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Saint Mary’s University

SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL


Bayombong, Nueva Vizcaya

A Jomel Jay B. Segundo STEM 12 E


B Queenie Mae L. Marquez January 20, 2020
C Erica Lhie L. Lopez Group #8

Electric Charge, Are You There?

Objectives
1. To observe the transfer of electric charges between objects
2. To demonstrate how the charges between the materials react to one another
3. To qualitatively study conducting and insulating materials, electric charges, and charge
transfer.

Materials
- Glass jar with lid - Copper wire
- Aluminum Foil - Wire cutter
- Electrical tape

Procedure
1. Find the necessary materials. Gather all the materials before making the electroscope.
2. Punch a hole through the center of the jar lid. Take the lid off the jar and then use a hole
punch to make the hole. Make sure the hole in the lid is big enough for the copper wire to
fit through.
3. Cut 10 inches (25 cm) of copper wire and twist half of it into a spiral. Use wire cutters
to cut the copper wire.
4. Drop the straight end of the wire into the lid. The spiral end of the wire should be
sticking out of the straw at the top of the lid, and the straight end should be hanging down
from the bottom of the lid.
5. Bend the straight end of the wire to make a hook. Make the hook about 1 inch (2.5 cm)
long.
6. Cut 2 triangle-shaped pieces of aluminum foil and punch a hole in them. Make the
pieces of foil the same size, and make sure they’re small enough to fit in the jar without
touching the sides. Punch a hole in 1 corner of each foil triangle
7. Hang the pieces of aluminum foil from the hook end of the wire. Slide the holes you
punched in the aluminum pieces onto the hook.
8. Screw the lid on the jar and test out your electroscope. To test the electroscope, get an
inflated balloon and quickly rub it back and forth between your hands. Then, hold the object
next to the copper spiral at the top of your electroscope. The 2 pieces of aluminum foil
should move away from each other.
Saint Mary’s University
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
Bayombong, Nueva Vizcaya

A Jomel Jay B. Segundo STEM 12 E


B Queenie Mae L. Marquez January 20, 2020
C Erica Lhie L. Lopez Group #8

Electric Charge, Are You There?


Preparation Narrative Report

As required project in General Physics 2, we were tasked to make an electroscope.


Electroscope is an instrument used to detect the presence of electric charge on a body. We
brainstormed as a group and as a result, we decided to use materials that can be seen in our home
such as glass jar with lid, electrical tape, copper wire, straw, aluminum foil, and a balloon to avoid
expenditures. The materials were distributed to each members of the group. Student A will bring
the copper wire and balloon, student B will bring the aluminum foil and electrical tape, and student
C will bring the glass jar with lid and the straw. The overall cost would be zero since the materials
are distributed and can be found at home. Hence, we can be able to assemble a cost-effective model
of an electroscope. Also, we will adapt the procedures of Ruff (2019) in making our own
electroscope. With that said, the procedures were comprehensible and can be easily followed so
we can be able to create a durable and working electroscope. Furthermore, we were only allowed
to construct our electroscope model in the school, and we discussed as a group to give time in this
project to finish it on time.
Saint Mary’s University
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
Bayombong, Nueva Vizcaya

A Jomel Jay B. Segundo STEM 12 E


B Queenie Mae L. Marquez January 20, 2020
C Erica Lhie L. Lopez Group #8

Electric Charge, Are You There?


Activity Proper Narrative Report

After brainstorming and researching for what we will do, we gathered the materials needed
to make the electroscope and brought it in the school. First thing we did was to remove the black
rubber wrapped in the copper wire and then it was cut according to the height of the jar. Next thing
we did was to put a hole in the lid of the jar where the copper wire will enter but unfortunately the
lid cracked. We mended it by putting an electrical tape in the cracked lid. Afterwards, one end of
the copper wire was twisted to spiral, and the other end was put in a lollipop stick then inserted in
the jar lid and curved it to make a hook. Then, two small rectangular aluminum foil was hooked
in the copper wire. Lastly, we closed the jar with the lid. We hoped that it will work however when
we tried it using a plastic comb rubbed in the hair, it didn’t. We troubleshoot our electroscope and
we found out it was the lid. Therefore, we replaced it with a cardboard and sealed it in the jar with
an electrical tape and made sure that no air will enter. After that we tried it again with a plastic
comb rubbed in the hair then it finally worked. We encountered lots of failures in making our
electroscope but at the end we were able to make it work.

Documentation