia  
Addi'onal  features  on  PE  
Folate   -­‐  Glossi1s  
deficiency  
-­‐  Plus  signs  of  underlying  e'ology,  e.g.  
           -­‐>  RA  hands  
 
B12  deficiency   -­‐  Glossi1s  
-­‐  Subacute  combined  degenera1on  of  the  spinal  cord  (features  
of  damage  to  dorsal  column)  

-­‐  Plus  signs  of  underlying  e'ology,  e.g.  


           -­‐>  autoimmune  features  (goitre,  vi'ligo,  RA  hands)  
           -­‐>  laparotomy  scar  
 
Megaloblas1c  anemia  
Inves'ga'ons  
  PBF  features   Folate   B12   Homocysteine  

 Folate  deficiency   Macrocytosis,   Low   Normal   Low  


hypersegmented  
  neutrophils  

 B12  deficiency   Macrocytosis,   Normal   Low   Low  


  hypersegmented  
neutrophils  
 
 
Also  consider  other  Ix  to  determine  e'ology.  
e.g.  an'-­‐parietal  cell  Ab,  an'-­‐intrinsic  factor  Ab,  OGD  
Non-­‐megaloblas1c  macrocy1c  anemia  

•  There  are  other  causes   Non-­‐megaloblas1c  


of  macrocy'c  anemia   Alcoholism  
that  do  not  produce   Liver  disease  
megaloblasts   Hypothyroidism  

•  Mechanism  is  not  fully   Myelodysplas'c  syndrome  


elucidated  for  some   Spurious:  Re'culocytosis  
causes  
•  Myelodysplas'c  syndrome:  BM  is  dysplas'c,  so  it  
produces  funny  large  cells  
•  Re'culocytosis:  Re'culocytes  are  larger  than  RBCs,  
so  lab  machine  wrongly  counts  it  as  a  large  RBC  
Non-­‐megaloblas1c  macrocy1c  anemia  

•  Inves'gate  as  necessary  if  e'ologies  of  non-­‐


megaloblas'c  macrocy'c  anemia  are  suspected  
–  LFT  
–  TFT  
–  Re'culocyte  count  
–  BM  aspira'on  &  trephine  
Normocy1c  anemia  
 
80  <  MCV  <  100  
Normocy1c  anemia  
80  <  MCV  <  100  

•  Unlike  microcy'c  and  macrocy'c  anemias  which  are  


typically  due  to  underproduc'on,  normocy'c  
anemias  can  be  a>ributed  to  BOTH  underproduc'on  
and  increased  loss  

•  Re1culocyte  count  can  help  us  to  differen'ate  


underproduc'on  (central)  VS  increased  loss  
(peripheral).  
Normocy1c  anemia  
80  <  MCV  <  100  

•  Re1culocytes  
–  Are  immature  RBCs  
–  Typically  1-­‐2%  in  peripheral  blood  
–  This  is  requested  as  a  separate  Ix  from  the  FBC  
–  In  the  presence  of  anemia,  a  properly  func'oning  
marrow  is  able  to  increase  re1culocyte  
produc1on  beyond  this  normal  range.  
–  Failure  to  increase  re1culocyte  produc1on  
means  central  underproduc1on.  
Normocy1c  anemia  
80  <  MCV  <  100  

Because  re'culocyte  count  is  expressed  as  a  %  of  total  


RBCs,  it  is  falsely  elevated  in  anemia  because  total  
RBCs  drop.  
 
Example  person  here  has  1  RC  in  8  RBCs  (12.5%)  
 
 
 
 
 
NOTE  this  is  just  an  example:  RC  is  only  1-­‐2%  in  reality.  
Normocy1c  anemia  
80  <  MCV  <  100  

Because  re'culocyte  count  is  expressed  as  a  %  of  total  


RBCs,  it  is  falsely  elevated  in  anemia  because  total  
RBCs  drop.  
 
Anemic  person  appears  to  have  1  RC  in  4  RBCs  (25%!)  
 
 
 
 
 
NOTE  this  is  just  an  example:  RC  is  only  1-­‐2%  in  reality.  
Normocy1c  anemia  
80  <  MCV  <  100  

Because  re'culocyte  count  is  expressed  as  a  %  of  total  


RBCs,  it  is  falsely  elevated  in  anemia  because  total  
RBCs  drop.  
 
Corrected  re1culocyte  count  is  hence  employed  
 
=  Re'culocyte  count    x  Hct  /  45  
         (45%  is  taken  as  normal  Hct)  
 
So  our  previous  anemic  person  actually  has  a  corrected  
value  of  25%  x  22.5/45  =  12.5%  
Normocy1c  anemia  
80  <  MCV  <  100  

Underproduc1on   Increased  loss  (Peripheral  problem)  


(Central  problem)   Hemolysis   Acute  blood  loss  
Marrow  infilta'on   Autoimmune  hemoly'c  anemia   Acute  bleed  
(primary  cause  =  
myelodysplas'c  syndrome  /   Mechanical  hemoly'c  anemia  
acute  leukemia  /  lymphoma   (TTP,  HUS,  prosthe'c  valves,  
VS  secondary  cause  =  mets)   aor'c  stenosis)  
Aplas'c  anemia   Hypersplenism  
Anemia  of  chronic   Gene'c  (G6PD,  sickle  cell,  
disease   hereditary  spherocytosis)  
Chronic  kidney  disease   Malaria  

E'ologies  highlighted  in  green  are  marrow  problems  that  can  affect  >1  cell  
lineage:  prepare  to  see  them  again  later  in  thrombocytopenia!  
Normocy1c  anemia  
80  <  MCV  <  100  

Inves1ga1ons  
–  Re'culocyte  count  [Underproduc'on  VS  Increased  loss]  
–  Peripheral  blood  film  
Underproduc'on:  
–  Bone  marrow  aspira'on  &  trephine  [Marrow  problems]  
–  UECr  [CKD]  
Hemolysis:  
–  Hemoly'c  screen  of  Bilirubin  (↑),  LDH  (↑),  Haptoglobin  
(↓)  [Hemolysis]  
–  Direct  Coomb’s  Test  [Autoimmune]  
–  Other  tests  as  necessary  e.g.  malaria  blood  films  
Normocy1c  anemia  
80  <  MCV  <  100  

Inves1ga1ons  
–  Peripheral  blood  film  special  cell  types:  
       Schistocytes                      Spherocytes  
(Mechanical  hemolysis)              (Autoimmune  hemolysis  &  HS)  

h>p://www.wadsworth.org/chemheme/ h>p://www.accuspeedy.com.tw/Y01_picture_mt/
heme/glass/slide_014_schisto.htm   blood%20cell/rbc_morphology/Spherocyte/sphe_2.jpg  
Normocy1c  anemia  
80  <  MCV  <  100  

Inves1ga1ons  
–  Peripheral  blood  film  special  cell  types:  
       Blast  cells    
       (Acute  leukemia)      

h>ps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Acute_leukemia-­‐ALL.jpg  
Anemia:  Summary  
•  Microcy1c  (MCV  <  80)  
–  Iron  deficiency;  Thalassemia;  Sideroblas'c  

•  Normocy1c  (80  <  MCV  <  100)  


–  Underproduc'on    
(Infiltra'on;  Aplas'c  anemia;  CKD;  Chronic  dz)  
–  Hemolysis    
(Autoimmune;  Mechanical;  Congenital;  Hypersplenism;  Infec'ous)  
–  Acute  blood  loss  

•  Macrocy1c  (MCV  >  100)  


–  Megaloblas'c    
(Folate;  B12  deficiency)  
–  Non-­‐megaloblas'c    
(Liver  dz;  Alcoholism;  Thyroid  dz;  MDS;  Re'culocytosis)  
Overview  
 

 1.  Approach  to  Anemia  


 2.  Approach  to  Bleeding  Diathesis  
 3.  Approach  to  WBC  Derangements  
 
 4.  Synthesis  of  Knowledge  

Picture  Source:  h>p://imagebank.hematology.org/Content/668/3666/3666_full.jpg  


Bleeding  diathesis  
What  features  allow  us  to  differen'ate  if  a  bleeding  diathesis  is  
secondary  to  platelet  issues  (primary  hemostasis),  or  
coagula1on  issues  (secondary  hemostasis)?  

Bleeding  tendency  

Issue  with   Issue  with  


platelets   coagula1on  cascade  

Quan1ta1ve   Qualita1ve   Quan1ta1ve   Qualita1ve  


(thrombocytopenia)        
Bleeding  diathesis  
What  features  allow  us  to  differen'ate  if  a  bleeding  diathesis  is  
secondary  to  platelet  issues  (primary  hemostasis),  or  
coagula1on  issues  (secondary  hemostasis)?  

Platelet   Coagula1on  cascade  

Bleeding  sites   Mucocutaneous   Muscles  &  Joints  

Petechiae   Present   Absent  

Hemarthrosis   Absent  (tradi'onally)   Present  

Bleeding  afer  trauma   Immediate   Delayed  


(e.g.  surgery)  
Bleeding  diathesis  

Bleeding  tendency  

Issue  with   Issue  with  


platelets   coagula1on  cascade  

Quan1ta1ve   Qualita1ve   Quan1ta1ve   Qualita1ve  


(thrombocytopenia)        
Platelet  issues:  Clinical  features  
•  History  sugges've  of  platelet  issues:  
(Problem  may  be  quan'ta've  or  qualita've)  

–  Cutaneous  bleeding  
(easy  bruising,  “rash”)  

–  Mucosal  bleeding  
(epistaxis,  bleeding  gums,  menorrhagia)  

–  Presence  of  anemia  Sx  suggests  chronicity  


…  or  a  disease  affec'ng  mul'ple  cell  lineages!  
Platelet  issues:  Clinical  features  
•  Signs  sugges've  of  platelet  issues:  
(Problem  may  be  quan'ta've  or  qualita've)  

–  Petechiae,  purpura,  ecchymosis  

–  Signs  of  anemia  (conjunc'val  pallor)  are  sugges've  of  


severe,  longer-­‐standing  thrombocytopenia  
…  or  a  disease  affec'ng  mul'ple  cell  lineages!  
Relevant  FBC  Parameters  
Platelets  (Plt)    150  –  400    x  10^12/L  
 
Plt  value  doesn’t  tell  us  about  platelet  quality!  Merely  a  quan(ta(ve  measure.  
 

Mean  platelet    9  –  12  fL  


volume  (MPV)  
 
Low  MPV  is  sugges've  of  central  underproduc'on.  High  MPV  is  sugges've  of  
increased  platelet  produc'on,  e.g.  to  compensate  for  peripheral  destruc'on.  
 
However,  predic've  value  of  MPV  doesn’t  appear  to  be  as  robust  as  MCV.  
Thrombocytopenia  
Quan1ta1ve  problem  

•  Before  considering  genuine  causes  of  


thrombocytopenia,  exclude:  

–  Spurious  errors    
(e.g.  “platelet  clumping”  reported  on  FBC  report)  

–  Dilu'onal  errors  
(e.g.  recent  aggressive  hydra'on)  
Thrombocytopenia  
Quan1ta1ve  problem  

Underproduc1on   Increased  loss  


Marrow  infilta'on   Immune  thrombocytopenia  purpura  
(primary  cause  =  myelodysplas'c   (primary  VS  secondary  to  SLE,  CLL  etc)  
syndrome  /  acute  leukemia  /  lymphoma  VS  
Infec'on  
secondary  cause  =  mets)  
(dengue,  meningococcus)  
Aplas'c  anemia   Thrombo'c  microangiopathy    
(TTP,  HUS,  DIVC)  
Megaloblas'c  anemia   Hypersplenism  
Drug-­‐induced  
(heparin,  an'-­‐epilep'cs,  Abx)  

Remember  the  e'ologies  highlighted  in  green  under  normocy'c  anemias  


previously?  We’re  adding  megaloblas'c  anemia  to  this  list  which  was  previously  
classified  under  macrocy'c  anemias.  
Platelet  dysfunc1on  
Qualita1ve  problem  

•  Apart  from  thrombocytopenia,  it  is  prudent  to  


consider  e'ologies  pertaining  to  platelet  dysfunc1on  
in  the  workup  as  well.  

•  This  is  important  because  some  e'ologies  of  


mucocutaneous  bleeding  (sugges've  of  platelet  
issues)  are  due  to  qualita've  problems,  and  not  due  
to  thrombocytopenia!  
 e.g.  aspirin  use  
 
Platelet  dysfunc1on  
Qualita1ve  problem  

Qualita1ve  
Drugs  
(Aspirin,  Clopidogrel  aka  Plavix  etc)  
Uremia  
Myeloprolifera've  neoplasm  
Congenital  diseases  
(vWD,  Bernard-­‐Soulier  etc)  
Platelet  issues:  Summary  

QUANTITATIVE   QUALITATIVE  
Underproduc1on   Increased  loss    
Marrow  infilta'on   ITP  (primary  VS  secondary  to   Drugs  
(primary  cause  =  myelodysplas'c   SLE,  CLL  etc)   (Aspirin,  Clopidogrel  etc)  
syndrome  /  acute  leukemia  /  
lymphoma  VS  secondary  cause  =   Infec'on   Uremia  
mets)   (dengue,  meningococcus)   Myeloprolifera've  neoplasm  
Aplas'c  anemia   Thrombo'c  microangiopathy     Congenital  diseases  
(TTP,  HUS,  DIVC)   (vWD,  Bernard-­‐Soulier  etc)  
Megaloblas'c  anemia   Hypersplenism  
Drug-­‐induced  
(heparin,  an'-­‐epilep'cs,  Abx)  
Bleeding  diathesis  

Bleeding  tendency  

Issue  with   Issue  with  


platelets   coagula1on  cascade  

Quan1ta1ve   Qualita1ve   Quan1ta1ve   Qualita1ve  


(thrombocytopenia)        
Coagulopathy:  Clinical  features  
•  Features  sugges've  of  coagula'on  issues:  
(Problem  may  be  quan'ta've  or  qualita've)  

–  Deep  bleeding  
(joints,  muscles)  

–  Delayed  bleeding  a|er  trauma  


PT/PTT  
aPTT      35  –  45  sec  
Evaluates  intrinsic  +  common  pathways    
 

PT      11  –  15  sec  


INR      0.9  –  1.2  
Evaluates  extrinsic  +  common  pathway  
 
Unlike  the  Plt  count,  the  PT/PTT  values  will  reflect  both  
quan'ta've  and  qualita've  defects.  
Coagulopathy:  Summary  

Congenital   Acquired  
Von  Willebrand  disease   Drugs  
because  vWF  stabilises  Factor  VIII   (an'coagulants,  eg.  warfarin)  
Liver  disease  
Hemophilia  A  (Factor  VIII)   Vitamin  K  deficiency  
Hemophilia  B  (Factor  IX)   Disseminated  intravascular  
coagula'on  (DIVC)  
Dilu'on  
QUANTITATIVE  PLATELET   QUALITATIVE  PLATELET  
Underproduc'on   Increased  loss  
Marrow  infilta'on   ITP  (primary  VS  secondary  to  SLE,   Drugs  
(primary  cause  =  myelodysplas'c   CLL  etc)   (Aspirin,  Clopidogrel  etc)  
syndrome  /  acute  leukemia  /   Uremia  
lymphoma  VS  secondary  cause  =   Infec'on  
mets)   (dengue,  meningococcus)   Myeloprolifera've  neoplasm  
Aplas'c  anemia   Thrombo'c  microangiopathy     Congenital  diseases  
(TTP,  HUS,  DIVC)   (vWD,  Bernard-­‐Soulier  etc)  
Megaloblas'c  anemia   Hypersplenism  
Drug-­‐induced   COAGULOPATHY  
(heparin,  an'-­‐epilep'cs,  Abx)  
Drugs  
(an'coagulants,  eg.  warfarin)  

Bleeding  diathesis   Liver  disease  


Vitamin  K  deficiency  
Summary   Disseminated  intravascular  
coagula'on  (DIVC)  
Dilu'on  
Congenital  
(vWD,  Hemophilia)  
QUANTITATIVE  PLATELET   QUALITATIVE  PLATELET  
Underproduc'on   Increased  loss  
Marrow  infilta'on   ITP  (primary  VS  secondary  to  SLE,   Drugs  
(primary  cause  =  myelodysplas'c   CLL  etc)   (Aspirin,  Clopidogrel  etc)  
syndrome  /  acute  leukemia  /   Uremia  
lymphoma  VS  secondary  cause  =   Infec'on  
mets)   (dengue,  meningococcus)   Myeloprolifera've  neoplasm  
Aplas'c  anemia   Thrombo'c  microangiopathy     Congenital  diseases  
(TTP,  HUS,  DIVC)   (vWD,  Bernard-­‐Soulier  etc)  
Megaloblas'c  anemia   Hypersplenism  
Drug-­‐induced   COAGULOPATHY  
(heparin,  an'-­‐epilep'cs,  Abx)  
Drugs  
(an'coagulants,  eg.  warfarin)  

Bleeding  diathesis   Liver  disease  


Vitamin  K  deficiency  
Summary   Disseminated  intravascular  
coagula'on  (DIVC)  
…  what  if  we  classify  these  causes  according  to  the   Dilu'on  
presen'ng  pa'ent’s  clinical  background?  
Congenital  
(vWD,  Hemophilia)  
QUANTITATIVE  PLATELET   QUALITATIVE  PLATELET  
Underproduc'on   Increased  loss  
Marrow  infilta'on   ITP  (primary  VS  secondary  to  SLE,   Drugs  
(primary  cause  =  myelodysplas'c   CLL  etc)   (Aspirin,  Clopidogrel  etc)  
syndrome  /  acute  leukemia  /   Uremia  
lymphoma  VS  secondary  cause  =   Infec'on  
mets)   (dengue,  meningococcus)   Myeloprolifera've  neoplasm  
Aplas'c  anemia   Thrombo'c  microangiopathy     Congenital  diseases  
(TTP,  HUS,  DIVC)   (vWD,  Bernard-­‐Soulier  etc)  
Megaloblas'c  anemia   Hypersplenism  
Drug-­‐induced   COAGULOPATHY  
(heparin,  an'-­‐epilep'cs,  Abx)  
Drugs  
(an'coagulants,  eg.  warfarin)  

Bleeding  diathesis   Liver  disease  


Vitamin  K  deficiency  
Summary   Disseminated  intravascular  
coagula'on  (DIVC)  

the  ACUTELY  UNWELL  pa1ent   Dilu'on  


Congenital  
(vWD,  Hemophilia)  
QUANTITATIVE  PLATELET   QUALITATIVE  PLATELET  
Underproduc'on   Increased  loss  
Marrow  infilta'on   ITP  (primary  VS  secondary  to  SLE,   Drugs  
(primary  cause  =  myelodysplas'c   CLL  etc)   (Aspirin,  Clopidogrel  etc)  
syndrome  /  acute  leukemia  /   Uremia  
lymphoma  VS  secondary  cause  =   Infec'on  
mets)   (dengue,  meningococcus)   Myeloprolifera've  neoplasm  
Aplas'c  anemia   Thrombo'c  microangiopathy     Congenital  diseases  
(TTP,  HUS,  DIVC)   (vWD,  Bernard-­‐Soulier  etc)  
Megaloblas'c  anemia   Hypersplenism  
Drug-­‐induced   COAGULOPATHY  
(heparin,  an'-­‐epilep'cs,  Abx)  
Drugs  
(an'coagulants,  eg.  warfarin)  

Bleeding  diathesis   Liver  disease  


Vitamin  K  deficiency  
Summary   Disseminated  intravascular  
coagula'on  (DIVC)  

the  ACUTELY  UNWELL  pa1ent   Dilu'on  


Congenital  
(vWD,  Hemophilia)  
QUANTITATIVE  PLATELET   QUALITATIVE  PLATELET  
Underproduc'on   Increased  loss  
Marrow  infilta'on   ITP  (primary  VS  secondary  to  SLE,   Drugs  
(primary  cause  =  myelodysplas'c   CLL  etc)   (Aspirin,  Clopidogrel  etc)  
syndrome  /  acute  leukemia  /   Uremia  
lymphoma  VS  secondary  cause  =   Infec'on  
mets)   (dengue,  meningococcus)   Myeloprolifera've  neoplasm  
Aplas'c  anemia   Thrombo'c  microangiopathy     Congenital  diseases  
(TTP,  HUS,  DIVC)   (vWD,  Bernard-­‐Soulier  etc)  
Megaloblas'c  anemia   Hypersplenism  
Drug-­‐induced   COAGULOPATHY  
(heparin,  an'-­‐epilep'cs,  Abx)  
Drugs  
(an'coagulants,  eg.  warfarin)  

Bleeding  diathesis   Liver  disease  


Vitamin  K  deficiency  
Summary   Disseminated  intravascular  
coagula'on  (DIVC)  

the  otherwise     Dilu'on  


Congenital  
PREVIOUSLY  WELL  pa1ent   (vWD,  Hemophilia)  
QUANTITATIVE  PLATELET   QUALITATIVE  PLATELET  
Underproduc'on   Increased  loss  
Marrow  infilta'on   ITP  (primary  VS  secondary  to  SLE,   Drugs  
(primary  cause  =  myelodysplas'c   CLL  etc)   (Aspirin,  Clopidogrel  etc)  
syndrome  /  acute  leukemia  /   Uremia  
lymphoma  VS  secondary  cause  =   Infec'on  
mets)   (dengue,  meningococcus)   Myeloprolifera've  neoplasm  
Aplas'c  anemia   Thrombo'c  microangiopathy     Congenital  diseases  
(TTP,  HUS,  DIVC)   (vWD,  Bernard-­‐Soulier  etc)  
Megaloblas'c  anemia   Hypersplenism  
Drug-­‐induced   COAGULOPATHY  
(heparin,  an'-­‐epilep'cs,  Abx)  
Drugs  
(an'coagulants,  eg.  warfarin)  

Bleeding  diathesis   Liver  disease  


Vitamin  K  deficiency  
Summary   Disseminated  intravascular  
coagula'on  (DIVC)  

the  otherwise     Dilu'on  


Congenital  
PREVIOUSLY  WELL  pa1ent   (vWD,  Hemophilia)  
QUANTITATIVE  PLATELET   QUALITATIVE  PLATELET  
Underproduc'on   Increased  loss  
Marrow  infilta'on   ITP  (primary  VS  secondary  to  SLE,   Drugs  
(primary  cause  =  myelodysplas'c   CLL  etc)   (Aspirin,  Clopidogrel  etc)  
syndrome  /  acute  leukemia  /   Uremia  
lymphoma  VS  secondary  cause  =   Infec'on  
mets)   (dengue,  meningococcus)   Myeloprolifera've  neoplasm  
Aplas'c  anemia   Thrombo'c  microangiopathy     Congenital  diseases  
(TTP,  HUS,  DIVC)   (vWD,  Bernard-­‐Soulier  etc)  
Megaloblas'c  anemia   Hypersplenism  
Drug-­‐induced   COAGULOPATHY  
(heparin,  an'-­‐epilep'cs,  Abx)  
Drugs  
(an'coagulants,  eg.  warfarin)  

Bleeding  diathesis   Liver  disease  


Vitamin  K  deficiency  
Summary   Disseminated  intravascular  
coagula'on  (DIVC)  

the  pa1ent  with   Dilu'on  


Congenital  
other  CO-­‐MORBIDITIES   (vWD,  Hemophilia)  
QUANTITATIVE  PLATELET   QUALITATIVE  PLATELET  
Underproduc'on   Increased  loss  
Marrow  infilta'on   ITP  (primary  VS  secondary  to  SLE,   Drugs  
(primary  cause  =  myelodysplas'c   CLL  etc)   (Aspirin,  Clopidogrel  etc)  
syndrome  /  acute  leukemia  /   Uremia  
lymphoma  VS  secondary  cause  =   Infec'on  
mets)   (dengue,  meningococcus)   Myeloprolifera've  neoplasm  
Aplas'c  anemia   Thrombo'c  microangiopathy     Congenital  diseases  
(TTP,  HUS,  DIVC)   (vWD,  Bernard-­‐Soulier  etc)  
Megaloblas'c  anemia   Hypersplenism  
Drug-­‐induced   COAGULOPATHY  
(heparin,  an'-­‐epilep'cs,  Abx)  
Drugs  
(an'coagulants,  eg.  warfarin)  

Bleeding  diathesis   Liver  disease  


Vitamin  K  deficiency  
Summary   Disseminated  intravascular  
coagula'on  (DIVC)  

the  pa1ent  with   Dilu'on  


Congenital  
other  CO-­‐MORBIDITIES   (vWD,  Hemophilia)  
Overview  
 

 1.  Approach  to  Anemia  


 2.  Approach  to  Bleeding  Diathesis  
 3.  Approach  to  WBC  Derangements  
 
 4.  Synthesis  of  Knowledge  

Picture  Source:  h>p://imagebank.hematology.org/Content/668/3666/3666_full.jpg  


Relevant  FBC  Parameters  
WBC  Count    4  –  11  x  10^9/L  
 
Differen'al  Counts  
-­‐  Neutrophils  (Absolute  neutrophil  count)  
-­‐  Lymphocytes  
-­‐  Monocytes  
-­‐  Eosinophils  
-­‐  Basophils  
WBC  Derangements:  Leukocytosis  
•  When  leukocytosis  is  present,  it  is  typically  
a>ributed  to  a  single  lineage  of  white  cells.  
–  Neutrophils  
–  Lymphocytes  
–  Monocytes  
–  Eosinophils  
–  Basophils  
Neutrophilia  
•  Neutrophils  are  a  marker  of  acute  
inflamma'on.  

•  Think:  
–  Acute  bacterial  /  fungal  infec'on  
–  Tissue  injury  (e.g.  ischemia,  trauma)  
–  Hematologic  neoplasm  
Lymphocytosis  /  Monocytosis  
•  Lymphocytes  and  monocytes  are  markers  of  
chronic  inflamma'on.  They  are  also  involved  
in  specialised  arms  of  the  immune  system  
defending  against  specific  pathogens  

•  Think:  
–  Acute  viral  inflamma'on  
–  Slow-­‐growing  bacteria  (e.g.  TB)  
–  Chronic  inflamma'on  (e.g.  autoimmune)  
–  Hematologic  neoplasm  
Eosinophilia  
•  Eosinophils  are  tradi'onally  associated  with  
allergy  and  parasite  reac'ons.  

•  Think:  
–  Allergy  
–  Parasi'c  infec'on  
–  Hematologic  neoplasm  
–  Hypereosinophilic  syndrome  
WBC  Derangements:  Leukopenia  
•  Once  again,  there  are  e'ologies  shared  with  anemia  
and  thrombocytopenia  as  follows:  

Underproduc1on  
Marrow  infilta'on  
(primary  cause  =  myelodysplas'c  
syndrome  /  acute  leukemia  /  lymphoma  
VS  secondary  cause  =  mets)  
Aplas'c  anemia  
Megaloblas'c  anemia  
 
WBC  Derangements:  Leukopenia  
•  There  are  also  e'ologies  specific  to  WBCs:  

–  Infec'on  (HIV)  
–  Drugs  (Cor'costeroids,  Immunosuppressants)  
–  Autoimmune  (SLE)  

 
Overview  
 

 1.  Approach  to  Anemia  


 2.  Approach  to  Bleeding  Diathesis  
 3.  Approach  to  WBC  Derangements  
 
 4.  Synthesis  of  Knowledge  

Picture  Source:  h>p://imagebank.hematology.org/Content/668/3666/3666_full.jpg  


Synthesis  
•  Although  in  our  discussion  of  low  counts  we  
considered  each  lineage  separately,  there  are  a  
number  of  common  e'ologies  across  lineages:  
Underproduc1on   Destruc1on  
Marrow  infilta'on   Autoimmune  
(primary  cause  =  myelodysplas'c  
syndrome  /  acute  leukemia  /  lymphoma   Mechanical  
VS  secondary  cause  =  mets)   Hypersplenism  
Aplas'c  anemia  
Megaloblas'c  anemia  

•  Hence  it  is  important  to  determine  the  number  of  


lineages  involved  in  a  FBC  aberrancy.  
Synthesis  
A  general  approach  to  a  FBC  abnormality  for  low  counts  can  be  
as  such.  
  FBC  abnormality  

Is  this  a  spurious  result?  


e.g.  venepuncture  from  arm  with  drip  site  
e.g.  ‘platelet  clumps’  

Number  of  lineages  involved   1  lineage:  


Approach  as  usual  

2/3  lineages:  
Consider  common  differen'als  
Case  1  
Mr  L  is  69  year  old  re'red  Chinese  male  referred  from  polyclinic.  
He  complained  of  lethargy  and  SOB  for  the  past  3  months,  
together  with  a  loss  of  about  5kg  body  weight  and  loss  of  
appe'te.  
 
Has  significant  PMHx  of  HTN  on  enalapril,  DM  on  me€ormin  &  
glipizide,  and  HLD  on  simvasta'n.  Cholecystectomy  done  20  
years  ago.  Right  inguinal  hernia  repair  done  5  years  ago.  No  
significant  FHx  that  he  is  aware  of.  
 
You  take  some  further  history,  perform  a  physical  exam  and  
no'ce  significant  conjunc'val  pallor.  You  then  perform  an  FBC.  
 
Case  1  
  Value   Reference  
  Hb   9.5  (L)   13  –  17  
  WBC   4.3   4  –  11    
  Platelets   230   150  –  400  

  RBC   3.8  (L)   4.3  –  5.8  


Hct   29  (L)   40  –  50  
 
MCV   72  (L)   80  –  100  
 
RDW   18.2  (H)   11  –  16  
 
MPV   9.2   9  –  12  
 
What  differen'als  are  there?  What  other  history  and  physical  
exam  findings  would  you  a>empt  to  elicit,  and  how  would  you  
con'nue  the  workup?  
Case  2  
A  22  year  old  university  student  was  referred  to  you  because  of  
an  abnormally  low  Hb  result  she  received  when  a>emp'ng  to  
donate  blood.  
 
She  a>ributes  the  low  Hb  to  ‘heavy  periods’  she  has  had  since  
menarche.  Symptom-­‐wise,  she  no'ced  that  her  exercise  
tolerance  has  severely  dropped  over  the  past  month  such  that  
she  is  unable  to  complete  her  usual  20  min  walk  from  her  home  
to  the  nearby  MRT  without  stopping  for  rest.  Her  friends  have  
also  no'ced  her  geMng  pale.  She  has  no  significant  PMHx  or  
FHx.  
 
You  take  a  look  at  the  appended  FBC  result.  
Case  2  
  Value   Reference  
  Hb   5.6  (L)   12  –  16  
  WBC   29.4  (H)   4  –  11    
  Platelets   155   150  –  400  

  RBC   2.5  (L)   4.0  –  5.2  


Hct   18  (L)   35  –  45  
 
MCV   88   80  –  100  
 
RDW   14.2   11  –  16  
 
MPV   9.8   9  –  12  
 
What  differen'als  are  there?  What  other  history  and  physical  
exam  findings  would  you  a>empt  to  elicit,  and  how  would  you  
con'nue  the  workup?  
Case  3  
A  19  year  old  university  student  was  referred  to  you  because  of  
a  low  Hb  result  she  received  when  a>emp'ng  to  donate  blood.  
 
She  is  completely  asymptoma'c  and  is  represen'ng  her  hall  in  
mul'ple  sports.  She  has  no  significant  PMHx  or  FHx.  
 
You  take  a  look  at  the  appended  FBC  result.  
Case  3  
  Value   Reference  
  Hb   11.3  (L)   12  –  16  
  WBC   5.1   4  –  11    
  Platelets   295   150  –  400  

  RBC   4.3   4.0  –  5.2  


Hct   34  (L)   35  –  45  
 
MCV   79  (L)   80  –  100  
 
RDW   12.1   11  –  16  
 
MPV   10.1   9  –  12  
 
What  differen'als  are  there?  What  other  history  and  physical  
exam  findings  would  you  a>empt  to  elicit,  and  how  would  you  
con'nue  the  workup?  
Case  4  
Geh  Kiang  is  a  19  year  old  NSF  who  approached  you  to  evaluate  
his  frequent  and  heavy  nosebleeds  over  the  past  2  weeks,  
associated  with  a  strange  rash  on  his  arms  and  legs  (which  you  
recognise  as  petechiae).    
 
He  has  a  PMHx  of  allergic  rhini's  on  intranasal  steroids.  He  is  
taking  some  Chinese  supplements  to  ‘boost  immunity’  as  he  
caught  a  flu  while  in-­‐camp  about  2  months  ago  which  has  since  
resolved.  
 
You  decide  a  FBC  is  a  good  idea.  
Case  4  
  Value   Reference  
  Hb   15.6   13  –  17  
  WBC   4.3   4  –  11    
  Platelets   2  (L)   150  –  400  

  RBC   5.6   4.3  –  5.8  


Hct   47   40  –  50  
 
MCV   96   80  –  100  
 
RDW   12   11  –  16  
 
MPV   11.9   9  –  12  
 
What  differen'als  are  there?  
Case  5  
Ms  T  is  a  40  year  old  CEO  of  a  local  SME  who  presents  for  
increasing  lethargy  which  has  affected  her  concentra'on  at  
work.  She  has  brought  her  FBC  report  from  her  GP.  
 
Ms  T  has  a  PMHx  of  SLE  diagnosed  at  32  for  which  she  is  on  
medica'ons,  though  she  skips  doses  once  in  a  while  due  to  her  
busy-­‐ness.  She  has  been  seeing  her  GP  for  ‘gastric’  problems  
from  skipping  meals  for  a  few  years.  Ms  T  has  smoked  a  pack  
every  day  since  she  started  working  and  drinks  fairly  o|en,  to  
relieve  stress  from  her  work.  
 
You  no'ce  significant  scleral  icterus  while  Ms  T  is  talking  to  you.  
Case  5  
  Value   Reference  
  Hb   10.1  (L)   12  –  16  
  WBC   9.7   4  –  11    
  Platelets   371   150  –  400  

  RBC   3.8  (L)   4.0  –  5.2  


Hct   32  (L)   35  –  45  
 
MCV   95   80  –  100  
 
RDW   15.7   11  –  16  
 
MPV   10.1   9  –  12  
 
What  differen'als  are  there?  What  other  history  and  physical  
exam  findings  would  you  a>empt  to  elicit,  and  how  would  you  
con'nue  the  workup?  
Case  6  
Mr  Z  is  an  82  year  old  Indian  male,  who  was  referred  to  you  for  
abnormali'es  in  his  FBC  result.  He  is  a  poor  historian.  
 
His  case  notes  indicate  he  has  stage  2  colorectal  cancer  that  has  
since  been  resected  and  finished  chemotherapy  when  he  was  70  
years  old.  His  oncologist  on  follow-­‐up  does  not  note  any  
recurrence  of  his  primary  malignancy.  
 
He  has  other  PMHx  of  HTN  on  losartan  and  nifedipine,  and  DM  
on  me€ormin  and  glipizide.  Other  than  an  anterior  resec'on  for  
CRC,  he  has  undergone  an  appendectomy  and  hydrocele  
drainage  in  his  middle-­‐age,  as  well  as  a  bilateral  TKR  for  OA  
knees  about  10  years  ago.  
Case  6  
  Value   Reference  
  Hb   10.3  (L)   13  –  17  
  WBC   3.2  (L)   4  –  11    
  Platelets   138  (L)   150  –  400  

  RBC   3.9  (L)   4.3  –  5.8  


Hct   31  (L)   40  –  50  
 
MCV   82   80  –  100  
 
RDW   11.4   11  –  16  
 
MPV   8.5  (L)   9  –  12  
 
What  differen'als  are  there?  What  other  history  and  physical  
exam  findings  would  you  a>empt  to  elicit,  and  how  would  you  
con'nue  the  workup?  
References  
Clinical:  
•  Approaches  to  Symptoms  of  Disease  (v1  &  v2)  by  Nigel  Fong  
•  Up-­‐to-­‐Date  
•  Prior  set  of  seniors’  teaching  lecture  slides  by  Eugene  Gan  

Basic  Science:  
•  Fundamentals  of  Pathology  by  Husain  Sa>ar