Sie sind auf Seite 1von 136

ADVA

ANCEED GA
AS TAN
NKER
R TRAINING
G    
  S
STUDE NT HA
ANDOU
UT 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                     Liquefied Gas 
“A liquid which has a saturated vapour pressure exceeding 2.8 bar absolute at 
37.8 deg C and certain other substances as listed in Chapter 19 of the IGC Code” 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

2
INDEX  
   
                                 TOPIC                                                                                  Page No  

 
General Definitions                          5 
 
Chapter 1: Physical and Chemical Properties of Gases                                             15 
 
Chapter 2: Hazards of Gas Cargoes                                                                               36 
 
Chapter 3: Safety on board Gas Carriers                                                                      48 
 
Chapter 4: Gas Codes, Types of Gas Carriers, Cargo Containment                         52                
                     Systems on board gas tankers and types of Gas carriers  
                     According to Hazard potential of the cargo being carried. 
 
Chapter 5: Cargo Instrumentation                                                                                63 
          
Chapter 6: Gas Detection Instruments                   77 
 
Chapter 7: Cargo Calculations                       82 
 
Chapter 8: Cargo Operations on board Gas Tankers               86 
 
Chapter 9: Documentation                               102 
 
Chapter 10: Care of Cargo during carriage at sea                105 
 
Chapter 11: ESD – Emergency Shut Down                           107 
 
Chapter 12: Occupational Health and Safety Precautions             115 
 
Chapter 13: The effect of bulk liquid on trim and stability and structural          124 
                      Integrity  
   
Chapter 14: Emergency Procedures                                                                            126 
 

3
INDEX  
   
                                 TOPIC                                                                        Page No  
 
Chapter 15: Fixed Fire Fighting Systems on gas carrier                                       130 
 
Chapter 16: Pre‐Cargo operations Meeting on board gas tanker                     135 
                       
Chapter 17: Importance of training on board gas tanker                                     136 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

4
General Definitions 
1) Absolute Pressure: The Absolute Pressure is the total of the gauge pressure plus the pressure of the 
surrounding atmosphere. 
 
2) Absolute Zero: The temperature at which the volume of the gas theoretically becomes zero and all 
thermal motion ceases. It is generally accepted as being ‐273.16deg C 
 
3) Absolute Temperature: The fundamental temperature scale with its zero at absolute zero and 
expressed in degrees Kelvin. 
 
4) Adiabatic: Describes an ideal process undergone by a gas in which no gain or loss of heat occurs. 
 
5) Aerating: Means the introduction of fresh air into a cargo tank with the objective of removing toxic 
hazardous and inert gases and increasing the oxygen content to 21 percent by volume. 
 
6) Airlock: A separation area used to maintain adjacent areas at a pressure differential. For 
example the airlock to an electric motor room on a gas carrier is used to maintain a pressure 
differential between a gas hazardous zone on the open deck and the gas – safe motor room 
which is pressurized. 
 
7) Auto Ignition Temperature: It is the lowest temperature to which the gas or liquid requires to be 
raised to cause self – sustained spontaneous combustion without ignition by a spark or a flame. 
 
8) Approved Equipment: Equipment of a design that has been type – tested by an appropriate 
authority or governmental agency or classification society. Such an authority will have certified the 
particular equipment safe for use in a specified hazardous atmosphere. 
 
9) Bar (G) – is the reading of pressure taken from the pressure gauge attached to a closed 
container which is not open to atmosphere. 
 
10) Bar (A) – is the total of the gauge pressure plus the pressure of the surrounding atmosphere. 
 
       Standard value of Atmospheric Pressure at sea level is 1.01325 bar. 
 
11) Bar (A) = Bar (G) + 1.01325 bar 
 
12) BLEVE: This is the abbreviation for Boiling Liquid Expanding vapour Explosion. It is associated with  
       the rupture, under fire conditions, of a pressure vessel containing liquefied gas. 
 
13)  Bubble Point: The bubble point of a liquid mixture, at a given pressure, is defined as that 
temperature at which the liquid will begin to boil as the temperature rises.  
 
 
 

5
14) Boil Off: Boil Off is the vapour produced above the surface of a boiling cargo due to heat ingress or a 
drop in pressure. 
 
15) Boiling Point : The temperature at which the vapour pressure of the liquid is equal to the pressure 
on its surface (The boiling point varies with pressure) 
 
16) Booster pump : A pump used to increase the discharge pressure from another pump ( such as a 
cargo pump ) 
 
17) Bulk cargo: Cargo carried as a liquid in cargo tanks and is not shipped in containers, drums or 
packages. 
 
18) Canister Filter Respirator: A respirator consisting of a mask and replaceable canister filter through 
which air mixed with toxic vapour which is inhaled by the wearer and in which the toxic elements 
are absorbed by the activated charcoal or other material. A filter for that specific toxic gas must be 
used by the wearer. These filters are replaceable and are only effective for that particular toxic gas. 
 
19) Carbamates: A white powdery substance produced by the reaction of ammonia with carbon dioxide. 
 
20) Carcinogen: A substance capable of causing cancer. 
 
21) Cargo Area: That part of the ship which contains the cargo containment system , cargo pumps, and 
compressor rooms and includes the deck area above the cargo containment system. Where fitted, 
cofferdams ballast tanks and void spaces at the after end of the aftermost hold space or the forward 
end of the forward most hold space are excluded from the cargo area. 
 
22) Cascade Reliquefaction Cycle: A process in which the vapour boil off from the cargo tanks is 
condensed in a cargo condenser in which the coolant is a refrigerant gas such as R22 or equivalent. 
This refrigerant gas is condensed and then passed through a conventional sea water cooled 
condenser. 
 
23) Cavitation:  A process occurring within the impeller of a centrifugal pump when the pressure at     
         the inlet of the impeller falls below that of the vapour pressure of the liquid being pumped. The   
         bubbles of vapour which are formed collapse with impulsive force in the higher pressure regions  
         of the impeller. This effect can cause significant damage to the impeller surfaces and  
         furthermore pumps may loose suction. 
 
24) Certificate of Fitness:  A Certificate issued by the Flag Administration confirming that the structure , 
equipment , fittings , arrangements and materials used in the construction of the gas carrier are in 
compliance with the relevant Gas Codes. 
 
25) Certified Gas Free: A tank or atmosphere is certified to be gas free when its atmosphere has been 
tested with an approved instrument and found in suitable condition by an independent chemist. 
This means that it is not deficient in oxygen and sufficiently free of toxic or flammable gas for a 
specified purpose. 

6
 
26) Coefficient of Cubical Expansion : The increment in volume of a unit volume of solid, liquid, or gas 
for a rise of temperature of 1° at constant pressure. Also known as coefficient of expansion; 
coefficient of thermal expansion; coefficient of volumetric expansion; expansion coefficient; 
expansivity.  
 
27) Compatibility of Gas Cargoes: Compatible cargoes are those substances which can be loaded 
consecutively without prior need to gas free the tanks. However, care must be taken to fully comply 
with Charter Party, shippers or other stated requirements for the cargo changeover, as these may 
require more stringent procedures. 
 
28) Compression Ratio: The ratio of the absolute pressure at the discharge from a compressor divided by 
the absolute pressure at the suction. 
 
29) Condensate: Reliquefied gas which is sent back to the cargo tank is called condensate. 
 
30) Critical Pressure: The Pressure at which a substance exists in its liquid state at its critical 
temperature. 
 
31) Critical Temperature: The temperature above which the gas cannot be reliquefied by pressure alone. 
 
32) Cryogenics: The study of the behavior of matter at very low temperature. 
 
33) Dangerous Cargo Endorsement : Endorsement issued by a Flag State administration to a Certificate 
         of Competency of a ships officer allowing service on dangerous cargo carriers such as oil tankers ,     
         chemical carriers or gas carriers. 
 
34) Deepwell Pump: A type of pump commonly found on gas carriers. The prime mover is usually an 
electric or hydraulic motor. The motor is usually mounted on top, outside of the cargo tank and 
drives via a long transmission shaft through a double seal arrangement, the pump assembly located 
at the bottom of the tank. The cargo discharge pipeline surrounds the drive shaft and the bearings 
are cooled and lubricated by the liquid being primed. 
 
35) Density: The mass per unit volume of a substance at specified conditions of temperature and 
pressure. 
 
36) Dew point: The temperature at which condensation will take place within a gas if further cooling 
occurs. 
 
37)  Diffusion and mixing of gases: Molecular diffusion, often simply called diffusion, is the thermal 
motion of all (liquid or gas) particles at temperatures above absolute zero. The rate of this 
movement is a function of temperature, viscosity of the fluid and the size (mass) of the particles.  
 
38) Enthalpy: Enthalpy is a thermodynamic measure of the total heat content of a liquid or vapour at a 
given temperature and is expressed in energy per unit mass (k Joules per 1 kg) from absolute zero. 

7
Therefore for a liquid /vapour mixture it will be seen that it is the sum of the enthalpy of the liquid 
plus the latent heat of vaporization.  Enthalpy is defined as the total energy content of the system. It 
is denoted by the letter H 
 
39) Entropy: Entropy is the measure of a system's thermal energy which is not available for conversion 
into mechanical work.  
 
40) Explosion‐ Proof/Flameproof Enclosure: An enclosure which will withstand an  internal    
        ignition of flammable gas and which will prevent the transmission of any flame able to  
        ignite a flammable gas which may be present in the surrounding  atmosphere. 
 
41) Flammable: Capable of being ignited. 
 
42) Flame Arrestor: A device fitted in gas vent pipelines to arrest the passage of flame into 
enclosed spaces. 
 
43) Flame Arrestor: A device fitted in gas vent pipelines to arrest the passage of flames into 
enclosed spaces. 
 
44) Flame screen: A device incorporating corrosion resistant wire meshes. It is used for 
preventing the inward passage of sparks (or for a short period of time the passage of flame) 
yet permitting the outward passage of gas. 
 
45) Flammable: Capable of being ignited. 
 
46) Flammable Range: The range of gas concentrations in air between which the mixture is 
flammable. This describes the range of concentrations between the LFL   (Lower Flammable 
Limit) and the UFL (Upper Flammable Limit). Mixtures within this range are capable of being 
ignited. 
 
47) Flash Point: The lowest temperature at which the liquid gives off sufficient vapour to form a 
flammable mixture with air near the surface of the liquid. The flash point temperature is 
determined by laboratory testing in a prescribed apparatus. 
 
48) Gas Codes: The Gas Codes are the Codes of construction and equipment for ships carrying 
liquefied gases in bulk. These standards are published by the IMO 
 
49) Gas – Dangerous Space or Zone : A space or zone ( defined by the Gas Codes ) within a ship’s 
cargo area which is designated as likely to contain flammable vapour  and which is not 
equipped with approved arrangements to ensure that its atmosphere is maintained in a safe 
condition at all times. 
 
50) Gas – free Certificate: A gas – free certificate is most often issued by an independent chemist 
to show that the tank has been tested, using approved equipments, and is certified to contain 

8
21 percent oxygen by volume and is sufficiently free from toxic, chemical and hydrocarbon 
gases for a specified purpose such as tank entry and hot work. 
 
51) Gas – free Condition: Gas‐ free condition describes the full gas‐ freeing process carried out in 
order to achieve a safe atmosphere. It therefore includes two distinct operations: Inerting and 
Aeration. 
 
52) Gas – Freeing : The removal of toxic and flammable gas from a tank or enclosed space 
followed by the introduction of fresh air 
 
53) Gassing – up : Gassing up means replacing an inert atmosphere in a cargo tank with cargo 
vapour of the next cargo to a suitable level in order to allow cool down of the cargo tank in 
order to load the next cargo in that cargo tank. 
 
54) Gas – Safe Space: A space on a ship not designated as a gas – dangerous space. 
 
55) Hard‐ Arm: An articulated metal arm used at terminal jetties to connect shore pipelines to the 
ships manifold. 
 
56) Heel: The amount of liquid retained in a cargo tank at the end of discharge. It is used in order 
to maintain the cargo tanks cooled down during ballast voyages by recirculating through the 
spray lines. 
 
57) Hold Space: The space enclosed by the ship’s structure in which a cargo containment system 
is fitted. 
 
58) Hydrates: The compounds formed by the reaction of water and hydrocarbons. They are 
crystalline substances similar in appearance to slush ice. 
 
59) Hydrate Inhibitors: An additive to certain liquefied gases which reduce the temperature at 
which hydrates are formed. Typical hydrate inhibitors are methanol, ethanol and isopropyl 
alcohol.  
 
60) Ignition Temperature: The lowest temperature at which a combustible substance when 
heated catches fire in air and continues to burn. 
 
61) Incendive Spark: A spark of sufficient temperature and energy to ignite a flammable gas 
mixed with the right proportion of air. 
 
62) Inert Gas: A gas such as nitrogen, or a mixture of non flammable gases containing insufficient 
oxygen to support combustion. 
 
63) Inerting: Inerting means the introduction of inert gas into a cargo tank in order to reduce 
hydrocarbon content in order to avoid entering the flammable range before aeration of that 
tank for man entry. 

9
 
64) Insulation Flange: An insulating device inserted between metallic flanges, bolts and washers 
to prevent electrical continuity between pipelines, sections of pipelines, hose strings and 
loading arms or other equipment. 
 
65) ISGOTT: International Safety Guide for Oil Tankers and Terminals. 
 
66) Isothermal: Descriptive of a process undergone by an ideal gas when it passes through 
pressure or volume variations without a change in temperature. 
 
67) Latent Heat: The heat required to cause a change in state of a substance from solid to liquid 
(Latent heat of Fusion) or from liquid to vapour (Latent heat of Vaporisation). These phase 
changes occur without a change in the temperature at the melting and boiling point. 
 
68) Latent Heat of Vaporization: Quantity of heat required to change the state of a substance 
from liquid to vapour state (or vice versa) without a change in temperature. 
 
69) Latent Heat of Fusion : Quantity of heat to change the state of a substance from solid state to 
liquid state without change of temperature  
 
70) LNG: This is the abbreviation for Liquefied Natural Gas. The principal constituent is Methane. 
 
71) Lower Flammable Limit: The concentration of hydrocarbon gas in air below which there is 
insufficient hydrocarbon gas to support combustion. 
 
72) LPG: This is the abbreviation for Liquefied Petroleum Gas. This group of products includes 
propane and butane which can be shipped separately or as a mixture. 
 
73) MARVS: This is the abbreviation for Maximum Allowable Relief Valve Setting on a ship’s cargo 
tank – as stated on the ship’s Certificate of Fitness. 
 
74) Mlc: This is the abbreviation for metres liquid column and is a unit of pressure in some cargo 
pumping operations. 
 
75) Mole: The mass that is numerically equal to the molecular mass. It is most frequently 
expressed as the gram molecular mass (gmole) but may also be expressed in other units such 
as the kg/mole. At the same pressure and temperature the volume of one mole is the same 
for all ideal gases. It is practical to assume that all petroleum gases are ideal gases. 
 
76)  Molecular Weight: Molecular mass or molecular weight is the mass of a molecule. It is 
calculated as the sum of the mass of each constituent atom multiplied by the number of 
atoms of that element. 
 
77) Mollier diagram: A graphic method of representing the heat quantities contained in, and the 
conditions of a liquefied gas (or refrigerant) at different temperatures. 

10
 
78) NGLs: This is the abbreviation for Natural Gas Liquids. These are the liquid components found 
in association with natural gas. Ethane, Propane, Butane, Pentane, and Pentanes‐plus are 
typical natural gas liquids. 
 
79) NPSH: This is the abbreviation for Net Positive Suction Head. This is an expression used in 
cargo pumping calculations. It is the pressure at the pump inlet and is the combination of the 
liquid head plus the pressure in the vapour space. 
 
80) OCIMF: Oil Companies International Marine Forum 
 
81) Oxygen Analyser: It is an instrument used on ships and gas carriers to measure the 
concentration of oxygen gas in percentage by volume. 
 
82) Oxygen – Deficient Atmosphere: An atmosphere containing less than 21 percent oxygen by 
volume. 
 
83) Partial – Pressure: The individual pressure exerted by a gaseous constituent in a vapour 
mixture as if the other constituents were not present. This pressure cannot be measured 
directly but is obtained firstly by analysis of the vapour and then by calculation using Dalton’s 
Law. 
 
84) Peroxide: A compound formed by the chemical combination of a cargo liquid or vapours with 
atmospheric oxygen or from another source. In some cases these compounds may be highly 
reactive or unstable and a potential hazard 
 
85) Polymerisation: The chemical union of two or more molecules of the same compound to 
form a larger molecule of the same compound is called polymerisation. The new molecule is 
called a polymer. By this mechanism the reaction can be self ‐ propogating causing liquids to 
become more viscous and the end result may even result in a solid substance. Such chemical 
reactions usually give off a great deal of heat. 
 
86) Primary Barrier: This is the inner surface designed to contain the cargo when the cargo    
      containment system contains a secondary barrier. 
 
87) R22: R22 is a refrigerant gas whose full name is monocholrodifluromethane and whose 
chemical formula is CHClF2.It is colourless odourless and non – fllammable.It is virtually non‐ 
toxic with a TLV of 1000 ppm. 
 
88) Reactivity : Reactivity in chemistry refers to the chemical reactions of a single substance as 
well as the chemical reactions of two or more substances that interact with each other 
 
89) Reference temperature: The temperature at which the density has been calculated. The 
International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) now defines the standard 
reference conditions as 0 °C and 100 kPa (rather than 0 °C and 101.325 kPa) . 

11
 
90) Relative Liquid Density: The mass of a liquid at a given temperature compared with the mass 
of an equal volume of fresh water at the same temperature or at a different given 
temperature.  
 
91) Refrigeration of Gases: The process of keeping a gas cargo below room temperature by 
storing the gas cargo in a system designed to cool. 
 
92) Reliquefaction: The procedure by which the boil off vapour is converted into liquid and then 
returned to the cargo tank on a gas carrier is known as Reliquefaction. 
 
93) Relative Vapour Density: The mass of vapour compared with the mass of an equal volume of 
air, both at standard conditions of temperature and pressure. 
 
94) Restricted Gauging: A system employing a device which penetrates the tank and which, when 
in use, permits a small quantity of cargo vapour or liquid to be expelled to the atmosphere. 
When not in use, the device is kept completely closed. 
 
95) Rollover : The phenomenon where the stability of two stratified layers of liquid of differing 
relative density is disturbed resulting in a spontaneous rapid mixing of the layers 
accompanied in the case of liquefied gases , by violent vapour evolution. 
 
96) Saturated Vapour Pressure: The pressure at which the vapour is in equilibrium with its liquid 
at a specified temperature. 
 
97) Secondary Barrier: The liquid ‐ resisting outer element of a cargo containment system 
designed to provide temporary containment of a leakage of liquid cargo through the primary 
barrier and to prevent the lowering of the temperature of the ship’s structure to an unsafe 
level. 
 
98) Sensible Heat: Heat energy given to or taken from a substance which raises or lowers its 
temperature. 
 
99) SI ( Systeme International) Units : An International accepted system of units modeled on the 
metric system consisting of units of length ( meter ) , mass ( kilogram) , time ( second) , 
electric current ( Ampere ) , temperature ( degrees Kelvin) and amount of substance (mole) 
 
100) SIGTTO: Society of International Gas Tanker and Terminal Operators Limited. 
 
101) Span Gas: A vapour sample of known composition and concentration used to calibrate gas 
detection equipment. 
 
102) Specific Gravity: The ratio of the density of a liquid at a given temperature to the density    
              of fresh water at a standard temperature. 
 

12
Temperature will affect volume and the comparison temperature must therefore be stated. E.g.: 
Specific Gravity 15/4 deg C – Substance at 15 deg C , water at 4 deg C . 
Specific Gravity 60/60 deg F – Substance and water at 60 deg F. 
 
103)  Specific Heat:  This is the quantity of heat in Kilo Joules required  to change the 
temperature of 1 kg mass of a substance by 1 deg C. For a gas the specific heat at constant 
pressure is greater than the specific heat at constant temperature. 
 
104)  Spontaneous Combustion: The ignition of a material brought about by a heat‐ producing 
chemical reaction within the material itself without exposure to an external source of ignition. 
 
105) Static Electricity: Static Electricity is the electric charge produced on dissimilar materials 
caused by relative motion between each when in contact. 
 
106)  Submerged Pump: A type of centrifugal pump commonly installed on gas carriers and in 
terminals at the bottom of the cargo tank. It comprises a drive motor, impeller and bearings 
totally submerged by the cargo when the tank contains bulk liquid. 
 
107)  Superheated Vapour: Vapour removed from contact with its liquid and heated beyond its 
boiling temperature. 
 
108)  Surge Pressure: A phenomenon generated in a pipeline system when there is a change in 
the rate of flow of liquid in the line. Surge pressures can be dangerously high if the change 
flow rate is too rapid and the resultant shock waves can damage the pumping equipment and 
cause rupture of pipelines and associated equipment. 
 
109) Toxicity Detector: An instrument used for the detection of gases or vapours . It works on 
the principle of a reaction occurring between the gas being sampled and a chemical agent in 
the apparatus. 
 
110)  TLV: This is the abbreviation for Threshold Limit Value. It is the concentration of gases in air 
to which personnel may be exposed 8 hours per day or 40 hours / week exposure throughout 
their working life without any adverse effect to the nervous system. The basic TLV is a Time 
Weighted Average (TWA). This may be supplemented by a TLV‐STEL (Short Term Exposure 
Limit) or TLV‐C (Ceiling Exposure Limit) which should not be exceeded even instantaneously. 
 
111)  Upper Flammable Limit: The concentration of hydrocarbon gas in the air above which 
there is insufficient air to support combustion. 
 
112) Vapour Density: The density of a gas or vapour under specified conditions of temperature 
and pressure. 
 
113)  Void Space :An enclosed space in the cargo area external to a cargo containment system     
           other than a hold space, ballast space, fuel oil tank, cargo pump room or compressor     
           room or any space in normal use by personnel. 

13
 
114) Vapour Pressure : Vapour pressure is the pressure exerted by the molecules of vapour on 
the liquid surface at a given temperature 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

14
Chapter 1: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF GASES 
 
STATES OF MATTER

Most substances can exist in either the solid, liquid or vapour state. In changing from solid to
liquid (fusion) or from liquid to vapour (vaporization), heat must be given to the substance.

Similarly, in changing from vapour to liquid (condensation) or from liquid to solid (solidification),
the substance must give up heat.

The heat given to or given up by the substance in changing state is called latent heat. For a given
mass of the substance the latent heats of fusion and solidification are the same.

Similarly, the latent heats of vaporization and of condensation are the same, although of different
values from the latent heat of fusion or solidification.

 
 

15
What are Physical and Chemical Properties? 

Sounds like a complicated question! It's not if you break it down. What are properties? 
Properties are attributes, qualities or characteristics of something. Properties are used to identify 
elements. Properties are the characteristics of a substance which distinguishes it from another 
substance. 

 In chemistry these properties are called Physical properties and Chemical properties. Most 
common substances exist as solids, liquids and gases which have diverse physical and chemical 
properties. Matter can undergo physical and chemical changes . 

What are Physical Properties? 
Physical properties are those characteristics that can be observed without changing the 
substance into another substance. 

Physical properties of matter are usually those that can be observed using our senses. The 
observations usually consist of some type of numerical measurement. Examples of Physical 
properties include Color, Freezing point, Boiling point, Melting point, Density and Smell. 

What are Chemical Properties? 
Chemical properties are the characteristics that determine how it will react with other substances 
or change from one substance to another. 

Chemical properties, or characteristics, which are exhibited as one substance and then chemically 
transformed into another. 

Chemical properties are only observable during a chemical reaction. 

Examples of chemical properties are: Flammability (the ability to catch on fire), Toxicity (the 
ability to be poisonous), Radioactivity (giving off ionizing radiation), Heat of combustion (amount 
of heat released when the substance is completely burned), Reactivity with water (what happens 
when a substance reacts with water), Reactivity with acids (what happens when a substance 
reacts with an acid), Oxidation (the combination of a substance with oxygen). 

16
 
Propane 
======= 
At normal temperature and pressure Propane is a gas vapour that boils at ‐42 Deg C. 
As a liquid it looks a lot like water. It is colourless and odourless in its natural state. 
In its natural state Propane is an odourless gas. Caution should be exercised when handling 
Propane because it is very cold and causes severe cold burn on exposed skin. 
Unlike water the specific gravity of Propane is about half that of water at 0.51. Propane expands 
to about 270 times when it goes from liquid to Gas. In the presence of sufficient amount of 
oxygen Propane burns to form water vapour and carbon dioxide. 
 
Ammonia 
======== 
Ammonia is a colourless odourless liquid with a pungent odour. The vapours of ammonia are 
flammable and burn with a bright yellow flame, forming water vapour and nitrogen. The 
flammable range for ammonia is much higher and the concentration of ammonia vapour in air 
concentration or flammable range is between 14 – 28 percent. 
Ammonia is toxic and highly reactive it can form explosive compounds with mercury, chlorine, 
bromine, iodine, silver oxide, calcium, and silver hypochlorite.  
 
Ammonia vapor is extremely soluble in water. One volume of water will absorb 200 volumes of 
ammonia vapour and can very easily result in a vacuum situation in a cargo tank. Hence care 
must be taken at all times to not introduce water vapour into cargo tank containing ammonia 
vapour at all costs. Ammonia is alkaline in nature and hence ammonia / air mixtures can cause 
stress corrosion cracking. (Stress corrosion cracking is defined as cracking in a cargo containment 
system where typically fine cracks maybe formed in many directions) 
Because of ammonia’s highly reactive nature, copper alloys, aluminium alloys, galvanized 
surfaces, phenolic resins, polyvinylchloride, polyesters and viton rubbers are unsuitable for 
ammonia service. Mild steel, stainless steel, neoprene rubber and polythene are however 
suitable. 
 
 
Chlorine 
======= 
Chlorine is a much less carried cargo and is restricted to special ships. It is a yellow liquid which 
evolves a green vapour. It has a pungent and irritating odour and is highly toxic. It is non‐
flammable but it can support combustion of other flammable materials in much the same way as 
oxygen. It is soluble in water forming a highly corrosive acidic solution and can form dangerous 
reactions with all other liquefied gases. In moist conditions because of its corrosivity it is difficult 
to contain. Dry Chlorine is compatible with mild steel, stainless steel, and copper. Chlorine is very 
soluble in caustic soda solution which can be used to absorb chlorine vapour. 
 
 
 

17
 
Physical Properties of a few Liquefied Gases (Summarised in a Tabular Form) 
 
 

Gas Atmosph Critical Critical Liquid relative


eric temperatur pressure density Vapour relative
boiling e (bars, at Atm. Boiling density
point (°C) absolute) Pt. (Water = 1) (Air = 1)

Methane -161.5 -82.5 44.7 0.427 0.554

Ethane - 88.6 32.1 48.9 0.540 1.048

Propane - 42.3 96.8 42.6 0.583 1.55

n-Butane - 0.5 153 38.1 0.600 2.09

Vinyl
- 13.8 158.4 52.9 0.965 2.15
chloride
Ethylene
10.7 195.7 74.4 0.896 1.52
oxide
Propylene
34.2 209.1 47.7 0.830 2.00
oxide

Ammonia -33.4 132.4 113.0 0.683 0.597

Chlorine - 34 144 77.1 1.56 2.49


 
 
 
 
 
Liquefied Gas    Vapour Pressure at 37.8 Deg C      Boiling Point at Atmospheric Pressure 
(Bars absolute)                                         ( Deg C ) 
1)  Methane      Gas                     ‐161.5 
2)  Propane      12.9            ‐42.3                            
3) n‐Butane                   3.6            ‐0.5                                     
4) Ammonia                                14.7            ‐33.4      
5) Vinyl Chloride      5.7            ‐13.7 
6) Butadiene                  4.0             ‐5                                            
7) Ethylene Oxide     2.7            +10.7 

18
 
 
CHEMICAL STRUCTURE OF GASES 
 
Hydrocarbons are those substances that contain only hydrogen and carbon atoms. 
 
The arrangement of the atoms can vary and the resultant substance may be either a solid liquid 
or gas at ambient temperature and pressure, depending upon the number of carbon atoms in the 
molecular structure. 
 
Generally substances with up to four carbon atoms are gaseous at ambient temperature and 
pressure. As the number of carbon atoms increase from five to about twenty the substance is in a 
liquid state and when more than twenty carbon atoms are present in the arrangement the 
substance is a solid. 
 
A  Carbon atom has four valence electrons and hence can form four bonds with other atoms. A 
Hydrogen atom however has only one valence electron and can only form one bond with another 
atom. The bonds that can be formed between the two atoms in such cases are either single or 
double bonds. 
 
When one single carbon atom forms four single bonds with four hydrogen atoms we call this a 
“saturated hydrocarbon”. In this case the resultant gas is methane. 
The formula for a saturated hydrocarbon is CnH (2n + 2) where n is the number of carbon atoms. 
Examples of other saturated hydrocarbons besides Methane (CH4) are: ‐ Ethane (C2H6) and 
Propane (C3H8) 
 
However when there is less than the full complement of hydrogen atoms as given by the above 
formula then two or more carbon atoms become interlinked by double and triple bonds. For this 
reason they are called unsaturated hydrocarbons. In this case the links between the carbon 
atoms are weaker than the single bonds with the result that the compounds are chemically more 
reactive than the single – bonded compounds. Examples of unsaturated hydrocarbons are 
Ethylene (C2H4), Propylene (C3H6) and Butadiene (C4H6). 
 
The third group of liquefied gases is the chemical gases. These are characterized by additional 
atoms other than carbon and hydrogen. Examples are Propylene Oxide (C3H6O) and Vinyl 
Chloride (C2H3Cl). Most Compounds in this group are chemically reactive. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

19
 
 
Saturated Hydrocarbons: 
====================== 
The saturated hydrocarbons methane, ethane, propane and butane are all colorless odorless 
liquids. They are all flammable gases and will burn in air to produce carbon dioxide and water 
vapour. They do not present chemical compatibility problems when in contact with construction 
materials commonly encountered in gas handling. In the presence of moisture the saturated 
hydrocarbons form hydrates. 
 
 
 
Un ‐ Saturated Hydrocarbons: 
=========================== 
The unsaturated hydrocarbons like ethylene, propylene, butylene, butadiene and isoprene are 
colorless liquids with a faint sweetish odour. Like the saturated hydrocarbons they are all 
flammable in air or oxygen producing carbon dioxide and water vapour. They are more reactive 
from a chemical viewpoint than the saturated hydrocarbons and may react dangerously with 
chlorine. Ethylene, propylene and butylenes do not present chemical compatibility problems with 
materials of construction whereas butadiene and isoprene each having two pairs of double bonds 
are the most reactive in this family. They may react with air to form unstable peroxides which 
tend to induce polymerization  
 
Chemical Gases: 
============== 
The third group of liquefied gases consists of the chemical gases. These are characterized by 
additional atoms other than carbon and hydrogen. Most compounds in this group are 
chemically reactive. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

20
 

 
 
Molecular structure of saturated hydrocarbons – Single bond 
 

 
 
Molecular structure of Unsaturated Hydrocarbons – Double bond 
 
 

 
 
Molecular structure of some Chemical gases. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

21
 
Chemical Properties of some Liquefied Gases. 
 

Vinyl chloride 
Butadiene 
Propylene 

Propylene 
Ammonia 
Methane 

Ethylene 
Butylene 

Isoprene
Ethylene 

Chlorine 
Propane 

Butane 
 

Ethane 

oxide 

oxide 
 
 

 
Flammable  X  x  x  X  X  x  X  X  x X  x  x  X   

Toxic                X    x  x  x  X  x 

Polymerisable                x  x   x  x     
 
 
 
Reactive with 
Magnesium                X  X      X  X   

Mercury                X  X  X    X  X  X 
Zinc                    X        x 
Copper                X  X  X    X  X   
Aluminium                X  X  X  X  X  X  x 
Mild carbon  X        X                   
l
Stainless steel                        X     
Iron                        X  X   
PTFE*                    X         
PVC+                    X         
Polyethylene  X  X  X  X      X               
Ethanol                            x 
Methanol                            x 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

22
 
Chemical compatibilities of liquefied gases          X = incompatible 

Ethylene oxide

Carbon dioxide
Oxygen or Air
Vinyl chloride

Water vapour
Propylene
Ammonia
Propylene

Butadiene
Ethylene

Chlorine
Butylene
Methane

Isoprene
Propane
Ethane

Butane

oxide
Methane X
Ethane X
Propane X
Butane X
Ethylene X
Propylene X
Butylene X
Butadiene X X X
Isoprene X X X
Ammonia X X X X
Vinyl X X
hl id
Ethylene X X
Propylene
X
oxide
Chlorine X X X X X X X X X X X X
Water X X X
Oxygen or X X X X
i
Carbon X
dioxide
 
                      
 
Positive Segregation of Gas Cargo: When common pipeline systems are provided for various 
cargo‐related operations, contamination will occur when different grades of cargo are carried 
simultaneously. If segregation is needed to avoid cargo contamination, shippers’ instructions and 
regulatory requirements must be observed. If a common piping system has to be used for 
different cargoes, great care should be taken to ensure complete drainage and drying of the 
piping system before purging with new cargo. Wherever possible, separate reliquefaction 
systems should be used for each cargo. However, if there is a danger of chemical reaction, it is 
necessary to use completely segregated systems, known as positive segregation, at all times, 
utilizing removable spool pieces or pipe sections. This restriction should apply equally to liquid, 
vapour and vent lines as appropriate. Whilst positive segregation may be acceptable for most 
cargoes, some substances may require totally independent piping systems. 

23
FLAMMABILITY OF LIQUEFIED GASES 
 
All liquefied gases are Flammable. Every Liquefied Gas has a unique Flammable Range.  
 
It is the vapour given off by a liquid and not the liquid itself which burns.  A mixture of vapour and 
air cannot be ignited unless the proportions of vapour and air lie between two concentrations 
known as the Lower Flammable Limit (LFL) and the Upper Flammable Limit (UFL).  The limits vary 
according to the cargo.  Information about the Flammable Range for a particular gas cargo can be 
found out from the Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for that gas cargo. Concentrations below 
the lower limit (too lean) or above the upper limit (too rich) cannot burn.   
 
However, it is important to remember that concentrations above the upper limit can be made to 
burn by diluting them with air until the mixture is within the flammable range, and that pockets 
of air may exist in the system, leading to the creation of a flammable mixture. 
 
A liquid has to be at a temperature above its flash point before it evolves sufficient vapour to 
form a flammable mixture.  Many liquefied gas cargoes are flammable, and since they are 
shipped at temperatures above their flash points flammable mixtures can be formed. 
 
Fire is prevented by ensuring that at least one of these three elements is excluded. 
 
In the presence of a flammable substance, sources of ignition or oxygen should be excluded.  
Oxygen can be restricted to a safe level within the cargo system by keeping the pressure above 
atmospheric pressure with cargo vapour or inert gas.  Many sources of ignition are eliminated 
during the design stage and care should be taken to ensure that design features are not impaired 
in any way.   
 
Where sources of ignition and oxygen are likely to be present, such as in accommodation, engine 
and boiler rooms, galley, motor rooms etc., it is vital to exclude flammable vapour.  Particular 
care is necessary if there is a direct connection between the engine room the cargo system (e.g. 
when cargo vapour is burnt as fuel), or if the inert gas plant is located in the engine room. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

24
Flammability Diagram

The purpose of the Flammability Diagram is to enable procedures to be developed for avoiding 
flammable mixtures in the cargo system at all times. 

Diagram no 1

(Diagram courtesy – Tanker Safety Guide Liquefied Gases)

Every point on the diagram represents a mixture of air, flammable vapour and inert gas, specified 
in terms of its flammable vapour and oxygen content.  Air and flammable vapour mixtures 
without inert gas lie on the line AB, the slope of which reflects the reduction in oxygen content as 
the flammable vapour content increases (i.e. at 50% air and 50% cargo vapour, oxygen is 10.5 % 
of tank atmosphere).  Points to the left of the line AB represent mixtures in which the oxygen 
content is further reduced by the addition of inert gas. 
 
The lower and upper flammability limits for mixtures of flammable vapour and air are 
represented by the points C and D. As the inert gas content increases so the flammable limits 
change, as indicated by the lines CE and DE, which finally converge at the point E. Only those 
mixtures represented by points in the shaded area within the loop CED are capable of burning. 
 

25
It is evident from Diagram no 1 that as inert gas is added to flammable vapour and air mixtures 
the flammable range decreases until the oxygen content reaches a level at which no mixture can 
burn. 
 
On such a diagram, changes in the composition of the tank atmosphere are represented by 
movements along straight lines.  When adding air the line is directed towards point A, at which 
only pure air is left in the tank.  When adding inert gas the line is directed towards a point on the 
x‐axis corresponding to the oxygen content of the inert gas, at which only inert gas is left in the 
tank (and in the case of nitrogen will be 0%).  These lines shown in Diagram no 1 are for an 
inerted mixture with concentrations corresponding to point F. When such an inerted mixture is 
diluted by air its composition moves along the line FA and therefore enters the shaded area of 
flammable mixtures. 
Diagram no 2 shows that a point G can be established from which a line GA will separate all 
mixtures (above and to the right, including point F) which will pass through a flammable 
condition as they are mixed with air during a gas‐freeing operation, from those mixtures which 
will not become flammable on dilution with air (those below and to the left of line GA, including 
point H).  The line GA is called a line of critical dilution.  Note that it is possible to move from 
mixtures such as at point F to one such as at point H by dilution with additional inert gas.  
Likewise there is a line of critical dilution when inerting a cargo vapour atmosphere or purging a 
tank with cargo vapour and this line is JB; mixtures above and to the right of the line JB go 
through a flammable condition, mixtures below and to the left of the line JB do not. 

Diagram no 2

 
(Diagram courtesy – Tanker Safety Guide Liquefied Gases)

26
It can be seen that an initial oxygen content of less than J% will ensure that no flammable 
mixtures are formed when purging with cargo vapour and an initial cargo vapour content of less 
than C% will prevent the formation of flammable mixtures when gas‐freeing with air.   
 
In practice a safety factor of 2 is adopted to account for less than perfect mixing, equipment error 
etc.  Therefore, the cargo vapour concentration in the cargo system after inerting should not 
exceed (G/2) % before gas‐freeing begins and the oxygen concentration should be below (J/2) % 
after inerting before purging with cargo vapour.   
 
Although a safety factor of 2 is adopted, every effort should be made to ensure that the inerting 
and purging operations are carried out properly using correct equipment and procedures, and 
accurately calibrated gas detection equipment. 
 
We must always refer to the Material Safety Data Sheet of the Cargo to find out the Flammable 
Range of that cargo. 

 
 
 
 
Polymerisation 
 
The chemical union of two or more molecules of the same compound to form a larger molecule of a new 
compound called a polymer. By this mechanism the reaction can become self‐propagating causing liquids 
to become more viscous and the end result may even be a solid substance. Such chemical reactions 
usually give off a great deal of heat  
               

               
Polymerisation of Vinyl Chloride 
 
Polymerisation may be prevented, or at least the rate of polymerisation may be reduced, by 
adding a suitable inhibitor to the cargo. However, if polymerisation starts, the inhibitor will be 
consumed gradually until a point is reached when polymerisation may continue unchecked. In the 
case of butadiene, tertiary butyl catechol (TBC) is added primarily as an anti‐oxidant but, in the 
absence of oxygen, it can also act, to a limited extent, as an inhibitor. Inhibitors can be toxic. 

27
Those most commonly used are hydroquinone (HQ) and TBC. Care should be taken when 
handling inhibitors and cargoes with inhibitor added. 
 
Ships' personnel should ensure that an Inhibitor Information Form is received from the cargo 
shipper before departure from the loading port.  
 
 
  This certificate should provide the information shown in the figure below:‐           

                 

In addition, the quantity of inhibitor required for effective inhibition and the toxic properties of 
the inhibitor should be advised. 
 
A similar but more difficult reaction to control is known as dimerisation. This cannot be stopped 
by inhibitors or any other means. The only way to avoid or slow down dimerisation is to keep the 
cargo as cool as possible and such cooling is recommended, especially during longer voyages. 

28
ID
DEAL GAS  
 
An ideaal gas is one which obeyys the gas laws by virtue
e of its mole
ecules beingg so far apartt that 
thhey exert noo force on on
ne another.
 
no such gas e
 In fact, n exists, but att room temp
perature andd at moderate pressuress many non‐‐
saturated d gases apprroach the co most practical purposes. 
oncept for m
 
The ideal gas laws go overn the relationships bbetween abssolute pressure, volumee and absolutte 
temperatture for a fixxed mass of gas. The relaationship beetween two of these varriables is 
common nly investigatted by keeping the third variable constant.  
 
IDEA
AL GAS LAW
WS 
 
Boyle’s Law: Boylee's Law statees that, at coonstant tem
mperature, th
he volume o
of a fixed maass of 
gas varie
es inversely wwith the abssolute presssure.  
 
This relattionship can be written as PV = Consstant or P1V V1 = P2V2 
 
 
Charless' Law:  Charles' Law staates that, att constant pressure, thee volume of a fixed masss of 
gas incre
eases by 1/2 273 of its vollume at 0°C for each deggree Centigrrade rise in ttemperature. 
 
This law can be writtten as V/T = Constant orr V1/T1 = V2//T2 
 
The Pre essure Law w: The Pressuure Law stattes that, at cconstant volume, the prressure of a fixed 
mass of ggas increasees by 1/273 o of its pressu
ure at 0°C fo
or each degre
ee Centigradde rise in 
temperature. 
 
This law can be writtten as P/T = Constant or P1/T1 = P2//T2 
 
 
 
Diagrammaatically the laws can be described ass follows: 

 
 

29
THERMODYNAMIC GAS LAWS 
 
The Zero (th) Law: It introduces the concept of thermal equilibrium between bodies.  
     It states that, if a body “A” is in thermal equilibrium with body “B” and body “B” is also in 
thermal equilibrium with body “C”, then body “A” is also in thermal equilibrium with body “C”. 
 
 
The First Law: It states that, the heat lost from a source is equal to the total heat gained and 
work done on the bodies. ΔU = Q + W (j)  
 
The Second Law: It states that, heat always flows from a hot body to a cooler one. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

30
RELIQUEFACTION 

 
CRITICAL TEMPERATURE and CRITICAL PRESSURE 
“Critical Temperature” of a gas is the temperature above which the gas cannot be reliquefied no 
matter how great the pressure. The “Critical Pressure” of a gas is the pressure required to 
compress the gas to its liquid state at the critical temperature. 
 
Critical Temperatures of some of the common liquefied gases carried at sea are listed below 
along with their critical pressures. 
 
Name of gas                  Critical Temperature                          Critical Pressure 
            (°C)                (Bars, absolute) 
 
Methane          ‐82.5          44.7 
Ethane                       32.1          48.9 
Propane           96.8          42.6 
N‐Butane           153            38.1 
I‐Butane           133.7          38.2 
Ethylene           9.9          50.5 
Propylene          92.1          45.6 
Vinyl Chloride                     158.4          52.9 
Ethylene Oxide        195.7          74.4 
Propylene Oxide        209.1          47.7 
Ammonia          132.4          113.0 
Chlorine          144          77.1 
 
As will be seen from the data above, with the exception of methane gas, all the gases can be 
liquefied by pressure alone within the normal ambient range. 
 
In the case of LNG carriers, boil off is seldom an option, although presently LNG carriers are being 
constructed with partial reliquefaction of boil off. The rest of the boil off is burnt off in the ships 
boilers and is used as a fuel.   
As liquefied gases are carried at or near their boiling point there is always a build up of cargo 
vapour inside the cargo tank. In order to maintain the tank pressures below the MARVS of the 
safety relief valves the cargo vapour is reliquefied and the cold low temperature liquid 
condensate is returned back to the cargo tank. This process is called “Reliquefaction”. 
Reliquefaction of the cargo needs to be carried out depending upon the properties of that gas 
cargo. 
       
 
 
 

31
Single‐Stage Compression  
 
 

Schematic Mollier Chart – Single Stage Direct


Compression Cycle
      
          (Diagram courtesy – Tanker Safety Guide – Liquefied Gases)  
 
Boil‐off vapour (1) is taken from the cargo tank to the compressor (2) via a liquid separator; any 
liquid in the vapour would damage the compressor.  The compressor is used to increase the 
temperature of the vapour so that a sea‐water condenser can be used.  The superheated vapour 
from the compressor (3) is condensed to an ambient temperature liquid in a sea‐water cooled 
condenser (4), and is collected in a collecting vessel, known as a condensate receiver, before 
being passed through an expansion valve (5) to cool it.  The flow through the expansion valve is 
controlled by a level switch in the collecting vessel to prevent back‐pressure from the cargo tank 
reaching the condenser and compressor.                                                                                        The 
throttling (expansion) valve is designed to ensure that there is sufficient pressure to press the 
liquid into the cargo tank. 

This simple system can be used aboard semi‐pressurised ships for high boiling point cargoes. 
 

32
Two‐Stage Compression  

If the compressor discharge‐to‐suction pressure ratio in a single stage system exceeds about 6:1 
the efficiency of the machine is reduced and two stage compression is necessary.  This can take 
place in two separate machines or in one two‐stage compressor. 
 
The first part of the two‐stage cycle is the same as the single‐stage cycle.  Boil‐off (1) is taken 
from the tank via a liquid separator to the first‐stage compressor (2) where it is superheated (3).   
The vapour can then be cooled in an interstage cooler (or "intercooler") (4) before passing to the 
second stage compressor.  The purpose of the intercooler is to reduce the suction pressure of th 
 second stage and increase efficiency; it is essential for a cargo such as fully refrigerated  
ammonia. 
 
The second compression further superheats the vapour (5) which is then cooled and condensed 
in a sea‐ water cooled condenser (6).  The ambient temperature liquid is then collected and  
passed through the expansion valve (8) as in the single stage cycle.  Before the expansion valve,  
the condensed liquid can be used as the intercooler coolant (7). 
 
This system can be used for semi‐pressurised and fully refrigerated LPG ships. 

Two Stage Compression Cycle  
 
(Diagram courtesy – Tanker Safety Guide – Liquefied Gases)  

33
Hydrate Formation 
 
Propane and Butane may form hydrates under certain conditions of temperature and pressure in 
the presence of free water. 
 
This water may be present in LPG as an impurity or may be extracted from cargo tank bulkheads 
if rust is present. Rust which has been dehydrated in this way by LPG loses its powers of adhesion 
to tank surfaces and may settle to the tank bottom as a fine powder. 
 
LPG hydrates are white crystalline solids which may block filters and reliquefaction regulating 
valves. Furthermore they may damage cargo pumps. Hydrate inhibitors such as methanol or 
ethanol may be added at suitable points in the system but nothing whatsoever should be added 
without the consent of the shipper and ship operator. It should be noted that in some countries 
the use of methanol is banned.  
 
In addition, some chemical gases may be put off specification by the addition of methanol. Care 
must be taken if a hydrate inhibitor is added to a polymerisable cargo as the polymer inhibition 
mechanism may be negated. 

Since methanol is toxic, care should be taken regarding its safe handling. 
 
LUBRICATION OF COMPRESSORS 

Liquefied hydrocarbon gases can dissolve in lubricating oil and, for certain applications, such
admixture can result in inadequate lubrication of pump seals and compressors. The solvent action
of liquefied gases on grease can cause the degreasing of mechanical parts with similar loss of
lubrication in fittings such as valves.

In addition to low viscosity, liquefied gas has relatively poor cooling properties and liquids are not
able to carry heat away from a shaft bearing very effectively. Any excessive heat will result in a
relatively rapid rise in temperature of the bearing. (Specific heat of propane is about half that of
water). Under these circumstances, the liquid will vaporise when its vapour pressure exceeds the
product pressure in the bearing.

The vapour will expel liquid from the bearing and result in bearing failure due to overheating. This
is the cause of compressor lubricating problems.

It should also be noted that the lubricating oil used in a compressor must be compatible with the
grade of cargo being carried.

34
Factors affecting lubrication 

Liquid Lub oil Water Propane


(temperature) (at +70°C) (at +100°C) (at-45°C)
 
Viscosity (centipoise) 28.2 0.282 0.216
 
 
  Specific Heat (k cal/kg °C) 0.7 1.0 0.5
 
  Latent Heat of Vaporisation
  35 539 101
(k cal/kg)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

35
Chapter 2: HAZARDS OF GAS CARGOES  
 
The Hazards associated with Liquefied Gas Cargoes can be grouped into the following main 
categories:  
 
1) EXPLOSION AND FLAMMABILITY  
2) HEALTH 
3) TOXICITY  
4) REACTIVITY 
5) CORROSIVITY 
6) SPILLAGE 
7) POLYMERISATION 
8) INERT GAS COMPOSITION 
9) STATIC ELECTRICITY. 

 
We shall discuss each one more in detail but in dealing with any hazard on board the gas carrier 
the general approach is as follows: 
1) Hazard Control 
2) Hazard Removal and finally  
3) Reliance on Personal Protective Equipment. 
 
 
HAZARD DUE TO FLAMMABILITY AND EXPLOSION 
================================================== 
All Gas cargoes are “flammable”, they are capable of being ignited .Every Gas Cargo has a unique 
“Flammable Range” . The Flammability data for a particular gas cargo  is stated in the   “Cargo 
Data Sheet” for that particular gas cargo. 
 
For example as shown below the “Flammable Limits” for Propane LPG are 2‐ 10% by volume as 
obtained from the MSDS sheet for this Gas Cargo. 
 

 
 

36
The concept of a flammable range gives a measure of the proportions of flammable vapour to air 
for combustion to occur. The flammable range is the range between the minimum and maximum 
concentrations of vapour (per cent by volume) in air which form a flammable mixture. The lower 
and upper limits are usually abbreviated to LFL (lower flammable limit) and UFL (upper 
flammable limit).  
 

All the liquefied gases, with the exception of chlorine, are flammable but the limits of the 
flammable range vary depending on the particular vapour. These are listed in the table. The 
flammable range of a vapour is broadened in the presence of oxygen in excess of that normally 
found in air.  

 
Ignition properties for liquefied gases 
Liquefied Gas  Flash Point (°C)  Flammable range (%  Auto‐ignition 
    by vol. in air)  temperature (°C) 

Methane  ‐175  5.3‐14  595 

Ethane  ‐125  3.0‐12.5  510 


Propane  ‐105  2.1‐9.5  468 
n‐Butane  ‐ 60  1.5‐9.0  365 
i‐Butane  ‐ 76  1.5‐9.0  500 
Vinyl Chloride  ‐ 78  4.0‐33.0  472 
Ethylene oxide  ‐ 18  3.0‐100  429 
Propylene oxide  ‐ 37  2.1‐38.5  465 
Ammonia  ‐ 57  14‐28  615 
Chlorine  Non‐flammable 

          Flammability range in air and oxygen for some liquefied gases 
  Flammable range (% by volume) 
  (in air)  (in oxygen) 
Propane  2.1‐9.5  2.1‐55.0 
n‐Butane  1.5‐9.0  1.8‐49.0 
Vinyl Chloride  4.0‐33.0  4.0‐70.0 
 

37
Flash Point 
The flash point of a liquid is the lowest temperature at which that liquid will evolve sufficient 
vapour to form a flammable mixture with air.  
 
Auto‐ignition Temperature 
The auto‐ignition temperature of a substance is the temperature to which its vapour‐in‐air 
mixture must be heated to ignite spontaneously.  

Flammability within Vapour Clouds 
Should a liquefied gas be spilled in an open space, the liquid will rapidly evaporate to produce a 
vapour cloud which will gradually disperse downwind. The vapour cloud or plume is flammable 
only over part of its area. 

 
Flammable vapour zones — a liquefied gas spill 
 
The region (B) immediately adjacent to the spill area (A) is non‐flammable because it is over‐rich. 
It contains too low a percentage of oxygen to be flammable. Region (D) is also non‐flammable 
because it is too lean; containing too little vapour to be flammable. The flammable zone lies 
between these two regions as indicated by (C). 

SUPPRESSION OF FLAMMABILITY BY INERT GAS 

Whereas increasing the oxygen concentration in a flammable mixture causes a broadening of the 
flammable range and a lowering of the energy necessary for ignition, decreasing the oxygen 
causes the flammable range to be narrowed and the minimum ignition energy to be increased. If 
the oxygen availability is reduced to a sufficient extent, the mixture will become non‐flammable 
no matter what the combustible vapour content may be. Figure below illustrates this concept for 
typical hydrocarbon gas mixtures with air and nitrogen. The mixtures are represented on the 
horizontal axis by the percentage oxygen content in the total mixture. The diagram provides 
much useful information. The narrowing of the flammable range as the oxygen is reduced 

38
 
           Flammable limits of gas mixtures in air and nitrogen 
 

39
 
 
Example of Flammable Range Diagram of Propane LPG gas cargo. 
 
 
 

40
It must be remembered that for any gas to catch fire the three elements in the correct 
proportions must be present. The three elements are Air, Fuel and Heat. In the context of this 
discussion Fuel can be interpreted as that concentration of Cargo Vapour in Air which lies within 
the Flammable range. 
 
 
So in order to avoid a Fire or Explosion Hazard we must always ensure that any one side of the 
Fire Triangle is missing or eliminated completely. In the context of this discussion the percentage 
concentration of flammable vapour in air must always be below the Lower Flammable Limit for 
that gas cargo. 
 
 
HEALTH HAZARD 
================== 
 
 
Gas cargoes are toxic in nature. For every gas cargo carried on board at sea, the TLV or Threshold 
Limit value of that gas is known. This data is available in the “Cargo Data Sheet” which is required 
to be exchanged between the ship and the shore prior loading and discharging of the cargo. 
 
The 'time‐weighted average' (TWA) also known as TLV Threshold Limit  Value of the gas is the  
concentration of  gas cargo vapour to which it is believed workers may be repeatedly exposed, 
for a normal 8‐hour working day and 40‐hour working week, day after day, without adverse 
effect.   
   It may be supplemented by a 'short‐term exposure limit‘ 
 
TLV of Propane gas Cargo as obtained from the MSDS sheet. 
 

 
 
 
If the concentration of the gas inhaled by the crew member exceeds this number (measured in 
parts per million) then following side effects occur. 
 
1) Eyes start burning / watering 
2) Feeling of drowsiness or stupor or sleepy feeling 
3) Unconsciousness 
4) In extreme cases death can even occur 
 
The immediate remedy is to move away from the concerned area and go to an area of fresh air. 
 
Chemical gases like VCM (Vinyl Chloride Monomer) have been proven to cause lung and liver 
cancer. In cases where there is a higher risk crew members are provided with special canister 
filter respiratory masks that have a filter specifically unique to that particular gas. They must be 
worn by the crewmember while working in such an area. It is important to stress at this point 
that Canister Filter respirators must NEVER be worn in an area of reduced oxygen concentration 

41
as they only serve to filter out the toxic gas because of the specific filter that is attached for that 
toxic gas.  
 
Some liquefied gas cargoes are toxic because their chemical properties can cause a temporary or 
permanent health hazard such as irritation, tissue damage or impairment of faculties.  
The effect may be caused by skin or skin ‐ wound contact or inhalation. 
 
Gas cargoes if inhaled can cause asphyxia. This is a condition in which the brain is deprived of 
oxygen leading to unconsciousness and even death.  
 
Certain cargoes can also attack human tissue creating chemical burns, due to their corrosivity.  
Liquefied gas cargoes are shipped at very low temperatures and this can present a hazard to 
personnel.  
 
HAZARD DUE TO TOXICITY  
====================== 

Some cargoes are toxic and can cause a temporary or permanent health hazard, such as irritation, 
tissue damage or impairment of faculties. Such hazards may result from skin or open‐wound 
contact, inhalation or ingestion. 
 
Contact with cargo liquid or vapour should be avoided. Protective clothing should be worn as 
necessary and breathing apparatus should be worn if there is a danger of inhaling toxic vapour. 
The toxic gas detection equipment provided should be used as necessary and should be properly 
maintained. 
 
Asphyxia :  Asphyxia occurs when the blood cannot take a sufficient supply of oxygen to the 
brain. A person affected may experience headache, dizziness and inability to concentrate, 
followed by loss of consciousness. In sufficient concentrations any vapour may cause 
asphyxiation, whether toxic or not.  
 
Asphyxiation can be avoided by the use of vapour and oxygen detection equipment and 
breathing apparatus as necessary. 
 
 
Anaesthesia:  Inhaling certain vapours (e.g. ethylene oxide) may cause loss of consciousness due 
to effects upon the nervous system. The unconscious person may react to sensory stimuli, but 
can only be roused with great difficulty. 
 
Anaesthetic vapour hazards can be avoided by the use of cargo vapour detection equipment and 
breathing apparatus as necessary. 
 
Frostbite:  Many cargoes are either shipped at low temperatures or are at low temperatures 
during some stage of cargo operations. Direct contact with cold liquid or vapour or uninsulated 
pipes and equipment can cause cold burns or frostbite. Inhalation of cold vapour can 
permanently damage certain organs (e.g. lungs). 
 
Ice of frost may build up on uninsulated equipment under certain ambient conditions and this 
may act as insulation. Under some conditions, however, little or no frost will form and in such 

42
cases contact can be particularly injurious. 
 
Appropriate protective clothing should be worn to avoid frostbite, taking special care with drip 
trays on deck which may contain cargo liquid. 
 
Example of MSDS sheet of Ammonia which shows the Main Hazard as “TOXIC” 

 
REACTIVITY HAZARD 
================= 
 
Some hydrocarbon cargoes may combine with water under certain conditions to produce a 
substance known as “hydrate”. This looks like crushed ice also called slush ice. The water for the 
hydrate formation can come from purge vapours with an incorrect dew point, water in the cargo 
system or water dissolved in the cargo. Care must always be taken to ensure that the dew point 
of any purge vapour used is suitable for the cargo concerned and that water is excluded from the 
cargo system.  
 
Hydrates can cause pumps to seize and equipment to malfunction; care must be taken to see that 
this is prevented from forming. 
 
In case hydrate formation does occur these hydrates can be dissolved using deicing chemicals 
such as methanol, ethanol and isopropyl alcohol. For LPG cargoes a small dose of antifreeze 
chemical is normally permitted but for chemical cargoes like ethylene even a very small amount 
like one litre per two hundred tons can make the cargo valueless.  
 
As anti freeze is a chemical in itself, it is also toxic and flammable in nature. Great care must be 
taken when handling them.  
 
Some cargoes react with air to form unstable oxygen compounds which could cause an explosion. 
The Gas codes require that these cargoes are either inhibited or carried under inert gas. 
 
Certain cargoes can react dangerously with one another and these should be provided from 
mixing. This is normally prevented by using separate piping and vent systems for each cargo and 
separate refrigeration equipment for each cargo. Care must be taken to ensure that this 
segregation is maintained. 
 
To establish whether or not two cargoes will react with each other the material data sheets for 
both cargoes must be consulted. The data sheets list materials which should not be allowed to 
come in contact with the cargo. The materials used in the cargo system are required to be 
compatible with the cargoes to be carried and care should be taken to ensure that no 
incompatible materials are used. 
 

43
Reaction can occur between cargo and purge vapours of poor quality (eg: inert gas with high Co2 
content can cause carbamate formation with ammonia) .Reaction can also occur between 
compressor lubricating oils and some cargoes which can cause blockage and damage. 
 
Example of the “REACTIVITY DATA” as is obtained from the Propane LPG MSDS sheet. 
 
        

                                                  
 
HAZARD DUE TO POLYMERISATION 
============================ 
 
Some LPG cargoes react with themselves in the presence of a small amount of heat and undergo 
a reaction known as polymerization. 
 
 This is a very exothermic or heat generating reaction which causes further amount of cargo to 
polymerize. 
The best example is that of Vinyl Chloride Monomer or VCM which in the presence of a very small 
amount of heat undergoes this reaction, and liquid VCM polymerizes into a thick viscous rubber. 
 
This reaction can be prevented by adding a small amount of inhibitor (for example Hydroquinone 
or TBC – Tertiary Butyl Catechol) 
 
This is permitted as per the Gas Codes and is the normal practice carried out prior shipment of 
cargo that can polymerize en route. A Certificate of Inhibition is provided by the shipper to the 
Master to be handed over to the receiver at the discharge port. This certificate clearly states the 
amount of inhibitor added and the validity of the inhibitor. Very important to note that the 
inhibitor is not effective once the validity period or life period ends. Normally sufficient inhibitor 
is added by the shipper at the load port to cover the duration of the ship’s voyage. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

44
HAZARD DUE TO SPILLAGE 
====================== 
 
Care should be taken to prevent the spillage of low temperature cargo because of the hazard to 
personnel and the danger of brittle fracture. In the event of spillage the source must be first 
isolated and the spilt liquid dispersed. The presence of vapour will require the use of breathing 
apparatus. If there is a danger of brittle fracture then a water hose could be used both to 
vaporize the liquid as well as reduce the extent of brittle fracture damage.  
 
The cargo manifold drip trays are made from low temperature steel. Normally during manifold 
connection and disconnection a very small amount of cargo liquid does spill over into the drip 
trays.  
 
Great care must be taken during manifold connection and disconnection as any cargo liquid that 
comes in contact with human tissue will cause severe cold burn. 
 
If the liquefied gas spills into the sea, large quantities of vapour will be generated by heating 
effect of the water. This vapour may create a fire or health hazard or both. Great care must be 
taken to ensure that such spillage does not occur, especially when disconnecting cargo hoses.  
 
 
HAZARD DUE TO STATIC ELECTRICITY (ELECTROSTATIC GENERATION)  
======================================================= 
 
Static Electricity can cause sparks capable of igniting a flammable gas. Some routine operations 
can cause electrostatic charging, and precautions to minimize the hazard are given below. 
 
All materials whether solid, liquid or vapour can generate and retain a charge to some extent. The 
level of charge depends on the electrical resistance of the material; if it is high then charge can 
build up. It is possible for charge to build up in a system with low resistance. The cargo system on 
a gas carrier is electrically bonded to the ship’s hull to prevent charge build up and it is important 
that these bonding systems are maintained in an efficient condition. 
 
Hoses are normally bonded to the flanges by the metal reinforcement, and this provides a 
continous path to the earth through the ship’s manifold and the hull.  
 
In an unbonded system, static electricity could be generated by  
1) Flow of liquid through the pipes. 
2) Flow of liquid /vapour mixtures through the nozzles 
3) Flow of vapour containing particles (eg: rust) through piping. 
 
The danger of ignition by static electricity is reduced if the system is correctly bonded or if 
flammable mixtures are not formed. 
 
In order to provide protection against static electrical discharge at the manifold when connecting 
and disconnecting cargo hose strings and metal arms, the terminal operator should ensure that 
they are fitted with an insulating flange or a single length of non‐conducting hose, to create 
electrical discontinuity between the ship and shore.  

45
All metal on the seaward side of the insulating section should be electrically continuous to the 
ship. And that on the landward side should be electrically continuous to the jetty earthing 
system. 
 
Simply switching off a cathodic protection system is not a substitute for the installation of an 
insulating flange or a length of non‐conducting hose.  
    
Cargo hoses with internal bonding between the end flanges should be checked for electrical 
continuity before they are taken into service and periodically thereafter. 
 
 
A ship / shore bonding cable is not effective as a safety device and may even be dangerous. 
 
 
Clarification 
=========== 
 
Although the potential dangers of using a ship/shore bonding cable are widely recognized, 
attention is drawn to the fact that some national and local regulations may still require a bonding 
cable to be connected. 
   
 If a bonding cable is demanded, it should first be visually inspected to see that it is mechanically 
sound. The connection point for the cable should be well clear of the manifold area. There should 
always be a switch on the jetty in series with the bonding cable and of a type suitable for use in a 
hazardous area 
 
It is important to ensure that the switch is always in the “off” position before connecting or 
disconnecting the cable.  
 
Only when the cable is properly fixed and in good contact with the ship should the switch be 
closed.  
The bonding cable should be attached before the cargo hoses are connected and removed only 
after the hoses have been disconnected 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Carbon Dioxide 
 
When liquid carbon dioxide under pressure is released at high velocity, rapid evaporation causes 
cooling and particles of solid carbon dioxide may form. 
 
The solid particles in the cloud of CO2 may become electrostatically charged. For this reason 
carbon dioxide should not be released into spaces containing a flammable mixture. 
 
 

46
               HAZARD DUE TO INERT GAS COMPOSITION 
                ============================================ 
                                                                                Inert Gas Composition 
    Nitrogen 
Component  Inert Gas   Membrane 
by combustion Separating 
Nitrogen  85 to 89%  up to 99.5% 
Carbon dioxide  14%  — 
Carbon monoxide  0.1% (max)  — 
Oxygen  1 to 3%  >0.5% 
Sulphur oxides  0.1%  — 
Oxides of Nitrogen  Traces  — 
Dew point  ‐45°C  ‐65°C 
Ash & Soot  Present  — 
Density (Air = 1.00)  1.035  0.9672 
       
 
Carbon particles in the form of ash and soot can put many chemical gases off specification. 
 
Carbon dioxide will freeze at temperatures below ‐55°C thus contaminating the cargo if carriage 
temperatures are particularly low, such as in the case of ethylene or LNG. Carbon dioxide will also 
contaminate ammonia cargoes by reacting to produce carbamates. Both solid carbon dioxide and 
carbamate formation result in cargo contamination and operational difficulties, such as clogging 
of pumps, filters and valves. Carbon dioxide can also act as a catalyst in complicated chemical 
reactions with sulphur compounds in some LPG cargoes. 
 
Carbon monoxide, if generated in sufficient quantities, can cause difficulties during any 
subsequent aeration operation. When aeration is thought complete, the levels of toxic carbon 
monoxide may still be unacceptable from the aspect of personal safety. (It should be noted that 
carbon monoxide has a TLV‐TWA of 50 parts per million.) 
 
Moisture in inert gas can condense and in so doing hydrates can form in cargoes and inerted 
spaces can suffer from severe corrosion. When cold cargo is to be loaded, it is therefore 
important that the inert gas in cargo tanks has a sufficiently low dew point to avoid any water 
vapour freezing out and other operational difficulties. Furthermore, moisture can create 
difficulties particularly with butadiene, isoprene, ammonia and chlorine cargoes. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

47
Chapter 3: SAFETY ON BOARD GAS CARRIERS 
 
Carrying and handling liquefied gas cargo on board poses significant potential hazards including 
risk of injury or death, threats to environment and each person working on a gas carrier and 
terminal ashore needs to understand the risks involved, obtain the necessary training and take all 
the needed precautions. 
 
The procedures outlined here should be considered as general guidance only; there is considerable  
variation in the design of cargo containment and cargo handling systems, and specific instructions should 
be prepared for inclusion in the cargo operations manual for individual ships.  
 
These instructions should be carefully studied by all personnel involved in cargo handling operations. 
 
  There is always the possibility of the presence of gas in the atmosphere, particularly: during loading and 
discharging of liquefied gases  
 when the ship is gassing‐up or being gas‐freed 
 when a pipeline or cargo pump is opened up for maintenance 
 in compressor rooms 
 within ballast tanks and void spaces and double bottom tanks adjacent to cargo tanks. 
 
 
The handling of liquefied gas cargoes requires that everyone on board exercise a maximum degree of 
safety. 
The overall safety of personnel , machinery and ship demands that everyone on board is thoroughly 
familiar with the hazards involved. 
 
It is the duty of every personnel on board to know the hazards of the cargo carried and the emergency 
procedures that must be followed in the event of an emergency. 
 
Order of Gas Densities 
 
Nitrogen (Lightest Gas) 
Air / Ammonia 
Inert Gas 
Lpg Vapour 
 
(In short we can remember the Acronym NAIL) 
 
In windy conditions vapours rapidly disperse (that is to say they dilute, to below LFL or TLV). Where there 
is little air movement, there is a greater danger of flammable or toxic mixtures accumulating and 
possibly being drawn into machinery spaces or the accommodation. Many cargo vapours are heavier 
than air and will accumulate in bilges and other low areas . An area or space that is considered gas free 
for hot work or entry should be frequently re‐tested. 

48
In still airr conditions,, flammable or toxic gases may accu umulate in potentially haazardous areeas. In the 
event of large accum mulations of ggas, cargo w work will be sstopped imm mediately un ntil the vapo our has 
dissipateed and the haazard removved.  
 
Under theese circumstances you m must 
 
 ensure all portholes and doors aare closed 
 carry ou ut orders reggarding venttilation openings and aiir intakes 
ad dhere to your ship's rules and proccedures 
 
GAS DAN NGEROUS ZO ONE: Is any zzone or spacce on a gas ccarrier that ““MAY” contaain flammab ble vapour an
nd 
is  
not beingg “Continuously” monito ored by gas instrumentss is called a G
Gas – Safe Zoone. 
 
GAS SAFE ZONE: Is any zone or sspace on a gas tanker that is not Gass dangerous is called a G Gas – safe 
zone. 
 
 
Air flowin ng rapidly paast a ship's ssuperstructu
ure swirls aro
ound it  espeecially on thee lee side. 
Some of the moving air is drawn into swirling currents, w which are kn nown as edd dies. 
 
During caargo operations flammable or toxic gases can ed ddy and sommetimes thesse can causee pockets  
of gas to be present in the most unexpected d places. Where they forrm depends on wind speeed and  
direction n; a wind bloowing from forward mayy cause gasess to accumulate aft of th he superstru ucture. 
 

                           

49
Air flow over the accommodation deck. 
  
Precautions to be followed 
 Smoking is STRICTLY “NOT PERMITTED” on deck. 
 Smoking is only permitted “INSIDE ACCOMODATION” in “ Designated Smoking Areas” 
 Care must be taken to avoid sparks when using tools in the cargo tank area . 
Note: Experiments have shown that sparkless tools can cause sparks with sufficient energy to ignite 
explosive mixtures. 
 Only explosion proof torches must be used on decks and cargo area. 
 
 Shoes must not be fitted with steel reinforcements that cause sparks. 
DESIGNATED SMOKING AREAS 
 
On board Gas Carrier smoking is only permitted “INSIDE” the Accommodation in “ Designated 
Smoking Areas” 
 
There SHOULD be a placard / notice informing all crew of the designated smoking areas for that  
vessel . This Placard / Notice must be approved by the Master. 
 
Crew Smoke Room, Officers Smoke Room, Duty Mess Room, Ship’s Office, Coffee shop are 
examples of Designated Smoking areas on board Gas Carrier.  
   
 
 
 
Precautions during cargo operations 
 Be vigilant at all times 
 No smoking permitted on deck and no using mobile phones on deck 
 Frequent rounds to be made on deck to check for leaks on cargo lines and  also to check the 
condition of mooring lines and where necessary careful adjustment of the mooring lines and fire 
wires done to ensure that they are rigged as per terminal requirements  
 Ensure that personnel in charge of Manifold watch are wearing Personal Protective Equipment. 
 Ensure that personnel keeping a manifold watch are keeping a watch on the manifold connection 
from a safe distance. 
 In case of any leaks or in case of any doubt inform the Duty Officer immediately. 
 Radio Batteries must only be changed in the accommodation (Gas safe zone). 
 All scuppers should remain closed while the vessel is alongside the terminal. 
 
Please do read the following Publications. 
 
1) Your Personal Safety Guide – SIGTTO 
2) Tanker Safety Guide – Bulk Liquefied Gases – ICS 
 
 

50
 ALWAYS REMEMBER “SAFETY FIRST” 
 
 
 IF IN DOUBT PLEASE DON’T HESITATE TO ASK 
 
  
 GAS CARRIERS HAVE AN EXCELLENT SAFETY RECORD. THIS IS DUE TO 
THE EFFORTS OF EVERYONE INVOLVED.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

51
Chapter 4: Gas Codes, Types of Gas Carriers, Cargo 
Containment Systems on Gas Carriers and the types of Gas 
Carriers according to hazard potential of cargo being carried. 
 
 
 
Gas Carrier Codes: The Gas Codes, developed by International Maritime Organization apply to all gas 
carriers regardless of size. 
 
Existing Ship Code 
Gas carriers built before 1976 must comply with the Existing Ship Code. This Code 
 is not mandatory but is applied by some countries for ship registration and in other countries as a 
necessary fulfillment prior to port entry. 
 
The GC Code 
This code is applicable to gas carriers built between 1976 and 1986.Although this Code is not mandatory, 
many countries have implemented it into national law. 
 
International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships 
Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk (IGC Code) 
The Code which applies to new gas carriers (built after 30 June 1986).The IGC Code, under 
 Amendments to International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea(SOLAS), is mandatory  
for all new gas ships. As proof that a ship complies with the Code, an International Certificate of Fitness 
for the Carriage of Liquefied Gases in Bulk should be on board. In 1993, the IGC Code was amended and 
the new rules came into effect on 1 July 1994. Ships on which construction started on or after 1 October 
1994 should apply the amended version of the Code but ships built earlier may comply with previous 
editions of the IGC Code. 

                                                                     
 
(IGC Code – 1993 Edition) 
 
Note : Kindly ensure you have the latest Supplements included – 1993 Supplement and June 2013 
Supplement ) 
 

52
Types of Gas Carriers 
 
Gas Carriers can be grouped into the following Types 
 
1) FULLY PRESSURISED GAS CARRIER 
2) SEMI‐PRESSURISED GAS CARRIER 
3) FULLY REFRIGERATED GAS CARRIER 
4) ETHYLENE GAS CARRIER 
5) LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS CARRIER 
 
FULLY PRESSURISED GAS CARRIER 
Most fully pressurised LPG carriers are fitted 
with two or three horizontal, cylindrical or 
spherical cargo tanks and have capacities up 
to 6,000 m3.  
 
They carry the gas cargo at ambient 
temperature and pressure 
 
No reliquefaction plant is fitted on board. 
 
Cargo tank safety relief valves have a 
MARVS of 18 barg 
  
Fully pressurised ships are still being built in 
numbers and represent a cost‐effective, 
simple way of moving LPG to and from 
smaller gas terminals.  
    
 
SEMI‐ PRESSURISED GAS CARRIER 
These ships carried gases in a semi‐
pressurized/semi‐refrigerated state. 
 
These gas carriers have cargo tanks which are 
cylindrical, spherical or bi‐lobe in shape, and 
are able to load or discharge gas cargoes at 
both refrigerated and pressurised storage 
facilities.  
 
Reliquefaction plant may be fitted on board. 
Cargo tanks MARVS between 5‐10 barg 
              
 

53
FULLY REFRIGERATED GAS CARRIER 
These ships are built to carry liquefied
gases at low temperature and atmospheric
pressure between terminals equipped with
fully refrigerated storage tanks. However,
discharge through a booster pump and
cargo heater makes it possible to
discharge to pressurized tanks too.

Mostly fitted with Prismatic Type Tanks.

Reliquefaction plant is a MUST

Cargo tank MARVS 0.250 barg


.
Today, fully refrigerated ships range in
capacity from 20,000 to 100,000 m3. LPG
carriers in the 50,000 - 80,000 m3 size
range are often referred to as VLGCs
(Very Large Gas Carriers).
 
 
 
 
ETHYLENE GAS CARRIER 
 
 
 
Ethylene carriers are the most 
sophisticated of the gas tankers and have 
the ability to carry not only most other 
liquefied gas cargoes but also ethylene at 
its atmospheric boiling point of −104 °C.  
 
These ships feature cylindrical, insulated, 
stainless steel cargo tanks at 
temperatures ranging from a minimum of 
−104 °C to a maximum of +80 °C and at a 
maximum tank pressure of 4 bars.  

 
 
 

54
LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS CARRIER 
 
Built to transport Liquefied Natural Gas     
(Mainly Methane) at ‐162 Deg C  
 
The majority of LNG carriers are between 
125,000 and 135,000 m3 in capacity.  
 
Partial Reliquefaction is possible but Boil 
off gas is also used as fuel for propulsion 
 
Cargo Tank Safety Relief Valves MARVS 
set at 0.250barg 
 
Cargo Calculations are based on the 
quantity of Energy Content delivered. 
 
Cargo is carried in Membrane Type Tanks 
or Type C Tanks.  
                    
 
 
 
 
Cargo Containment Systems on board Gas Carrier 
 
 
TYPES OF CARGO CONTAINMENT SYSTEMS ON BOARD GAS CARRIERS. 
 
I) INDEPENDENT TYPE TANK – TYPE A / TYPE B / TYPE C  
II) INTEGRAL TYPE TANK 
III) MEMBRANE TYPE TANKS 
IV) SEMI – MEMBRANE TYPE TANKS 
V) INTERNAL INSULATION TYPE TANK 
 
    Types of Insulation used in the construction of Cargo Tanks on gas carriers 

               
 

55
INDEPENDENT TANK TYPE A  
 
The main design pressure for this type of 
cargo tank is 0.7 barg 
 
This is a self supporting prismatic tank and has 
internal stiffening. 
 
It does not depend on the ships hull for 
support. 
 
Mainly used for the carriage of LPG Cargoes    
( as low as ‐55 Deg C ) 
 
In case the ship is designed to carry cargoes 
below ‐10 Deg C, then a secondary barrier 
(normally ventilated with Inert Gas) must be 
fitted. 
 
 
 
 
INDEPENDENT TANK TYPE B 
The tank design can be either cylindrical or 
prismatic shape. This type of tank was mainly 
designed to carry LNG cargoes. There are LNG 
carriers with the prismatic type of cargo tank 
design having design pressure of 0.7 barg. 
 
The most common type is however the 
spherical type or Kvaerner Moss design type 
of cargo tank. 
 
 
Hold space is normally filled with dry inert 
gas. In case air ventilated then a provision 
must be made to allow the space to be 
inerted in case the vapour detection system 
of the hold space detects cargo leakage.

 
 

56
INDEPENDENT TANK TYPE C 

 
 
                                    Single Lobe Tank                                Bi – Lobe Tank 
 
  In the case of a fully pressurized ship the design pressure is 18 barg. 
   
  In the case of semi pressurized ships the design pressure is between 5 and 10 barg. 
   
  No secondary barrier is required for Type C cargo tanks and the hold spaces may be 
  either filled with dry air or inert gas. 
   
  As the gas cargoes are carried at ambient temperature and pressure the cargo tanks 
  are not made from carbon manganese low temperature steel but ordinary steel 
   
  Very poor utilization of hull volume unless bi‐ lobe tanks are fitted. 
 
 
 
 
INTEGRAL TYPE TANK 
These tanks which form a structural part of the ship’s hull and are influenced in the same manner and by 
the same loads which stress the adjacent hull structure. These are used for the carriage of LPG at or near 
atmospheric conditions, butane for example, where no provision for thermal expansion and contraction 
of the tank is necessary. Integral tanks form part of the ship’s hull and are influenced by the same loads 
which stress the hull structure. Integral tanks are normally not allowed for the carriage of liquefied gas 
cargoes below – 10 deg C. Certain tanks on a limited number of Japanese built LPG carriers are of the 
integral design. Because of the temperature restriction (cannot carry cargoes below – 10 Deg C) these 
tanks were used for the dedicated carriage of butane cargoes only. (Butane is normally carried at ‐ 4 Deg 
C ) and this design was not a commercial success.  The void space is always filled with Inert gas and is 
always pressurized.  
 

57
MEMBRANE TYPE TANK 
 

 
The cargo containment system consists of a 
very thin membrane normally between 
0.7mm to 1.5 mm thick which is supported 
through the insulation 
 
Such tanks are not self supporting and the 
inner hull forms the load bearing structure. 
Tank containment system consists of Primary 
barrier and Secondary barrier. 
 
There are primarily two types of Membrane 
systems in use , the TECHNIGAZ Membrane 
type and the GAZ TRANSPORT Membrane 
type tanks both named after the companies 
designed primarily for the carriage of LNG. 
 
MARVS for this cargo containment system is  
0.7 barg.  
 
Cargo in these types of tanks is carried at ‐163 
Deg C 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

58
 
SEMI ‐ MEMBRANE TYPE TANK 

 
 
 Tank containment system consists of Primary barrier and Secondary barrier. 
 The containment system is not independent but supported by wooden chocks made 
of balsa wood all around the tank and located in the Void space. 
 The INSULATION that covers the outer wall of the cargo tank is normally made of Poly 
urethane foam. 
 The Secondary barrier or Void space also called the IBS Space (Inter Barrier Space) is 
always pressurized with inert gas only. 
 This type of containment system has proved very efficient for the carriage of the full 
range of LPG cargoes upto ‐55 Deg C. 
 Commercially a very successful design. 
 
 
 
INTERNAL INSULATION TYPE TANK 
 
Internally insulated tanks are similar to integral tanks. They utilize insulation materials to contain 
the cargo. The insulation is fixed inside the ships inner hull or to an independent load bearing 
surfaceThe non – self – supporting system obviates the need for an independent tank and 
permits the carriage of fully refrigerated cargoes at temperatures as low as ‐55 Deg C .  
 

59
Internal Insulation type tanks have been incorporated in a very limited number of fully 
refrigerated LPG tankers but this concept has not proved satisfactory for continued use in service. 
It has become OBSOLETE.  
 
SURVIVAL CAPABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR GAS CARRIERS 
 
 
Ship Type 1G  
 
A gas carrier intended to transport products indicated in Ch.19 which require the 
maximum preventive measures to preclude the escape of such cargo. 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

60
 
 
Ship Type 2G 
 
A type 2G ship is a gas carrier intended to carry products indicated in Chapter 19 of the 
IGC Code which require significant preventive measures to preclude the escape of such 
cargo. 
 
Ship Type 2PG 
 
A Type 2PG ship is a gas carrier of 150m in length or less intended to carry products in 
Chapter 19 of the IGC Code which require significant preventive measures to preclude the 
escape of such cargo and where the products are carried in independent Type C tanks for 
a MARVS of at least 7 bar gauge and a cargo containment system design temperature of ‐
55 Deg C or above. 
 
Ship Type 3G 
 
A Type 3G ship is a gas carrier indicated to carry products indicated in Chapter 19 which 
require moderate preventive measures to preclude the escape of such cargo. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

61
   
 
 
The ship type required for individual products is indicated in column c in the table of Chapter 19 of the 
IGC Code. 
 
If a gas ship is intended to carry more than one product listed in Chapter 19 the survival 
capability should correspond to that product having the most stringent ship type 
requirement. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

62
Chapter 5: CARGO INSTRUMENTATION 
 
In this chapter we will discuss about the following: 
1) Cargo pumps 
2) Pump Efficiency curves 
3) Pressure Relief System   
4) Cargo Vaporiser / Heater 
5) Cargo Compressors 
6) Cargo Gauging systems 
 
 
 
Cargo Pumps: Cargo pumps on board the Liquefied Gas Carrier are normally of the Centrifugal 
design and may be either Deepwell type or Fully Submerged type. They normally operate alone or 
in series with one another. They may also operate in series with a deck mounted Booster pump 
and a cargo heater normally used when discharging to pressurized storage of LPG. 
 
Whatever the type of cargo pump in use great care must be taken in following the manufacturers 
instruction regarding, starting, stopping and care of cargo pumps. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

63
 
 
Deepwell cargo pump 
 
 In this type of cargo pump design the pump assembly is located inside the cargo tank and 
the electric motor is located outside the cargo tank. 
 The drive shaft is held in carbon bearings inside the cargo discharge tube and these 
bearings are lubricated and cooled by the cargo flow. 
 The centrifugal impeller is mounted at the bottom of the cargo tank and frequently 
comprises two or three stages together with a first stage inducer. 
 Shaft sealing at the cargo tank dome consists of a double mechanical seal flushed with 
lubricating oil. This stops cargo leakages to the atmosphere. 
 The accurate alignment of the motor coupling , thrust bearing and mechanical seal is very 
important  
 Mostly used in handy max LPG tankers between 30000 m3 to 50000 m3 capacity  
 The larger gas carriers like VLGC’s of capacity in excess of 50000 m3 mostly are fitted with 
Fully Submerged Cargo pumps. 

64
 

65
 
Fully submerged motor pump for LPG 

 
 

66
Typical LNG submerged motor pump assembly 
 
 In this type of pump design, the pump assembly, electric motor and pump bearings are all 
located inside the cargo tank at the bottom of the cargo tank. 
 They are fitted on all the LNG carriers and on the larger LPG Carriers. 
 Power is supplied to the motor through specially sheathed cables. 
 Electric cabling is passed through a hazardous area junction box in the tank dome and 
then by flexible stainless steel armoured insulated power cables to the motor terminals. 
 These pumps are cooled and lubricated by cargo flow and are prone to damage should the 
cargo flow be lost. 
 In order to prevent the pump from dry running there are safety devices such as under ‐ 
current relay, low discharge pressure switch, or a low tank level switch. 
 Submerged cargo pumps need to designed and only are used for the intended grades of 
cargo that are being carried on board as stated in the Ship’s Certificate of Fitness. 
 
Booster pumps  
 
 Booster pumps are usually of the Centrifugal type. 
 They may be vertically or horizontally mounted. In these positions they will be driven by 
an increased safety (E Exe) electric motor. 
 They could also be fitted in the cargo compressor room, and in such an arrangement they 
are driven by a shaft which passes through a gas – tight bulkhead which connects the 
electric motor located in the motor room. 
 These cargo pumps are fitted with double mechanical seals. 

67
 
 
Vertical Booster Pump 

68
 
 
Horizontal Booster Pump 
 
Precautions when using booster pumps 
 
1) Before starting, check (manually if possible) that the pump is free to turn and doze with 
antifreeze if necessary. If the pump is submersible types check the electrical resistance. 
2) Start in accordance with the manufacturer’s instruction; pay special attention to pump 
priming, discharge valve setting and what to do if the pump does not “catch” first time. 
3) When running, valves should be opened slowly. Cavitation should be avoided.  
4) Towards the end of pumping, discharge valves should be throttled to maintain suction and 
improve drainage. Manufacturer’s instructions must always be followed. 
5) During maintenance, particular attention should be given to keeping filters clean and to 
the condition of the seals, bearings and pressurizing circuits. 

69
 
Pressure Relief Systems on Ship 
 
The Gas Codes require at least two pressure relief valves of equal capacity to be fitted on any 
cargo tank of greater than 20 cubic metres capacity. Below this capacity one valve is sufficient.  
The type of valves fitted may be either spring ‐ loaded or pilot – operated. Pilot – operated relief 
valves may be found on all tank types whereas spring ‐ loaded relief valves are usually used on 
Type “C” tanks.  
 
Cargo tank relief valves exhaust via the vent header. From there the vapour is led to the 
atmosphere via one or more vent risers. Vent riser drains are provided and these should be 
checked regularly to ensure any rain water collected is drained out. Any accumulation of water 
has the effect of altering the relief valve operation due to increased back pressure. 
 
The Gas Codes require all pipelines which may be isolated, when full of liquid, to be provided with 
relief valves to allow for thermal expansion of the liquid. These valves usually exhaust back into 
cargo tanks. Alternatively the exhaust may be taken to a vent riser via liquid collecting pots, in 
which case means for detecting and disposing of liquid in the vent system must be provided. 
     

 
 
Cargo Heater / (can also be used as Cargo Vaporiser) 
 
We use the cargo heater normally when discharging refrigerated cargo into a pressurized storage. 
This is because at some gas tanker terminals, the shore pipelines are not able to carry low 

70
temperature cargoes and damage to the shore pipelines will result. During the Pre – Discharge 
meeting which is mandatory between ship and shore PRIOR discharge , the terminal loading 
master will inform the ship’s Cargo Officer ( normally the Chief Officer ) the temperature 
acceptable to the shore during discharge. This must be strictly adhered to as any damage to 
shore pipelines will be payable by the ship for non compliance. 
In order to heat up the cargo prior discharge, gas carriers are provided with Cargo heaters, which 
are normally of the shell and tube type. Most often they are mounted in the immediate vicinity of 
the manifold area, on the open deck in open air. 
 
We use Sea Water as a heating medium as it is very economical and freely available. However if 
the temperature of the sea water falls below 4 deg C , there is a risk of damage to the shell of the 
heater due to the abnormal expansion of water and also a very real risk of freezing . Sea Water is 
normally not used below temperatures of 4 Deg C. In this case we use Glycol as a very suitable 
alternative which has the facilty of being heated by steam from the engine room.  
 
By using the cargo heater we can effectively warm up refrigerated cargo from as low as – 55 Deg 
C to + 15 Deg C. It is an absolute must that the heating medium is much warmer than the cargo as 
a cargo heater is only a “heat exchanger” 
 
Great care must be taken when using the cargo heater. Before sending any cargo to the heater it 
is an absolute MUST that the sea water or glycol is running through the heater and is sufficiently 
warmer than the cargo (Normally temperatures of + 20 Deg C are sufficient). It is only once the 
sea water or glycol is running through the heater that we start sending cargo to the heater, 
initially at a slow rate. Great care must be taken to ensure that terminal requirements on 
temperature of cargo during discharge are maintained during the entire operation. 
 
Once we have finished using the heater, we initially stop the cargo to the heater and allow any 
residual cargo in the line to be sent ashore. This can be easily checked by the temperature gauges 
at the suction and discharge end of the heater. 
 
It is only after this that we stop the sea water or glycol to the heater. The sea water or glycol 
system to the heater is always the last system to be stopped. It is a good practice to drain the 
remaining sea water and fill the shell with fresh water in case there will be a long sailing or 
interval of time between the next use of the heater. This is done to avoid corrosion of the 
titanium tubes inside the cargo heater, thus prolonging the life of the heater 
 
During Grade change operations on board the gas tanker, we require very large amounts of cargo 
vapour in order to gassup a cargo tank. This cab be achieved by using the cargo heater as a 
vaporizer. Normally a connection from the condensate line is connected to the suction or cargo 
inlet of the cargo heater. At the discharge end there is another connection provided to the 
vapour line. By selecting the appropriate lines and valves we are able to effectively use the cargo 
heater also as a Vaporiser. In some designs an automatic level controller switch is provided on 
the condensate line to control the amount of condensate being fed into the cargo heater. 
 
 

71
Cargo Compressors 
 
The Cargo Compressor is the heart of the LPG Ship. There are mainly two types of Cargo 
Compressors on board LPG Ships namely the Reciprocating Compressors and the Screw type 
Compressors. 
 
RECIPROCATING COMPRESSORS: 
The reciprocating compressors found mainly on board gas carriers are the Oil free type. 
 
Illustrated below are the salient features regarding these compressors: 
1. The piston’s surface is machined with labyrinth grooves, forming a succession of throttling 
points for gas blow‐by. 
2. The cylinder is water cooled or heated and is similarly provided with grooves in the bore. 
3. The gland consists of a system of graphite rings forming a labyrinth seal. Gas leakage at 
this gland is usually returned to the intake side of the compressor. 
4. The distance piece gives clear segregation between the compression space and crank gear 
and prevents the part of the piston rod (with a molecular oil film) from entering the gland 
    5.    The oil wiper prevents oil creeping up the piston rod into the neutral                   space and 
thence into the gland. 
    6.    The piston rod is guided very accurately by a guide bearing and crosshead. 
    7.    The guide bearing is lubricated and water cooled. 
    8.    The crank shaft is lubricated. 
Note: Although being an oil free compressor, it is a common practice to change the lubricating oil 
during grade changes to meet with the compatibility requirements. 
 
 
PRECAUTIONS 
 
If the compressor is fitted with a capacity control, automatic unloading devices require 
careful routine maintenance. 
Pressure – Temperature switches should be checked and calibrated as a routine: set 
points should be adjusted for certain grades of cargoes (for e.g. temperature limit for 
Butadiene is 60*C. After this temperature the danger of polymerization exists.) 
Suction valves should be opened slowly when starting the compressor, as this will 
vaporize any liquid present by pressure reduction. 
Damage can be caused if liquids enter the compressor, and therefore the performance of 
level switches in the separator is of importance.  
 
 

72
   
 
 
SCREW COMPRESSORS: 
 
These are positive displacement high speed compressors with mated screw motors.  
 
They can be of either of Dry Oil Free type or the Oil Flooded Screw Compressor type  
 

 
 

73
DRY OIL FREE TYPE 
In this type the screw rotors do not make physical contact but are held in‐mesh and driven by 
external gearing. Due to leakage through the clearances between the rotors, high speeds are 
necessary to maintain good efficiency (typically 12,000 rpm). The above diagram is a typical rotor 
set with the common combination of four and six lobes. The lobes intermesh and gas is 
compressed in the chambers numbered 1,2,3, in the diagram which are reduced in size as the 
rotors turn. The compressor casing carries the suction and the discharge ports. 
 
OIL FLOODED SCREW COMPRESSOR 
The oil flooded machine relies on oil injection into the rotors and this eliminates the need for 
timing gears. Drive power is transmitted from one rotor to the other by the injected oil. This also 
acts as a lubricant and coolant. Because the rotors are sealed with oil, gas leakage is much less 
and, therefore, oil flooded machines can run at lower speeds (typically 3,000 rpm). An oil 
separator on the discharge of the machine removes oil from the compressed gas 
 
PRECAUTIONS WITH COMPRESSORS 
 
 Filters must be kept in good condition because internal clearances are vary fine and the 
passage of solids (e.g. rust or weld slag) will cause damage. 
 Liquids should not be allowed to pass through compressors ( as they are designed to 
handle vapours only). 
 Compressors should not be operated with the discharge valve closed 
 
CARGO GAUGING SYSTEMS ON GAS CARRIER 
 
Float gauges 
Float gauges have been used widely on all types of tankers.  
Their construction is very simple, consisting of a float attached by a tape to an indicating device.  
The indicating device can be arranged so that the reading can be read out remotely or locally as 
desired. 
 
These are also fitted with isolation valves so that the float alone can be taken out and be serviced 
if required  
 
 
 

74
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

75
Radar gauges 
This is another type of gauging equipment that operates on the principle of radar. 
This type of gauge is used on all modern tankers now‐a‐days for their accuracy and reliability.  
Radar gauges operate at very high frequencies (11 gigahertz).  
In case of gas carriers, the setting of the transmitter on the tank dome is very important for the 
most accurate operation.  
 
Advantages of Radar gauges 
Since the antenna is the only moving part inside the tank, it is highly accurate and highly reliable. 
Radar waves are most suitable because they are not affected by the atmosphere above the cargo 
in the tank.  
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 

76
Chapter 6: GAS DETECTION INSTRUMENTS 
 
Gas analyzing equipment includes oxygen monitors, detectors for combustible gases, compressed 
breathing air monitors, and systems for detection of an array of toxic gases. 
 
 Available equipment ranges from single‐gas and four‐gas portables to multi‐channel stationary 
gas detection systems. 
 
 
  Vapour detection equipment is required by IMO codes for a number of reasons. 
 Cargo vapour in air, inert gas or the vapour of another cargo. 
 Concentrations of gas in or near the flammable range. 
 Concentrations of oxygen in inert gas, cargo vapour or enclosed spaces. 
 
 
OXYGEN ANALYSER 
 

 
 
 
1) An instrument used to measure oxygen concentrations, expressed as a percentage by volume.  
2) A typical indicator draws the sample through a Teflon membrane into a potassium chloride 
solution and activates a chemical cell. When the switch is closed current flows round the circuit 
and deflects the ammeter needle.  

77
3) The more oxygen absorbed by the solution the greater the current and needle deflection 
indicating the percentage oxygen in the sample.  
 
 
4) The instrument described above operates without batteries and is relatively insensitive.  
5) Other types of analyzers include the polarographic and paramagnetic‐type instruments. These 
are much more sensitive and require batteries. 
6)  It should be noted that batteries should never be changed in a gas dangerous zone.  
7) Such instruments have dual scales, each having a separate function.   
              Scale 1 — oxygen deficiency in air — zero to 25 per cent oxygen by volume; 
            Scale 2 — oxygen in nitrogen — zero to 1 per cent oxygen by volume. 
 
 
       

 
 
Oxygen indicator — plan view 
 
 
These instruments should be regularly spanned (calibrated) with fresh air 
(21 per cent oxygen) and test‐nitrogen (a virtual zero per cent oxygen content). 
 
 
Liquid contamination, pressure or temperature effects will result in incorrect 
instrument response. 
 
 

78
                                                                                             
               

 
 
The basic electric circuit consists of a Wheatstone bridge. 
 
 Sample gas to be measured is aspirated over the specially treated sensor filament which is heated  
by the bridge current. Although the gas sample may be below the lower flammable limit, it will burn 
catalytically on the filament surface.  
 
In so doing it will raise the temperature of the filament and thereby increase its electrical resistance  
 and so unbalance the bridge. The resultant imbalance current is shown on the meter and is related 
 to the hydrocarbon content of the sample gas. 
 
The meter scale commonly reads from zero per cent to 100 per cent of the lower flammable limit (LFL).  
On instruments having a dual range, a second scale indicates zero to 10 per cent of the LFL.  
Instruments of this type contain batteries which must be checked prior to use and it is a recommended 
practice to check the instrument using a calibration gas at frequent intervals. 
 When calibrating the instrument, the meter reading should fall within the range indicated on the 
calibration graph which is provided by the manufacturers. 
 
Since the action of the catalytic gas indicator depends upon combustion with air, it cannot be used for 
inerted atmospheres because of oxygen deficiency. 
 

79
 Instruments (Tank scope) suitable for such use, while operating on a similar Wheatstone Bridge  
principle, contain a filament sensitive to variations in heat conductivity of the sample which varies  
with its hydrocarbon content. 
 
Such meters usually register over the range 0 to 25 per cent hydrocarbon vapour by volume and 
 are useful for monitoring inerting operations. 
 
 
 
          

 
 
Toxic gas indicator 
 
Toxic gas detectors usually operate on the principle of absorption of the toxic gas in a chemical tube 
which 
 results in a colour change.  
 
 Immediately prior to use, the ends are broken from a sealed glass tube. This is inserted into the bellows  
unit and a sample aspirated through it. The reaction between the gas being sampled and the chemical 
 contained in the tube causes a colour change.  
 
Usually, readings are taken from the length of the colour stain against an indicator scale marked on the  
tube. These are most often expressed in parts per million (ppm).  
 
Some tubes, however, require the colour change to be matched against a control provided with the  
instruction manual. As tubes may have a specific shelf life, they are date‐stamped and are accompanied  
by an instruction leaflet which lists any different gases which may interfere with the accuracy of the 
 indication. 
When using this type of instrument, it is important to aspirate the bulb correctly if reliable results are to  

80
be obtain ows are compressed and
ned. Normallly, the bello d the unbrokken tube inseerted. By this means thee 
instrumeent is checke
ed for leaks p
prior to breaaking the tub
be. If found tto be faulty, it should bee replaced.
 

     
 
Perso
onal Gas Instrumentss 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

81
Chapter 7: CARGO CALCULATIONS 
 
Liquefied Gas cargoes are carried at sea at or near their boiling points in equilibrium with their 
vapours. Unlike other cargo calculations involving bulk liquids when we calculate the cargo 
quantity of any given tank we consider both the LIQUID and VAPOUR states. We calculate the 
quantity of cargo in each state separately and in order to obtain the total quantity we add the 
weight of cargo both in vapour and liquid state to finally obtain the final weight. 
 
On discharge it is common practice on gas carriers to retain on board a small amount of cargo 
liquid usually called “heel”. This is done to maintain the tank temperature during the ballast 
voyage while the ship is en route to the load port. 
Without this minimum amount of heel it would be very difficult to maintain tank shell 
temperatures. 
The quantity of heel already present in the cargo tank is always calculated in the intial 
calculations prior loading as the final quantity of cargo loaded is obtained after deducting this 
same amount from the total cargo on board ship after completion of loading. 
 
There are two parts of the cargo calculation. In each calculation we calculate the quantites of 
cargo in the liquid and vapour state. 
 
Initial calculation is always done PRIOR any operation either at load port or discharge port. 
Final Calculation is carried out on completion of the cargo operation either loading or discharging 
to obtain the quantity of cargo either LOADED or DISCHARGED.  
 
Before proceeding further it is very important to understand the difference between “Weight” 
and “Mass”. 
Mass: It is the amount of matter in any given object. Mass is characteristic of an object. It would 
be the same anywhere, either on earth or in space (zero gravity) 
Mass is the only SI unit not based on fundamental atomic properties or the speed of light. The 
reference standard is a small platinum cylinder of exactly 1 kilogram made in the late 1880’s and 
kept under inert conditions at the Bureau International des Poids et Measures  near Paris. 
 
Weight:  Weight is the gravitational force exerted on a given mass of a body. It would differ 
depending on the location. The same mass would have a different weight on earth and in space 
because unlike on earth where the gravitational force is 9.8 kgm/s2 , in space there is zero gravity 
so its weight would be much less as compared to earth. 
 
On similar lines we have two terms used in the Cargo Calculations called “Weight in Air” and 
“Weight in Vacuum”.  Cargo quantities calculated on board gas carriers are weights in vacuum . 
To convert this weight obtained in vacuum to weight in air we have to multiply by a factor which 
is obtained from ASTM Table 56 corresponding to the Density at 15 deg C  
Relative Density (Specific Gravity): The “relative density” or “specific gravity” of a liquid is defined 
as the ratio of the weight in vacuum of a given volume of that liquid at a specified temperature to 
the weight in vacuum of an equal volume of pure water at a specified temperature. 

82
It is very important that when this ratio is reported the reference temperatures must also be 
stated. For example, relative density 15°C/20°C means the ratio of the true density of the liquid 
at 15°C to the true density of water at 20°C. 
         LOADING / DISCHARGING 
PART A ‐‐‐ Gauging          
      BEFORE  AFTER 
A  Trim  m    
B  Sounding  m    
C  Corrected Sounding  m    
READINGS 

D  Temperature of Liquid (Avg)  Deg C    

E  Temperature of Vapour  (Avg)  Deg C    
F  Tank Pressure       

G  Full Tank Volume  m3    
Part B ‐ Calculation of Liquid Mass     BEFORE  AFTER 
H  Liquid Volume  m3    
K  Shrinkage Factor       
L  Corrected Liquid Volume (HxK) m3    
Volume Reduction Factor 
LIQUID  

M  (Astm Table 54B)       
N  Volume at 15 Deg C ( L x M )  m3    

P  Density (at 15 Deg C )  kg/m3    

Q  Liquid Mass  ( Nx P )  kg    
Part C ‐ Calculation of Vapour  Mass     BEFORE  AFTER 
R  Vapour Volume  m3    
Shrinkage Factor ( for obs 
S  temp)       
VAPOUR 

Corrected Vapour Volume (R x 
T  S ) (at obs temp)  m3    
Density of vapour ( at obs 
V  temp) (*** formula below)  kg/m3    

W  Mass of vapour ( Tx V )  kg    
 
Total Mass ( Weight in Vacuum)  = (Q + W) (kg) 
 
(To convert weight in vacuum to weight in air we must multiply the factor obtained from ASTM 
Table 56 to the Total Mass to get the Total Weight in Air) 

83
Case 1 
A fully pressurised ship loading propane at 20°C with relief valves set at 16 barg. 
R
LL  FL  
L
Reference temperature +49°C (corresponding to SVP of 16 + 1 =17 bar for propane) 
Density of liquid propane at 49°C     = 452 kg/m3 
Loading temperature +20°C 
Density of liquid propane at 20°C     = 502 kg/m3 

452
LL  98   88.2   
502
Therefore, the tank can be filled to 88.2 per cent of tank volume. 

Case 2 
A semi‐pressurised ship loading propane at‐42°C with relief valves set at 5 barg and having no 
additional pressure relieving facility fitted. 
Here, since no additional pressure relief is fitted in accordance with the Gas Codes, the reference 
temperature must be taken as the temperature corresponding to vapour pressure at set pressure 
of relief valves, i.e. a temperature corresponding to an SVP of 5+1=6 bar. 
Reference temperature  = + 8°C  
Density of liquid propane at 8°C  = 519 kg/m3 Loading 
temperature  = ‐42°C  
Density of liquid propane at ‐42°C  = 582 kg/m3 

519
LL  98   87.4   
582
Thus, the tank can be filled to 87.4 per cent of tank volume. 

Case 3 
A fully refrigerated ship loading propane at ‐42°C with relief valves set at 0.25 barg. 
Reference temperature  = ‐37.5°C 
Density of liquid propane at ‐37.5°C  = 577 kg/m3 
Loading temperature ‐42°C 
Density of liquid propane at ‐42°C  = 582 kg/m3 

577
LL  98   97.1   
582

Thus, the tank can be filled to 97.1 per cent of tank volume. 

 
 

84
 
To determine the Vapour Density at Vapour Space Conditions we use the following 
formula: 
 
 
D(vt) = T(s) x  P(v)   x M (m)         kg/m3 
‐‐‐‐       ‐‐‐‐       ‐‐‐‐‐‐ 
T (v)    P(s)        I 
 
Where: T (s) is the Standard Temperature of value 288K (15°C) 
T (v) is absolute temperature of vapour in degrees Kelvin 
P (v) is the absolute pressure of vapour space in bar 
P (s) is the standard pressure of 1.013 bar 
M (m) is the molecular mass 
I is the ideal gas molar volume at Standard Temperature of 288K and Standard pressure of 1.013 
bar of value = 23.645m3/ kmol. 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

85
Chapter 8:  CARGO OPERATIONS ON BOARD GAS CARRIERS 
 
When a gas carrier is delivered from a shipyard and is on its maiden voyage from the shipyard to 
the first load port generally to load the initial coolant stock which will later be used to cool down 
the cargo tanks all cargo tanks and pipelines are in an inerted condition. 
 
At the first load port normally, gassing up of one cargo tank is done alongside the terminal and 
after this tank has been gassed up and cool down is completed a very minimal amount of coolant 
stock is loaded in this cargo tank so that the remaining cargo tanks are gassed up at sea. 
 
During the commercial life of a gas carrier at sea there are several key operations routinely 
carried out when carrying out a 100% gas change. 
These are 1) Warming up also called Hot gassing of the cargo tank  
                  2) Inerting of the cargo tank 
                  3) Gassing up with cargo vapour of the next grade of cargo to be loaded 
                  4) Cool down in order to cool down the tank shell as close as is practically possible prior 
loading the next grade prior loading. 
 
In case man entry has to be done in a cargo tank after Warming up and inerting the cargo tank we 
will aerate the cargo tank with air so as to increase oxygen content to 21% which is mandatory. 
 
Before we can actually discuss the procedures involved it is very important to first understand 
two things 
1) Order of gas densities  
2) Location of suction / discharge of cargo pipelines inside a cargo tank on board a gas 
carrier. 
 
 
 
ORDER OF GAS DENSITIES 
 
From Lightest gas to heaviest the order is as follows: 
Nitrogen (Lightest) 
Air / Ammonia  
Inert Gas 
Lpg Vapour 
 
In short (“NAIL” is an easy way to remember) 
During the various procedures always remember to introduce the lighter gas from the top and 
the heavier gas at the bottom. 
 
 
 
 

86
Diagrammatic representation of cargo pipelines inside a gas carrier cargo tank 

 
 
 
The vapour line suction is located at the top of the cargo tank. The main function of this line is to 
take vapour suction (also called boil off) from the cargo tank to the cargo compressor room. 
Normally it is colour coded yellow on gas carriers and valves attached to this pipeline have the 
notation “V”. 
 
The Liquid line (also known as Loading / Discharging line) has its end at the bottom of the cargo 
tank , located in the pump sump normally about 0.3 metres above the tank top. This cargo 
pipeline is used for loading and discharging the cargo. It is colour coded red on gas carriers and all 
valves attached to this pipeline have the notation “ L ”. 
 
The Condensate line has the main function of returning the reliquefied gas called condensate 
from the cargo compressor room back to either the same cargo tank or another cargo tank 
having the same grade. There are two spray rails called “top spray” and “bottom spray” The 
selection for the type of spray rail to be used would depend on the cargo operation and is made 
outside the cargo tank on the tank dome. The valves attached to this pipeline have the notation 
“C”. 
 
Prior to explaining the various procedures in detail let us take a moment to revisit the definitions 
of the procedures about to be discussed. 

87
 
Drying operation: A procedure carried out on new building ship deliveries after delivery from the 
shipyard and prior to loading the first cargo either coolant stock or main cargo. It is a procedure 
carried out to remove any traces of water vapour remaining in the cargo tank as lpg cargoes react 
with water to form hydrates which is very bad for the cargo system. Drying operation is normally 
carried out using inert gas either from shore or from the ships Inert Gas Plant on board. 
 
Warming Up: It is a procedure carried out in order to remove any traces of heel or liquid cargo 
along the tank floor after discharging the entire cargo and in order to prepare the cargo tank to 
carry the next grade of cargo. This is normally done by hot gassing the cargo tank. 
 
Inerting of cargo tank: This is a procedure followed on gas carriers in order to reduce the 
hydrocarbon content in the cargo tank from 100 pct LEL to 2 pct LEL.  
 
Aerating of cargo tank : If we need to make man entry in the cargo tank after the cargo tank has 
been inerted we aerate the cargo tank or introduce air inside the cargo tank with the main goal of 
increasing oxygen content from 2pct ( after inerting the cargo tank) to 21 pct . 
 
Gassing up: This is a procedure carried out on gas carriers after inerting (except in the case of 
ammonia) by which we introduce cargo vapours of the next grade of cargo to be loaded. 
 
Cool down: In order to load LPG cargo which is at a very low temperature the tank shell must be 
cooled down to as near as is practically possible to the temperature of the next cargo to be 
loaded. This is known as Cool down. 
 
Tank inspection                                                                                                                                                                 
Before any cargo operations are carried out it is essential that cargo tanks are thoroughly 
inspected for cleanliness; that all loose objects are removed; and that all fittings are properly 
secured. In addition, any free water must be removed. Once this inspection has been completed, 
the cargo tank should be securely closed and air drying operations may start. 

Drying 
Drying the cargo handling system in any refrigerated ship is a necessary precursor to loading. This 
means that water vapour and free water must all be removed from the system. If this is not done, 
the residual moisture can cause problems with icing and hydrate formation within the cargo 
system. (The reasons are clear when it is appreciated that the quantity of water condensed when 
cooling down a 1000m3 tank containing air at atmospheric pressure, 30°C and 100% humidity to 
0°C would be 25 litres.) 
Whatever method is adopted for drying, care must be taken to achieve the correct dew point 
temperature. Malfunction of valves and pumps due to ice or hydrate formation can often result 
from an inadequately dried system. While the addition of antifreeze may be possible to allow 
freezing point depression at deep‐well pump suctions, such a procedure must not substitute for 
thorough drying. (Antifreeze is only used on cargoes down to ‐48°C; propanol is used as a de‐icer 
down to ‐108°C but below this temperature, for cargoes such as LNG, no de‐icer is effective.) 
 
Drying of tank atmosphere can be accomplished in several ways. These are described below. 

88
Drying using inert gas from the shore 
Drying may be carried out as part of the inerting procedure when taking inert gas from the shore 
and this is now commonly done. This method has the advantage of providing the dual functions 
of lowering the moisture content in tank atmospheres to the required dew point and, at the 
same time, lowering the oxygen content. A disadvantage of this and the following method is that 
more inert gas is used than if it is simply a question of reducing the oxygen content to a particular 
value. 

Drying using inert gas from ship's plant 
Drying can also be accomplished at the same time as the inerting operation when using the ship's 
inert gas generator but satisfactory water vapour removal is dependent on the specification of 
the inert gas system. Here, the generator must be of suitable capacity and the inert gas of 
suitable quality — but the necessary specifications are not always a design feature of this 
equipment. The ship's inert gas generator is sometimes provided with both a refrigerated dryer 
and an adsorption drier  which, taken together, can reduce dew points at atmospheric pressure 
to ‐45°C or below 
 
Warming up (Also known as hot gassing of the cargo tank)  
 In order to remove the residual heel or traces of cargo liquid of the previous grade of LPG cargo 
warming up the cargo tank is carried using the hot gas ( by passing expansion valve) and then via 
the condensate line and bottom condensate rail inside the cargo tank. Initially as the liquid cargo 
vaporizes the tank pressure increases and this can be again led via the vapour line to the cargo 
compressor room for reliquefaction. Normally one compressor would be lined up on 
reliquefaction and the condensate would be sent to ANOTHER tank and NOT the SAME cargo 
tank having the same grade of cargo. In very rare cases do we vent off this at sea. Normally the 
reliquefied gas is stored in another cargo tank or in the deck tank.  
 
As we warm up the tank the bottom tank temperatures will slowly start increasing from negative 
towards zero and eventually become positive. When the bottom temperature of the cargo tank 
crosses zero from negative to positive and is say +1 deg C we call the tank “liquid free”. Ideally we 
continue hot gassing the cargo tank till the temperature of the bottom reaches +10 to  + 15 deg 
C. We continue running the reliquefaction compressor and take out as much cargo vapour 
suction as is possible and generally stop at low tank pressure alarm (normally 20mb) and before 
the compressor trips or cargo tank goes into vacuum. 
 
Proper planning, good management of cargo compressors will ensure a quick and efficient 
warming up operation. Remember the tank bottom needs to be liquid free or positive 
temperature and the tank pressure must be as low as is possible before you can proceed further. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

89
Diagram
mmatic rep
presentatio
on of “Warming up”” the Cargo
o Tank  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

90
Inerting of Cargo Tank 
 
Inerting of a cargo tank is carried out mainly to reduce the Hydrocarbon content and Oxygen 
content in an existing cargo tank mainly for any one of the two reasons. 
 
We need to inert the cargo tank and then aerate the cargo tank so that we can make man entry 
later. 
We need to carry out a 100 pct gas change or grade change of previous cargo grade as specified 
in the Charter Party Agreement. Some charter parties are not very insistent on a 100 pct grade 
change in which case inerting is only carried out prior man entry in that tank. 
 
Prior inerting any cargo tank we need to make sure that the dew point of the I.G entering the 
cargo tank is minimum below ‐45 deg C and secondly that the oxygen content is not more than 2 
pct. 
When inerting a cargo tank at sea which is the normal practice, the ship’s Inert Gas plant is 
designed to supply inert gas meeting this requirement. 
Some ships are fitted with even more advanced Inert gas plants which can deliver dew point as 
low as ‐75 deg C. 
Once the Inert gas is meeting this requirement it is introduced from the top of the cargo tank 
(normally from the aeration line) as it is LIGHTER than lpg cargo vapour. 
From the liquid line, suction is taken to the manifold where a flexible elbow is connected to the 
vapour line and led to the cargo compressor room for reliquefaction.  
 
The MANUAL VAPOUR VALVE on the tank dome in question is kept FULLY SHUT or else Inert gas 
will enter the cargo system and cause severe high temperatures and problems for the cargo 
compressors as cargo compressors on ship are designed to only reliquefy LPG vapour and not 
inert gas. 
As this is a “Displacement” method it is very important to maintain a pressure differential 
throughout without causing mix up due to turbulence. Simultaneously readings with a portable 
Hydrocarbon meter or HC detector are taken for top , middle and bottom vapour sampling points 
located on the tank dome. 
Initially as the tank has hydrocarbon vapour all readings will be 100 pct. As the tank gets inerted 
these readings will start to decrease from the top downwards and finally settle at 2 pct LEL.  
When the bottom reading shows 2 pct LEL we call that cargo tank Inerted. On completion all 
readings from top, middle and bottom must show 2 % LEL HC Vapour. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

91
 
Diagrammatic representation of “Inerting” the Cargo Tank  
 
 
INERT GAS 
TO MANIFOLD 
AERATION / IG LINE  CROSSOVER 
ON TANK DOME 

CARGO VAPOUR

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

92
Gassing up of Cargo Tank 
 
After inerting the cargo tank, the next step in a 100 pct gas change operation involves gassing up 
the cargo tank with cargo vapour of the next grade of cargo to be loaded.  
 
In order to carry out this operation successfully we need to initially have the cargo vaporizer 
running and ready. Depending on the temperature of the sea water either seawater or glycol will 
be chosen as the heating medium. Sea water is not used below 4 deg C as there is a great risk of 
damage due to the abnormal expansion of water below 4 deg C.  
 
At sea the cargo vapour is generated from either coolant stock stored in the deck tank or stored 
in another cargo tank sufficient to gassup the required number of cargo tanks. In extremely rare 
cases is the gassing up operation of an entire cargo tank carried out alongside terminal as it is a 
very costly affair. 
Prior to starting careful attention must be given to line up. Normally a briefing would be carried 
out by the Cargo Officer with the personnel involved just to make things clear and leave no room 
for doubt. 
 
The most efficient way to get a very good vapour generation is by keeping the cargo rate of inlet 
to the cargo vaporizer as low as is practically possible and by having the sea water or glycol which 
serves as the heating medium as warm as is practically possible.  
 
Cargo is bled into the cargo vaporizer using the condensate line (which has a very low rate of 
about 4 mt / hr, depending on the make and model of cargo compressor fitted on board). As this 
liquid condensate passes through the cargo heater it gets heated up by the glycol or seawater 
passing on the outside of the tubes and causes the cargo to vaporize. By the time it reaches the 
discharge end of the cargo vaporizer it is completely vaporized. 
This cargo vapour of the next grade of cargo to be loaded is then led via the vapour line to the 
manifold where a flexible elbow connects it to the liquid line. 
Being heavier than inert gas, the LPG vapour is introduced into the cargo tank from the bottom 
via the liquid line. 
 
From the top of the cargo tank in question, via the aeration line, the Inert Gas is vented to the 
atmosphere. Throughout this operation we need to maintain a constant release of inert gas 
vapour from the top of the cargo tank via the aeration line and simultaneously introduce LPG 
vapour to the bottom of the cargo tank via the liquid line. This will ensure a very good 
displacement of inert gas by the LPG vapour. Any stoppages in between will cause the interface 
between the two gases existing to be lost. 
 
Continuous monitoring with a portable Hydrocarbon meter will enable to very easily identify the 
level in the cargo tank at which the LPG vapour is. Initially as the tank was inerted, all three 
readings obtained from top, middle and bottom sampling points will be 2 pct LEL. 
 
As the LPG vapour rises in the cargo tank by displacement method the readings with the same 
instrument will slowly start increasing from the bottom. On completion of gassing up, all three 

93
readings obtained from top , middle and bottom will show 100 pct LEL HC Vapour. Once all three 
readings are 100 pct we call the cargo tank “Gassed up”. 
 
 
 
 
Diagrammatic representation of “Gassing up” a cargo tank. 
 
 
CARGO VAPOUR IN 
   IG VAPOUR TO VENT MAST 

  MANUAL VAPOUR VALVE ON 
TANK DOME MUST BE SHUT 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

94
Cooling Down  
 
Cooling down is very necessary in order to lower the tank shell temperature to as close as is 
practical to the temperature of loading the next cargo. Generally most terminals only permit a 
maximum tolerance of not more than 5 deg C from the tank shell bottom temperature obtained 
on completion of cooling down the cargo tank and that of the loading temperature of the next 
cargo to be loaded in that same cargo tank. 
 
This is mainly because after inerting and gassing up a cargo tank which can take almost 36 hours, 
the tank shell becomes warmer than the temperature of the next cargo to be loaded. If we 
attempt to load a very cold LPG cargo in an uncooled tank shell besides causing severe brittle 
fracture (cracking of tank shell) there will tremendous boil off produced inside the cargo tank 
which will definitely cause the safety relief valves to lift resulting in very severe fines by the 
terminal and definite blacklisting of ship. 
 
Cooling down the tank shell is the last stage in a complete gas change and it is only once this is 
completed that we come to know how good or bad the gassing up of cargo tank has been. 
 
With the cargo compressors lined up (definitely not more than 2 cargo compressors on any one 
cargo tank) vapour suction of the next grade of cargo to be loaded is taken from the top and the 
reliquefied gas or condensate is led to the same tank dome via condensate lines and sprayed into 
the cargo tank using the TOP SPRAY RAIL only.  
 
Initially as the tank shell is warm; spraying cold condensate will result in more vapour generation 
in the same tank which is again taken out via the vapour line to the cargo compressor room for 
reliquefaction. 
The cargo condensate is again returned to the same cargo tank and sprayed via the top rail. This 
process is done repeatedly. 
After a while the tank shell starts cooling down which is measured by the temperature sensors 
located at various positions of top, middle, and bottom inside the cargo tank. 
The thumb rule is not to cool down the tank shell faster than 4 deg C / hr. This is a standard 
practice at sea recommended by all gas shipping companies and charterers in order to avoid 
excessive thermal stresses of the tank shell. 
 
Once the tank has been successfully cooled , it follows simultaneously that the cargo tank 
pressure of that particular cargo tank starts to fall as there is no more vapour generation in that 
cargo tank. 
If the entire gas change operation is done carefully the tank bottom shell temperature will 
automatically arrive as close as is possible to the temperature of the next cargo to be loaded. 
 
 
 
 

95
Diagrammatic representation of “Cooling down a cargo tank” 
 
FROM  CARGO 
COMPRESSOR ROOM 
TO CARGO COMPRESSOR 
ROOM 

 
 
 
 

96
LOADING Operation 
 
Prior starting the Loading Operation on board a gas tanker ensure that the Cargo Tank Safety 
Relief Valves MARVS have been changed to 450 barg. 
 
Confirm that the condensate return is set to bottom. 
 
Cross check that the Line Up is correct for the operation at hand. 
Ensure that Cargo Strainers have been fitted in the Liquid line. 
Test communication with all key personnel on board and also with the shore. Ensure back‐up 
shore radio is also working satisfactorily. 
 
Ensure that all required Generators are started and that the Gas Engineer and Deck Crew of the 
watch are standby . Duty Officer must be standby at the Cargo Manifold area . 
Confirm all key personnel are in position . Test communication. 
Confirm that the Filling valve of the first tank to be loaded is Fully Open.  
 
Commence loading at a slow rate . Usually this is around 100 m3 / hr unless specifically instructed 
by the terminal. 
 
Once the cargo liquid reaches the cargo tank in question there will be a rapid increase in the boil 
off as the cold liquid comes in contact with the warmer tank shell.  
 
Cargo Compressors to be started as required and the condensate return must be sent back to the 
“bottom” of the tank. Once the tank pressure has stabilised / reduced the rate of loading may be 
progressively increased till max rate for that terminal and vessel’s capabilities.  
 
Always remember that increasing the rate must only be done once you are satisfied that the tank 
pressures are under control. There is no fixed time given to achieve MAX rate from starting cargo. 
 
Always remember “ Safety First ” 
 
 
 
Important 
During any cargo operation on a gas tanker  whether it be loading or discharging 
continuous rounds on deck to check for leaks , to tend to the moorings as required , 
to check manifold position , to check the position of the fire wires , to check 
position of the Shore Gangway must be stressed upon.  
 
 
 
 

97
DISCHARGING Operation 
 
Prior starting any discharge operation on a gas tanker ensure that there is sufficient power 
supply. 
  
Normally the terminal would give the vessel about 10‐15 minutes notice prior starting cargo. 
Once this notice is received the Duty Engineer can be contacted to start the Generators. As a 
precaution we normally start all Generators. If they are not required they can be unloaded at a 
later stage with the knowledge of the Chief Engineer and Chief Officer.  
 
Ensure that the Line – Up is correct. Check , check and recheck (using the strainer by pass route to 
manifold) 
Ensure that the manifold arms are connected and leak tested. 
Ensure that all deck watch personnel are standby. 
If using Deepwell pumps for discharging ensure that the pumps are “free to turn ” 
 
Test communication with all key personnel and also with the terminal. 
Once the terminal is ready to accept the cargo start one cargo pump at minimum rate ( Keep 
filling valve open at least 75‐80 pct ) . 
Ask the Gas Engineer to verify that the cargo is following the intended line up.  
 
This is done by placing the hand under the bottom side of the liquid line and following the line – 
up till the manifold. At very low rates it is almost impossible to get the line iced up but the line 
will feel cool to touch and is easily recognizable.  
 
Ask the Duty Officer to report the manifold temperatures and pressures. 
A drop in manifold temperature accompanied by verbal confirmation from the Gas Engineer and 
Duty Officer that the liquid lines are cool to touch confirms the cargo liquid is travelling from the 
cargo tank via the manifold ashore.  
 
Deck Duty watch keepers to make rounds on deck to check for leaks. 
Ensure that Gangway is manned at all times. 
Remind the Manifold Watch to maintain a safe distance from the cargo arms.  
 
Once the terminal requests to increase the rate gradually start one cargo pump at a time always 
following all “safety” precautions. 
 
Always remind the deck watch to stand clear when “starting” cargo pumps. 
If requested by the Duty Engineer inform the Duty Engineer if more than 2 cargo pumps are 
started as they may need to start additional Generators .  
 
Once the vessel is on Max Discharge Rate as declared inform the terminal accordingly. 
Hourly record keeping of all cargo parameters is essential. 
Once the Chief Officer is satisfied that the operations are underway safely he must rest non‐
essential personnel. 

98
The Gas Engineer and Chief Officer must leave their Written instructions for the Duty Officer and 
once he / she has understood the same must sign the same. 
 
 
LOADING Operation 
(With / without Vapour return) 
 
Loading with Vapour Return 
At some gas terminals there is a possibility of connecting the vapour return line to shore. 
When the vapour return line to shore is connected to the ship’s vapour line then the vapours in 
the ship’s system and shore system become common.  
 
Advantages of Vapour Return Line 
 Higher discharge rate as shore cargo compressors assist in reliquefaction of cargo vapour. 
 Vessel generally would not need to run Cargo Vaporiser. 
 Savings in terms of Vessel’s reliquefaction machinery may not be required during the  
              discharge operation.  
 
Disadvantages of having vapour return line 
 
× High shore tank pressures will also affect the ship system. 
× From experience it has been found that the promised vapour return rate is actually much   
             less and as a result vessel has to start cargo vaporiser. 
× Shore incondensibles can contaminate the ship system.  
 
 
 
Loading without Vapour Return 
At some gas terminals there is NO possibility of connecting the vapour return line to shore. 
Therefore this means that now the vessel must maintain positive tank pressure using her own 
Reliquefaction Plant. 
 
 
 
Advantages of NO Vapour Return Line 
 
 Ship system cannot be contaminated by shore incondensibles. Remember the 
Reliquefaction Plant is the heart of a gas carrier. So the healthy and proper working of cargo 
compressors is important to maintaining cargo tank pressures below the MARVS. 
 No need to connect Vapour Return Line at Manifold. 
 
 
 
 

99
Disadvantages of having NO vapour return line 
 
X  Ship will need to maintain positive tank pressures. So at higher discharge rates it will be 
necessary to start the Cargo Vaporiser. 
 
X Maximum discharge rate would in a sense be also restricted by the amount of cargo vapour 
generated. The efficiency of Sea Water as a heating medium drops as the sea water temperature 
drops and if the Sea Water Temperature falls below 4 Deg C it may also be required to run the 
Glycol system to the Cargo Heater.  
 
 
Discharging using Booster Pump  
 
At some gas terminals it may be required to discharge the cargo against a high back pressure . 
Usually this is declared in the Pre Discharge Meeting between the Ship and the Terminal. 
This could be because maybe the shore tanks are already partly full or maybe they are located 
very far away and at a higher level than the ship’s tanks. 
 
As a thumb rule if in doubt, observe the manifold outboard pressure gauge prior starting the 
discharge operation and if the manifold outboard pressure gauge reads a pressure > 6 barg 
contact the terminal and confirm the shore tank pressure. Sometimes they could be preparing 
their system.  
 
Once it is confirmed that the back pressure is very high > 6‐7 barg then it will be needed to start 
the booster pump on board as the normal discharge pressure of a cargo pump is about 5.5 – 6 
barg . You will also need to inform the Duty Engineer to start additional Generators and inform 
the Gas Engineer.  
 
Starting and stopping the Booster Pump requires special care and it is very 
important to stress here that the manufacturers' instructions must ALWAYS be 
complied with. 
 
Before starting the Booster Pump we must first ensure that the requirement for minimum 
pressure on the suction side of the booster pump ( usually about 6 barg ) is met . 
In order to achieve this we may need to start two cargo pumps. 
Once the minimum discharge pressure has been obtained on the suction side of the booster 
pump , start the booster pump keeping the discharge valve of the booster pump fully shut.  
 
 
As soon as we start the booster pump there will be a very high pressure on the discharge side of 
the booster pump. The manual valve can be now gradually opened and at the same time the 
manual manifold valve can be simultaneously opened thus allowing the liquid to be sent ashore. 
Normally in this type of a discharge operation we also will require to use the Cargo Heater. 
 

100
We must not throttle any valves on the Cargo Heater inlet or outlet and only control the entire 
operation by opening or closing the discharge valve on the booster pump. 
Remember that while you open the discharge valve on the booster pump do it very very slowly as 
careful attention must be paid to the suction side of the booster pump. 
 
Opening the manual valve on the booster pump very fast may result in the inlet pressure on the 
suction side of the booster pump to fall below the minimum required pressure which will result in 
tripping the Booster pump. 
 
It is also very important to note that once the system is stabilised we should not throttle the 
discharge valves on the cargo pump as this could affect the inlet pressure to the suction side of 
the booster pump which may trip the entire system. 
 
 
 
Booster Pumps in series or in parallel 
At some terminals it may be required to run Booster pumps in series to overcome High Back 
pressure ( > 13‐14 barg ) or it may be required to run booster pumps in parallel to increase the 
discharge rate as requested by the terminal. 
 
 
 
Proper planning and constant monitoring remain the keys to a 
safe operation. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

101
Chapter 9: Documentation 
 
The transport of liquefied gas is subject to similar commercial documentation as found for oil 
cargoes. The documents accompanying cargoes of liquefied gas normally include those 
described in this section. 
 
Bill of Lading 
 
Considering the documents covered below, the Bill of Lading is the most important and is the 
basis against which the cargo receiver can assess if the proper quantity has been discharged.  
 
The shipmaster, before departure from the loading terminal, should ensure that the Bill of 
Lading quantities accurately represent the cargo loaded. 
 
The shipmaster should also be sure that cargo calculation records made at loading and 
discharge are properly prepared. 
 
A Bill of Lading is a document signed by the shipmaster at the port of loading. It details the 
type and quantity of cargo loaded, the name of the ship and the name of the cargo receiver.  
 
The cargo quantity written on the Bill of Lading can be the shore tank figure or the quantity as 
given by shore‐based custody transfer meters.  
 
However, in many gas trades it is commonly found that the ship's figure is used and this is 
calculated after completion of loading, usually with verification from an independent cargo 
surveyor. 
 
The Bill of Lading has three functions.  
 The shipmaster's receipt for cargo loaded. 
 A document of title for the cargo described in it. 
 Evidence that a Contract of Carriage (such as a voyage charter party) exists 
 
As such, the Bill of Lading is a vital document in the trade. By signing the document, the 
shipmaster attests to the apparent good order and condition of the cargo loaded. 
By signing the Bill of Lading, the shipmaster agrees to the quantity of cargo loaded and any 
subsequent claim for cargo loss will hinge on the quantity stated on the document.  
 
In some circumstances, where the Bill of Lading quantities do not match the ship's figure, 
the shipmaster may be expected to issue a Letter of Protest at the loading port.  
 
The most important function of a Bill of Lading is as a document of title.  
Whoever possesses the Bill of Lading rightfully owns the cargo and can demand a 
shipmaster to discharge that cargo to him. 
 

102
Should a cargo be sold on the water — that is before it reaches its destination — the Bill of 
Lading must be endorsed by the original cargo buyer to show the new cargo owner.  
 
Accordingly, as an alternative to presenting the original Bill of Lading to the ship master, a 
receiver may issue a Letter of Indemnity (LOI) to the ship. The terms of the Letter of Indemnity 
should be agreed between the ship charterer and the ship owner. As the name suggests, such 
a letter indemnifies the ship‐owner against any subsequent claims to the cargo and against 
wrongful discharge. 
 
Certificate of Quantity 
 
A Certificate of Quantity is issued by the loading terminal as, or on behalf of, the shipper and 
the cargo quantities declared as loaded may be verified by an independent cargo surveyor.  
 
The certificate is of assistance to the shipmaster in determining the quantities to be inserted 
in the Bill of Lading. However, the quantities as stated on the Bill of Lading remain the official 
record of the cargo as loaded. 
 
Certificate of Quality 
 
A Certificate of Quality provides the product specification and quality in terms of physical 
characteristics (such as vapour pressure and density) and component constituents.  
 
It is issued by the loading terminal as, or on behalf of, the shipper or may be issued by an 
independent cargo inspection service. 
 
 The data contained in the document assists the shipmaster in signing the Bill of Lading. 
 
Certificate of Origin 
 
A Certificate of Origin is a document issued by the manufacturer or shipper, countersigned by 
the customs authorities, which attests to the country in which the cargo was produced.  
 
It may be required by financial authorities in the importing country so that they may assess 
import taxes or grants. 
 
Time Sheet 
 
The Time Sheet records all salient port‐times, from a ship's port entry until final departure.  
 
The Time Sheet is usually prepared by an independent cargo surveyor or the ship's agent and 
is checked and countersigned by the shipmaster and the shore terminal. 
 Its purpose is to provide an agreed statement of facts relating to the timing of events and 
delays during the ship's port call and is used to facilitate demurrage claims. 

103
 
Cargo Manifest 
 
A Cargo Manifest is usually prepared by the ship's agent at the loading port or by the 
shipmaster and lists all cargoes according to the Bills of Lading.  
Its purpose is to provide readily available data for customs authorities and ships' agents in the 
discharge port.  
 
The appropriate preparation of the Cargo Manifest is controlled by the SOLAS convention. 
 
Certificate of Tank Fitness 
 
A Certificate of Tank Fitness is usually issued by a specialist chemist from a cargo surveying 
company and is issued where particular tank cleanliness conditions are required prior to 
loading. 
 
Certificate of Inhibitor Addition 
An Inhibitor Information Form is issued by the loading terminal or by the cargo manufacturer. 
 
Letter of Protests 
Letter of Protest can be issued by ship and also by shore. 
 
Examples:  
 1) Slow Loading Rate by Ship / Shore  
2) Slow Discharge Rate by Ship due to High Shore Tank Pressures restricting increase in rate 
by ship 
3) Warm Cargo 
4) Difference in Cargo quantity obtained from ship and shore. 
 
Thumb Rule : If in Doubt – Issue a Letter of Protest  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

104
Chapter 10: Care of Cargo during Carriage at sea 
 
For all refrigerated and semi‐pressurised gas carriers, it is necessary to maintain strict control of 
cargo temperature and pressure throughout the loaded voyage.  
 
This is achieved by reliquefying cargo boil‐off and returning it to the tanks. 
 
During these operations, incondensibles must be vented as necessary to minimise compressor 
discharge pressures and temperatures if necessary  
 
 In LNG ships, the boil‐off is burned as fuel in the ship's main boilers. 
 
Frequently, there are occasions when it is required to reduce the temperature of an LPG cargo on 
voyage.  
 
This is necessary so that the ship can arrive at the discharge port with cargo temperatures below 
that of the shore tanks. 
 
Depending on the cargo and reliquefaction plant capacity, it can often take several days to cool 
the cargo by one or two degrees centigrade, but this may be sufficient. The need for this will 
often depend on the contractual terms in the charter party. 
 
RELIQUEFACTION DURING CARRIAGE AT SEA
 

 
In this respect, poor weather conditions can sometimes present problems. Although most 
reliquefaction plants have a suction knock‐out drum to remove liquid, there is a risk, in gale 
conditions, that entrained liquid can be carried over into the compressor.  
 

105
For this reason, it is preferable not to run compressors when the ship is rolling heavily, if there 
is risk of damage 
 
In calm weather conditions, if the condensate returns are passed through the top sprays, because 
of the small vapour space and poor circulation in the tank, it is possible that a cold layer can form 
on the liquid surface.  
 
This enables the compressors to reduce the vapour pressure after only a few hours running, 
when in fact the bulk of the liquid has not been cooled at all.  
 
To achieve proper cooling of the bulk liquid, the reliquefaction plant should be run on each tank 
separately and the condensate should be returned through a bottom connection to ensure 
proper circulation of the tank contents.  
 
After the cargo has been cooled, reliquefaction capacity can be reduced to a level sufficient to 
balance the heat flow through the tank insulation.  
 
If the reliquefaction plant is being run on more than one tank simultaneously, it is important to 
ensure that the condensate returns are carefully controlled in order to avoid the overfilling of 
any one tank. 
 
Precautions to prevent Polymerisation  !!!! 
Where butadiene cargoes are being carried, the compressor discharge temperature must not 
exceed 60°C. 
 
 Similarly, in the case of vinyl chloride, compressor discharge temperatures should be limited to 
90°C to prevent polymerisation. 
 
Condition inspections   
Throughout the loaded voyage, regular checks should be made to ensure there are no defects in 
cargo equipment. 
 
On LNG ships, it may be necessary to carry out visual cold‐spot inspections of cargo tank 
surrounds even when the ships are fitted with temperature monitoring of the inner hull surfaces. 
 
 Such inspections must comply with all relevant safety procedures for entry into enclosed spaces 
and due regard must be given to hazardous atmospheres in adjacent spaces. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

106
Chapter 11: ESD – Emergency Shut down  
 
The main purpose of the ESD system is to stop cargo flow in the event of an emergency and to 
return the system to a safe, static condition so that any remedial action can be taken. 
 
 
At a number of locations around the ship (bridge front, gangway, compressor room and cargo 
control room, emergency control station), pneumatic valves or electric push buttons are 
provided. 
  
When operated, these controls close remotely activate valves and stop cargo pumps and 
compressors (where appropriate). This provides an emergency‐stop facility for cargo handling.  
 
Such emergency shut‐down (ESD) is also required to be automatic upon loss of electric control or 
valve actuator power.  
 
Furthermore, if a fire should occur at tank domes or cargo manifolds (where fusible elements are 
situated), the ESD system is automatically actuated. Individual tank filling valves are required to 
close automatically upon the actuation of an overfill sensor in the tank to which they are 
connected.  
 
ESD valves may be either pneumatically or hydraulically operated but in either case they must be 
fail‐safe; in other words they must close automatically upon loss of actuating power. 
A vital consideration, particularly during loading, is the possibility of surge pressure generation 
when the ship's ESD system is actuated. 
 
The situation varies from terminal to terminal and is a function of the loading rate, the length of 
the terminal pipeline, the rate of valve closure and the valve characteristic itself.  
 
The phenomenon of surge pressure generation is complex and its effects can be extreme, such as 
the rupture of hoses or hard arm joints. 
 
Precautions are, therefore, necessary to avoid damage and sometimes, loading jetties are fitted 
with surge pressure drums. 
 
Terminals should confirm ship's ESD valve closure times and adjust loading rates accordingly or 
place on board a means to allow the ship to actuate the terminal ESD system and so halt the flow 
of cargo before the ship's ESD valves start to close. 
 
In this respect consultation between the ship and shore must always take place, to establish the 
parameters relevant to surge pressure generation and to agree upon a safe loading rate. 
 
 
 
 

107
Pneumatic ESD Link System 
 
The earliest ship/shore links used in gas tanker projects were simple pneumatic 
umbilical links, an air hose coupled directly into the ship’s air security system. 
Such systems are inherently slow in operation, suffer from problems caused by dirt 
or moisture and it is difficult, if not impossible, to achieve accurate and repeatable 
timing. The designer must be aware that the diameter of the pipe work and dump 
valve can significantly influence the closing time. These drawbacks have led to the 
development of electronic ESD systems with fibre optic or various intrinsically‐safe 
electric systems providing the ship/shore link. 
 
 However, despite its disadvantages, having a pneumatic link is better than having 
no ESD link at all.  
 
 

 
 
 
 
In the majority of terminals, pneumatic links are only now provided as a backup 
in the event of failure of the main optical fibre or electrical link. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

108
Electric Ship/Shore Link System 
The first intrinsically‐safe electric ship/shore link was installed at the LNG stern loading berth at 
Lumut, Brunei, in 1972. This unique system provided both ESD‐1 and ESD‐2 as well as telephone 
signals. It was later replaced by a fibre‐optic link when the original berth was replaced by a 
conventional loading berth. 
 
ESD‐1 emergency shutdown stage 1: Shuts down the cargo transfer operation in a quick 
controlled manner by closing the shutdown valves and stopping the transfer pumps and other 
relevant equipment in ship and shore systems. 
 
ESD‐2 emergency shutdown stage 2: Shuts down the transfer operation (ESD‐1) and uncouples the 
loading arms after closure of both the ERS (Emergency Release System) isolation valves. 
 
ESD2 is normally initiated by the terminal and will result in all the actions as for ESD1, plus the 
initiation of a dry break of the shore arm from the ship.ESD2 may be initiated manually, for 
example, in the event of a terminal emergency, or automatically, for example, if the ship moves 
outside the movement envelope of the chicksans. 
 
The automatic disconnection of shore arms can be a violent and potentially dangerous 
operation and it is important that personnel at the manifold are warned to leave the area 
before ESD2 activation. 
 
Four types of Electric ESD 
1)    Pyle National Electric System 
2) ITT‐Cannon Telephone Link System 
3)    Miyaki Electric System 
4) SIGTTO Electric Link System 
 

 
 
 
 

109
SIGTTO Electric Link System : This system was the result of a collaborative effort by SIGTTO 
members to produce a standardised, intrinsically safe delay‐free ESD link using standard 
components as described in ‘Recommendations and Guidelines for Linked Ship/Shore Emergency 
Shut‐down of Liquefied Gas Cargo Transfer’  
 
The advantages of the system are that it provides an ESD‐1 signal in both directions; ‘arming’ the 
link requires resetting in a particular sequence. The whole system is designed and certificated to 
ensure its intrinsic‐safety is not compromised and it incorporates features for testing and fault 
indication. 
 
They are generally used in LPG and chemical gas transfer operations where many LPG carriers in 
the international trades are so fitted. 
 
Although the system has been installed in a few LNG carriers to maximise spot trading 
advantages, none of the major international LNG projects has adopted the SIGTTO link as the 
primary system and, to date, the use of this system within the LNG sector has been limited to the 
Norwegian LNG coastal network, operating small LNG carriers.  
 
 
Fibre‐Optic Ship/Shore Link System: The first optical fibre link system was developed by 
Sumitomo in association with Furukawa, and came into commercial use in 1989. 
 
The system uses a 6‐core fibre‐optic cable; two used for an ESD‐1 signal in each direction; two 
cores used with a multiplexer to provide four data channels; two cores spare. One of the data 
channels is normally reserved for mooring load monitoring and the other three for telephones. 
 

 
 
 

110
ESD will be initiated by any of the following: 
1) Manual activation by personnel using the ESD pushbuttons  
2) Loss of ship’s power  
3) Shore activation of their ESD system  
4) Fusible links around each tank domes, manifold and compressor house in case of fire  
5)  Cargo tank Very High level alarm  
6)  Low tank pressure  
7) Hold/cargo tank differential pressure  
8) Low cargo valves hydraulic pressure  
9) Low control air pressure  
10) Fire extinguisher system released.  
 
The initiation of ESD will lead to the following:  
All ship manifold valves that are open will close  
All ship’s cargo pumps that are running will trip 
All ship’s cargo compressors that are running will trip. 
All shore pumps that are running will trip  
The shore manifold valves will shut down 
Audible and visual alarm will be generated on the Main deck , Cargo Control Room and Bridge  
On LNG tankers, Master gas valve to engine room will close  
 
The ship's ESD system is active at all times, whether at sea or in port.  
 
When at sea all manifold and tank filling valves are held in the shut position and the cargo and 
spray pumps are held in the off position. 
 
 The cargo compressors may be operated as normal, but will stop if an ESD is initiated.  
 
The shore ESD input is blocked in the “At Sea” condition. 
 
The “At Sea” condition” will be selected prior to the shore connection being disconnected after 
the cargo operations have been completed.  
 
The “At Sea” condition has the following effect: 
 Isolates the shore connection from the ESD logic  
Locks the cargo pumps in the OFF condition  
Positions the manifold valves in the CLOSED position  
Positions the cargo tank filling valves in the CLOSED position  
Allows the low duty compressors to run if the ESD or low duty system trips are not activated  
Allows the high duty compressors to run if the ESD or high duty system trips are not activated 
 
 
Prior to any cargo operations in port, the “At Sea” condition must be switched to 
the “In Port” position to allow the ESD system to be fully active. 

111
Testing of the ESD 
According to the IGC Code ESD must be tested before cargo transfer operations. 
 
LNG vessels must always conduct pre‐arrival ESD system tests 48 hours before arrival at any load 
or discharge port. Additionally in the event of an extended voyage, the ESD system should again 
be tested at intervals of not more than 30 days from the previous test. 
 
 
These tests must include, but not be limited to:  
 Cargo Emergency Shutdown system test, including all push buttons and trips (These may 
be tested in rotation).  
 All Cargo and Ballast valves operated.  
 Manifold valve timings checked.  
 Check the operating parameters of nitrogen generators and barrier space pressures 
(where applicable).  
 Barrier space water detection (where applicable).  
 Check of Flame Screens on Mast Risers.  
 Ship‐Shore interface connection operations. 
Successful completion of these tests must be logged and recorded in the deck log book. 
 
Typical Gas Carrier Loading Arm 
 

 
Loading arm operating envelope 

112
 

 
 
 
Quick connect / disconnect coupling (QCDC) 

 
 
 
 
 

113
 
Powered Emergency Release Coupling (PERC) 
 

 
 
Bursting Disc & Surge Drum 
 

114
Chapter 12: OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & SAFETY PRECAUTIONS 
 
The important criteria to remember at all times are that Safety always comes FIRST. 
 
Never ever compromise on Safety. Never take short cuts!!! Always follow safety procedures.  
 
In order to help us do the job safely companies have developed Checklists that serve as a useful 
reference before starting any particular task. 
 
These Checklists must be used and all safety precautions taken BEFORE we carry out the Task.  
In case of any doubt we should not hesitate to ask for help.  
 
It is also very important to remember that the safety of the crew member that is going to carry 
out this task is also accounted for in this checklist. 
 
Crew members undertaking any task on board should always wear the Appropriate PPE                                       
(Personal Protective Equipment) for the task at hand. 
 
Tool box Talks must be carried out among persons concerned with the task. 
 
The Master of the vessel must ensure that all Safety Precautions are followed at all times.  
 
Enclosed space hazards 
 
There are four main types of hazards: 
• Hazardous atmosphere 
• Configuration hazard 
• Changing and hazardous conditions 
• Engulfment hazard 
 
Hazardous atmosphere 
There are seven types of hazardous atmospheres: 
• Oxygen depleted or oxygen enriched 
• Presence of toxic gases or liquids 
• Flammable atmosphere 
• Temperature extremes 
• Presence of dust 
• Absence of free flow of air 
 
Oxygen enriched or depleted atmosphere 
Man can live: • three weeks without food 
• three days without water 
• only three minutes without oxygen! 

115
The acceptable range of oxygen inside an enclosed space is between 19.5% and 
23.5%. Normal air contains 21% oxygen. 
 
 

 
 
 
Have you done a Risk assessment? 

 
 
 
 

116
 
 
 
IS THE PERMIT TO WORK SIGNED BY THE MASTER? 
 

 
 

117
CHECK OXYGEN CONTENT!!! 

 
 
 
CHECK THE SHIP’S PLANS BEFORE ENTERING THE ENCLOSED SPACE FOR THE FIRST TIME !!!  

 
 

118
CHECK
K THAT ALLL PIPELINEES TO THE SPACE AR
RE ISOLATEED!!!  

 
 
 

 
 

119
 
 
PRECAUTIONS FOR ELECTRICAL SAFETY  
 Ensure that the power supply to the equipment being repaired is off and 
isolated with warning signs posted informing all concerned that repair work is going 
on with the electrical equipment and it is not to be switched on. 
 Loose clothing must not be worn near moving machinery. Particular 
attention should be paid to ties and other forms of neckwear. Suitable footwear 
must be worn 
 Long hair must be protected from contact with machinery by wearing 
suitable headgear. 
 Goggles must be worn when using grinding wheels or any other process 
where there are flying particles. 
 The use of dust masks is recommended where there is prolonged exposure 
to dust or particles. 

120
 Rings should not be worn when using machinery.  
 Ensure that Company procedures are followed and that all necessary permits     
           to work are duly signed and authorized by the Master. 
 Do not use machinery without the appropriate guards and be sure that  
           guards are replaced after a machine has been re‐set. Report any defects in  
            guards or interlocks immediately.   
 Suitable guards should be provided for destructive testing machines to  
           prevent injury from any flying particles.  
 Hearing protection must be made available.  
 
PRECAUTIONS FOR HOT WORK 
 Condition of pipes/fittings checked?  
 Enclosed fabrications (e.g. tanks, pipes) checked for hazardous contents?  
  Combustible materials in area removed or covered?  
  Combustible floors protected?  
  Bulkhead / Openings protected?  
 Smoke/ heat detectors protected?  
 Master informed? 
 Fire Watch maintained? 
 All fire firefighting equipment and safety equipment needed are standby? 
 Permit to work signed by Master?  
 Check for signs of fire after work completed 
 
Code of Safe Working practices for merchant seamen Consolidated Edition 2011 
 

 
 
 

121
 Written for merchant seamen on UK registered vessels, the UK COSWP is of a 
safety‐critical nature. You’re strongly advised to refer only to the official Maritime 
and Coastguard Agency (MCA) version.  
 The 2011 print edition contains the same content as the 2010 electronic edition. 
The only difference is that it’s printed and bound.  
 Copies of the current printed edition must be carried on all UK ships (this does 
not apply to fishing vessels and pleasure craft). 
 
How many copies to have on‐board? 
 The Master, Safety officer and any members of the safety committee must each 
have their own copy. 
 
 There must be one available for general reference 
 
A copy must be made available to any seaman in the ship who requests it. 
This is in line with the Merchant Shipping (Code of Safe Working Practices for 
Merchant Seamen) Regulations 1998.  
 
The Code is arranged in 4 sections which deal with broad areas of concern. 
The introduction gives the regulatory framework for health and safety on 
board ships and overall safety responsibilities under that framework. 
 
Section 1 is largely concerned with safety management and the statutory 
duties underlying the advice in the remainder of the Code.  
  
Section 2 begins with a chapter setting out the areas that should be 
covered in introducing a new recruit to the safety procedures on board. 
 
Section 3 is concerned with various working practices common to all ships. 
 
Section 4 covers safety for specialist ship operations.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

122
POLLUTION PREVENTION 
 
General requirements for pollution prevention in the marine environment. 
 
 Most international regulations on marine pollution come from the 1973 
International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL), 
which was updated in 1978. MARPOL was developed by the International Maritime 
Organization (IMO) and is aimed at preventing and minimizing pollution from ships 
‐ both accidental and from routine operations. 
 
There have been a number of amendments to the Convention since it was first 
produced, and MARPOL now has six technical annexes covering marine pollution 
by: 
 oil 
 noxious liquid substances carried in bulk 
 harmful substances carried in packaged form 
 sewage from ships 
 garbage from ships 
 air pollution from ships 
 
The disposal of garbage and sewage from ships is a major environmental issue, and 
Annexes IV and V of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution 
from Ships were developed to address this. 
 
Within the UK, Merchant Shipping (Prevention of Pollution by Garbage) Regulations 
1998 were developed to address this and were updated in 2008 to reflect changes 
made to the system internationally.  
 
MGN 385 (M+F) Guidance on the Merchant Shipping (Prevention of Pollution by 
Sewage and Garbage from Ships) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

123
Chapter 13: The Effect of bulk liquid cargoes on trim, stability 
and structural integrity 
 
Depending upon ship design, it may be necessary to undertake loading / de‐ballasting or 
discharging / ballasting operations simultaneously.  
 
The distribution of cargo and ballast on board should at no time create excessive stress on the 
ship’s hull. 
 
If this is the case, consideration should be given to the stability of the ship, especially to free 
surface effect in tanks, correct use of cargo tank centerline bulkhead valves, and cargo and ballast 
distribution to ensure adequate stability.  
 
Care should also be taken to ensure that the weight distribution does not lead to excessive trim, 
list or stress in transverse and longitudinal directions. 
 
Concern about the introduction of alien organisms into environmentally sensitive waters and 
adjacent areas has prompted some national administrations to establish controls on the 
discharge of ballast water from ships.  
 
If it is necessary to change ballast at sea, the same care and attention must be paid to trim, 
stress and stability. 
 
On the ballast passage, in addition to dealing with excess vapour produced as the remaining 
cargo boils, the temperature of the tanks also has to be controlled so that on arrival at the 
loading terminal, the vessel berths in a ready to load condition.  
Boil of gas creating pressure rises is dealt in the same way as on the loaded passage i.e. burned as 
fuel in the boilers. 
 
As part of the statutory requirements gas tankers are provided with stability data , including the 
effects of free surface and sloshing damage to the tanks. 
Guidance should also be taken from the Cargo Handling Information Booklet which must be 
available on board.  
 
Information to be provided to Master 
 
According to the IGC Code the maximum allowable loading limits for each cargo tank should be 
indicated for each product which may be carried, for each loading temperature which may be 
applied and for the applicable maximum reference temperature, on a list to be approved by the 
Administration. Pressures at which the pressure relief valves have been set should also be stated 
on the list. A copy of the list should be permanently kept on board by the Master. 
 
 
 

124
The Damage Stability booklet 
The Damage stability booklet of the vessel which must be given to the Master of the ship lists the 
damage stability calculations for various damaged conditions for that type of gas tanker and the 
stability information for that damaged condition. 
 
Training should be carried out using assumed damaged compartments and cross checking the 
data that is provided in the manual with the information that is obtained from the Loadicator.  
 
 
 
Stress considerations are critical on a gas tanker and hourly checks alongside terminal during 
loading / discharging operations should include the observation and recording of shear forces , 
bending moments , draft and trim and any other relevant stability requirements particular to 
the tanker. 
 
 
Cargo Handling Manual 
The purpose of this manual is to give necessary basic information to ensure a correct operation of 
the ship’s cargo handling plant. In this respect, a general description of the more common 
processes is given. Since these processes are dependent on the relevant cargoes that will be 
carried on board that gas ship , the shore installation equipment , the requirements from the 
shipping agents and harbour regulations , the aim of this manual is to give certain guidelines and 
service conditions.  
 
This demands that the operators have a thorough understanding of the relevant cargoes under 
different conditions. The manual is written in a format that makes it suitable for private studying.  
 
 
The Cargo Handling Manual contains information on the following:‐  
 Safety Aspects 
 General Theory 
 Plant Description 
 Control and Measuring Equipment 
 Operation and Functioning 
 Maintenance 
 Cargo Description 
 Describes the more common processes for which the cargo handling plant is used.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

125
Chapter 14: EMERGENCY PROCEDURES 
 
 
What is an Emergency? 
 
An emergency is a situation that poses an immediate risk to health, life, property, and /or the 
environment. 
 
If an emergency occurs on board a ship it is extremely important that 
the whole crew of the ship know exactly what they should do. 
 
Shipboard Emergency Management 
 
 
SHIP EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN  
 
An emergency can occur at any time and in any situation.  
 
Effective action is only possible if pre‐planned and practical procedures have been developed and 
are frequently exercised.  
 
The Contingency Plan provides guidelines and instructions that assist in making an efficient 
response to emergency situations onboard ships. 
 
These Ship Specific Emergency Response Plans must also deal with various possible situations 
that occur on a gas tanker during emergencies such as : 
 Cargo Operations Emergency Shutdown 
 Emergency Cargo Valve Operations 
 Actions to be taken in the event of failure of systems or services 
             essential to cargo operations 
 Fire Fighting Operations on Liquefied gas carriers 
 Enclosed Space Rescue 
 Jettisoning of Cargo 
 Medical First Aid Procedures and use of Antidotes with reference to the MFAG Table for 
use in accidents involving dangerous goods. 
 
It is worth stating that an abnormal condition need not necessarily be cargo related, it might be in 
the engine room, or involve deck machinery such as a mooring winch failure for instance. 
Most emergencies require urgent intervention to prevent a worsening of the situation, although 
in some situations, mitigation may not be possible and shore agencies may only be able to offer 
palliative care for the aftermath. 
 

126
Planning and preparation are essential if personnel are to deal successfully with emergencies on 
board tankers. The Master and other officers should consider what they would do in the event of 
various types of emergency. 
 
They will not be able to foresee in detail what might occur in all such emergencies, but good 
advance planning will result in quicker and better decisions and a well organized reaction to the 
situation. 
 
These plans should be used actively during emergency drills. The objective of an emergency plan 
is to make the best use of the resources available. This will be the shipboard personnel whilst the 
ship is at sea but may include resources from shore when the ship is in harbour or passing 
through coastal waters. 
 
The plans should be directed at achieving the following aims:  
 rescue and treatment of casualties 
 safeguarding others 
 minimising damage to property and the environment 
 bringing the incident under control. 
 
 
All these plans must be practised during emergency drills and exercises.  
Make sure you know what to do and how to use the safety equipment  if in doubt ask an officer. 
In any emergency situation, you MUST CONTINUE using the DPA or alternate contact number you 
have already used when advising of the emergency. 
 
YOUR SHIP HAS CONTINGENCY PLANS YOU MUST BE FAMILIAR WITH THEM AND THE 
EQUIPMENT YOU MAY HAVE TO USE. 
 
During a serious incident many telephone calls may be made to the ship. The Master must clearly 
identify the caller before passing any information.  
 
Unauthorized callers must be referred to the Company for information. The media in particular 
will persist in trying to obtain as much information as possible. Only the Master must speak to 
them. 
 
Information passed to the media must only be the minimum necessary and is to be factual. 
Information, which is found to be misleading, can be very damaging to the management of the 
incident. Whenever possible the Master must refer any caller to the Company for information 
and official media release. 
 
The Safety Management System requires that the Company establishes procedures to identify 
describe and respond to potential emergency shipboard situations.  
 
 
 

127
 
The following information should be readily available: 
 Type of cargo, amount and disposition. 
 Location of other hazardous substances. 
 General arrangement plan. 
 Stability information. 
 Fire‐fighting equipment plans. 
 
 
 

                            
 
 
 
Emergency Cycle 
 
 
 
 
In the event of a serious incident many different parties will require statements from the Master 
and Crew. It is important that statements are not given until the Company arranges for a lawyer 
representing the Owners/Company to be present. 
 
 
 

128
Additional recommended reading  
 
Contingency Planning and Crew Response Guide for Gas Carrier Damage at Sea and in Port 
Approaches, 3rd Ed. – SIGTTO Publication. 
 

                      
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

129
Chapter 15: Fixed Fire Fighting Systems on Gas Carrier 
 
On board Gas Tanker we have the following Fixed Fire Fighting Systems 
1) Fixed Water Spray System 
2) Fixed DCP ( Dry Chemical Powder ) System 
3) Fixed CO2 System 
 
 
 
 
FIXED WATER SPRAY SYSTEM 
 

 
 
The Fixed Water Spray System on board gas tankers is given for cooling, fire prevention and crew            
protection. 
 
The Fixed Water Spray system should be installed to cover:‐   
 Exposed cargo tank domes and any exposed parts of cargo tanks. 
 Exposed on‐deck storage vessels for flammable or toxic products  
 Cargo Liquid and Vapour Manifolds 
 Boundaries of superstructures and deckhouses normally manned, cargo compressor 
rooms, cargo pump‐rooms, store‐rooms containing high fire risk items and cargo control 
rooms all facing the cargo area.  
 Boundaries of unmanned forecastle structures not containing high fire risk items or 
equipment do not require water spray protection.  
 
 
The system should be capable of covering all areas with a uniformly distributed water‐spray of at 
least 10l/m2 per minute for horizontal projected surfaces and 4l/m2 per minute for vertical 
surfaces. Stop valves should be fitted at intervals in the spray system for the purpose of isolating 
damaged sections.  
 
The capacity of the fixed water‐spray pumps should be sufficient to deliver the required amount 
of water to all areas simultaneously. 

130
A connection should be made between the fire main and the water spray main outside the cargo 
area. Subject to the Approval of the Administration water pumps normally used for other services 
may be arranged to supply the water‐spray main. 
 
Remote starting of pumps supplying the water spray system and remote operation of any 
normally closed valves in the system should be arranged in suitable locations outside the cargo 
area, adjacent to the accommodation spaces and readily accessible and operable in the event of 
fire in the areas protected.  
 
 
 
FIXED DCP SYSTEM 
 
 

 
 
 
For Firefighting on the deck in the cargo area and bow or stern cargo handling areas if 
applicable. 
 
 The system and the dry chemical powder should be adequate and satisfactory to the 
requirements of the Administration. The system should be capable of delivering powder from at 
least two hand hose lines or combination monitor / hand hose lines to any part of the above‐deck 
exposed cargo area including above‐deck product piping. The system should be activated by an 
inert gas or nitrogen used exclusively for this purpose and stored in pressure vessels adjacent to 
the powder containers.  
 

131
The system for use in the cargo area should consist of at least two independent self‐contained 
dry chemical powder units with associated controls. 
 
For ships with cargo capacity of less than 1000 m3 only one such unit may be provided. 
 
A monitor should be provided and so arranged as to protect the cargo loading and discharge 
manifold areas and be capable of actuation and discharge locally and remotely. 
The monitor is not required to be remotely aimed if it can deliver the necessary powder to all 
required areas of coverage from a single position. 
 
All hand hose lines and monitors should be capable of actuation at the hose storage reel or 
monitor. At least one hand hose line or monitor should be situated at the after end of the cargo 
area.  
 
A fire‐extinguishing unit having two or more monitors, hand hose lines or combinations thereof 
should have independent pipes with a manifold at the powder container, unless a suitable 
alternative means is provided and Approved by the Administration.  
 
The length of a hand hose line should not exceed 33 metres. A sufficient quantity of dry chemical 
powder should be stored in each container to provide a minimum of 45 s discharge time for all 
monitors. 
 
Ships fitted with low bow or stern loading and discharge arrangements should be provided with 
an additional dry chemical powder unit complete with at least one monitor and one hand hose 
line complying with the requirements of the IGC Code. 
 
 

132
 
 
EXAMPLE – DCP OPERATION DIAGRAM 
 
 
System Operation. 
 
Nitrogen passing through a reduction valve pressurizes the tank and nozzles fitted in the bottom 
atomise the contents. 
 
When a pressure of 0.9‐1 MPa bar has been achieved, a pilot valve opens the main discharge 
valve and the dry powder flows through the distribution manifold to the monitor or hand hose 
line in question. 
 
The pressure during discharge is kept constant by means of a reduction valve placed upstream of 
the dry powder unit. 
 
Release of the system may be remotely operated from the release boxes utilising a nitrogen pilot 
cylinder or alternatively manually operated at the dry powder unit. 
 
The propellant gas system is designed to contain sufficient nitrogen to maintain the pressure 
during release as well as to clean the pipes and hand hose lines after discharge. 
 

133
 
 
On board Gas Carriers the Fixed CO2 System is given mainly for 
1) Engine Room 
2) Cargo Compressor Room 
3) Motor Room 
 
According to the IGC Code, Chapter 11, the amount of carbon dioxide gas carried should be 
sufficient to provide a quantity of free gas equal to 45 % of the gross volume of the cargo 
compressor and pump‐rooms in all cases. 
 
 
 
Important 
A notice should be exhibited at the controls stating that the system is only to be used for fire 
extinguishing and not for inerting purposes, due to electrostatic ignition hazard. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

134
Chapter 16: Pre‐ Cargo Operations Meeting on board a Gas Tanker  
With Ship’s Staff  
 
 
Why??? 
 
Cargo Operations on a gas tanker require that all personnel involved in the  cargo operations are 
on the “same page”. 
 
This means that each and every crew member on board the gas tanker must understand what is 
required of him / her, what are the operations being carried out and what are the precautions to 
be followed when operations are being carried out.  
 
Who should attend? 
 
This meeting MUST be attended by all Officers and Crew that would be directly involved in the 
cargo operations namely:‐ 
Master 
Chief Engineer 
Chief Officer  
Gas Engineer 
Junior Deck Officers  
 
Ratings (Deck) – must attend  
Bosun (If Applicable) 
Able Seamen  
Ordinary Seamen 
If required then Engine Ratings would also need to attend. 
 
 
What is discussed???? 
 
 Cargo Operation that is to be carried out at the Port / Terminal. 
 Quantity of cargo being loaded / discharged at the Port / Terminal. 
  Any special requirements for Generators. 
  Hazards of the Cargo being loaded / discharged. 
 Precautions to be followed by Deck Crew on watch during cargo operations. 
  Master’s additional instructions as required. 
 Chief Engineers comments. 
 Past Experience at terminal if available.  
 Any additional information relevant and important for the safety of the operation by the 
Master. 
 
Always always always remember “SAFETY FIRST” 

135
Chapter 17: Importance of training on board a gas carrier. 
 
An emergency situation on ship must be handled with confidence and calmness. Hasty decisions 
and “jumping to conclusions” can make the matters even worse. Efficient tackling of emergency 
situations can be achieved by continuous training and by practical drills onboard vessel.  
 
However, it has been seen that in spite of adequate training, people get panic attacks and 
eventually do not do what they should in an emergency situation. 
 
What can we do? 
 Contingency plans should be prepared for all possible types of Emergencies that can occur 
onboard a gas tanker 
 These plans be practiced through onboard drills that must be carried out as realistically as 
possible 
 Plans must be amended if needed to incorporate any missing elements  
 The plan should be approved by the Master and the Company. 
 
Regular training carried out on board definitely improves the confidence level of all on board in 
the event of a “real” emergency. 
 
 
TRAIN! 
 
TRAIN! 
 
RETRAIN!!!!!! 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

136