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Naga City Montessori School

Grade School Department


Mayon Avenue, Naga City

Presented By:

Ma. Bless E. Del Rosario

Grade VI- Wisdom, Student


Photoshop Selection Tools Basic

Learn selection basics


Use a selection to edit part of an image.
What you learned: To make a selection and adjust only the selected area
A selection isolates part of an image so you can work on that area without affecting the
rest of the image.
1. In the Tools panel, select the Rectangular Marquee tool. Drag a rectangular selection onto the
image. The area inside the animated border represents your selection.
2. To select more, click the Add to selection icon in the options bar or press Shift and drag. To
select less, click the Subtract from selection icon in the options bar or press Alt (Windows) or
Option (macOS) and drag.
3. Select a layer you want to adjust. Then try applying some adjustments (Image > Adjustments).
With a selection active, adjustments affect only the selected area of that layer. The same is true if
you were to apply a filter, paint, fill, copy, or make other edits.
4. When you’re done, deselect by choosing Select > Deselect or pressing Control+D (Windows) or
Command+D (macOS).

Learn how to use the Quick Selection and Lasso tools


What you learned: Use the Quick Selection tool

1. In the Tools panel, select the Quick Selection tool.


2. Drag over an area you want to select. This tool tries to find image edges and automatically stops
the selection there.
3. After your initial selection, this tool automatically switches to its Add to Selection option. To
select more, drag over other areas.
4. To select less, hold the Alt key (Windows) or the Option key (macOS) as you drag over areas to
remove from the selection.
5. Experiment with adjusting the size and hardness of the Quick Selection tool in the options bar.

Use the Lasso tool


1. In the Tools panel, select the Lasso tool. This tool is useful for cleaning up a selection that you
started with another tool.
2. To add to a selection made with any tool press Shift and drag around the area you want to add.
3. To subtract from a selection, select the Subtract from selection option in the options bar or press
Alt (Windows) or Option (macOS) and drag around the area you want to remove.
4. Press Control+D (Windows) or Command+D (macOS) to deselect
Fine-tune a selection
To fine-tune a selection in the Select and Mask workspace
What you learned: To enhance a selection

1. Make a selection with a selection tool, like the Quick Selection tool.
2. In the options bar, click Select and Mask to open the Select and Mask workspace.
3. Go to the View menu on the right side of the workspace and choose one of the view options,
like Overlay, for a more accurate view of your selection. In Overlay view, the selected area is
clear and the non-selected area is translucent red by default.
4. In the Tools panel, select the Brush tool. Paint on the image where you want to add to the
selected area. If you want to subtract from the selected area press Alt (Windows) or Option
(macOS) and paint on the area to remove.
5. Scroll down on the right side of the workspace to the Output Settings > Output to menu, and
choose Selection as the output type.
6. Click OK to close the Select and Mask workspace.
PHOTOSHOP & PHOTOSHOP ELEMENTS TIPS

Adobe Photoshop Selection Tools


Adobe Photoshop also offers a number of selection tools: Quick Mask, Rectangular
marquee, Elliptical marquee, Lasso, Polygonal Lasso, Magnetic Lasso, Magic Wand.
The most efficient way to make a selection in Adobe Photoshop is to use Quick
Mask mode.
 Quick Mask mode
To switch from Standard mode to Quick Mask mode, press the button in the
lower part of the Toolbox or use a hot key Q .
Paint over the areas to be selected with a hard edge Brush (in Quick Mask mode
the selected area is highlighted in semi-transparent red)
Then switch back to Standard mode by pressing the button in the lower part of
the Toolbox and invert the selection using the command Select -> Inverse. It is
critical to invert the selection as in Quick Mask mode it is the unpainted area that
falls into the selection.

Note that if you set Selected Areas in the Quick Mask Options (opened by
double clicking on the Quick Mask button), you do not need to invert the
selection. Also, you can change the highlight color and its opacity here.

Hints on the Quick Mask Options::


Open the Options by double clicking on the Quick Mask button.
o if the "Masked Areas" option is active the areas non marked with red will
be selected
o if the "Selected Areas" option is active the areas marked with red will
be selected

The Rectangular marquee and Elliptical marquee tools are hidden in the Toolbox
under one and the same icon. The icon on the Toolbox displays the last tool used. To
open the floating menu right-click on the arrow in the lower right corner of the displayed
icon.
 Rectangular marquee
This tool selects rectangular and square areas.
To select a rectangular area you should:
Step 1. Activate the Rectangular marquee tool by clicking on the icon ,
or (if the Rectangular marquee was not the last tool applied) select it from
the floating window.
Step 2. Bring the mouse cursor to the point of the image where the corner
of an imaginary rectangle should be, and press the left mouse button.
Step 3. Keeping the left button pressed, move the cursor diagonally to the
opposite corner and release the button.
To select a square area of the image make a selection keeping the Shift key
pressed. Take into account that if you already have a selected area the new
selection will be added to the previous one. To avoid it you should press
the Shift key only when you start selecting a new area.

 Elliptical marquee
This tool selects ellipses and circles.
To select an elliptical area you should:
Step 1. Select the Elliptical marquee tool from the Toolbox by clicking on
the icon , or (if the Elliptical marquee was not the last tool applied)
select it from the floating window.
Step 2. Bring the mouse cursor to the point of the image where the corner
of an imaginary rectangle with an inscribed ellipse should be, and press the
left button.
Step 3. Keeping the left button pressed, move the cursor diagonally to the
opposite corner and release the button.
To select a circular area of the image make a selection keeping the Shift key
pressed. Take into account that if you already have a selected area the new
selection will be added to the previous one. To avoid it you should press
the Shift key only when you start selecting a new area.
If you keep the Alt ( Option in Mac) key pressed when selecting an elliptical or a
rectangular area, the selection is generated from the center to borders, not from
one corner to another.

The Lasso, Polygonal Lasso, Magnetic Lasso tools are hidden in the Toolbox under one
and the same icon. The icon on the Toolbox displays the last tool selected. To open the
floating menu right-click on the arrow in the lower right corner of the displayed icon.

 Lasso
The tool allows creating freehand selections.
To make a freehand selection you should:
Step 1. Select the Lasso tool from the Toolbox by left-clicking on the
icon , or (if Lasso was not the last tool applied) select it from the
floating window.
Step 2. Bring the mouse cursor to the object that must be selected and
outline it keeping the left button pressed.

 Polygonal Lasso
The tool makes freehand selections, but its contour is made up of straight
segments.
To make a selection you should:
Step 1. Select the Polygonal Lasso tool from the Toolbox by clicking on
the icon , or (if Polygonal Lasso was not the last tool applied) select it
from the floating window.
Step 2. Bring the cursor to any point near the object to be outlined and
press the left mouse button - it'll be the first point of the contour.
Step 3. Move the cursor to the next point of the contour not far from the
first one and left-click it again. The program will automatically draw a
straight line between the two points.
Step 4. Keep putting points in this way until the whole object is outlined
and close the contour.
 Magnetic Lasso
This tool makes a freehand selection.
When you use Magnetic Lasso you do not need to follow the contour of the object
precisely. If the object stands out against the background the border of the selected
area will be traced automatically as you move the cursor along the object.
To select an area using Magnetic lasso you should:
Step 1. Select the Magnetic Lasso tool from the Toolbox by clicking on the
icon , or (if Magnetic Lasso was not the last tool applied) select it from
the floating window.
Step 2. Bring the mouse cursor to the border of the object that should be
selected.
Step 3. Press the left button and start dragging the cursor along the object.
Pay attention to fastening points that appear as you outline the object and
when you male a click. If a fastening point is irrelevant you can remove it
by pressing the Delete key and return to the previous fastening point to
continue outlining the object.
Step 4. Close the contour, that is join the first fastening point with the last
one by bringing the cursor to the first point or by making a double-click.

 Magic Wand
This tool selects a consistently colored area. You can set Tolerance in the Options
palette of the Magic Wand tool. The higher is the value, the more colors will fall
into the selected area. The Tolerance value ranges from 0 to 255. At Tolerance
equal to 0 the selected area will be represented only by one color, at Tolerance
equal to 255 - all colors of the image will be selected, that is the whole image.
To select a consistently colored area, you should:
Step 1. Select the Magic Wand tool in the Toolbox by clicking the icon .
Step 2. Bring the cursor to the pixel of the image that must be included into the
selection and left-click it. As a result an outline appears around the pixel. It
includes colors of the image similar to the color of the selected pixel according to
the specified Tolerance value.

These selection tools are efficient due to the flexibility of their usage: you can add to,
subtract from or intersect a selection.
To add an area to the previous selection you should press the Shift key before you use a
selection tool and, keeping it pressed, make a new selection.
To subtract an area from the previous selection you should press the Alt ( Option in Mac)
key before you use a selection tool and, keeping it pressed, make a new selection.
If you press Shift and Alt ( Shift and Option in Mac) keys simultaneously you obtain an
intersection of the old and new selections.
Trivia about Computers

Computer?

You probably think about all the things you can do on it.

It can help you with homework, you can play games and you can easily find out
information that you need.

Or, you can book that next cool holiday all done from that nifty and clever device.

Here are some really cool facts about computers that you might be surprised at!

Enjoy!

The History of Computers


In 1833 a man by the name of Charles Babbage invented all the parts that are
now used for a modern computer. But it was only 120 years later that the first
‘modern’ computers were invented.

Konrad Zuse was the inventor of the first computer in the world in 1936 and he
named it the Z1.

In 1939, he created the Z2 as the first electro-mechanical computer in the world.


So computers were born, and these early computers were made in the 1940s
and were around the size of a large room and they used heaps of electricity.

Can you imagine having a computer the size of a large room? How would you be
able to sit in front of it?

Computers as we know them today only really started being made in 1980.

In 1980, the first one gigabyte disk drive was released in the world.

It was a whopping US$40,000 with the weight of 550 pounds (almost 227kg).
How on Earth did they move it?

What do Computers do?


Well, it’s literally a machine that takes what you put into it, and then gives you
some information back.

So you give it a command, just like you would your dog and it follows the
command to give you the result you want. Pretty awesome machines these are.

Computers have something called a microprocessor that can make calculations


super-fast.
They also have a memory, or what is referred to as RAM.

This stores all the information you need when you’re not using it.

It also keeps everything your computer needs to work nice and safe.

Computers have fans to keep them cool; otherwise they’ll get too hot.

Interesting Facts about Computers


Do you enjoy playing video games?

Well, there are two games that were the first ever made in the US called
Asteroids and Lunar Lander in 1980. Have you heard of them?

Over 6,000 computer viruses are released each month.

This is crazy! The first computer mouse ever made was made of wood.
Did you know that you blink up to 20 times a minute? Well this is quite
awesome…you only blink 7 times a minute when you’re using a computer!

Must be all that concentration.

This is pretty cool. If you open up the case of the original Macintosh, there are 47
signatures there, which are from each member of the Apple’s Macintosh division
in 1982.

The first Apple computer ever made by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak was
made from old parts they collected for free from their staff!

Facebook has over two billion users. If it was a country it would be the largest in
the world.
HP, Google, Microsoft and Apple all started out of garages. Wow, and look how
far they’ve come.

Stewardesses’ is the longest word you can type with one hand. Go on, give it a
try.

When you’re all grown up and working and you use a computer each day, your
hands would have travelled 12.6 miles (about 20km) per day!

We hope you’ve enjoyed our super-cool computer facts and you can wow your
friends about all your brand new knowledge!

Words You Need to Know


Electro Mechanical Computer – a computer that runs on electricity.

Gigabyte – this is a unit of computer information.

Microprocessor – a device in the computer that manages all that information and
controls what the computer does.

RAM – stands for Random Access Memory and this is the place on a computer
where everything that’s used all the time is stored and can be found quickly.
REFERENCES:

https://akvis.com/en/photoshop-tips/selection-tools.php

https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/how-to/selection-tools-basics.html